Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
The Florida
Alligator

Vol .56, No. 46

Florida Blue Key
Taos 17 UF Students

Seventeen new members were
tapped yesterday by Florida Blue
Key (FBK), honorary leadership
fraternity.
Students and majors are:
Chip Block, student government;
Jim Crabtree, student govern government;
ment; government; Charles Edwards, service;
Dennis Flanagan, service; Tod
Goodwill, village government and
Frank Harshaw, student govern government.
ment. government.
Fred Lane, service; Charles
Maloy, organizations; M. J.
Menge, service; Allen McPeak,
politics; Charles Oates, athletics;
John Purcell, student government
and Gerald Richman, organiza organizations.
tions. organizations.
Barry Sinon, otudent govern-
United Fund's
Till Growing
UF United Fund leaders say
theyre happy with the results of
a weeks campaigning.
Fund chairman Robert Mautz,
vice president for Academic
Affairs, said $6,109.50 had been
collected as of Friday, the first
scheduled reporting date.
We are quite pleased. All
the reports arent in yet, and lots
of people havent been contacted
for contributions. It gives every
indication that UF will meet its
quota, he said.
The goal this year is $20,000.
With three more reporting dates
to go, Mautz said he is confident
the drive will go over the top.
In 1962, the UF drive fell short
of its goal by more than $2,200.
Only S9OO was reported in after
eight days of collection last year,
Mautz said.

JHHft x- jk . < zt{, *P5
FOUR PREPS WERE HIT OF THE SHOW
The Four Preps with their comedy routine kept UF stud studdents
dents studdents in laughter at Fall Frolics Friday night by satiriz satirizing
ing satirizing college life and popular music.

University of Florida,Gainesville Monday,

ment; Ned Service, student
government; Merrill Stainton,
service and Lou Voelkel, village
government.
Requirements for Florida Blue
Key include participation in one
major activity and two lesser--
or minor--activities. Applicants
must have completed at least 75

i | / §fl
\ KUnS! m * i
DEAN ADAMS BUYS FIRST BOX OF CANDY
Dean of Men Frank T Adams kicked off the World
University Service campus-wide sale by buying the
first box of candy from Dee Anna Malaska, 1 UC,
and Becky Bearden 2UC, as Paul Hendrick looks on.

Educations White
Resigns Dean Post

Dr. J.B. White, dean of the UF
College of Education since 1949,

N0v.11,1963

trimester hours of academic work.
FBK annually sponsors Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming and Gator Growl, which is
billed as the largest all-student
sh n w in the world. The organi organization
zation organization also is in charge of
activities including a speakers
burean and foreign student
sponsorship program.

has resigned to devote more time
to teaching and research.
Dean White plans to spend much
of his time on research dealing
with some of the current problems
of Floridas public schools.
A committee from the education
college is being formed to review
the appointment of a replacement
for Dr. White as dean of the
college, according to UF Pres. J.
Wayne Reitz.
White, a native of Marion County,
S.C.. is currently president of the
alumni association and a member
of the board of trustees of George
Peabody College, Nashville.
A principal and school super superintendent
intendent superintendent in South Carolina from
1925 to 1941, Dr. White holds a
B.A. from Wofford College. He
was awarded an M.A. degree by
Duke University and a Ph.D. by
George Peabody College.
Dr. White, after spending almost
40 years in the field of public
education, will remain at the UF
as professor of education.
Coming to the UF in 1948 as
professor of education, Dr. White
became dean of the college the
following year.
Dean White holds membership
in the National E ducatlonal
Association (NEA) and the Florida
Education Association.

Honor Court
Adds Concept
Honor Court members have voted to enlarge the concept of the
word cheating, thereby increasing the scope of Honor Court juris jurisdiction.
diction. jurisdiction.
The concept of cheating was enlarged recently by adding a new
definition to the present concept of the word.
The new definition states cheating is the intentional misrepresentation
of material fact, for personal advantage, while acting as a student.

For example, cheating may now
include lying to a professor about
the number of books that were read
in the preparation of a term paper.
Another example might be falsi falsifying
fying falsifying a class excuse.
As presently defined cheating is
the giving or receiving of any
information or material with the
intent of wrongfully aiding yourself
or another in any quiz, final
examination, academic paper or
any other item which is considered
in any way in the determination
of the final grade.
According to Honor Court Chan Chancellor
cellor Chancellor Herb Blessing, the purpose
of the additional definition is to
make the Honor System more ef effective.
fective. effective. This should indicate to
the student that there is more
to cheating than just copying some someones
ones someones paper, Blessing continued.
Honor Court members also voted
to amend the new definition with a
statement of intent concerning
possible misinterpretation.
It emphasized that the statement
be strictly construed. Therefore,
the Honor Court should not
exercise jurisdiction when a case
irises from personal relations.
The revisions also states the
chancellor should be liberal in
declaring the Courts jurisdiction
in a case when surrounding cir circumstances
cumstances circumstances would make its action
inappropriate.
John (Hammer) Ward stressed
that the purpose of the amendment
was to re-emphasize the scope
of the Honor Court, not to
indefinitely extend its jurisdiction.
To change the Honor Court Penal
Code requires an affirmative vote
of nine of the 12 members. Niue
members were present at the
meeting.
The revisions will become
effective next Monday.
Editor Takes
Writing Award
Florida Alligator editor David
Lawrence Jr. won the top prize
in undergraduate writing
competition sponsored by Sigtaia
Delta chi, professional journalslm
society, last week in Norfolk, Va.
Lawrence, competing with more
than 70 students representing SDX
chapters throughout the United
States, captured the SSO top prize.
Competition was based on
coverage of a speech and press
conference by Atomic Energy
Commission chairman Dr. Glenn
T. Seaborg.
The four-day convention ended
Saturday night.
Derrick To Talk
Dr. Clarence Derrick, chairman
of the humanities department here
will speak before the convention
of the National Council of Teachers
of English in San Francisco
Thanksgiving week.

11l
DR. HOLCOMB
.. Religion-in-Life Week
kickoff speaker.
Dr. Holcomb
Talk To Open
Religion Week
Dr. Harmon A. Holcomb will
open the 1963-64 Religion-in
Life program with a talk Monday,
Nov. 25, at 7:30 p.m. in the Law
School Auditorium.
In conjunction with this years
Religion in Life theme, A
World Come of Age, Dr. Holcomb
will speak on the topic, Atheism
Comes of Age.
He will also deal with Doubt
and Affirmation in Fairth at a
luncheon Monday ati2:os p.m.
in the Blue Room of the Student
Service Center (Hub).
A philosopher, Biblical scholar
and lecturer, Dr. Holcomb has
provided leadership for religious
emphasis weeks at institutions in including
cluding including Wellesley College, the
University of Rochester and Ohio
State. He Is a frequent visiting
lecturer on university and college
campuses, and in 1961 spoke here.
Dr. Holcomb is a member of
the Society of Biblical Theologians
and the Theology-Science Dis Discussion
cussion Discussion Group, which draws
together nationally known theolo theologians
gians theologians and scientists. He spent
a year at the university of Munich
in Germany while doing research
in contemporary forms of
Christian Apologetics in Europe.
In April Dr. Holcomb was a
delegate tp an International con conference
ference conference on science, philosophy and
theology in Switzerland and helped
to prepare the official report.
Fine Arts Post
Up For Grabs
Applications are being accepted
for persons interested in the chair chairmanship
manship chairmanship of the Fine Arts
Committee of the Florida Union
Board of Student Activities.
The Fine Arts committee this
year has sponsored a hootenany,
music matinees, discussion ses sessions,
sions, sessions, painting-for-fun classes,
exhibits and art displays.
Applications may be obtained in
room 315 of the Florida Union
through Thursday noon, interviews
will be 3:30-5 p.m, Thursday.



Page 2

The Florida Alligator Monday, N0v.11,1963

PSYCHOLOGY PROF SAYS

Fingernail Biting No
Sign Os Maladjustment

Fingernail biting, a common
habit of college students, isnt
an indication of poor adjustment
anymore than is garter-straight garter-straightening,

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THE SUPER ITALIAN SUB
THE CHICKEN SALAD CUBANA
Two of the Most Delicious, Freshly-Made
Sandwiches In Town; Available Only At:
ALANS
CUBANA
Next to Seagle Bldg*
6-1252
Free Delivery Open 7 Days a Week
10 til midnight weekdays; til 1 am weekends

THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
FOOD SERVICE
I
n
I Announces A New Food Plan For Students I
I X Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Monday Through Friday I
I AT THE MAIN CAFETERIA ONLY I
I 15 Meals For MO. 30 .NCLumNGiAx I
I OlbjWF' n . STARTS NOVEMBER 18 I
I m\\ A Full Breakfast I
I *yM\V\ WITH A CHOICE OF FOOD, INCLUDING MILK & COFFEE I
I M j WILL FEATURE A CHOICE OF THREE ENTREES, I
I mn POTATO, CHOICE OF VEGETABLE, SALAD, I
I If DESSERT, BREAD & BUTTER, ICE TEA OR COFFEE I

ening, garter-straightening, nose wiping, pen clicking
or any other habit that an indi individual
vidual individual may have acquired, accord according
ing according to Dr. Richard Anderson, Pro Professor

fessor Professor of Psychology at the UF.
Fingernail biting may be an
indication of some high degree
of emotional tension, but usually
it is only a harmless habit,
Anderson said.
Most people have some sort
of such harmless neurotic be behavior,
havior, behavior, he added.
Although fingernail biting is us usually
ually usually much more prevalent among
boys than girls, Df. Anderson
maintains it is not because it is
more socially unacceptable for
girls to bite their nails. Rather
it is because most behavior that
is any way out of the ordinary
is more prevalent among boys
than girls, Anderson said.
Girls tend to be more con conservative
servative conservative and more alike in be behavior;
havior; behavior; any extreme or abnormal
behavior is found many times more
in the male than in the female,
Anderson said.
Feeble-mindedness, extreme
brillance, bed-wetting and other
such characteristics are found
more often in boys then girls,
Anderson said.
Hypnosis has been used as a
means for stopping fingernail bit biting,
ing, biting, but has only been occasion occasionally
ally occasionally sucessful, according to An Anderson.
derson. Anderson. Any deeply ingrained habit
can be stopped by hypnosis, he
said, but it will usually appear
again in times of extreme emotion emotional
al emotional stress or another habit will be
formed to take its place.

