Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
The Florida
Alligator

Vol .56, N 0.40

TED, THAT IS-

Goldwater, Kennedy
To Talk On Campus?

By ROBERT GREEN
Os The Gator Staff
U.S. Sens. Barry Goldwater of
Arizona and Ted Kennedy of
Massachusetts may speak on
campus next trimester if arrange arrangements
ments arrangements can be worked out.
If the invitations are accepted
and an agreeable date and location
can be worked out, the two will
give separate lectures on their
respective political views.
Goldwater is the outstanding ex exponent
ponent exponent of conservatism in the
country and is considered to be
the leading contender for the
Republican presidential nomina nomination
tion nomination in 1964.
Kennedy, brother of the
President and the Attorrtey-
General, was recently elected as
junior senator of Massachusetts.
He campaigned on a straight
administration platform.
We (the committee) thought of
Goldwater immediately as the
spokesman for the conservatives,
said Bowles. 'We would have loved
to have the President speak here,
but we thought he would have
to speak as a president rather
than as a liberal spokesman.
Therefore, we thought his
brother would be able to give the
best lecture on the liberal view viewpoint.
point. viewpoint.
Bowles emphasized the
appearance was still highly
tentative and a number of factors
still have to be worked out before
the speakers will appear.
I think this will be a fine
thing for the academic side of
the university," said committee
member and humanities professor
Jack Funkhouser. -Both these
men are outstanding represen representatives
tatives representatives of their political v iewpoints
and are interesting personalities."

ADVERTISING THE PIAYEOY PARTY
...is Sharon Hennessey. She'll be at the Graham Area
Playboy Party Saturday night. She's aUF freshman.
I

University of Florida,Gainesville Friday,

Playboy Bunnies To Hop Tonight

PHI ETA SIGMA GIVES DOLLARS FOR SCHOLARS'
Phi Eta Sigma Pres. Robert Solomon is presenting a S3OO check to Ed Abbot
of the Dollars for Scholars organization as Dean of Men Frank Adams and
Gerald Haskins look on.

Frolics Tickets On Sale

Tickets for this falls -double -doublebarreled
barreled -doublebarreled Frolics featuring Della
Reese and the Four-Rreps go on
sale today at the information Booth
across from the Student Service
Center (Hub).
Tickets are priced at $1.75 per
person for the Interfraternity
Council (IFC) sponsored concert

N0v.1,1963

scheduled next Friday at 8:30 p.m.
in the Florida Gymnasium.
Dress for Frolics will be semi semiformal.
formal. semiformal.
The information booth will be
open today through Friday of next
week, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. except
Saturday and Sunday.
Miss Reese with her unimitable

Graham Areas Playboy party
will be bigger and better than
last year's, according to Dance
Chairman Terry S. Rayborn.
The Playboy party will be
Saturday, from 8 p.m. until...
Sixty nine bunnies,two dance
bands and a piano player will be
featured at the blast."
The Play Room, where dress
is casual, will offer dancing to
the music of the Playboys" dance
band. The Bill Wolf Quintet will
entertain in the VIP room. A
piano-bar will be set up in the
Playboy Library.
Dress for the VIP room will
be coat and tie for men and high
h?els for women.
All girls will be admitted free
to the party. A free taxi service
will be provided to and from
womens dormitories.
A Graham Area playmate of
the Year will be selected at the
party.

Top-Ranking
Prof Appointed

Dr. M.S. Heidingsfield yesterday
was announced as Food Fair Pro Professor
fessor Professor of Marketing at the UF's
College of Business Adminis Administration
tration Administration at the Governor's press
conference in Tallahassee.
Dr. Heidingsfield is a nationally
known consultant in the field of
marketing and marketing
research. Prior to his current
affiliation, he was the associate
dean and professor of marketing
at the College of Commerce and
Finance of Villanova University.
He has also been the manager
of market research for the RCA
Sales Corporation and was the

style has become one of the most
exciting concert artists, as well
as polished cabaret and theatre
performer.
One of the most popular campus
groups, the Four Preps blend
lightness and gaiety of song with
humor to entertain their audience.

