Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

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ALMOST BARRED FOR ENTERING THE Cl
. .yesterday was David Sheehan, faculty co-sponsor of
the Student Group for Equal Rights. He was entering when
manager K.C. Hammon stopped him (see insert) and then
allowed him into the establishment.
Cl Day Turnout
Called Success

By JIM HAMMOCK
Copy Editor
More than 4,000 persons
crowded into the College Inn (Cl)
during a 12-hour period yesterday
in response to the Student Group
For Equal Rights-sponsored Cl
day.
This was more than three times
the number of persons entering
the Cl during the same period on
Monday, according to Student
Group faculty co-advisor David
R. Sheehan.
At one time during the supper supperhour,
hour, supperhour, the line of people waiting to
eat in the Cl extended out the
front door and down the sidewalk
past the Gold Coast restaurant.
Student Group advisor Sheehan
reported that he was barred from
entrance into the Cl during the
lunch-hour. After some conver conversation
sation conversation with Cl manager C. K.
Hammon, he was allowed to enter.
Three unidentified persons
walked in front of the Cl yesterday
carrying signs calling for students
not to enter the Cl in the name
of free They failed
to identify themselves and had no
spokesman to tell who they
represented.
Dr. Austin B. Creel, co-advisor
of the Student Group, expressed
hope that a solution to the problem
UF Library
Lacks Space
The UF Library is suffering
from a lack of space, according
to assistant director of libraries
Margaret K. Goggin.
The librarys main building is
filled to the brim, Miss Goggin
said, as are the branch libraries.
Excess books are now stored in
the UF auditorium and in the
Century Tower.
Any new funds received would
be directed towards the building
of a new graduate research
library, Miss Goggin said.

of integration at the Cl could be
found.
We are very pleased but not
at all surprised at the tremendous
response to CI Day,Creel said.
Id like to eat there again
soon, Creel said, after visiting
the Cl yesterday.
Hammon and Cl Manager George
A. Loomis chose not to comment
on the crowds in their
establishment.

Leg Council Nixes
Corner Gas Station

The Legislative Council went
on record Tuesday night in opposi opposition
tion opposition to the plans of American Oil
Company (AMOCO) to build a gas
station On the old SAE property
State Cabinet
Shuts Door
On Pay Hikes
The State Legislature voted
Tuesday to reject all future
retroactive pay raises for
university personnel.
Gov. Farris Bryant suggested
that all future retroactive salary
requests not be accepted.
Otherwise, Bryant said, I
dont know how we can retain any
authority in these matters.
We might just as well hire
somebody to rubberstamp these
salary requests, Bryant said.
Budget Commission Director
Harry Smith forwarded
recommendations on pay raises
for professors, instructors and
an assistant dean at the UF. These
pay raises became effective Sept.
1, 1963.
A salary of $15,000 was approved
by the Cabinet for UF law
professor Robert J. Farley,
advisor to the dean.

The Florida
Alligator

Vol .56, N 0.44

Solon Says WRUF
Violated FCC Rules

By ROBERT GREEN
Os The Gator Staff
UF radio station WRUF has
been charged with violating
federal regulations in promoting
the $125 million university bond
issue.
The charge was made against
the state owned station by
Pinellas County legislator Richard
Deeb in a letter to the Federal
Communications Commission (F
CC) last week.
Deeb said WRUF allowed
speakers in favor of the bond
issue, which was voted on Nov.
5, to appear at halftimes of
Florida football games, broad broadcast
cast broadcast over the station and SOothers
throughout the state on the UF
network.
Deeb said the station would not
allow him to appear over the
network to speak against the issue,
a violation of the equal rights
clause of the Federal
Communications Act administered
by the FCC.
WRUF station director Kenneth
Small said the station was not in
violation of the act because a
candidate was not involved.
Section 315 of the Federal
Communications Act says stations
must allow all candidates for
public office equal time over the
air.
This section does not apply to
controversial issues, such as the

on 13th Street and University
Avenue.
The resolution urged the
company to suspend its plans to
construct a service station ... and
to encourage an alternate use of
the property which would be eco economically
nomically economically productive while
maintaining an esthetically attrac attractive
tive attractive neighborhood. A copy of
the resolution which had the
support of Student Body "President
Paul Hendrick is to be forwarded
to officials of the company in Chi Chicago.
cago. Chicago.
The corner has been the object
of considerable discussion in city
politics. Humble Oil Company
bowed to public pressures last
year over its plans to purchase
the property for a similar use.
AMOCO has brought suit against
the City and the matter is now
before the courts.
Neale Pearson, who presented
the resolution, noted the concern
of Mayor Byron Winn and others
about protecting the academic and
residential atmosphere of the
neighborhood presented to
travelers passing through the Uni University
versity University area. It was felt that
Gainesville would have a difficult
time preventing 13th St. from be becoming
coming becoming an area of gas stations and
grocery stores if AMOCO is suc successful
cessful successful in its court suit to construct
the gas station on the property.

University of Florida, Gainesville

bond amendment, said Small. In
that type of case, the FCC says
only that a station shall give a
fair presentation of Uoth sides
of the issue.
Small said he had not received
any word from the FCC concerning
the matter and did not know the
exact details of the complaint.
He said the first speaker for the
bond issue was Gov. Farris Bryant
during the halftime of the
Mississippi State game, Sept. 28.
We have had many complaints
of this type on other issues, along
with many radio stations


Under Bond Issue

Building Begins

By DAVE BERKOWITZ
or The Gator Staff
Bids for the first building to
be constructed under the College
Building Amendment, passed by a
3 to 1 margin by Florida voters
Tuesday, will be let Dec. 19, ac according
cording according to D. Neil Webb Assistant
Architect for the State Board of
Control.
Webb said a general classroom
building is to be the first con constructed
structed constructed with the UFs slice of
the bond issue and will cost $1.2
million. The structure is to be
located behind Building E, facing
Stadium road.
Two and a quarter million
dollars is earmarked for a new
graduate library planned for the
north end of the Plaza of the
Americas.
The School of Engineering and
Industries will get a space boost
with the construction of several

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H
Cl DAY PICKETERS
. .marched yesterday during part of the hours that the
Student Group for Equal Rights usually marches. The
picketers, identified as UF students, refused to identify
themselves and said they were not representing any group
but were picketing because of their own beliefs.