W m
lr
I*^2l^
*&* '^
VIH^hHhHHI 1
* T | p-&
THIS NECKLACE IS PART OF THE INDIAN ARTIFACTS
This necklace will soon be part of an Indian Artifacts
exhibit planned by the Florida State Museum.

Dean Mase Named
To Advisory Group

Darrel J. Mase, Related Ser Services
vices Services dean, has been named to
a twelveman Advisory Board
Committee on Mental Health and
Mental Retardation by the united
States Junior Chamber of Com Commerce
merce Commerce (Jaycees).
The appointment is part of the
Jaycees project for the coming
year- r working on answers to the
problems of mental health and
mental retardation.
Mase has served on the Pres Presidents
idents Presidents panel on Mental Retard Retardation

ation Retardation and has worked on other
boards in the field.
Among those serving with him
will be Dr. William Menniger,
of the Menniger Clinic, former
Florida Gov. Leoy Collins, Dr.
Robert Cooke, head pediatrician
at Johns Hospital, Mrs. Felix
DuPont, Mrs. Winthrop Rocke Rockefeller
feller Rockefeller and Mrs. Sargent Shriver.
The Jaycees yearly project will
be carried on in over 5,000
communities throughout the nation..



WSA Names Keller
Co-edikette Editor

Barbara Lynn Keller, 2UC, has
been chosen editor of the 1964
Co-edikette.
Co-edikette, a handbook for wo women
men women students, contains UF rules
and regulations applying to women.
The primary purpose of Co Coedikette
edikette Coedikette is to introduce the UF
to incoming women students,
'jffam&Ewar s
- -jr I
BARBARA KELLER
.. .new editor.
13 Students
Presented
Scholarships
Thirteen UF banking and finance
students have received scholar scholarships
ships scholarships from the Florida Bankers
Association, University officials
announced last week.
The one-year scholarships were
based on scholastic recommenda recommendations
tions recommendations and a demonstrated interest
to enter the banking field in
Florida.
The recipients are:
Anthony John Bauer, Orlando;
James Andrew Ebert, Jr., Sara Sarasota;
sota; Sarasota; Herbert Summers Falken Falkenberg,
berg, Falkenberg, Fort Walton Beach; James
A. Crawford, Warrington; Charles
F. Green, Live Oak; Michael J.
Griffin, North Palm Beach; Rich Richard
ard Richard H. Williams, West palm
Beach; Joseph M. Mason, Jr.,
Brooksville; George W. Leach,
Tampa; John L. Stewart, New
Smyrna; John W. Jones, Jackson Jacksonville;
ville; Jacksonville; Gerald Elliott Fine, and
Clifford B. Wentworth, both of
Hollywood.

Peel Editor Hopes
Sales Continue

New Orange Peel editor Stan
Hugenin hopes the large increase
in sales of this years New Peel
issue is not due merely to curios curiosity.
ity. curiosity.
It is too soon to see if our
increased popularity is because
the students approve of our
changed format, Hugenin said.
Over 4000 copies of the first
issue of the magazine were sold,
which is more than the combined
number sold of both issues last
year, according to Hugenin-.
Hugenin said his new format
features expanded interests,
giving more that appeals to more
students.
Among the changes in the New
Orange Peel, he counted the pin pinup
up pinup foldout, the opinion section,
and the s at i r e as the most effec effective.
tive. effective.
Hugenin said the student studentoriented
oriented studentoriented opinion section will pre present
sent present ideas by Coach Ray Graves
in the next issue.
The weakest section of the last
issue, according to Hugenin, was

according to Miss Keller.
Although the handbook is pri primarily
marily primarily directed towards the in incoming
coming incoming freshmen, Miss Keller
hopes to enlarge its format and
content this year. She hopes the
book will function as an adver advertisement
tisement advertisement for the UF.
She intends to include material
that will make Co-edikette a use useful
ful useful reference for women students
and a guide to the parents of in incoming
coming incoming students.
Miss Keller, an English major,
served as president and vice vicepresident
president vicepresident in Jennings Hall during

UF Press Plans
Floridiana Series

Reprints of basic books and
documents some long out of
printthat have shaped Floridas
historical development are being
prepared by the UF Press in time
for Floridas fourth Centennial
Celebration next year.
The Floridiana Series, as the
collection of reprints is called,
will be of great value to regional
historians, according to Professor
Lewis F. Haines, director of the
UF Press.
The collection of historical
literature joins a new book, the
first Atlas of Florida, in UF
Press publications dealing with
state or regional subject matter.
This material accounts for 40
percent of the departments pub publications.
lications. publications.
Haines said another 40 per percent
cent percent of the Presss publications
has Latin America as its subject.
The remaining 20 per cent is
scholarly, creative material of
general interest. He said not
only books but also monographs,
pamphlets and periodicals are
published.
Now located at 15NW 15th St.,
the Press began in much smaller
quarters in 1945. Its founders
were Dr. John J. Tigert, then
president of the UF; Dr. J. Speed
Rogers, head of the Department
of Biology; and Dr. Harold Hume,
dean of the College of Agriculture.
The Press was established be because
cause because many educators in the state
saw a need for an agency that
would edit, publish and distribute
scholarly books and papers.

tne humor section. A remedy
is being sought by offering money
to joke donors.
The Board of Student Publica Publications
tions Publications unanimously voted recently
to congratulate the New Orange
Peel staff for their Homecoming
issue.
STAN HUGUENIN
...Peel Editor.

her first two years at the UF.
Last year she was a member of
the Co-edikette staff.
Assistant editor will be fresh freshman
man freshman Eunice Tall. Art editor is
Carole Ralston, 2UC, and busi business
ness business manager is Carol Stockstill,
3JM.
Other staff members chosen
were Carolyn Smith, 2UC, and
Joyce Denis, lUC. Faculty advis advisor
or advisor of co-edikette is Assistant
Dean of Women Marjorie Jackson.
The staff will be introduced
to the Womens Student Association
(WSA) at a meeting tonight.

Haines said this has remained the
basic purpose of the university
Press.
The actual printing and binding
of manuscripts accepted for pub publication
lication publication are done by private com companies
panies companies around the state.
About 250 manuscripts from
throughout the world are process processed
ed processed each year by the Press. The
UF Press also serves as the
university press for the other
state universities, Haines said.

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Monday, N0v.11,1963 The Florida Alligator

[evepy fray's & Qpanfr opening)
H M do come on over
p Hountree I
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Page 3



The Florida Alligator Monday, Nov. 11, 1963

Page 4

UF Professor Wins Chemist Award

UF professor Dr. Paul Tarrant
was named last week the 1963
chemist who has made the most
out-standing contributions to the
welfare of the South.
He will receive the Southern
Chemist Award for 1963 at the

On Campus i
C n*-/ (Author of Rally Round the Flay, Boys!
and Barefoot Boy With Check)
I WAS A TEEN-AGE SLIDE RULE
In a recent learned journal (Playlxiy) the distinguished board
chairman (Ralph Hot Lips Sigafoos) of one of our most
important American industrial corporations (the Arf Mechan Mechanical
ical Mechanical Dog Co.) wrote a trenchant article in which he pinpointed
our single most serious national problem: the lack of culture
among science graduates.
I>et me hasten to state that Mr. Sigafooss article was in no
sense derogatory. He said emphatically that the science grad graduate,
uate, graduate, what with his gruelling curriculum in physics, math, and
chemistry, can hardly he expected to find time to study the
arts too. What distresses Mr. Sigafoosand, indeed, all of us
is the lopsided result of todays science courses: graduates
who can build a skyscrajier but cant compose a concerto; who
know Newtons Third Law but not Beethovens Fourth Sym Symh
h Symh bfsdedmlt ofiMidm
phony; who are familiar with Fraunhofers lines but not with
Shelleys.
Mr. Sigafoos can find no solution to this lamentable imbal imbalance.
ance. imbalance. I, however, believe there is oneand a very simple one.
It. is this: if students of science dont have time to come to
the arts, then the arts must come to students of science.
For example, it would be a very easy thing to teach poetry
and music right along with physics. Students, instead of being
called upon merely to recite, would instead be required to
rhyme their answers and set them to familiar tuneslike, for
instance, the stirring Colonel Bogey March. Thus recitations
would not only be chock-a-block with important facts but
would, at the same time, expose the students to the aesthetic
delights of great poetry and music. Here, try it yourself. You
all know The Colonel Bogey March. Come, sing along with me:
Physics
Is what ice learn in class.
Einstein
Said energy is mass.
Xcwfon
Is high-faintin'
And Pascal's a rascal. So's Boyle.
l)o you see how much more broadening, how much more up uplifting
lifting uplifting it is to learn physics this way? Os course you do. What?
You want another chorus? By all means:
Leyden
He made the Leyden jar.
Trolley
He made the Trolley car.
Curie
Rode in a surrey
And Diesel's a weasel. So's Boyle.
Once the student has mastered The Colonel Bogiy March,
he can go on to more complicated melodies like Death and Trans Transfiguration,
figuration, Transfiguration, Sixteen Tons, and 800-Hoo.
And when the student, loaded not only with science but
with culture, leaves his classroom and lights his Marlboro
Cigarette, how much more he will enjoy that filter, that flavor,
that pack or box! Because there will no longer be a little voice
within him repeating that he is culturally a dolt. He will know
know joyouslythat he is a complete man, a fulfilled man,
and he will bask and revel in the pleasure of his Marlboro as a
colt rolls in new grassexultant and triumphanta truly
educated human .persona credit to his college, to himself, and
to his tobacconist!
£ 1963 Max Shulmaii
* *
We, the makers of Marlboros and sponsors of this column,
urge you not to roll colt-wise in the grass if you are carrying
a soft pack of Marlboros in your pocket. If, however, you
are carrying the crush-proof box and weigh less than 200
pounds, you may safely fling yourself about.