PLAYBOY PARTY REVIEW
.. .is given by bevy of bunnies, including Sandy Schory,
Cheri Burke, Sharon Hennessey and Mary Ann Houk.

chairman of the marketing depart department
ment department at the School of Business and
Public Administration of Temple
University in Philadelphia.
Dr. Heidingsfield was the educa educational
tional educational consultant for the Charles
Morris Price School of Advertis Advertising
ing Advertising of the Poor Richard Club and
was the chairman of the
Educational Council of the
Philadelphia Chamber of
Commerce. He is a Fellow of the
American Association for the
Advancement of .Science and a
member of the national honorary
society of Beta Gamma Sigma.
The Food Fair Professorship
of Marketing was established here
through the Governors educational
foundation. Dr. Heidingsfield is
the first man to fill the
professorship.
The 48-y ea r old educator
received a B.S. degree with honors
from the College of the City of
New York and M.A. and Ph.D.
degrees from New York
University.
He is the co-author of three
well known textbooks and the author
of numerous papers on business
problems. He has also been on
the faculty of Columbia University
and the College of William and
Mary at Williamsburg, Va.
300 Musicians
Converge On
Gainesville
At least 300 musicians and com composers
posers composers from all over the state
are expected to convene here
Sunday for a three-day meeting
of the Florida State Music
Teachers Association.
Seven concerts or major recitals
are scheduled during the con conference,
ference, conference, with Leon Fleischer,
noted pianist, heading the list. He
performs at 8:15 p.m. Monday night
in the University Auditorium. His
performance is a Lyceum Council
presentation.
Fleischer will also present a
piano master class on Tuesday.
Mel Powell, director of the
electronic music studio at Yale
University, will give a theory
lecture and conduct a music
seminar as another highlight.



Page 2

The Florida Alligator Friday, Nov. 1,1963

IFC Planning New
Rushing Services

Inter fraternity council (IFC)
plans additional services for
incoming freshmen, according to
Henry (Skip) Heydt, IFC rush
chairman. **
Objectives IFC will stress are
selling the fraternity system
through publicity, and encouraging
freshmen to see many different
fraternity houses before pledging,
Heydt said.
The IFC plans to publish a
four-color booklet to be distri distributed
buted distributed in the orientation packet
freshman recieve. The booklet

one full pound DINNER NOON AND EVENING
SIRLOIN # meat, salad,vegetable,
STEAK drink & dessert
Qt -* LUNCHEON 6sjzf
j 3>l-==>Q ALFORD'S TOWER HOUSE

_ ;^
THEY SING HONEST FOLK SONGS.
IN A WILD,
DRIVING,
SPIRITED,
EXCITING,
AND SOMETIMES QUIET
NEW WAY.
UOURNEVMEN
rs NEW
i pt DIRECTIONS
s i- Vx v .Y n
u iSMHP
s'iN V. s 11 WWi || '||| f ( 'WIWNWWMiIBMBiPi -
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Just listen to their Capitol album, New Directions in Folk Music.
Youll hear the rocking, driving way the Journeymen sing Someday Baby
a low down blues out of Chicago. The fun they have with Stackolee! the wild
song about a legendary terror of New Orleans. Their quiet and moving version
of All the Pretty Little Horses]' one of the most beautiful lullabies ever written.
Their spirited ragtime rendition of San Francisco Bay.
Then youll know whats new in folk songs. And whats best. (Gw*oC)
Look forask for-the Journeymen in concert on your campus.
L: : J
jr
RECORD BAR
923 W. UNIVERSITY AVENUE

will explain the fraternity system,
Heydt added.
The IFC believes that by be becoming
coming becoming acquainted with as many
fraternities as possible, a
freshman will choose the fraternity
that is best suited for him and
stick to this fraternity, he said.
A speakers program during
pre registration also is
being planned to sell the fraternity
system to parents, Heydt said.
The IFC will try to convince
parents that fraternities offer
many advantages, Heydt said.