Thursday, Nov.7, 1963

throughout the country. We always
try to present both sides although
the FCC allows for a very broad
interpretation of this matter,
Small said.
Since the first speaker on this
issue spoke more than a month
ago, I wonder why the complaint
was not made until last week?
Small continued.
Assistant Athletic Director
Percy Beard, whose office is in
charge of the broadcasts with
WRUF acting as the producing
station, said he received a letter
from Deeb last week.


new buildings at the present site
of the Plants and Grounds Depart Department.
ment. Department.
Construction will include a
general unit, $2.5 million; a
chemical engineering unit,
$1.5 million; a connection between
the main engineering building and
Reid Laboratory, $765,000; and a
mechanical engineering unit, $2
million.
Plants and Grounds is scheduled
to move to a new site southwest
of Corry Village at a cost of $1
million.
A life science building to be
added to McCarty Hall at a cost
of $2,127,000 and an addition to
the J. Hillis Miller Health Center
for $330,000 rounds out the main
building plans under the bond
proposal.
Webb said it would take several
months before bids could be let
for buildings other than the class classroom
room classroom complex.



Page 2

Tbe Florida Alligator Thursday, N0v.7,196

Folk Gestures Carry
Different Meanings

"In stamp auctions, bids are made by wiggling an ear."

ONC FUU POUND ** DINNER NOON AND EVENING
KC SIRLOIN y c meat sal ad, vegetable
STEAK drink & dessert 85^
* LUNCHEON 6?^
$1.95 ALFORD 1 S TOWER HOUSE
chiffon sheath \ f j
blazes with a sequin ) f
paved jacket. Evening J
news headline in a slio / f
I
of a rayon chiffon sheath f j i
and sequined jacket. / /
Both fully lined in sizes / /
7to 15. White or pale / /
/ /f I
- / /-
30.00 /
311-313 N.W. 13th Street FR 2-1581

By STAN KULP
Os The Gator Staff
Gestures, literally thousands of
them, according to Dr. Francis
C. Hayes, Professor of Foreign
Languages at the UF help people
communicate and make up an
important part of their folkways.
Folkways contain many
things, says Hayes who is a
nationally known authority on
gestures in folklore and
people, he said, covering every
phase of life.
A folk phrase can be either
a word or a gesture, Hayes
added.
When a Brazilian wants to
denote I told you so,, for
example, he points to his nose.
Kissing was considered
obscene, even immoral, in the
Far East until very recently,
Hayes said, in japan it is still
considered very impolite to point
with the foot.
The forming of a circle with
the thumb' and index finger in the
United States means 0.K.,
Hayes said. In certain of
South America it is considered
obscene, while in Korea it is the
sign for money.
In parts of Germany, if a girl
bares her rump, it is thought to
break the enemys sword, Hayes
said. The same action in Jutland
will supposedly protect a child
from the evil eye.
Hayes added that the same
gesture in Oberpfalz and Lapland
is used to call forth inclement
weather, while in Pomerania the
act will prevent a swarm of bees
from leaving the hive.
Deficit Spending
Topic Os Speech
Kennedys Deficit Spending,
a speech by UF economics pro professor
fessor professor Joseph W. Romita, will
highlight Thursday nights Young
Republicans meeting at 8:30 p.m.
in room 121 of the Florida Union.
Dr. Romita in his second year
at the UF, received his Ph.D.
from the University of Madrid.

Imj I
a Browse Shop a
NEW LINE PRENTICE HALL TECHNICAL & REFERENCE
METHODS OF QUANTUM FIELD THEORY IN STAT STATISTICAL
ISTICAL STATISTICAL PHYSICS ...Abrikosov
LOGIC & BOOLEAN ALGEBRA ...Arnold
E.T.T. REVIEW ...Faires & Richardson
GROUP THEORY & SOLID STATE PHYSICS.. .Mariot
SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICE PHYSICS... Nussbaum
PROGRAMMING THE 7090 ...Saxon
THEORY OF ION FLOW DYNAMICS.. .Samaras
INTRODUCTION TO NUCLEAR PHYSICS & CHEM CHEMISTRY
ISTRY CHEMISTRY ...Harvey
SYSTEMS ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS
...Alexander & Bailey
ATOMIC & NUCLEAR PHYSICS... Bush
CAMPUS SHOP AND BOOKSTORE

"In Brazil, pulling on an earlobe means the girl is a
sharp dresser."
!; v.
StrJ
W a
n Wi
il VTA
"If she's reallya sharp dresser, the hand goes around
the head and tugs the opposite earlobe. 11

Broward Adopts
New Ethic Code

By JOE KOLLIN
Q£ The Gator Staff
A Code of Ethics has been
adopted for Broward Hall,
according to Southeast Broward
Pres. Carolyn A. Smith.
The code, concerned mainly with
behavior and etiquette in the lobby,
is an effort to stimulate more
pride in Broward Hall, Miss Smith
said.

Women on each floor of
Southeast Broward met to decide
what should be included in the
code. A committee was then
formed to combine the
suggestions, Miss Smith added.
All 700 residents of Broward
Hall will meet Nov. 14 to discuss
the code. Both humorous and
serious skits illustrating the rules
will be presented by the girls.
Each girl will receive a copy of
the code at the meeting.
A modified version of the code
will be placed on the lobby bulletin
board, Miss Smith said.
- lip
GATOR GIRL
.. .today is senior Tay Tanya
Tallman.An education
major, this green-eyed, 5
feet 2 blonde, who has 35-
23-36 for statistics, is pin pinned
ned pinned to Lambda Chi Alpha
Bill Goeller.