Southeastern Regional Meeting of
the American Chemical Society
(ACS) in Charjotte, N. C., Nov.
15. The award is given annually
by the Memphis Section of the
ACS.
Dr. Tarrant, Department of

DR. PAUL TARRANTX 1 !!^

Chemistry member, has received
world-wide recognition for his
work in fluorine chemistry and is
now serving as the first chair chairman
man chairman of the Fluorine Division of the
ACS.
Some of his present research
JBL;
f .o**,
GATOR GIRL
...today is sophomore Patty
Connors. An English major,
this 5 feet 5, blue-eyed
brunette has 35-24-37 as
statistics.

I I i I
I S' Wr i I H
War*w JLzl*
If {4 1. m
vKUBriMMIMni
Wat a MmTe~.
\
HAVE YOU BOUGHT YOUR 1964 SEMINOLE YET?
THIS IS THE ABSOLUTE LAST CHANCE TO GET ONE
,
GREEKS
1
HOUSE BLOCK SALES OF SEMINOLES
Buy Your Seminoles thru Your House, $3.00 plus
SI.OO for mailing, if desired. During November
only.
TREASURERS: Forms for block sales may be picked
up m the Student Publications business office, Rm.
12, Florida Union.

involves putting fluorine atoms in
organic molecules and studying the
effect on their physical and chemi chemical
cal chemical properties.
Dr. Tarrant has supervised the
work of some 15 Ph.D candidates
at the UF.
Dr. Tarrant has been with the
since 1946. He has served
t. '.airman and secretary-trea secretary-treasurer
surer secretary-treasurer of the Florida Section of
the ACS. Author of 32 technical
papers he has published five in
the journal of Organic Chemistry
in.co-authorship with other chem chemists
ists chemists since 1961. He holds nine
patents and has directed approxi approxi.
. approxi. matoly SBOO,OOO in research
grants since 1947.
Dr. Tarrant received his B. S.
degree from Howard College, his
M.S. degree from Purdue Univer University
sity University and his Ph.D. degree from
Duke University. He is a member
of Phi Beta Kappa, Sigma Xi and
a number of other scientific and
scholarly organizations.
His selection for the 1963
Southern Chemist Award empha emphasizes
sizes emphasizes the continued recognition
given UF chemistry professors,

said Dr. Harry s. Sisler, chemis
try department head.
Jgp
Bp A

."'ML ***
DR. TARRANT
.. .wins award
T I ill Ml I ! !
Arts Dames Meet
The UF Arts and Sciences
Dames will meet Wednesday at 8
p.m. at the home of Dean and
Mrs. S.E. Wimberly, 305NW23rd.
St.
Guest speaker will be Charlie
Woods. Those members needing
transportation should call 2-3733.



Romifa Hits
JFK's Deiicit
Spending
The u. S. Government, headed
by president John F. Kennedy,
is the biggest buyer, lender, real
estate holder, and waster in the
country, Dr. Joseph w. Romita
told the UF Young Republicans
(YR) Club last week.
Romita, a UF economics asso associate
ciate associate professor, has served on
economic councils to Spain, the
Philippines, and Paraguay.
President Kennedy has had three
years of deficit spending and is
working on his fourth, said
Romita.
The deficit this year will be
approximately $11.9 billion, the
largest in u. S. history, accord according
ing according to Dr. Romita. Yet this year,
Kennedy has presented the largest
budget since World War 11, Romita
said.
President Kennedy wants a tax
cut, but still presents more ex expenditures,
penditures, expenditures, said Romita.
We need a better balanced bud budget
get budget before cutting taxes, he add added.
ed. added.
Romita said this is the first
year the foreign aid and tax bills
havent been approved by July 1.
He forsees no tax reduction this
year.
Romita sighted Kennedys $315
million budget and humorously
stated, Till debt do us part.
Ten per cent of our income tax
goes to interest on the deficit,
he reported. We could lower taxes
with a smaller deficit.
President Kennedy is using un unrealistic
realistic unrealistic planning, charged
Romita. If the Republicans dont
win in 1964, our deficit will con continue
tinue continue to inflate. Only recently
Teamster Jimmy Hoffa announced
new wage demands, and hell get
them, Romita predicted.

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ADDED TO THIS EXTINCT ELK AT THE FLORIDA MUSEUM
... will be an exhibit of bear and rhinoceros fossils found in Alachua County. The
exhibit should be ready for the public in the near future.

Florida State Museum Plans
Several New Fossil Exhibits

The Florida State Museum,
located in the southwest corner
of the Seagle Building is preparing
several new exhibits, according to
Historical Nonsense
There is a matter for this
class that I am forced to men mention
tion mention today, announced the stern sternfaced
faced sternfaced UF professor.
Accustomed to tirades of wrath,
the HY 246 class quickly came to
order.
I dont like bringing this up,
continued the unsmiling prof, But
I have no choice.
My daughter, he blurted out,
would like you to bring in rum rummage
mage rummage for her Girl Scout sale.

Curator of Exhibits, Thomas G.
Baker.
An extensive fossil area has
been discovered in Alachua
County, and findings from these
areas are being prepared for ex exhibit,
hibit, exhibit, Baker said.
In these deposits, said Baker,
we found numerous rhinoceros
as well as bear fossils. We hope
to have these exhibits set up with
our other collections in the very
near future.
Plans are also being made for
the addition of several more boa
constrictors to the museum. The
ones there now are of the smaller

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Monday, N0v.11,1963 The Florida Alligator

variety, six to eight feet in length.
Baker expressed his desire to in include
clude include in the museum some boas in
the larger category, 16 to 20 feet
in length.
The discovery of various
articles brought up from the At Atlantic
lantic Atlantic ocean off Cape Canaveral
has been of great significance to
the museum.
A Spanish treasure fleet went
down off the Cape somewhere a around
round around the 17th century, said
Baker. We have some of these
articles here now mostly coins
and pieces of china, but they are
not on display yet.

YDs Attend
Florida
Workshop
Members of the UF Young
Democrats (YD) Club attended a
State Workshop held in Orlando,
Nov. 2-3.
The convention was open to
democrats throughout the state and
approximately 250 people attend attended.
ed. attended.
The major speech of the con convention
vention convention was given by U.S. Sena Senator
tor Senator Spessard Holland. A dinner
was given in his honor Saturday
night.
An address was presented by
Joseph Fuller, head of the State
Democratic Executive Committee.
He discussed the states party
structure and the problems in involved
volved involved in the system.
Dr. William G. Carlton, former
UF professor of political science,
spoke on the possible Kennedy-
Goldwater presidential race in
1964. Carlton stated he believed
this would be the most savage race
of the century but that Kennedy
would win by an overwhelming
margin.
A seminar was held to discuss
how the Democratic party could
expand itself in Florida and best
meet the challenge of the two twoparty
party twoparty system. Moderator for the
seminar was Richard Pettigrew,
president of the states YI) Club.
State Representative Fredrick
B. Karl, gubernatorial hopeful
from Daytona Beach was present
at the workshop.

Page 5



Page 6

The Florida Alligator Monday, Nov. 11,1963

editorials
Wheres The Service?
The Food Service falls generally under the realm of UF institutions.
It is established, tolerated by its customers and usually a topic of
conversation. Students talk about the Food Service to each other but
rarely do their comments get any further.
As a results of previous comment, this editor was called to the
office of Gay H. Welborn, Director of Food Service. Constructive
criticisms of the Service were exchanged, and after a pleasant chat,
Mr. Welborn made assurances that the situation would be studied and
the criticisms would be considered.
This conversation was nearly six weeks ago.
The only concrete change noted in Graham Area was a return to the
use of orange juice instead of orange drink.
The overall philosophy, however, has not changed. The Food Service
is a division of UF and is not privately owned, it is, theoretically, a
service to the students. Here the great paradox begins. The Food
Service cannot better serve the student, by becoming a monopoly, which
seems to be its present goal. The vending machines are desired by
Food Service. The concessions at Area functions(i.e., movies, dances,
parties etc.) are sought by Food Service. The Food Service claims
sole authority to serve food on this campus and does so under the
guise of ieing best able to serve. What it doesnt realize, or refuses to
realize, is that these concessions help offset the cost of various Area
functions. if Food Services takes over these concessions only an
infinitesimal profit increase will be shown, and it may force Graham
Area to discontinue the movie program and others whose costs had
been offset by the concession stands. The Food Service by forcing
curtailment of the movie program and others is not better serving the
students.
UF Administration and Mr. Welborn: Re-examine the philosophy
of the Food Service. Just who is serving whom?
- Drew Haslett in the Graham Cracker
Cheap, Tawdry Politics
THE LIBERALS, both Democrats and Republicans, who are
clamoring for an even stronger civil rights bill than the one
originally recommended by the Kennedy administration, are doing a
distinct disservice to the country.
Moreover, they are obstructing the passage of any civil rights
legislation in this session of congress.
So cne may rise to inquire why influential members of the House
charged with the responsibility of writing a reasonable and realistic
bill insist upon going far beyond the attorney generals proposals?
The terse and unpleasant answer is politics; cheap, tawdry politics.
As James Reston said in The New York Times: A partisan race
is developing, not to see who can devise an effective attainable bill,
but to see which side qan appear to be the greatest champion of
Negro rights. Some Republicans want to go beyond the administrations
bill so that they can appear to be more for the Negro than the
opposition. And some Democrats, not to be outbid, want to go even
further than their Republican colleagues.
It is a tragic, unnecessary and essentially false situation, in
which the basic values of liberals and conservatives, Republicans
and Democrats, are all being lost, and the immediate, the unthinking
and the political are prevailing over the better judgment of those
who favor an effective civil rights program.