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PROBLEM FOR FRATERNITY MEMBERS
...of Phi Kappa Tau is this full-sized fort. It's made of solid pine and took
an estimated 6,000 man-hours to build. Problem: how to dismantle the fort.

By STEVE VAUGHN
Os The Gator Staff
For sale: one Western fort,
complete with lookout towers and
cannon.
This highly unlikely classified

Fort Still Stands

ad might well be placed by Phi
Kappa Tau fraternity, which con constructed
structed constructed a full-size fort front as
part of its winning fraternity
Homecoming decoration.
A majority of fraternity and
other Homecoming decorations can
be torn down with relative ease.
But the Phi Taus fort, designed
by three architecture students,
presents problems.
This think was built so sturdily
that its going to take some real
work to pull it down, Bob Ostwald
said. Ostwald and Court Lantaff
directed the forts construction.
We may run an ad for a pre prefabricated
fabricated prefabricated fort, ostwald said.
Actually, we have offers from
other fraternities to buy the wood,
and this is what well probably
do.
The thing has to be torn down
first, he said, and thats where

Ag School Offers
Scholarshipsss

Scholarships worth SIOO to SSOO
are available to students in the
UF College of Agriculture, Dean
M.A. Brooker said.
The William F. Ward Scholar Scholarship
ship Scholarship is a grant of SSOO, awarded
annually to a junior majoring in
citrus studies. Outstanding
scholarship, leadership in the
College of Agriculture and need
are the basis for choosing the
winner of this scholarship.
The Florida Ford Tractor
Company awards $2,400 annually
in scholarships through the J.W.
Schippmann Scholarship Fund.
Two scholarships are awarded to
seniors in Agricultural En Engineering
gineering Engineering and two to juniors.
The Sears Roebuck Foundation
gives seven S3OO scholarships each
year to entering freshmen. At
the end of the year an additional
S3OO scholarship is given to the
outstanding member of this group
Employed Women
Offered Cash
Assistance
Employed women in this area
are offered cash loans on
signature only. Many women are
taking advantage of this oner
by Marion Finance Co. You can
repay a $109.24 loan by install installments
ments installments of only $ll.OO per month,
of course Marion Finance has
other loan plans up to S6OO with
repayment of only $34.39 per
month. a phone call to
FR 6-5333, or a visit to our
office is all thats required. .
do it now.
MARION FINANCE CO.
222 W. Univ. Ave. FR 6-5333
Geo. L. Ellis, Mgr.

the work comes in.
Ostwald said the fort was made
up of more than 600 individual
pieces of slab pine and figured
it took over 2,000 man-hours to
build.
He also said several brothers
slept in the lookout towers
Thursday night before Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming in the wake of rumors that
an assault on the fort was planned
by other fraternities.
The Phi Taus, who claimed first
place in Gator Growl skit
competition, had a large Louisiana
State University tiger attacking
the fort while a space type
machine, in turn, attacked the
tiger.
The machine was made movable
by use of an electric motor. A
tape recorder was employed to
provide background battle sound
effect.

for his sophomore year.
The Ralston-Purina Company
awards a SSOO scholarship annually
to a senior in animal, dairy or
poultry science.
Borden Agricultural Scholar Scholarships
ships Scholarships are awarded each year to
a junior and a senior in agriculture.
All scholarships are awarded on
the basis of scholarship, leader leadership,
ship, leadership, professional potential and
need.
Dean Brooker said some 4-H
scholarships available to entering
freshmen are .awarded on the basis
of a competitive examination given
at 4-H short courses.
Many fellowships and research
grants are also available to
graduate students in the college,
he said.
C-5 Tapes
Now Available
The problem of getting to the
humanities listening hours at the
scheduled time is a thing of the
past.
Jack S. Funkhouser, assistant
professor of humanities, has re recorded
corded recorded all of the music for C-51
and C-52. Students are able to
listen to these at any time of the
week at no cost.
Tapes are available in the l r
Humanities Department office m
Anderson Hall.
Ahy individual or campus group
soon will be able to buy copies
of the tapes.
Copies will be sold for the
of the tapes and should be read}
the first week in November, and
persons interested in obtaining die
apes may contact Funkhousei*



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SHE'S HELPING TWO GOBLINS
Kathy Fairfield of the SisTers of the Maltese Cross is
aiding two junior-sized hobgoblins find their way. The
two children and others were feted by ATOs yesterday.