Alumni Office Initiates
'Operation Brainpower

'jHfc ~ IP
I atCT r It, 'w, ,
,-jpjg> a&ft2iigkM jHn c
W*
_
THETA CHI FRATERNITY SERENADE PINMATES
Bob Kuzmick,. 2tjC, and JoAnn Switzer, lUC, were part
of the Theta Chi "pinning ceremony" at a Broward Hall
serenade last night. __

Responsibility
Key To Living
In UW Dorms
MADISON, Wis. (UPI) The
proximity of the opposite sex has
made responsible adults out of
college boys living in the first
coeducational dormitory at the
University of Wisconsin, reports
the dormitory manager.
William paleen, who is in charge
of the month-old Sellery Hall on
the Wisconsin campus, said the
men feel a responsibility to the
hall which is like a desire to
protect the women residents.
The challenge to get the
women only exists in such
schools as the University of lowa
where men are housed on one
side of the river and women
on the other, Paleen said.
The Victorian attitudes we have
been saddled with no longer exist,
he said. We are very pleased
with the respect for the hall that
all of the students have shown.
Sellery Hall consists of two
adjoining 10-story towers, one for
the mens living quarters, and the
other for coeds. The two towers
are connected by a two-floor
commons area with joint facilities.
Actually, the first co coeducational
educational coeducational housing experiment at
Wisconsin was in 1952 when two
previously all-male dormitories
were converted to joint use with
women housed in one unit and the
men in another.
Because of the success of
Sellery Hall, the university is
expanding its coeducational
housing program. A twin toSellery
is nearing completion and will be
ready for occupancy next fall.
About the only problem which
has arisen between the male and
female residents is the question
of buying hair driers for the
women. Male students on a council
representing the 1,100 dorm
residents cannot see the reasons
for the expense of purchasing
them, said Paleen.
The students have assumed
tremendous responsibility for
themselves, Paleen said. They
have formed their own cultural
and athletic programs.
A co-educational touch football
league has been set up with.each
floor orgamzing a team to play a
team from the corresponding floor
of the other tower.
And the male students and coeds
are planning to stage an art show.

Something different in eating experience. Gourmet
Shop, Delicatessen & dining room. Open Daily 11 am
to 9 pm, SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
f
| 706 West University Ave
! BETTER NOD wis 1
gooooocoooooooocooooooQooco
Indian Com. .35c bunch
Guava Shells.. .65$ can
(Delicious Cream Cheese Dessert)
Anchovies, rolled or flat. .25c can
Stuffed Cuttle Fish in its ink...42c can
Portuguese Sardines. .33c can
(in olive oil, skinned & boned 1 )
Italian Stuffed Figs (with almonds). ,50c lb.
Indian Summer Apple Cider.. .75c half rn l
Wilkes Canned Boiled Peanuts...2sc can
FANELLI & ED WARDS
MARKET
2410 NEWBERRY ROAD Within Walking Distance
across from Beta Woods Os Corry Vi I, age

A program to get more of
Floridas top high school and
junior college students to attend
the UF has been started by the
Alumni Office.
The plan, labeled Operation
Brainpower is designed to
familiarize outstanding high
school seniors, and junior college
freshmen with the opportunities
offered at the UF.
Brainpower is administered
through Alumni District
Committees who obtain the names
of the top five per cent of each
class in their districts and assign
each an alumni advisor.
Through Appreciation Banquets
and informal talks the Alumni
Office hopes to foster interest in
attending the UF.
This will help keep Floridas
potential leaders from going to
Ivy League schools and being lost
by the state. The program will
thus benefit all Florida, according
to Alumni Association Field
Secretary Harold Dillinger.

Thursday, N0v.7,1963 The Florida Alligator

For the greatest surfing on the east coast of Florida,
COME TO
DAYTONA BEACH
- Sr-'*- 1
THE SURF SHOP at 506 Main Street, Daytona Beach,
has hundreds of surfboards and at the lowest coast as
an introductory offer. Rentals with option to buy.
Come and spend a weekend of surfing.
Daytona Beach Surf Shop,
tnc.
506 Main Street, Daytona Beach Ph. 253-3366
-
-4

ALL CLEAR"
MEDICATED
LIPSTICK
BY 2)u Bawuf
s|_so
plus tax.
a color treat
a beauty treatment
conditions as it colors
5 new Fall fashion shades
Silver and gold-tone jewelers
cases shaped so a wardrobe
of shades fits in your purse.
GRESHAM DRUGS
12 West University Avenue

Page 3



The Florida Alligator Thursday, N0v.7,1963

Page 4

Hi' '**
A House For Man
(EDITORS NOTE: the editorial below is not really an editorial,
and it may even be out of place in these columns. Written by a staff
member who chose to remain anonymous, it is a stirring indictment
of the sort of housing which is becoming more and more prevalent
in America -- the mass-produced, picture-windowed, subdivision sort
of dwelling. We think it is eminently worth reading.)
*********
A mans house, if it were built to shelter his spirit as well as his
body, would no longer be called house. For that is a pedestrian
word, a dull word. It could not describe such a dwelling; nor, perhaps,
couid any existing word.
But alas, all we have are houses. Only the dwelling places of
architects and certain rare rich men with imagination and taste
even begin to approach what houses could be.
A house should first be an extension of the man; his particular
approach to life, his memories and ideas and dreams.
After that, it should be something greater than the man. It should
provide not only a resting place for his soul, but also a place for
his soul to grow, rise up, be free.
The houses we have now are not extensions of ourselves, nor
even of their builders. The houses we have now are boxes to hide
within, utilitarian shells to protect against the elements, spiritless
containers conceived by mediocre minds to compartment visionless
animals.
No sensitive man, living in such cages, can long escape boredom,
discontent, anger, and finally hatred -for the house, those who share
it with hi..., and himself.
No dull, unimaginative, uncaring man will ever rise above himself
in such a house, though in every man there is the potential to become
greater than he is.
I would tell you of the house I have built in my dreams, for it is
such a house as I have described, a house to hold the spirit as God
might hold a star.
There are no small rooms within my house. Why should there
be? Even the closets will be as large and well-lighted as bedrooms
are now. And, of course, they will be more than closets. Clothes will
not be packed together on a single rack like soldiers in tight formation,
crushed and dispirited. How much better to spread them about the
closet-room until they become curtains as well as coats and shirts,
a gay, patchwork backdrop as well as only dresses.
And there is a great room somewhere in the house with high walls
of stone. And an immense fireplace, and here and there a painting
or piece of sculpture. Stone shelves for beautiful baubles. The room
has no specific purpose, it is not marked for sleeping or eating,
although one can do either within its walls. Is it necessary that
every room have strictly defined functions? If little children sometimes
play among its shadows, or a man and woman make love before its
fireplace; if strangers meet beside its sculpture and intimate friends
speak gently in its soft-lit corners, what name, what function should
it be assigned? Living room? But all rooms are that. No, there can
be no limiting.
The only other room I would mention now is one I cannot, perhaps,
describe, though it is more necessary to my house than walls and
roofs themselves. I cannot call it a temple, and yet it serves that
highest function of a temple; to provide a place where man may be
alone with beauty and mystery; the mystery of life and of himself.
The room is small, and bare, and the light is cool and soft. Perhaps
the name might be meditation room. but how graceless, how
shallow. Very well, then; again, no name. I can possibly find my
way into these rooms even without placards on the doors.
I have tried to present my imaginings of a house I may never see.
It has been an imperfect presentation, for I have not the genius of
the architect. With all my imaginings, I could not draw my house.
But I would know when I saw it, unmistakably.
Well, perhaps I have made too much of this house of mine. A man
can, after all, dream among garbage, or he may decay within palace
walls. I take It as axiomatic, however, that we may be diverted from
despair by surroundings that say to us, One is not a fool to dream.
I take it as axiomatic tha x t truth may be more difficult to find for
those who live among falsity and shallow deception. It seems to
-me indisputable- that-a-rnanw-ho can find a place to meet and be do me meacquainted
acquainted meacquainted with himself will be neither afraid nor ashamed to meet
and become acquainted with other men.
Which might possibly be worth the abandonment of the joys of
subdivisions.
The Florida Alligator
Editor-in-Chief David Lawrence Jr.
Managing Editor. . Bob Wilson
Sports Editor Dave Berkowitz
Layout Editor. Ron Spencer
City Editor Cynthia Tunstall
Copy Editor Jim Hammock
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper
of the University of Florida- and is published five times weekly
except during the months of May. June, and July, when a weekly
issue is published. THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is entered as
second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida.