Re-examine Curriculum Trends

The heart of the college or
university is what it teaches, and
of that we like to think the curri curriculum
culum curriculum is a major part, women
have increased their interest in
the shortage fields, including eco economics
nomics economics and the applied social
sciences. The number and per percentage
centage percentage of women studying mathe mathematics
matics mathematics and the natural sciences
has increased substantially. Pres Pressure
sure Pressure for such change has been
mostly in terms of national need
for such specialists. Stated in
another way, job opportuni ties have
been dangled, financing of graduate
work has been provided and
patriotic duty urged. But some
women have chosen these fields
to satisfy a personal preference.
The number of engineering de degrees
grees degrees awarded women is not large,
but the increase is encouraging.
A new look at engineering has
shown how much of it can be
easily done by a trained woman
with a trained mind, and the wel welcome
come welcome mat has been put out before
many doors. Again, shortages
have brought this increase about.
Campaigns to inform people of

WOMEN S EDUCATION: VIII

the need for other professional
workers are obviously paying off in
increased election by women of
education as librarians, social
workers, religious educators, and
foreign language specialists.
Questions may still exist on
whether these choices are satis satisfying
fying satisfying women for all their lives,
especially as job training. There
is much need for research before
any definitive comment can be
made, but in programs for the ma mature
ture mature like the AAUW Educational
Foundation's College Faculty Pro Program,
gram, Program, a graduate program, the
choices follow -fairly well the
established pattern for women.
This is confirmed by analysis of
women enrolling in the University
of Minnesotas Plan in which one
of the largest groups is composed
of women seeking to complete their
baccalaureate degree. The Plan's
*Newsletter says ...the areas
of education, social sciences,
English and the humanities, and
the medical disciplines were the
most often mentioned-as fields of
interest....
The Womens Bureau of theU.S.

- r- . S' w^r
(rws mute yoiju. V > jusr eor i / pressfp scrk me r:vo s |
Th.
('the FELLOWS WERS ArTT A
(to BWt* Mi] "j %:

CONSERVATIVE VIEWPOINT

One Step Toward Defeat

By GEORGE HUBERT JR.
P resident, G aine s ville Young
Americans For Freedom
The nuclear test ban treaty
negotiated in Moscow, and ratified
by the Senate, must be considered
in context with both the Kennedy
Administrations disarmament
program and the Kremlin policy
of peaceful coexistence.
According to the State Depart Departments
ments Departments program calling for general
and complete disarmament, at the
end of a three-stage program
within a ten year period, nations
would retain forces sufficient to
maintain internal order only, while
a strong UN Peace Force equipped
with tactical nuclear weapons
capable of assuring the peace
would be established. However,
assuming that the United Nations
becomes captive to Soviet policy,
it is not inconceivable that an
international peace force might
carry out a decision to return
Alaska to Russia, regardless of

Department of Labor reports that
78 percent of college women work working
ing working in 1959 were in professional
type work, and 12 percent, the next
largest group, in clerical work.
A picture of the true importance
of teaching to womens work goals
is clearly evident.
Further guidance on education
for the future can be found in the
Womens Bureau predictions for
1970: t
About 1 out of gvery 3 workers
will be a woman.
Further expansion in the
employment of women in occupa occupations
tions occupations in which they have long been
established, such as teachers,
office workers, librarians, social
workers, home economists,
nurses, laboratory technicians,
medical and other health workers.
Greater opportunities for women
with the required ability and educa educational
tional educational qualifications as mathema mathematicians,
ticians, mathematicians, statisticians, scientists,
engineers, technicians of various
kinds, and higher level office
workers with training in the use
of the electronic data processing
and other business machines.

objections from the American
government.
Whereas the program may be
worthy of the noblest aspirations
of mankind, it fails in many
respects in dealing with the reali realities
ties realities of a world in conflict. This
program calling for complete
world disarmament would not only
jeopardize the security of the
United States, but would abolish
the concept of national sovereignty
as well.
Yet the preamble of the Moscow
Treaty specifically states that the
treaty will be the first in a series
of treaties and
designed to effect complete world
disarmament. Can this nation rely
upon the Soviet Union to abide by
the terms of the treaty? I think
not.
Overlooking the fact that the
USSR has abrogated fifty of fifty fiftytwo
two fiftytwo major treaties and agreements
with the U.S., the Kennedy Admin Administration
istration Administration insists that v confidence
can be built. This assumption
of Soviet good' faith is totally
unwarranted, as evidenced by the
Soviet Unions betrayal of the
voluntary moratorium in 1961. At
that time, President Kennedy re released
leased released a statement that any test
ban treaty, such as that negotiated
this summer in Moscow, would be
unacceptable to the U.S., in that
our national security would be
greatly endangered, and that our
nuclear laboratories would
atrophy. This information was
based upon studies undertaken by
the Administration at that time.
The Administrations euphoria
concerning the treaty has not been
shared by many of our leading
scientists and military theorists.
Their recent testimony before the
Senate indicates that there are
indeed, cogent arguments against

The Florida Alligator
L
4
Editor-in-chief David Lawrence Jr.
Managing Editor W iison
Sports Editor Dave Berkowitz
Editorial Page Editor . . John Askins
Layout Editor *... .Ron Spencer
City Editor Cynthia Tunstall
Copy Editor Hamm ock
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
l nnersity of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
e months of May, June, and July, when a weekly issue is published.
HE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is entered as second class matter at
e Lnited States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida.

the treaty today, just as there
were only two years ago.
No doubt that seasoned diplomat,
Mr. Averell Harriman, who ne negotiated
gotiated negotiated the treaty, was just as
euphoric when he previously
negotiated with the Russians at
Yalta, Potsdam, and Geneva. But
the consequence of his accepting
the machinations of Soviet
diplomacy have resulted in the
Communist occupation of the
nations of Eastern Europe, much
of Germany, and Laos. Mr.
Harriman, it would appear, has
committed quite consistently that
sin of diplomacy-appeasement.
During this era of peaceful
coexistence, the Russians have
found that the art of diplomacy
and insurrection are important and
effective weapons in winning the
Cold War struggle. Consequently,
increasing emphasis upon develop developing
ing developing diplomacy, encouraging
internal subversion and
insurrection against non-
Communist governments has.
tended to strengthen the overall
position of Communist East, while
undermining that of the free West.
Thus, the Treaty of Moscow
appears to be the first in a con concatenation
catenation concatenation of agreements and
treaties designed to appease and
surrender this nation on the
installment plan. Our implied
trust in the Communist leadership
will render ineffectual our govern governments
ments governments remaining anti-communist
efforts.
Only weeks ago, Mr. Krushchev
reiterated, We shall continue to
make every effort to dig the hole
deeper, and forever bury the
capitalist system! It appears
that Mr. Arthur Schlesinger, Jr.
(special advisor to the president),
Mr. Averell Harriman, et al, are
willing to do just that.



-

Good Work
EDITOR:
Regarding Cl Day, many thanks
are due -
First and foremost, to the
thousands of students and faculty
members who supported integra integration
tion integration and ate at the Cl. Without
them, Cl Day would have flopped;
with them, it was a roaring suc success.
cess. success.
To the many, many faculty
members and students who sup supported
ported supported equal rights but couldnt
wait, because, at times, the line
reached to the Gold Coast. Pro Professor
fessor Professor Cutler, for example, found
his youngsters getting restless,
and so had to leave the line but
before leaving, he had the kindness
to tell the Cl management of his
support for equality.
Tt the Alligator, for its good
wishes and very good coverage of
sides.
To the many Student Group for
Equal Rights members, for laying
a good groundwork for a positive
demonstration for equality.
To the Cl employees who effi efficiently
ciently efficiently moved the line along and
thus helped increase the customer
count.
To these and to many others, I
say, Thank you very much. My
hat is off to you. Several were
refused service (Pincus Gross,
Jim and Dan Harmeling, lan
Belson, and myself, to name some)
and so would perhaps not be wel welcome
come welcome at the Cl. But we trust
that when the Cl does integrate
and comes out- for equality, you
will be welcome regulars there.
Keep up the good work!
Burin Kantabutra
3BA from Thailand
Erroneous
Editor:
We would like to take this op opportunity
portunity opportunity to point out to both you
and the readers, an erroneous
observation made in the Thursday,
Nov. 7, issue of the ALLIGATOR.
The statement in question appeared
in the column entitled, Cl Day
Turnout Called Success. it read
as follows: Three unidentified
persons walked in front of the Cl
yesterday carrying signs calling
for students not to enter the Cl
in the name of free enterprise.
The signs did not call for
students not to enter the Cl,
nor did either the signs or the
picketers imply any such motive.

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To the contrary, the signs merely
expressed the following: (1) a
belief in free enterprise, (2) a
belief in the right of an individual
to manage his private business
as he sees fit, and (3) a criticism
Os the strategy of the Student
Group for Equal Rights. Indeed,
does it make sense that we should
want to penalize the Cl owner
financially, by dissuading students
from eating there? in reference
to the strategy of Cl Day, we
overheard one individual put it
very well, when he said substan substantially,
tially, substantially, How can we lose? He
(the Cl owner) get hurt either way.
There were two main reasons
for the picketers not making a
statement about their activities.
One reason was that this, in fact,
was not an organized group. The
other was a fear of being
misquoted. Since we were the
victims of inaccurate reporting
anyway, we fell compelled to make
this clarification.
In addition, there is another
reported fact of which we
seriously question the validity.
This refers to the first paragraph
in the article which states that
more than 4,000 persons crowded
into the College Inn in response
to the Cl Day. We cannot
believe that all of those 4,000
persons patronized the Cl purely
in response to the cause. From
the comments we heard many
showed up as they do every day
purely in response to their
stomachs. How can such statistics
be accurate without personally
interviewing each patron
concerning his motives?
Also, why was the previous
Monday and not the previous Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday chosen by the Student Group
for Equal Rights as a standard
of comparison? we wonder if
this same type of statistical ap approach
proach approach is used in proclaiming the
percentage of the student body that
is behind the movement. (As a
further evaluation of the article,
it might be noted that in counting
the number of pickets the reporter
could only count to three, which
is substantially less than the
number of different individuals
who picketed. As stated above
he managed to reach 4,000 in
counting the number of persons who
entered the CL)
In the interest of objective re reporting
porting reporting and representing the
student body as a whole, we suggest
that you print this letter and set
the record straight.
Name Withheld