Alumni Give Financial
Backing To Bond Issue

A total of $5,000 has been spent
by the UF Alumni Association in
support of the Bond Issue
Amendment to be voted on Tuesday.
The $75 million bond issue will
authorize the issuance of bonds
for institutions of higher learning,
including junior colleges and voca vocational
tional vocational technical schools.
About 26,000 UF alumni have
received the September issue of
The Florida Alumnus in which
is printed a series of articles
under the title of A Judgment
of Values.
The article, explaining the pro proposal

Art Wives Displaying

Wives of the UF Department of
Art faculty members have taken
over -for the time being, at least.
Five faculty wives, all of whom
are experienced teachers of art
and have had their works exhibited
on both state and national levels,
are currently displaying their work
in Gallery X in Building X, on
campus.
Although all are housewives,
they are recognized professional
artists, according to Eugene E.
Grisom, head of the art
department.
The quintet includes Mrs. Lorna
Craven, wife of professor of ad advertising
vertising advertising design Roy Craven; Mrs.
Vivian Holbrook, wife of Hollis
H. Holbrook, professor of painting
and drawing; Mrs. Mary Purser,
wife of SJuart purser, professor
of painting and drawing; Mrs. Jac Jacquelin
quelin Jacquelin Ward, wife of Philip Ward,
professor of ceramics, and Mrs.
Nancy Collum Ward, wife of John
Archery Club
Slates Shoot
Two turkeys will be prizes for
a turkey tournament sponsored by
the UF Archery Club set for 10
a.m. Nov. 16 on the archery range
behind Broward Hall, faculty
sponsor Jane Millar said.
All students are eligible to enter
the shoot. Registration fee is
25 cents.
The top scoring man and woman
will each receive a turkey. Field Fieldtype
type Fieldtype target faces will be used.

posal proposal before the state voters, was
written by leaders, including Gov
Farris Bryant, State Sen. John E.
Mathews Jr., author of the bill,
and Thomas E. Bailey, superin superintendent
tendent superintendent of the State Department
of Education.
Several thousand copies of the
article have been printed and dis distributed
tributed distributed throughout the state. A
portion of the article was sent to
other national land grant colleges.
1 Postcards were sent this week
to 7,000 active alumni requesting
them to ask five other persons

Ward, instructor of art history.
Open Monday through Friday
from 9 a.m. to noon and 1:30-5
p.m., the exhibit continues through
Friday, Nov. 8.

ORDER NOW
CLASS RINGS
For Delivery On Or Before Dec. 20, Place
Your f Order By Saturday Noon, November
2, For The OFFICIAL University of Florida
Class Ring at the:
CAMPUS SHOP & BOOKSTORE

UF Physics
Pressuring
Maid 'Milly'
Milly the molecule is being
pushed around by the UF depart department
ment department of physics.
Knowing how mysterios women
can be, the department has taken
precautions against any explosive
outbursts.
A concrete, sand and aluminum
chamber will be Millys future
home.
Dr. Thomas A. Scott and nine
students working on Ph.D.s have
used funds from a $107,000 Nation National
al National Science Foundation grant to build
a high pressure chamber. Most
of the planning and labor has been
done within the department.
The small pressurized room
sits next to the physics building
and will be in operation in two
months.
In the chamber, Scott said,
helium gas will be compressed
to 200,000 pounds per square inch.
Thats more pressure than is found
in the ocean depths, he said.

to vote Tuesday.
The UF alumni office has mailed
10,000 letters to studentsparents,
asking for support of the bond
issue.
CD Routes
Sororities
UF sororities should report to
Yule Hall and Mallory Hall in
the event of disaster, UF Civil
Defense Coordinator R.G. Sher Sherrard
rard Sherrard said yesterday.
Seven sororities have been
assigned to report at Yule Hall.
They are Alpha Chi Omega, Alpha
Delta Pi, Alpha Epsilon Phi, Alpha
Omicron Pi, Chi Omega, Delta
Delta Delta and Delta Gamma.
Six sororities will report
to Mallory Hall. They are Delta
Phi Epsilon, Kappa Alpha Theta,
Kappa Delta, Phi Mu, Sigma Kappa
and Zeta Tau Alpha.