Womens Curfew Rules Bunk!

To the Editor;
When I arrived on this
campus as a freshman, I
found many strange rules
to which I have since be become
come become either directly or
indirectly subject. The
strangest of these rules is
womens hours.
At first I considered wo womens
mens womens hours as curious,
then useless and now
complete nonsense.
Why should women have
hours? I asked that
question last year and came
up with the following
answers:
1) Mainly, they are to
satisfy the parents of the
girls who come here. They
know their little girl is
going to be watched over.
2) Without hours, women
might not get enough
studying done. But if they
do show themselves to be
serious about academic
matters, we will extend

LATIN AMERICAN ANALYSIS

Brazil Isn't Latin America

By CLIFF LANDERS
Inadvertently, this column last
week was guilty of presenting an
unclear and erroneous idea of
some of Latin Americas
problems, and especially those of
Brazil.
The generalities stated
concerning the problems of
language and communications are
true for the countries with a heavy
Indian population (e.g., Peru,
Bolivia, Paraguay), but in Brazil
less than one per cent are tribal
Indians, out of a population of over
70 million.
Since a large majority of all
Brazilians live on or near the
coast, there is relatively little
difficulty in spreading the news,
both through radio and the large
number of newspapers.

Cl Day
w
Jr
"I'm striking a blow for Freedom!"

their hours alter a
semester and later give
them an even longer exten extension.
sion. extension.
3) They will protect the
innocent coed from
carnally minded male
students.
I can sum up my feelings
for these lines of reasoning
in one word: Bunk!
For the first explanation,
I reply that if parents do
not trust their daughter
enough to send her to a
school without hours, they
should keep her home! Col College
lege College is for adults, not
children. If daughter chose
to find a job instead of
school, she could possibly
end up in an apartment any anyway.
way. anyway.
The second reply is
equally ridiculous. If a
person is not inclined
toward scholarly pursuits,
he or she will not benefit
from imprisonment in a
dormitory during specified

Undoubtedly there are still some
dwellers in the interior who have
never heard of Joao Goulart, but
in our own hill country we have
seen exampled of native-born
Americans who still think Coolidge
is president.
In short, Brazil is luckier than
most countries. Although she does
share certain problems with the
rest of Latin America -- notably
economic straits and
maldistribution of population
she has developed to a greater
extent than any other Latin
American nation her cultural
identity.
Brazil is NOT Latin America.
Brazil is Brazil, a nation which
speaks Portuguese, not Spanish
like her neighbors. A vast nation
encompassing half a continent, a
nation where the melting-pot

hours! If they dont study,
they will not stay in school,
and this problem will take
care of itself.
The third answer i find
slightly more reasonable,
but still not satisfactory.
I believe that any woman womanwho
who womanwho wishes to be led
astray will be, and con conversely
versely conversely if she doesnt wish
so, she is well equipped to
prevent it.
As for protecting her,
who is going to save our
poor coed before 10
oclock? As much can be
done between 10 p.m. and
midnight.
One of the purposes of a
higher education should be
to teach self-reliance and
self discipline. I cant
see where womens hours
do anything toward
accomplishing this, infact,
they do just the opposite.
... Taken .rom a letter
in the University of Dakota
Student.

philosophy has actually merged
whites, Indians and Negroes --
in contrast to the U. S. cauldron
which melted predominantly
Northern Europeans.
Brazil has jungle, yes, but it
also has Rio, a unique city, it
has Sao Paulo, the Chicago of
South America. Unlike nations
such as Argentina, Brazil is not
dominated by one huge
metropolitan complex, with the
rest of the country consisting of
small towns and empty regions.
Brazil has a half dozen cities
of major importance in the life
of the nation; Rio, Sao Paulo, Belo
Horizonte, Porto Alegre, Recife,
Belem, Fortaleza all are
metropolitan areas of over
400,000 population.
Brazils contributions to culture
are not sufficiently appreciated,
especially in the case of its
literature. If a master such as
Machado de Assis had written
in French, say, he would be as
famous as Zola or Balzac. But
Portuguese is not a language
frequently studied, as is French,
Brazilian literature has not come
to the attention of a great many
qualified translators.
Machado has only recently been
translated into English, about 50
years too late. The quality of
some of Brazilian literature is
indicated by the fact that Jorge
Amados GABRIELA, in
translation, appeared on the N.Y.
Times best-seller list earlier this
y^ar.
The musical creations ofHeitoi
Villa-Lobos show another fadet
of the Brazilian cultural
contribution. Villa Lobos is
considered one nf the g rea_t_
composers of our time.
Oscar Niemeyer is a world worldrenowned
renowned worldrenowned authority on
architecture; this Brazilians
ideas played a great part in the
overall design for Brasilia, the
new capital in the nations interior.
Brazil, then, is not culturally
unproductive; it is, rather, cul culturally
turally culturally unappreciated by the
majority of Americans. To think
of Brazil as a land of headhunters
and anacondas -(though both exist,
deep in the interior) is similar
to conceiving the United States
as a desert (we have deserts in
the West), a vast farmland (there
are a great many farms, especially
in the Mid-West) or a gangsters
paradise (we have had gang
killings, you recall).
No, Brazil like the United
States -- can be understood only
as a montage, not as a cameo.