Heres A Progress Test

GENERAL DIRECTIONS: This
examination is to be graded by
the 9th grade remedial math
classes at P.K. Yonge. For the
kiddies to grade accurately, the
student must use a pencil
containing lollypop pink lead as
Gallup polls show that 9th graders
and college professors like pink
best.
IMPORTANT: Answer each
question as many times as you
damn well see fit so the kiddies
will have a chance to choose. Also,
please dont doodle on the answer
sheet as it prompts the graders
to scrawl on the walls or barf
on the walls, depending on where
they ate lunch.
IF you finish the test, write
the pledge in full on the back of
your answer sheet, sign your name
to it, and look on your neighbors
Sick, Tired
EDITOR:
After reading about the College
Inn controversy for the past
several months and hearing about
the mass demonstration rally of
patronage at the Cl last Wednesday,
Im finally becoming a little bit
sick and tired of all the noble
crusading of campus, state, and
national integrationist movements
to put unseeming pressure on the
owner of a local, private establish establishment.
ment. establishment.
Last Wednesdays assemblage at
the Cl, for example, seems to
have two logical purposes: to
rebuff the managements policy of
catering to the customers wishes,
and showing the Cl management
how much extra business (i.e.
money) theyll get if they lower
their ban.
The first purpose is transparent
in the fact that many of the regular
customers, having no knowledge of
the demonstration, were in at attendance
tendance attendance would not become regular
customers were the management to
lift the ban. A great many partici participants,
pants, participants, by more than logical
conjecture, were not staunch
prospect customers, but
integration sympathizers who are
more interested in the de desegregation
segregation desegregation band-wagon than in
either constitutional free enter enterprise
prise enterprise or a driving desire to eat
at the Cl therein lies the fallacy
of the second strategic purpose.
Until the American Constitution
is so amended to the effect that
local private businesses are totally
liable to federal law in their goods,
services, and policies, the civil
rights pressure groups have no
legal leg to stand on (in an in instance
stance instance like this) except, of course,
hot air.
Name Withheld

hSB *> BBS
NOTICE
I'
I Applications for the following positions for the Second Trimester are 1
now being accepted: |
I Editor of the Florida Alligator I
I Student Publications Business Manager I
I Application forms may be obtained in Room 12, Florida Union, and I
1 must be returned to that office no later than 12 noon Monday, Nov. I
18, 1963. I
I BOARD OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS I

Monday, Nov. 11,1963 The Florida Alligator

paper to make suit he has too.
NOTE: This test consists of
pages with 150 items numbered
consecutively 1-150, excepting 13,
47, 69, 76, 81, 93-94, which are
at the end of the test, item #77
which is located between 123 and
124 and 76,080 which is found on
Coach Graves pay check.
1. The author of the well-known
phrase Africa for the Africans
is:
(1) George C. Loomis
(2) Malcolm X
(3) Charlayne Hunter (maiden
name)
(4) Robert Kennedy
(5) David Lawrence Jr.
2. The author of the phrase If
they have no bread let them eat
cake is:
(1) Betty Crocker
(2) Gay H. Welborn
(3) Orville Freeman
(4) Mao Tse Tung
3. If you were standing 40 feet
from Trusler Hall, angle 30 de degrees
grees degrees to the North wall, angled 15
degrees 45 minutes to the ground,
with your left ear inclined per perpendicular
pendicular perpendicular to the ecliptic, on a
perfectly clear Thursday after afternoon,
noon, afternoon, you would be;
(1) Looking in Idelle Blens
bedroom window
(2) Sunbathing in the nopark noparking
ing noparking area on the service
road next to Simpson
(3) Watching the Ken L
Ration truck unloading
behind the Snack Bar
(4) Watching Mr. Bryans home
movies
(5) Stone drunk
4. Americas number 1 deterent
is:
(1) Haydon Burns hair oil
(2) U. of F. R.O.T.C. units
(3) Snack Bar bus boys
(4) RS 70
(5) Campus police with
halitosis
5. God could best be exem exemplified
plified exemplified in earthly terms by:
( 1) Paul Hendrick
(2) A fraternity man
(3) Me
(4) Steve Backmeyer on Satur Satur"
" Satur" day night
(5) Chairman of the State Board
of control
6. The number one record on
this weeks WRUF hit parade is:
(1) Where has theStudentGo theStudentGovernment
vernment theStudentGovernment Gone? by the
Student Party
(2) Where has the Student
Party Gone? by the VOTE
Party.
(3) Bury Wesley Davis by
Barry Goldwater
(4) (Every damn progress test
has a #4 except this one)
(5) Where have all the
appointments gone? by 65%

independents
7. READING FOR THE
GENERALIZED IDEA. The fol following
lowing following item is TRIPLE
WEIGHTED.
NOTE: The following is a verbatim
'"flotation from a three page
mimeographed sheet distributed
earlier this year entitled A Letter
of Welcome to Our Students from
Gay Ht Welborn, Director Food
Service Division, University of
Florida.
...THE FOOD SERVICE DI DIVISION
VISION DIVISION has been entrusted with
the magnanimous task of supply supplying
ing supplying your food requirements, to
insure that you continue to grow
healthy and strong, foritfied with
a natural fortitude to face the
problems confronting you, while
keeping the fires of your mental
growth and ambitions glowing
brightly.
In spite of all combined efforts,
however, we realize that there will
be days, ahead when you will MISS
HOME and, ESPECIALLY,
MOMS KITCHEN, with its brim brimming
ming brimming over cookie jars, cake plates,
fruit bowls, bubbling coffee pots
and whistling tea kettles, where
dishes were prepared especially
for you and to suit your individual
taste and occasion.
Well we KNOW we
could NEVER SURPASS MOMS
KITCHEN AND COOKING BACK
HOME BUT WE WANT
YOU TO KNOW THAT OUR EN ENTIRE
TIRE ENTIRE STAFF IS DEDICATED TO
TRYING JUST THAT!
The central idea of the pre previous
vious previous quotation is;
(1) Moms cooking stinks
(2) Gay Welborn has an Oedipus
Complex
(3) Madame Nhu serves
Buddhist Burgers on
Fridays
(4) The Food Service motto
is Yea for Ptomaine
(5) The Food Service emaci emaciates
ates emaciates all students equally
This is the end of the test and
the world. Before you pass go
and collect S2OO, write the Pledge:
Drunk on my tail as a Florida
student, I swear upon an empty
case of Bacardi that I have neither
seduced a proctor, pinched my
neighbor, or re enrolled at
Florida.
(Signature)
Be sure you have given your
life history at the side of the
answer sheet. CHECK YOUR ANS ANSWER
WER ANSWER SHEET CAREFULLY FOR
WEAK AND STRAY DOODLING.
WEAK AND STRAY DOODLINGS
VAGUELY RESEMBLING PLAY PLAYMATES
MATES PLAYMATES OF THE MONTH WILL
RESULT IN HIGHER SCORES.
Sleep well tonight The Board
of University Examiners will.
.. .from the Graham Cracker

Page 7



The Florida Alligator Monday, Nov. 11,1963

Page 8

GATOR CLASSIFTED^II

Wanted

WANTED 1 or 2 girls to share
an apartment; or if you have an
apartment and have room for one
more please call 376-3261 ext.
2832 or write to box 22 Fla. Alli Alligator,
gator, Alligator, Fla. Union. (C-45-ts-p).
GIRL leaving school needs ride to
Miami with someone who is willing
to take girl and belongings, on
week-end of Nov. 15th. All ex expenses
penses expenses paid. 2-6485. (C-45-st-c).
ARE YOU LOOKING FOR 2 room roommates
mates roommates (girls)? if you want to
move into an apartment call
2-7262. (C-46-st-c).
BOY WOULD LIKE to be taught
to play tenor banjo. Call 2-5746
after 7;00 p.m. (C-46-3t-c).
IT'S LIKE THIS, WE jl
BOOKED IT THEN WE I
PULLED IT...BOOKED I
IT AGAIN, THEN... j
ANYWAY,
HERE IT IS!
| CAPTURES THE KIND OF
[THING THAT PEOPLE HAVE \
/MERELY TALKED ABOUT FOR I
YEARS! I
This picture is for men and I
women. Jacopetti gate crashes
the most forbidden yet inviting
places. Women of the World
is a highly unconventional, nosy,
nervy and hypnotizing account of
the activities of females. .
Jacopetti is a master of the art; 1
j
| --JustinGilbert, N. Y. Mirror
I. . Beautiful color scenes
culled from seemingly every
exotic area of the globe; The
accent is not entirely on sex, of
course, and an observer can
justifiably be amazed. . This is
Jacopetti" s inspection of the
manners, mores and amorous
habits of the gentle sex. Candid..
Humorous. . Startling and
Shocking;'
--A. Weiler, N. Y. Times!
FASCINATING AND FUN; A[j
fresh viewpoint on the facts of B
life. Exceptional! Authentic; K
Startling; U
--Wanda Hale, Daily News
I YOU HAVE NEVER SEEN ANYTHING
I IN THE WORLD A*'.
WilEN\
oftheworld:
ITECHNiCOLOR^^*^
OitbeUd by SUALTIERO JACOPETTI
At A by PETER USTINOV * imwi Aciwm how
1-3:10-5-7:. 0-9 p.m.
!e T A TF TODAY THRU
L TUESDAY

I MAGNIFICENT PERFORMANCE' start! Wednesday SUPERB LiFe M0,.,, "]
'REMARKABLE
Yorker i "" l [
1 STATE I* NY Daily News 1
j "A MOST EXCELLENT FILM'' , 1 niu~TA grr
jr brilliant" J |

V
For Sale

PLAN AHEAD!! 1961 two bedroom
50 x 10 Nashua mobile home
available Jan. 1. Air conditioned.
Extra furniture. Excellent
condition. Financing available.
Call Tom Neff at 6-5027 after
five. (A-43-st-c).
FOR SALE: 33 x 8 ANDERSON
HOUSE TRAILER. 1 BR and
full bath $1,300. #l6 Glywood Park
Located behind Florida Power.
(A-44-3t-p).
LEARN TO FLY. Four airplane
club membership $l5O can
be resold when leaving club. Clive
Robertson. 2-6815 after 5;00p.m.
(A-45-lt-c).
ONE OF GAINESVILLE NICEST
HOMES. 1500 sq. ft. 3 bedroom,
2 bath, large living room, dining
area, custom kitchen with kitchen kitchenette,
ette, kitchenette, large paneled Fla. room with
custom fireplace and carpet.
FENCED PATIO. Fallout Shelter.
Fenced back yard. 190 x 100 lot,
fully landscaped. FHA & Con Conventional
ventional Conventional financing. 1907N.W. 38th
Dr. Call 6-3638 evenings and week weekend.
end. weekend. (A-46-st-p).
FOR SALE One set of Great
Books of the Western World. Ph
FR 2-0895. (A-46-3t-c).