Friday Nov. ], 1963 The Florida Alligator

Let
FRANK LENTZ
JM tell you how
I|l|PKf Equitables
Stork Option
f protects your family
From the minute your baby is born, your family automati automatically
cally automatically has extra protection when your policy includes the new
Option to Purchase Additional Insurance. During the baby's
first 90 days, this Option covers you with additional
insurance. And it gives you the right to make that insurance
permanent, without a medical exam. Ask The Man from
Equitable about all the new benefits in Equit Equitables
ables Equitables modernized Living Insurance policies. 4*
Look ahead with
LIVING INSURANCE...FROM EQUITABLE
FRANK LENTZ ii
215 N.E. FIRST ST. 372-144?
-- i 1

1. Excuse me, sir. Im conducting
a poll for the college newspaper.
I wonder if I might ask you
a few questions?
Be my guest.

3. Let me put it this way. During
the last half century what new
ideas have led to important
benefits for the American people?
Well, uh theres the
two-platoon system.

fiiff
5. Give it 4 try.
Well, speaking off the top of
mv head, I might say
stretch socks.
Im sure everyone would agree
theyve been useful. But isnt
there something with a bit more
social significance that comes
to mind.
s'
There certainly is. Theres
Group Insurance, the
principle of which is to help

For information about Living Insurance, see The Man from Equitable.
For information about career opportunities at Equitable, see your
Placement Officer, or write to William E. Blevins, Employment Manager.
The EQUITABLE Life Assuranc..Society of the United States
Home Office. 1285 Avenue of the Americas, New York 19, N. Y. 1963

2. In your opinion, what are some
of America's most significant
achievements in the past
50 years?
Huh?

4. Ill rephrase the question. Since
1912, what developments can you
think of that have made the lot
of the working man easier?
Now youre getting tricky.

ifil
provide protection for those
who need it most and can
afford it least. Pioneered and
developed by Equitable,
it has proved most efficacious.
Today, the working man
and his family enjoy a broad
spectrum of protection
provided by Group Insurance.
For that reason, I would
most emphatically suggest
its inclusion among the
significant achievements. But
I still think the two-platoon
system is pretty important.

Page 3



Page 4

TTie Florida Alligator Friday, Nov. 1,1963

ROBERT ACKERMAN
PAUL L. ADAMS
MAURICE R. AHRENS
JOHN D. AINSLIE
JOHN ALGEO
JOHN J. ALLEN
WAYNE W. ANTENEN
AARON H. ANTON
HARRY T. ANTRIM
DONALD AVILA
MELVIN C. BAKER
SAMUEL A. BANKS
ERNEST R. BARTLEY
MERLE A. BATTISTI
CHARLES N. BEALL
RAYMOND M. BEIRNE
CHARLES C. BENBOW
FORREST J. BERGHORN
LEWIS BERNER
GORDON E. BIGELOW
BERTHA E. BLOODWORTH
THOMAS BLOSSOM
WILLIS R. BODINE
ROBERT H. BOWERS
WALLACE S. BREY
L.R. BRISTOL
JOHN W. BROOKBANK
DAVID BUSH NELL
CORBIN S. CARNELL
ARCHIE CARR
THOMAS D. CARR
WILLIAM E. CARTER
WILLIAM C. CHILDERS
DAVID M. CHALMERS
ALFRED B. CLUBOK
SAMUEL O. COLGATE
J. WAYNE CONNER
ARTHUR W. COMBS, JR.
ROY CRAVEN
AUSTIN C. CREEL
MYRON C. CUNNINGHAM
ROBERT L. CURRAN
RONALD CUTLER
V>
HUGH C. DAVIS JR.
MOTLEY F. DEAKIN
JOHN DEGROVE
CLARENCE DERRICK
ROBERT DETWEILER
ROBERT M. DEWITT
HERBERT J. DOHERTY, JR.
JAMES L. DOW IS
RICHARD D. DRESDNER
CHARLES L. DURRANCE