SPEAKING OUT

The Movie Reviewer: Part II

By DON FEDERMAN
Reviewer
In my last column, I showed
how a mild-mannered track star
could be a movie reviewer for a
great metropolitan newspaper.
Now, you must strike a blow
for journalism by writing the
review.
Your first consideration in
writing the review is the time and
day you choose to go to the movies.
Saturday afternoon at the
Florida Theatre is most
interesting. The children are
romping in the aisles, throwing
popcorn, imitating big brothers
language, fighting, stepping on
your feet, jumping off the balcony
and occasionally glancing at the
screen while waiting for their
second wind. It is not that these
energetic activities are irritating,
but a newspapers readers will
soon tire of having to read a
review of Lord of the Flies
every Monday.
I suggest a weekday afternoon,
or perhaps you can arrange for
a sneak preview at one of the
theaters. This choice has two
disadvantages, in that the quiet
of the theater forces you to
concentrate on the movie, thus
necessitating a writing of the
review with no excuses, and that
you miss a comedy of humanity
which can only be had on Saturday
afternoon at the Florida. (Unless
you can make a rare Friday
evening showing of a movie at
the State when all of Gainesvilles
dateless wonders show up.)
Now that I have finished my
discussion on when to go to the
movies, forget what I have said
you dont get to choose! Its
all determined by the theater
bookings -- ha, ha, ha!
Anyway, once in the theater,
you have only to relax and take
notes. *Whats that you say? You
say its too dark to take notes.
You say your pencil broke, and
you have got to memorize all those
names and scenes and effects.
You asked the manager for some
advertising material, but he

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and see college B
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doesnt have the right stuff or he
isnt in when you happen to be in
the theater. Is that whats troubling
you?
Os course, you can solve the
problem of theater darkness by
reviewing a drive-in movie,
relaxing in your girls lap. Since
drive in theaters specialize in
first-run Bat Women of Reddick
movies, you can always enjoy the
company of your girl and print a
review of some past weird dream
same thing.
Ultimately, however, you must
review the movie.
The first rule of review writing
is to change your style to suit
the movie.
For most movies {and this
includes Hollywood comedies,
Hollywood westerns, Hollywood
love pictures, Italian Hercules
films, Godzilla and other such
tragedies, and exposes of
Hollywood because they are made
by Hollywood people), ones style
should be terse and to the point.
I suggest an opening paragraph
as follows;
Playing at the Theatre
through is Steve
Reeves latest and most notable
epic, The King and Lear. With
a cast of thousands, excellent
cardboard on location scenery,
and the brilliant direction of
Guiseppe (make -a million)
Franconi, Shakespeares
inconsistent drama is brilliantly
altered so that everyone- in the
family can say, This was some
kind of a movie.
This is not a bad beginning.
It certainly is much better than
the following style;
Shakespeares immortal play,
King Lear, has finally been
brought to the screen under the
direction of Guiseppe Franconi
with Steve Reeves playing the
symbolically blind king who goes
mad only to achieve a true insight
into the nature of reality. Despite
the lavish scenery and careful

editing, Reeves cannot quite
suggest the nobility of the fallen
king who sees that underneath
the superficial exterior of our
epidermal existence is an
ever-broadening dermis of
understanding.
And so forth.
No movie like this is worth
much expenditure of energy.
Notice how the first sample
paragraph suggests a publicity
release. This is because it was
most likely copied from a publicity
release.
When doing original writing of
your own, try to maintain this
feeling of a publicity release.
Avoid humorous or intelligent
remarks; this isnt journalism.
Unless a movie is an absolute
.failure, NEVER pan it; rather,
point out its faults. End your
review of this movie by showing
it has appeal to some type of
person.
For instance, using our Reeves
movie, say, All in all, The
King and Lear will have
Shakespearian purists and non nonpurists
purists nonpurists debating many a long hour
on this most controversial movie.
Then there are those rare
American comedies and dramas,
and those not-quite-as-rare fine
foreign cinema, which you must
review.
These are dangerous movies.
They make you THINK! They
take time to write. Your job may
ride on these reviews. Therefore,
either avoid seeing these movies,
or have your intellectual friend
next door write them for a small
fee and/or free pass.
Well, you know the job. Good
luck.

BHRlklKiS^lKlM^i
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This is the look college women adore...styling as timeless
as love itself, yet with a knowing contemporary flair that
makes it very much today.
Its the kind of look weve designed into Desert Star...
newest of the famous Artcarved engagement rings. Like
all Artcarved rings, its styled to stay beautiful...guar beautiful...guaranteed
anteed beautiful...guaranteed in writing for permanent value. See new Desert
Star now at any Artcarved jeweler listed here. Its
designed for you. .t*ocm*k

Thursday, N0v.7,1963 The Florida Alligator

fSY AS FALUNG
OFF A LOG
. .to sell, buy, rent or
Vi hire via a Want Ad in this
paper. The cost is small,
\ the action FAST. Trained
ad-takers await your call.
Florida
_ Alligator
UF Ext. 2832
WHOA!
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Located at Circle M Ranch, 3 miles south-east of town.l
Phone FR 2-8460