1 W
For Rent

CHILDLESS COUPLE, or two
students to rent furnished apt.
in Colonial Manor Apts. 1/2 block
from University, come, phone or
write Scott Keller, 1216 S.W. 2nd
Avenge, 372-2722. (B-27-ts-c).
NEW one bedroom apt.furnished.
Sleeps 3, Like a small home.
Near Campus. Call 6-0410. (B (B---45-ts-c).
--45-ts-c). (B---45-ts-c).

Help Wanted

STUDENTS WIFE or female
student to make telephone calls
from home. Hours-yours con convenience.
venience. convenience. Apply giving name,
address and phone number to box
12, Florida Alligator, Florida
Union. (E-46-lt-p).
* ,,M 1 IW
AN ARCOLA PICIURt 1 last I
mwim M/
BOUNTY jap
= FLORIDA =
i "

Services

HORSEBACK RIDING, TRAIL
RIDES, HAYRIDES, NIGHT RIDES.
All at Lake Wauberg Riding
Stables. 1/2 mile north of Lake
Wauberg. For reservation, in information
formation information and FREE trans transportation
portation transportation call 466-9295.(M-8-68t 466-9295.(M-8-68tc).
c). 466-9295.(M-8-68tc).
NESTORS TV, RADIO. HIFI
SERVICE. Tubes checked free.
Free Estimates. Next to Florida
Bookstore parking lot. 1627 NW
Ist Ave. Phone FR 2-7326. (M (M---36-MWF-c).
--36-MWF-c). (M---36-MWF-c).
NEW and USED Band Instruments,
Guitars and Amplifiers. Music
and Accessories. Complete
BAND INSTRUMENT REPAIR
SHOP on Premises. Derda Music
Co., 632 N.W. 13th St. Phone:
2-6715 (Just 6 blocks North of
Campus). (M-41-ts-c).

Autos |

1963 CHEVROLET Super Sport,
p/s r/h w/w. Any reasonable
offer accepted. Call FR 6-1456
or FR 2-3430. (G-42-st-c).
1956 English Ford, Good running
condition. Any reasonable offer
accepted. Call FR 2-0220 after
5:30 p.m. (G-44-3t-c).
1960 FORD FALCON 4 door
Priced for a quick sale. Call
Ken at 6-3261 ext. 2143 or ext
2140. (G-45-st-c).

Lost & found

LOST during Gator Growl -- A
Cornet. Brand name York, with
serial number 127773. Contact Bill
Taylor 6-9271. (L-41-ts-c).
FOUND --Ladys watch. Was found
in front of Anderson Building
contact Russell Howard, Phone
372-9495. (L-46-3t-p).
0
PAIR Mens prescription sun
glasses. Black case. From
Beckums. Smoke frame. Contact
P.L. Geyer Jewlery Dept. 6-8292
after 5 p.m. (L-46-3t-p).
- f
fnmSnM
BRIVI-IN TM lAft7^*l
2 adult hits
open 6:30, show 7
at 7 & 10:15
winner 4 British Awards
A mT£ OF HONEY
2nd Hit at 8:40
L LESLIE CARON
SHAPED ROOJA
STARTS FRIDAY
The H/tUNTtm

- ''' 'V->
H W h HteS.
KB *SP'^
BUILDING X IS ARTIST'S HAVEN
It's no wonder when statues like this can be found on
exhibition. Our roving photographer happened to
find this interesting one while on assignment.

Grading Machines
'Not Infallible

Five machines, rented from the
International Business Machines
(IBM) Corporation at S4O per
month, are now busily grading
progress tests in the Seagle
Building.
Popularly known on campus as
Flunkensteins, the machines
are actually standard IBM test
scorers. They have been grading
UF progress tests since 1937.
. Dr. John V. McQuitty, director
of the UF Board of Examiners,
said the machines are not re responsible
sponsible responsible for deciding whether or
not a progress test answer is right
or wrong, but only for counting
the number of correct and in incorrect
correct incorrect answers.
The machines must be set to
choose the right answers by use of
a test key, McQuitty said. They
can also be set to count off any
fraction for an incorrect answer.
Once the machine is set, it must
be operated by hand and the scores
are recorded on the test answer
sheet by hand. Each test is scored
Bus Times Set
Wives of UF students living in
Flavet 111 can now use the student
bus service to go to work on cam campus
pus campus each morning.
The bus is scheduled to pick up
the wives in Flavet 111 at 7:45
each morning and will deliver them
to Peabody Hall by 7:55 a.m.
TOLBERT AREA FILMS
Fri & Sat; 8 & 10 p.m.
Ingmar Bergman's
TMfiRJWSPRWIj"
South Hall Rec Room
Advance tickets avail available
able available in Tolbert Area
office, 1 -spm daily.
15$ talcard holders;
30$ to all others.

twice, by a different machine with
a different operator each time.
Operation of the machines is
very simple, McQuitty said.
Answer sheets are marked with
ele ct rog r aphi c pencils. The
markings send out electronic im impulses
pulses impulses when the papers are put
in the machine. -Right impulses
go one way on the electrical cir circuit
cuit circuit and wrong impulses go the
other way.
The number of right answers
is registered on a scale and the
machine operator reads this num number
ber number to the recorder, who writes
it on the answer sheet.
The machines can score up to
300 papers per hour. McQuitty
said it takes about 10 hours to
complete scoring of the average
C-course prog.
The machines are not in infallible,
fallible, infallible, he added, but since
each test is scored twice, mis mistakes
takes mistakes Sfre usually caught.
Rescoring of test papers is done
by hand in the presence of the stu student.
dent. student. Most of the time, McQuitty
said, the student has left stray
pencil marks on his paper which
have been picked up by the machine
and counted as wrong answers.
To show what he meant, McQuitty
picked up a piece of paper, made
15 almost indiscernible dots on it
and inserted it into one of the
machines. Thirteen of the 15
dots registered as answers.
Some students who come to see
us want to know why a particular
answer is wrong. This is a ques question
tion question for their professor. All we do
is check the paper scoring
errors and tell them how impor important
tant important It Ts To make heavy black;
marks in the answer spaces and
to make no superfluous marks or
dots on the sheet, he concluded.
Business Dames
Plan Meeting
The UF Business Adminstration
Dames will meet Wednesday at
8:00 p.m. at the home of Mrs.
James Athearn, 1511 N. W. 38th.
St.
A motorcade will meet at 7;40
in the parking lot next to the
Century Tower. A speaker will
address the meeting.
HEELS put on in 5 minutes
I SQfES put on in IS minutes
I modernshoel
REPAIR SHOP I
fronHs^ationalbonkfi



MOVIE REVIEW: 'WOMEN OF THE WORLD

Global Femininity Topic Os Film

By DON FEDERMAN
Reviewer
Women of the World, at the
State through Tuesday is a docu documentary
mentary documentary about feminine oddities
around the globe for the pleasure
of people lovers and some mascu masculine
line masculine oddities. It is made of scenes
not used for a movie of notable
anthropological value.
It has a fine narrator in Peter
Ustinov, a generally tight (though
often crassly misleading) script,
and some beautiful photography.
Often witty and brilliant in its

BOOKS

Peace in Their Time Men
Who Led Us In and Out of War,
1914-1945, by Emery Kelen
'Knopf $5.95): Kelen started
drawing the faces of history in
Hungary in 1918. Forty-five
years later, mostly with his
compatriot colleague, Alois
Derso, he has caricatured his
way through two wars, two
peace organizations and the
world between. Now he has
proved his typewriter as sharp
as his pencil in a book; part
history, part biography, part
wit, part wisdom, part satire
and part cynicism. It is a foot footnote
note footnote of vignettes by a man who
looked at historys heroes and
villains professionally, rather
than listening to them. Kelen
believes in constitutional psy psychology.
chology. psychology. People, to him, look
like what they are. He draws
them as he sees them and now
he writes about them the same
way. For example: The infan infantile
tile infantile look of Gandhis was his
secret weapon. Roosevelt used
"his jaw, massive and challeng challenging
ing challenging .. as men use hands and
elephants use trunks. Kelen
sees Hitler with the looseness
of his mouth when he spoke
revealing some irreplaceable
emptiness; Mussolini who
bugged his eyes like a lobster
. . and he seemed to be staring
entranced at the Four Horse Horsemen
men Horsemen of the Apocalypse; Dean
Acheson with a marmalade
colored mustache brushed up upward,
ward, upward, tomcat style; Will Rog Rogers
ers Rogers wtih a peanut face; An Andrei
drei Andrei Gromyko as a Punchinel Punchinello
lo Punchinello whose feelings have been
wounded; Sen. Tom Connally
as a monumental Texan built
like a railway station water
tank and dressed like a cartoon
senator, Haile Selassie as a
shadowy Christ. His word pic pictures,
tures, pictures, well sprinkled with on onthe-spot
the-spot onthe-spot art work, add up to a
worthwhile commentary on
contemporary figures.
* *
The Letters of Robert Frost
to Louis Untermeyer (Holt,
Rinehart and Winston s7>:
These are the first published
letters of Robert Frost, and the
laigesl number written oy Frost
to any single friend. They span
46 years of friendship with
Untermeyer, a poet, anthologist
and critic, who befriended and
defended the New Englander
when the caliber of his poetry
was not generally recognized.
Untermeyer reveals that Frost
at first was eager to see the
letters in print, but later made
excuses for delaying their pub publication.
lication. publication. He apparently was
fearful that the letters would
destroy an image the nation
had formed of him when he
recited The Gift Outright at
President Kennedys inaugura inauguration.
tion. inauguration. The letters do tend to
destroy that image. But in des destroying
troying destroying it, they illuminate a
full personality ranging from
light moods of cunning and wit
to grief, in one letter, Frost
growls vengeance at his critics:
in the next launches a fantastic

handling of such items as American
divorce and the pathetic Western Westernization
ization Westernization of Japan, it, nevertheless,
suffers from an obvious
over-emphasis of sex and a height heightening
ening heightening of the grotesque.
However, to deem this movie
obscene is to defend it. For in
labeling it such, the question arises
as to why the label. And it is
this r er s opinion that,
because our society is so
repressive towards xuality.
picture df this sort fulfills
incessant need for a pleasure cc
tinuously pervaded by an ir