This initial list of faculty endorsers is incomplete. An effort will be made to
members who have not yet been contacted an opportunity to endorse the above acu lty
Paid For By Endorsers Listed Above)

As Gainesville residents and faculty members of the University of
Florida, we endorse the efforts of the Student Group for Equal Rights to
&
end racial discrimination in local public accommodations. We commend
both those students who have devoted so much of their time to this
cause, and those who are honoring the Student Groups picket line.

WINIFRED DUSENBURY
PAUL R. ELLIOTT
MARVIN L. ENTNER
CHARLES H. FAIRBANKS
RUSSELL F. FARNEN
CHARLES D. FARRIS
ALFRED FLOWER
LORA FRIEDMAN
ARTHUR L. FUNK
JACK FUNKHOUSER
JAMES A. GAVAN
F. GEHAN
ROBERT GILSTRAP
BUELL GOOCHER
IRA J. GORDON
ROBERT M. GORDON
ALLEN W. GREER
JAMES H. GREGG
WILSON H. GUERTIN
FRANCIS HABER
PAUL G. HAHN
LOWELL C. HAMMER
EUGENE A. HAMMOND
PAUL L. HANNA
JOHN A. HARRISON
T.A.E. HART
FREDERICK H. HARTMANN
GERALD S. HASTEROK
GLEN C. HASS
FRANCIS C. HAYES
ARNOLD J. HEIDENHEIMER
JOHN F. HELLING
WARD HELLSTROM
RICHARD H. HIERS
PAULINE HILLIARD
VYNCE HINES
JAMES R. HODGES
G. HOFACKER
GLENN J. HOFFMAN
. HOLLIS H. HOLBROOK
EDMU ND-S. HQLDE N _J
ANNE K. HORTON
ROLAND F. HUSSEY
HARRY W. HUTCHINSON
RONALD G. JERIT
MARSHALL B. JONES
WILLIAM M. JONES
SIDNEY M. JOURARD
GLADYS M. KAMMERER
HARRY KANTOR

RALPH B. KIMBROUGH
HERBERT D. KIMMEL
ROY E. LAMBERT
THEODORE LANDSMAN
M.M. LASLEY
R.C. LEE
808 LEGGETT
A.L. LEWIS
HAL G. LEWIS
H.M.,LEVY, JR.
RENE LEMARCHAND
LEONARD L. LINDEN
PETER USCA
JAMES L. LISTER
JOHN K. MAHON
FRANK J. MATURO, JR.
EMILY S. MACHLACHLAN
JOHN V. MERING
lyle n. McAlister
EDWARD B. McLEAN
ida ruth McLendon
O.R. McQUOWN
RODGER MITCHELL
MARVIN L. MUGA
J.R. NEALE
ARTHUR P. NEWCOMB, JR.
JACK NICKELSON
FRANK G. NORDLIE
THERON A. NUNEZ, JR.
DANIEL R. OFFORD
PETER R. OLIVA
WALDEMAR OLSON
GEORGE C. OSBORN
PHILIP PASTORE
EVAN G. PATTISHALL
JOHN A. PENROD
HENRY S. PENNYPACKER
NATHAN W. PERRY
THOMAS R. PRESTON
SAMUEL PROCTOR
CHARLES E. REID
EDWARD J. RICHER
PAUL RILEY
CHARLES L. ROBBINS
WALTER W. ROSENBAUM
H.P. ROTHFELDER
GEORGE E. RYSCHKEWITSCH
PAUL SATZ