See Desert Star only at these
Authorized Artcarved Jewelers
FLORIDA
Clearwater-SMITHS JEWELERS
Coral Gables-
CARROLLS JEWELERS
Gainesville-RUTHERFORDS INC.
HollywoodBlLLY ROSE JEWELERS
JacksonvilleWELLS JEWELERS
Key West
BEACHCOMBERS JEWELERS
Marianna-CLARKS JEWELRY STORE
Miami
LITTLE RIVER JEWELRY CO.
Panama City
ARMSTRONG JEWELRY CO.
Pensacola-ELEBASH JEWELRY CO.
St. Auqustine-PHINNEY JEWELRY
St. Petersburg-
OWEN'COTTER JEWELRY CO.
TallahasseeVASON JEWELERS
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West Palm Beach-KRAUSS JEWELRY
Winter HavenFREEMANS
(FORMERLY BEALE JEWELERS)
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Page 5



Page 6

The Florida Alligator Thursday, N0v.7,1963

Services

WE BUY, sell, rent new and used
band instruments. We have guitars,
amplifiers, music and
accessories. Shop on premises.
Derda Music Co., 632 N.W. 13th
Street. 2-6715. (M-41-ts-c).
FOR A CHANGE OF PACE, Come
Horseback Riding at Lake Wauberg
Riding Stables,Tumbleweed Ranch.
Hay Rides and Night Trail Rides.
Student operated. 1/2 Mi. North of
Lake Wauberg. Reservations,
and free transportation. Call
466-9295. (M-8-68t-c).
TYPING DONE ON IBM electric
typewriter. Will type on short
notice. Reasonable rates, phone
Mrs. Martinez FR 6-3261, Ext.
2575 weekdays or FR 6-1859
weekends or nights. (M-4-th-c).

Wanted

WANTED experienced piano
player needed for dance band work.
Must be dependable and willing to
work. For more information call
FR 2-6086. (C-^-St-c).
...IT'S LIKE THIS, WE
BOOKED IT THEN WE
PULLED IT...BOOKED
IT AGAIN, THEN...
ANYWAY,
HERE IT IS!
CAPTURES THE KIND OF
THING THAT PEOPLE HAVE
TALKED ABOUT FOR
YEARS!
This picture is for men and
women. Jacopetti gate crashes
the most forbidden yet inviting
places. Women of the World
is a highly unconventional, nosy,
nervy and hypnotizing account of
the activities of females. .
Jacopetti is a master of the art!
--justinGilbert, N. Y. Mirror
. . Beautiful color scenes
culled from seemingly every
exotic area of the globe; The
accent is not entirely on sex, of
course, and an observer can
justifiably be amazed. . This is
Jacopettis inspection of the
manners, mores and amorous
habits of the gentle sex. Candid..
Humorous. . Startling and
Shocking!
--A. Weiler, N. Y. Times
FASCINATING AND FUN! A
fresh viewpoint on the facts of
life. Exceptional! Authentic;
Startling!
--Wanda Hale, Daily News
[YOU HAVE NEVER SEEN ANYTHING
IN THE WORLD
LIKE...
lOSEPH E LEVINE pi.wnw \ \S*v
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OFTHE WORLD
I TECHNICOLOR^^ I
Dutctad hy 6UAITIEW JACOPETTI
At MMk) PETER USTINOV .At [mwi Piet mw
1-3:10-5-7: iO-9 p.m.
tjATr TODAY THRU
TUESDAY

GATOR CLASSIFIED

t-
For Sale

BRAND NEW CLOTHES -- Navy
shirt waist dress size 14, 8
blouses size 14, one skirt size
12, car coat size 14. New pair of
white heels size 9 1/2, Red
umbrella. Carolyn 2 9417.
(A -43-3 t-c).
PLAN AHEAD!! 1961 two bedroom
50 x 10 Nashua mobile home
available Jan. 1. Air conditioned.
Extra furniture. Excellent
condition. Financing available.
Call Tom Neff at 6-5027 after
five. (A-43-st-c).
FOR SALE only $2.50-seats
in car going to Jax Saturday to
Gator Bowl game. Round trip tripcall
call tripcall 2-6023 after 5:00 p.m. (A (A---44-lt-p).
--44-lt-p). (A---44-lt-p).
1959 ALL STATE Cycle 125 cc,
3-speed, economical. Must sell.
Cheap. Call .2-9490 or 2-9476.
Between 5 and 7 p.m. Ask for
Glenn Block. CA-41-st-c).
ZOUAVE Rifle (Replica) 59 Cal.
Muzzle loader new condition --
$64.00 or good gun swap. Minnie
Ball mold for above -- $5.00.
Call after 6:00 M-F. 2-3074.
(A-41 -st-p).
FOR SALE: 33 x 8 ANDERSON
HOUSE TRAILER. 1 BR and
full bath $1,300. #l6Glywood Park
Located behind Florida Power.
(A-44-3t-p).

For Rent

SPACIOUS, Private room and bath
with central heat. In quiet modern
home. Kitchen privileges. Ideal
for U. of F. coed. 372-7883.
(B-40-st-c).
LARGE Furnished room centrally
heated and air conditioned. Less
than 1 block from campus at 1219
W. Univ. Ave. Phone Charley Mayo
2-3522. (B-41 ~st-c).
CHILDLESS COUPLE, or two
students to rent furnished apt.
in Colonial Manor Apts. 1/2 block
from University. Come, phone or
write Scott Keller, 1216 S.W.
Avenue, 372-2722. (B-27-ts-c).
FURNISHED Apartment, living
room, bedroom, kitchen, large
storage room. Private entrance.
Bath. Suitable for 2 students.
6-2721. (B-41 -ts-c).
NEW FURNISHED Apartment one
bedroom. Air-conditioned, one onethree
three onethree persons. Close to campus.
376-6576. (B-40-st-e).
* i " 11 -...l.
NEW one bedroom apt.furnished.
Sleeps 3, Like a small home.
Near Campus. Call 6-0410. (B (B---45-ts-c).
--45-ts-c). (B---45-ts-c).