United Press International

M 1 ~ l ""
Assignment: match the performance of our finest
jl automatic drive in a lighter, less expensive version /
traveling companion for our new, /
* hotter, medium-displacement V-8 engines

A completely new Ford Motor Company 3-speed
automatic drive for 1964 delivers improved
passing performance ... smoother acceleration
. . better start-ups (up to 35% higher torque
multiplication in Low) . more flexible down downhill
hill downhill braking . quieter operation in Neutral.
With the introduction of this lighter, highly
durable and efficient transmission in 1964
Comet, Fairlane and Ford models, our engi engineers
neers engineers have taken still another step toward
putting extra pep per pound into Ford-built cars.

MOTOR COMPANY
The American Road, Dearborn, Michigan
WHERE ENGINEERING LEADERSHIP BRINGS YOU BETTER-BUILT CABS
ap """

soliloquy; and in another hap happily
pily happily burlesques his fellow poets
The volume also contains
Frosts philosophy of poetry
poems not in the collected
works, poems previously un unprinted,
printed, unprinted, and first drafts. It con contains
tains contains his first poem, written at
15, and his only limerick.

bearable guilt. Visual sex is the
last ritual of our society which
is so obsessed with love, but more
in fantasy than anything else.
And thus, to react with righteous
indignation to this movie is just
as obscene as snickers or dirty
comments, for the moralist and the
filthy minded man are both
perversions of the same thing.
Other than some unnecessary
sexual sequences which tend
negate the value of the scene
a wh 1 and some hideous
of thaihdoinide babies and w
of hop* l to the scene of the h
lesslv crfiplod at Lourdes,
movie has some excellent do >
ment.ry sequences. This mod
is not a- skin flic, for sex
is kept within the limits of
law, though it still aboui
throughout the picture.
in the final summation, the pr
of admission to Women of the
World' will ik provide the satis satisfaction
faction satisfaction that ; u n think can be had
with a live-dollar woman, but it
is a partial outlet. In addition,
it might interest many an American
tired of being so wrapped up in
himself.

Monday, Nov. 11 1963 The Florida Alligator

'Taste Os Honey
Now playing at the Gainesville
Drive in is the finest double fea feature
ture feature in this town in a many a year.
The first hit, Taste of Honey,
is a beautiful account of a young
girls awakening unto i woman.
Pita Tushingham is superb as the
young girl made pregnant by a
Negro sailor, cat by
mosexual, and mis lei'stood
mother bound up nor own
ie world. The pla been
.- roved by its auth< r the

CASH/Jk
Marion Finance (~\ (
UyvSj
FR 6-5333 Loans up to S6OO 222 W. Univ. Ave.

Simplified gear case design and a one-piece
aluminum casting result in a lighter, more
compact transmission-one that has fewer
components and is extremely easy to maintain.
Built to precision tolerances akin to those in
missile production, the new automatic trans transmission
mission transmission is truly a product of the space age,
and is typical of technical progress at Ford.
Another assignment completed; another case
of engineering leadership at Ford providing
fresh ideas for the American Road.

screen, photographic imagery is
exquisite. in short, this is a
great cinema experience.
'L-Shaped Room
The L-Shaped Room, which
played here five weeks ago, is
back, and worth a second
viewing. For a review, consultthe
Oct. 2 issue of the ALLIGATOR,
then it can bo simply said that
this movie is trank and sensi sensitive
tive sensitive portray <1 love affair.
Congratual the Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville Drive-1 ; i ; rogram with
taste.

Page 9



Page 10

The Florida Alligator Monday, Nov. 11,196:

Gators Matthews Turns Fumble Into Touchdown^

5 'i yS&£
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GATOR END LYNN MATTHEWS POUNCES ON DUPREE FUMBLE IN END ZONE TO GIVE THE GATORS THEIR THIRD TOUCHDOWN

'Our Best Effort' -Graves

By ERNIE LITZ
AND MARK VALENTI
JACKSONVII T,E, lt was
our best effort all year, including

f= BEHIND THE EIGHTBALL
fy DAVE BERKOWITZ
Sports Editor
Cant Say We
Told You So
The Georgia Florida football game is history.
We cant say we told you so, because we didnt. We didnt shout to
the world we knew theyd \frin, because we really didnt have any idea.
The way the game was played was no real surprise. Having seen
two u F Georgia games before we had some idea of the kind of action
the fans would see at the Gator Bowl and we werent disappointed.
Saturdays game was no fluke conjured up by the Fates. The Gators
were the same and the plays were the same. The only difference was
that the Gators took advantage of opportunities, something theyve
found hard to do before.
Were proud of the way they rushed, the way they blocked and the
way they tackled, but most of all were proud of their spirit.
We are especially proud of two men, both of whom put out one of the
best efforts weve seen. They are Larry Dupree and Bruce Bennett.
Dupree, struck by personal tragedy Friday morning, put forth a
phenomenal effort. His touchdown in the first quarter was probably the
greatest single example of hard nosed football weve seen.
Bennetts three interceptions boosted his season total to six and
tied him with Walter Mayberry (1937) and Jimmy Dunn (1957) for the
most interceptions made by a Florida player in a single season.
Dunn is presently Bennetts defensive backfield coach. His interception
of R ake st raws Tifst pass for a touchdown gave the UF defense the
confidence it needed to stop Georgias air attack.
Had the Gators lost, we would be no less proud of their effort and
even if they dont win again this year, this game, even more than
the Alabama game, will be called their finest hour.
Splinters
We see that Gainesville Sun Sports Editor Joe Halberstein is campaign campaigning
ing campaigning to bring the 1964 Florida-Southern Methodist game to Gainesville
instead of Jacksonville where it is scheduled to be played, Sept. 19, 1964
Its been a fact that Jacksonville has been cool to all Florida games,
except the annual Georgia Florida clash. We support Halbersteins
idea and recommend a look at his column in yesterdays paper.
The UF freshman football team plays Georgias Bullpups at Florida
Field Saturday at 2 p.m. The team is 2-1 for the season with wins over
Auburn and Florida State and a loss to Miami.
We heard a report that a couple of eggs were thrown at the door oi
the Athletic Department in response to Fridays Alligator story regarding
the transfer of student seating from the hands of Student Government
to the Athletic Department.

the Alabama game, reported a
tired, but elated head coach Ray
Graves after the 21-14 victory
over Georgia Saturday.

J: V .- /
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~*' #

Graves had special praise for
UFs deadly defensive duo of Ken
Russell and Bruce Bennett.
Bennett, who had an excellent
day, intercepted three Larry Rake Rakestraw
straw Rakestraw passes, the first on
Georgias opening play from
scrimmage for a 43 yard touch touchdown.
down. touchdown.
Bennett, a high school
All American quarterback, was
asked if he liked playing defense
all the time.
Sure I like it, he said. Its
a challenge. Intercepting passes
isnt guesswork, it involves timing
and coordination. Youve got to
do a lot of things at once.
Do you prefer it to playing
offense?
Everyone wants to play
offense, Bennett said, but not
everyone can play defense.
The other half of the defensive
pair Kenny Russell wiped
his head with a towel and said,
Boy that was a tough one. The
trick is when you know theyre
going to pass that you know where
to be, and that isnt as easy as it
sounds. They had some mighty
good boys out there.
Graves also had praise for
senior guard Jack Thompson and
back Larry Dupree.
He (Dupree) gave a tremen tremendous
dous tremendous effort today and considering

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ftft ft ft ftftLJj Hi a W\l\\ ft^Ki*
OVER FOR THE SCORE
...is UF fullback Larry Dupree. Dupree lowered his head and drove the defense back.

WKss&jt >* -Ssa.. F,< y i**
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what he had been through the last
two days. Im just as proud of
him as I can be, Graves said.
Dupree went over to Graves
after the game and shook his hand
saying, I want to thank you, coach,
for everything youve done for us.
Yourre the finest man I know.
Ill fight the biggest man in
the world if he said Coach Graves
wasnt the finest man in the world,
Dupree said as his teammates car carried
ried carried him off the field.
Coach Jimmy Dunn called the
game a typical Florida-Georgia
battle.
No matter how far in front we
are you can bet that before long
Georgia will be breathing down
our necks. This game is always
a tough one.
Center Jim Bernhart, injured
in the game, said Georgia was
a good teafn.
They didnt give in, he said.
They hung in there right down to
the end.
Senior end Russ Brown summed
it all up: I dont want to play
another one like that. Wow!