CATHERINE SAVAGE
JOHN J. SCHWAB
DELTON L. SCUDDER
HENRY SELDEN
JEFF L. SELTZER
DAVID R. SHEEHAN
ROBERT SKELLY
JOHN E. SLAUGHTER
ALBERT B. SMITH
DARWIN W. SMITH
JAMES SMITH
PAUL SMITH
JOHN W. SPANIER
AUGUST STAUB
GEOFFREY STEERE
MORRIS B. STORER
ROBERT C. STOUFER
ROBERT O. STRIPLING
OSCAR SVARLIEN
D.C. SWANSON
HENRY SWANSON
LEWIS C. TATHAM
C.K. THOMAS
ARTHUR W. THOMPSON
RALPH B. THOMPSON
JOHN MORRIS TRIMMER
THOMAS L. TROYER
PAUL T. THURSTON
s' "l
JERRY UELSMANN
JOSEPH S. VANDIVER
HANI VAN DERIET
VERNON VAN DERIET
HARRY R. WARFEL
BIRON WALKER
MAUD C. WATKINS
JOHN WARD
BUTLER H. WAUGH
WILSE B. WEBB
EVELYN WENSEL
IRVING R. WERSHOW
WINTER J. WESTFALL, JR.
THOMAS L. WESTMAN
KIMBALL WILES
ROBERT R. WIEGMAN
EDITH WILLIAMS
HAROLD A. WILSON
JAMES D. WINEFORDNER
RICHARD WISAN
WILLIAM D. WOLKIN
J.A. ZOLTEWICZ



UF Prof Is
'Square'
Dance Caller
Ernest R. Bartley, professor
of political science here, admits
to being a square.
At least its true when talking
about square dancing, as Bartley
is one of Floridas most prominent
callers.
Bartley, former president of
the Florida Callers Association,
has called square dances from
Key West to Fairbanks, ranging
from club engagements to
conventions.
Square dancing is a popular,
democratic movement throughout
the country, Bartley said, it
represents a complete cross crosssection
section crosssection of the population.
It takes anywhere from around
20 to 30 lessons before a dancer
can be considered acceptable,
Bartley said, and .it takes at
least two years for a dancer to
become accomplished.
According to Bartley, modern
square dancing is no longer part
of yesterdays hillbilly music.
The dances today are all held
to country and western music.
Ag Station
Gets Gift
A $5,500 gift has been presented
to the UF Agricultural Experiment
Station to construct a building for
drying and processing peanuts.
Dr. J. R. Beckenbach, director
of the Agricultural Experiment
Stations, said the gift was
presented to the stations by the
Georgia-Florida-Alabama Peanut
Association.
The donation is being made in
recognition of the research
program involving peanut breeding
conducted by Dr. William A.
Carver.
Dr. Carver, agronomist and
member of the UF staff since
1925, was selected earlier this
year to receive the peanut
industrys highest honor, the
Golden Peanut Research Award.
He has also been cited by the
State Legislature for his
contributions to Floridas peanut
industry.
The new building will be con constructed
structed constructed at the Gainesville station.

Rtek&v..
jdfl Ml % rifefr.
.J 8&
\ t. h
wJk ,* ' WK^m
. %y I *.
FORMING PYRAMID OF VICTORY
...are UF cheerleaders, from top, Starling Feistham Feisthammel,
mel, Feisthammel, Judy Crawford, Kathy Fairfield, Pam Regan, Ann
Brown, Sharon Testy, Ed Billington, Bill Dixon, Brian
Schoot, Gerald Sal bo and Bil Pinney.