TOLBERT AREA MOVIES South Hall Rec Room
8 pm Friday & Saturday
Orson Welles Dean Stockwell
CoMPvL SION
All area card holders 15$, others 30$
Midnite show 25$ and 40$. Dates Free
i ----- -L

Autos

1963 CHEVROLET Super Sport,
p/s r/h w/w. Any reasonable
offer accepted. Call FR 6-1456
or FR 2-3430. (G-42-st-c).
1956 English Ford, Good running
condition. Any reasonable offer
accepted. Call FR 2-0220 after
5:30 p.m. (G-44-3t-c).
PONTIAC Bonneville. 1959. $1250.
All power and extra clean. Must
see to appreciate. Call FR 6-
4830 after 5 p.m. (G-44-2t-p).

i
Lost Sl Found

LOST during Gator Growl A
Cornet. Brand name York, with
serial number 127773. Contact Bill
Taylor 6-9271. (L-41-ts-c).
LOST -- A diamond engagement
ring with 2 baguettes, one on each
side. FR 6-3261, Ext. 2194.
(L -40-6 t-c).
LOST -- Pair of glasses in brown
case. Name on case, Martins
Optician. Reward. Call 6-3261,
Ext. 2784. (L-41 -st-c).
FOUND a pair of girls glasses.
Found on east part of campus.
If you have lost a pair of glasses
call 6-3261 ext. 2811. (L-44-2t-c).

$00:'
o \
I /
- $J
j
tI
U-
*
GATOR CLASSIFIEDS
REACH EVERYWHERE

.', > 3 m
ppppPppiL ifl^ip
S4 -- yfflffp
s'\ s 1 $1? !Mk&
- ffr-' A \ * ; v||||^-
SOPH SWIMMER CHARLIE KING
. .is expected to see much action this year.
UF Tankers
In First Meet

By MARK VALENTI
Os The Gator Staff
The potential of the Florida
swimming team, aiming for its
ninth straight Southeastern Con Conference
ference Conference (SEC) Championship, will
be on display at 11 a.m. Saturday,
Nov. 16 in the annual Orange and
Blue Meet at Florida Pool.
The meet will pit the Orange
squad against the Blue squad both
teams being made up of varsity
and freshman swimmers.
This meet helps show the boys
how far they have come along and
assists the coaches in making
up the traveling squad, manager
Frank Anderson said. It also
gives the boys a chance for some
experience in a meet situation.
The Orange Team is captained
by All-America butterfly artist
Jerry Livingston. Livingston is
also the regular varsity team cap captain.
tain. captain. Dick Farwell, a senior
backstroker from Pensacola, will
lead the Blue Team. Farwell,
one of the top backstrokers in
I HEELS put on in 5 minutes |
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Both all-time great
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Complete show late as 8:30

the South, barely missed making
All-America last year.
The teams have been divided
up as evenly as possible by Head
Coach Bill Harlan. The meet
should prove to be a good one if
Dast meets are any indication.
Most meets in the past have been
decided by mere inches.
The Blue team will be lead by
Farwell; Charlie King, an
individual medley artist; Ray
Whitehouse, a butterflyer, and Al
Lauwaert, a senior freestyler.
Besides Livingston, big guns
for the Orange are Rob Hubbert,
a backstroker from Tampa; Sandy
Chandler, a breaststroker; Bill
Corbin, a distance freestyler, and
Tom Dioguardi, flashy freshman
sprinter from Riveria Beach.
TRUE...TURBULENT...
TREMENDOUS!
'"'l
1 METRO GGLOWYN MAYER * I
I MARLON I
I BRANDO I
ITREVOR I
I HOWARD I
I RICHARD I
I HARRIS I
111 : H 8
I TECHNICOLOR* I
FIIMD i UJ* 7 N RCOU ICIU S



FROM THE GATOR PIT

Effigy Os Graves
Shows Immaturity

1 f We noticed that some clever individuals had the gall to hang
1 coach Ray Graves in effigy Monday.
We think its immature.
i If you brilliant football experts know whats wrong with our
I gridders, then youd be doing a service to the UF to tell Coach
Graves what you know.
I We dont profess to know why were just at the .500 level, but
I apparently someone on this campus does because their solution
was to hang Graves.,
If you really know whats wrong come on down and tell us, wed
be glad to listen...
I We also noticed that other clever individuals have been plastering
I quarterback Tom Shannons dormitory room door with witty obsenities.
I All we can say is that its a pretty rotten deal to kick a guy in i
the teeth when hes down.
Crystal Ball Time
Last week we soared to unheard of heights as we hit a 5-4 record
on our picks last week. As we are above the hot water line well
take some more risks this week.
FLORIDA i vs. GEORGIA. ... In line with Sports Editor Dave
Berkowitzs new policy we will in no way; shape or form predict
the outcome of this weeks football game.
Auburn over Mississippi State. . Now this one is a beaut!
We saw the Timers last week and they impressed us, but the Bulldogs
off the rebound from the Bama game could be tough. Its a game
wed like to see.
Kentucky over Vanderbilt. . .Both clubs are better than the
records indicate. The Commodores could be a big surprise to
Coach Charlie Bradshaws crew, but Kentucky should have enough
to pull it out after last weeks loss to Miami.
LSU over TCU. . .At Baton Rouge the fur will fly as the Bayou
Bengals are out for revenge after last weeks loss to rival ole
Miss. But those Texas teams are always tough, even in Tiger
Stadium.
Mississippi over Tampa. . HAHAHAHAHA.
Tennessee over Tulane. . in a tough one.
Georgia Tech over FSU. . After last years upset tie the
Jackets should be out to redeem themselves. Despite this, the
Seminoles should give Tech fits all day in Grant Field.
Miami and Alabama are idle.
Splinters
4,000 extra tickets will go on sale Saturday in Jacksonville for
Saturdays Florida Georgia tilt in the Gator Bowl.
That ole Miss-Tampa game is Mississippis Homecoming game.
Goad spot for an upset. One rating had the Rebels favored by 57
and another by 49. Rotsa Ruck!
A friend of ours, Charlie Laub, tells us that the upcoming Orange-
Blue intra-squad swimming meet will be a real doozy. (See story
P a ge 6.) He says that Jerry Livingston and Dick Farwell are battling
behind the scenes to win the meet.
Rainwear by
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By ERNIE LITZ