I GATOR SPORTS |

IS EVERYBODY HAPPY?
Gator cheerleader Ann
Brown looked that way af after
ter after Florida scored its first
touchdown*



* No.own fumbles lost 4 1^
V

Scouts Laud Defense
For Stopping Georgia

JACKSONVILLE Floridas
pass defense, which held Georgia
vaunted air attack to 94 yards,
received praise from Miami and
Florida State scouts during the
Gatorfe 21-14 victory Saturday.
Miami Assistant Head coach
Walter Kichefski was impressed
by Floridas rush on Georgia
quarterback Larry Rakestraw.
Floridas defense seems to be
better against a passing team than
a running team. Kichefski said.

Southeastern Conference Standings
Conference Games All Games
W L T Pet. PF PA W L T Pet. PF PA
x-Mississippi 4 0 0 1.000 116 17 6 0 1 .929 177 23
Alabama 5 1 0 .833 142 42 6 1 0 .857 163 55
Auburn 4 1 0 .800 95 66 6 1 0 .857 144 80
Louisiana St. 3 1 0 .750 52 50 6 2 0 .750 109 91
Mississippi St. 3 11 .700 .79 49 5 2 1 .688 152 66
Georgia Tech 3 2 0 .600 77 45 6 2 0 .750 148 59
FLORIDA 3 3 1 .500 61 71 4 3 1 .563 96 99
Georgia 2 2 0 .500 58 67 4 3 1 .563 130 123
Tennessee 1 4 0 .200 52 88 3 4 0 .429 135 107
Kentucky 0 4 1 .100 41 90 2 5 1 .313 123 142
Vanderbilt 0 4 1 .100 13 89 0 6 1 .071 32 122
Tulane 0 5 0 .000 13 123 17 0 .125 33 161
x-Defending conference champion.
(Ties count one-half game won, one-half game lost.)
ALL THE GATORS EAT HERE!
Expect More
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MEDIUM LARGE X-LARGE
1.35 1-65 2.00
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/ SERVED WITH
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j HOT ROLLS & BUTTER
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' 14 S.W. First St. (Behind Sears)
7 am 8 pm

The Whole Game Went Like This For Larry Rakestraw

The backs in the secondary were
all over the place. Theyve got
agility and speed and mix up their
defense well.
The Hurricanes, Gator
opponents on Nov. 23, lost to
Georgia, <
Rakestraw threw for 405 yards,
setting a Southeastern Conference
record.
Another UM scout, freshman
coach and former Miami All-

America Quarterback, Fran
Curci, said the Gators did just
about what he had expected.
The Gator pass defense was
very good, Curci said, its
probably a combination of both good
rushing and good secondary play.
Florida did well offensively,
too. Tom Shannon got tremendous
protection, plus he threw very well.
FSU scout, Bill Proctor said
the Gators had some good oppor opportunities
tunities opportunities and took advantage of them.
Larry Dupree and Tom Shannon
botl> looked good, Proctor said.
The Gators were going to the side
and using the quick trap to
advantage.
Both offensively and
defensively Floridas passing
game looked good.

Monday / Nov.ll/1963 The Florida Alligator

Sports Clubs
Meet Today
Swim Fins and Aqua Gators
will meet tonight at 7 in Room
201 of the Florida Gymnasium.
The meeting is to discuss the
clubs constitution.
* *
The Surfing club meets tonight
at 7:30 in Room 206 of the Florida
Gymnasium. A short surfing movie
will be shown.
* *
A meeting for all men interested
in freshman or varsity tennis is
scheduled for Tuesday, at 4:30
p.m. in Room 208 of the Florida
Gym.
* *
The Table Tennis Club is still
reorganizing. Persons interested
should contact the intramural
office in Room 229 of the Florida
Gym.

Ttti MI6MTY MIO6IT
WANT ADS WORK I
' n
Leave Your Car For
Service
While Attending
Classes
KUYKENDALLS
PURE Oil
Service Station
22 N. W 13th Street
Crocked Eger 3 doz SKIP

Page 11



The Florida Alligator Monday, Nov. 11 /1963

Page 12

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LARRY DUPREf
.. .gets congratulations from teammates and game football after Gator'swin Saturday.

NOVEMBER IS A GREAT MONTH AT
sikmum
a **W
A WONDERFUL OPPORTUNITY TO SUPPLEMENT
YOUR WARDROBE WITH NATURAL SHOULDER.
SUITS, SPORTCOATS,
SLACKS, SHIRTS,
TOPCOATS, JACKETS
Listed Below Are A Few Os The Many Items We Are
Offering:
SUitS Reg. 49.95 37.90
Suits Reg. 55 & 59.95 45.90
sportcoats Reg. 29.95-35 23.90
topcoats Re 9 29.95 -35 23.90
* 3 4 - I'll;
dress shirts Reg 5 - ?f5?0.50
sport shirts Reg. to 5.00 3.39
short sleeve 3 for 9.00
all-weather coats Reg. 18.95 15.90
| zip-out orlon pile lining
jackets Reg. 12.95 8.90
orlon-lined i
jackets Reg. to 19 13.90
No charge for normal alterations
One-hour free customer parking on Ist Federal lot
Use your Student Charge
cfitvewuiM i
225 West University Avenue
L.

=T
FRATERNITY
Orange League
(Football)
SX vs SAE PLP vs TEP
TX vs ATO SPE vs KA
Blue League
(Football)
DU vs PGD
SORORITY
Blue League
(Basketball)
AOP vs SK
- v
INDEPENDENT
Off campus vs S. Rawlings
E. Jennings vs. N. Rawlings

l 1 " " ' '
Now Available at Rutherfords
- University of Florida
CLASS RINGS
Fi I
SjWtnt)
Hardened to 210 Brine 11 tempered rating.
Ask your jeweler why this is important.
K fjaine&Mi
11 Quality tfewelab /Wfe
U-'W-H
jO3 WEST UNIVERSITY AVENUE

Texas Longhorns
Remain Unbeaten

Auburn and Princeton were of officially
ficially officially listed as missing in action
yesterday, leaving Texas the only
major unbeaten and untied college
football team in the country.
There can be many a slip by
a football team of any calibre
during the upset month of
November but the Longhorns now
seem assured of the Southwest
Conference championship, a Cotton
Bowl bid and the national title.
The list of perfect record ma major
jor major teams was reduced when the
Longhorns downed Baylor, 7-0,
Saturday, while Mississippi
State beat Auburn, 13-10, and
Harvard toppled Princeton, 21-7.
Texas, victory was a triumph
of ball control ground offense
over fancy passing. The Long Longhorns
horns Longhorns banged away for 240 yards
on the ground with tailback Tommy
Ford gaining 101 on 27 rushes.
Baylors Don Trull completed
19 of 39 passes but was foiled
by the Texas defense in close.
Texas scored the games only
touchdown in the third period when
Tom Stockton plunged over from
the one to climax a 45-yard drive.
Texas quarterback Duke Carlisle
intercepted a Trull pass in the
end zone with 22 seconds left to
end Baylors hopes for a last lastsecond
second lastsecond victory.
Justin Canale kicked field goals
of 35 and 36 yards, the second
one with 22 seconds left to play,
to upset previously unbeaten
Auburn. The loss dropped Auburn
out of a tie with Mississippi for
the Southeastern Conference lead.
The Rebels blitzed Tampa, 41 -0,
and will win the title and a Sugar
Bowl bid if they beat Tennessee
and Mississippi State.

The hallowed Ivy League came
up with its own shocker when
Harvard knocked Princeton from
the unbeaten ranks. The teams
gained a total of only six yards
passing during the rain-drenched
game, with Harvards line proving
superior to the Tiger forward wall.
Second ranked Illinois also
came a cropper, 14-8, at the hands
of Michigan. Bump Elliotts
Wolverines recovered four
fumbles including one that set up
the winning touchdown in the final
six minutes, to top brother Petes
Illini despite a statistical edge for
Illinois.
The other top ranked teams
which played on Saturday all won.
Fourth ranked Navy romped
over Maryland, 42 -7, sixth sixthranked
ranked sixthranked Oklahoma defeated lowa
State, 24-14, eighth-ranked Mich Michigan
igan Michigan state topped Purdue, 23-0,
ninth ranked Pittsburgh beat
Notre Dame, 27-7, and 10th 10thranked
ranked 10thranked Nebraska whipped Kansas,
23-9.
junior Coffey led a ground as assault
sault assault that totaled 362 yards as
Washington defeated California,
39-26, and moved another step
toward a Rose Bowl bid. Washing Washington
ton Washington holds a one game edge over
Southern California in the Big Six.
USC scored a 25-11 victory
Saturday over Stanford on Willie
Browns two touchdown receptions.
Miami Gets
Two Chances
The UF cross country team
gives Miami a chance for revenge
this morning, but according to
Coach Walter Welsch, their
chances are slim and none.
The meet will start at 10:30
over the Beta Woods course. Capt.
Charles Goodyear said that he
hopes to improve on his record
time of last week in the victory
over Auburn.
Tommy Harrell and Bill Opper Opperman
man Opperman have a good chance to get in
the 22 Minute Club according to
Goodyear. Jim Brown, Austin
Funk, George Donatello and Dan
Wells are expected to break 24
minutes.
Bill Plane, Miamis captain, won
the meet down in Migmi two weeks
ago so Coach Welsch promised
a steak for everyone who beats
him.
On Saturday, the harriers
journey to Tallahassee to rerun
the Seminoles. It will be FSUs
homecoming so the Gators will
seek to spoil it for them and beat
them a second time this season.
Welsch said, This is without
a doubt the best team we have
ever had based on their collec collective
tive collective times over the course. They
work 4iar4 without pushing and they
have a lot of desire.
Turkey Tourney
Held Saturday
Turkeys were won by Jim Pett Pettingill,
ingill, Pettingill, 4 AR, and Susie Sackett,
3ED, in Saturdays archery Turkey
Tourney.
Mens division results were in
this order:
Jim Pettingill, 4AR, 86; Henry
Bonar, 4EG, 61; DavidWoolverton,
4JM, 55; Gerald W. Offenhauer,
2UC; George Padgett, 4PH; Bill
Codemo, lUC and Marshall Frey,
lUC.
Winners in the womens division
were:
Susie Sackett, 3ED and Lorane
Samness, 4AS.
Bonar and woolverton used bow
sights.