Assistant Sports Editor

! ayj Your Lol lege Life Team in Gainesville
JIB Jim Lorec Don Wiggins Lou Burns
-**T- r
Onif
Ccn'DJny g
1
WHENCONSIDERING LIFE INSURANCE, BE SURE TO SEE A COLLEGE LIFE MAN
FOOTBALL FORECAST
J|||
T , , Guest Predictions By:
The GAMES C.L I.C.A Sigma Nu | Lambda Chi Alpha
FLORIDA GEORGIA FLORIDA FLORIDA FLORIDA
FSU GEORGIA TECH GEORGIA TECH j GEORGIA TECH GEORGIA TECH
ARKANSAS RICE ARKANSAS RICE 1 ARKANSAS
PENN STATE-OHIO STATE OHIO STATE i OHIO STATE OHIO STATE
PITT NOTRE DAME PI TT NOTRE DAME 1 piTT
MISS. STATE AUBURN AUBURN I AUBURN i AUBURN
NORTHWESTERN-WISCONSIN NORTHWESTERN NORTHWESTERN WISCONSIN
PURDUE MICHIGAN STATE MICHIGAN STATE MICHIGAN STATE MICHIGAN STATE
TCU LSU LSU LSU LSU
KANSAS NEBRASKA NEBRASKA NEBRASKA NEBRASKA
LAST WEEK'S RESULTS: CLICA mis-picked Air Force, Florida, Purdue, Kentucky,
and LSU. Pi Kappa Alpha mis-picked Florida, Purdue, LSU, Missouri, USC and
Georgia. Sigma Phi Epsilon mis-picked Florida, USC and Georgia. CLICA score
to date: 37-29-4.

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f CENTRAL PLAZA SHOPPING CENTER

Thursday, N0v.7,1963 The Florida Alligator

Page 7



Page 8

The Florida Alligator Thursday, N0v.7,196

UF Cagers Scrimmage

By JOHN CLENDENON
Os The Gator Staff
Tt was brother against brother
esterday at Florida Gymnasium
s coach Norm Sloan put his
arsity cagers through a game gameype
ype gameype scrimmage session designed
o test team progress since the
dart of practice Oct. 15.
Squaring off in the intra squad
tffair were two teams that Sloan
:ailed the tenative first and
.econd units.
Starting for the first unit were
rom Baxley and Brooks Henderson
it the guard spots, Dick Tomlinson
md Richard Peek at the forward
iosts, and Bob Hoffman at center.
The second unit included Bruce
doore and Lanny Sommese in the
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The gentleman hunter will
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it omits a collar to give
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backcourt; Bill Koss and Gary
Keller in the forward spot; and
Mont Highley at the pivot position.
Sloan has been pleased with the
showing of his charges in the
early workouts. The guards in
particular have impressed the
Gator mentor.
Both Baxley and Henderson
have been playing well, along with
Bruce Moore, Sloan said, Guard
is our strongest position because
weve got two fine starters and
some capable men behind them
for added depth.
Sloan has also been impressed
with the play of Dick Tomlinson.
The 6-foot-4 1/2 forward was
a starter last year averaging 7.2
points a game in his first year
at the UF.
Adding fuel to Sloans early
season optimism is the condition
and spirit of the squad.
The team is in good physical
shape at the moment, Sloan re remarked,
marked, remarked, and the morale has been
-eal good.
Mont Highley and Paul Morton,
who were both slowed at the start

Gators Continue Light Drills

By GROVER ROBINSON
Os The Gator Staff
The campus police were
checking press passes again
Wednesday as the Florida
Gators ran through another
closed practice session. UF Coach
Ray Graves and his staff were
busy installing special offensive
plays for the Gators game this
Saturday with the Georgia
Bulldogs.
We will need to move the balk
to keep pace with Georgia,
Graves said. Our play execution
and timing on offense has not
been very sharp this fall. That
is one of the reasons we are
working out in sweat pads rather
than the full uniforms this week.
Even the injured players can take
part in these light timing drills.
Our biggest problem, however,
will be defensing Larry
Rakestraw, Graves said. He is

of practice by ankle injuries, are
now back at full speed.
The season lidlifter on Dec. 3
with FSU is still four weeks away.
Well start working for Florida
State about 10 days before the
game although some of our time
in the next month will be spent in
preparation for teams that run
special patterns like Tennessee,
Sloan said.
During the season when you
play two or three games ig a
short time you dont have enough
time to really prepare for each
game.
Intramurals
Fraternity Blue league
(flag football)
PGD 25 CP 0
LC A 19 DC 6
iff! DU 18 AGR 7
PKP 18 AGR 7

a smart passer and not a bad
runner either. Several scouts have
told me he is the top pro passing
prospect in the South.
Morale will probably be the
key to the whole game, Graves
added. Both the Gators and Georgia
were beaten badly last week, it
will be a case Saturday of seeing
which team bounces back faster.
Halfback Hagood Clarke, tackle
Fred Pearson and end Lynn
Matthews returned to practice
Wednesday. All three Gators
suffered leg injuries in the
Auburn game. Clarke, who broke
his nose and sprained his knee
against the Tigers, wore a special
protective face mask today. Allen
Trammell ran at left halfback
with the Big Blue in Wednesdays
drill, but Clarke will probably
get the starting nod against.
Georgia.
Graves took time after practice
to analyze the Gators performance

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to date in the line, at end and at
halfback.
Our interior line play has
been inconsistent all year,
Graves said. Losing boys like
Roger Pettee, Fred Pearson and
Frank Lasky at the beginning hurt
our team unity. We have been
to get solid back to back
performances, particularly with
our offensive line.V
Our young ends nave hurt us
the most. They came along even
slower than expected, but here
again injuries to Russ Brown,
Barry Brown, Lynn Matthews and
Charles Casey played a big role
in slowing us down.
Halfback position has been the
most pleasant surprise on the
team, Graves added.
Sophomores like Allen
Trammell, Jack Harper, Dick Kirk
and Allen Poe came through real
well behind our few veterans. And
dont forget Bruce Bennett and

Kenny Russell on defense. Those
two come up with outstanding plays
every game.
Bennett, Russell and their
teammates in the Gators
defensive secondary will have
their hands full with Georgias
Larry Rakestraw. Rakestraw
passes 25 to 30 times a game,
Graves concluded. Our defense
must play a guessing game trying
to figure who he will throw to
each time.
Assistant athletic director
Percy Beard announced that 4,000
tickets to the Florida-Georgia
game will go on sale at the Gator
Bowl in Jacksonville at 11:00 a*m.
Saturday.
Florida Union
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