|J| | t
R
RP H
DR. BARTLEY
Cheerleader
Pinney Says
Fans 'A-OK'
By ANITA WILSON
Os The Gator Staff
Gator fans are tops -- theyre
really great, head cheerleader
Bil Pinney says.
And now that weve seen what
Gator spirit can do, lets continue
to show it at the games.
Pinney, a three-year member
of the cheerleading squad, said
Alabama demonstrated the
greatest spirit he has ever seen.
Win or lose -- the Crimson
Tide rooters never failed to back
their team, he said.
Cheerleaders have never
condemned fraternity cheers,
Pinney said, but rather believe
the majority of these cheers are
done previous to the game and at
halftime.
Being a cheerleader has many
rewarding aspects, Pinney said.
One has a feeling of being an
actual part of the game. You also
feel you are doing your best to
help the team win. Besides this,
cheerleading provides a good time.
The 11 cheerleaders work on
gymnastics such as round-offs,
hand springs and pyramids. Squad
member Dan Dremann has per performed
formed performed at the games with various
tumbling skills.
Every year the cheerleaders
are criticized for an abundance
of old yells, Pinney said.
We now have a bigger variety
of cheers than ever before.

Grove Hall Used
For Classrooms

Ancient Grove Hall, deemed
unsuitable for womens
residence less than a year ago,
is apparently good enough for UF
Architecture and Fine Arts
personnel.
Rooms which officials thought
were unfit for coeds have been
occupied by the college as class classrooms
rooms classrooms and offices since the
beginning of the year.
Coeds were ousted from Grove
following the 1962 fall trimester
despite a petition that they be
allowed to remain there.
It wasnt very suitable and I
think they (the former residents)
liked it primarily because of the
low rent, Col. Robert A. Mautz,
UF vice president of academic
affairs, said this week.
When the female residents
departed for rooms in permanent
dormitories, they thought the old
structure was to be destroyed.
Housing chief H. C. Riker
believes however, most women
who lived in Grove were in favor
Souvenirs
Sell Well
It was just like Christmas
time at Maceys.
Homecoming weekend is the
biggest time of the year for UF
souvenirs, Samuel P. Getzen,
director of the UF Campus Shop
and Bookstore, said Monday.
Alumni coming back for the
big weekend bought UF pennants
and T-shirts for children and beer
glasses and mugs for themselves,
Getzen said. UF men bought
sweatshirts and stuffed animals
for their out of town dates, he
said.
According to Getzen, Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming weekend is rivaled by the
week of state high school
basketball tournaments for
souvenir sales, but Saturday of
Homecoming weekend is the best
single day.
Items such as souvenirs and
supplies other than textbooks make
up the bulk of the business at the
Campus Shop, Getzen said. Since
the Shop is a part of the UF it
is not operated on the same basis
as private bookstores, he said.
We are trying to supply
students with more technical or
research books, Getzen said.
With the growth of UF continuing
as it is and with greater emphasis
on scientific and technical study,
we feel it our duty to supply the
books needed, he said.
With additional space we would
increase our supply of research
texts even more, Getzen said.

4 Student Terms jk"
8 Diamonds V V / 1
I Watches ,\ / A# />l/i Silver 1
I Jewelry wiwi/ Watch Repair I
I Charms Favors I
I "QUALITY GIFTS AT BUDGET PRICE" 1
B B

Friday, Nov. 1,1963 The Florida Alligator

of the move to newer buildings.
The women students preferred
the permanent halls, he said.
I dont believe the petition
represented a majority of the
total group in the hall.
After the women moved out, UF
officials considered relocating the
Architecture and Fine Arts library
in Grove. The maneuver proved
Tigert Hall
Backs Bonds
Opinion at Tigert Hall on the
probability for passage of the
College Building Amendment
Tuesday range from hopeful
to extremely confident.
The amendment will provide for
$75 million in bonds to be issued
for building construction of
Floridas colleges and universi universities.
ties. universities.
George W. Corrick, assistant to
the president said he is very
hopeful the amendment will pass.
He said the administration was
confident of its passage,
W. H. (Hoke) Kerns, UF director
of Informational Services, said if
the amendment didnt pass, Gov.
Bryant might call a special session
of the legislature to find new ways
to finance the college construction
program.

- THE CAMPUS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
IS ONLY 1/2 BLOCK FROM LARRY'S ON YOUR
WAY TO LARRY'S FOR ADELICIOUS MEAL, STOP
TO SEE IT.
LARRY'S RESTAURANT
JUST OFF CAMPUS ON UNIV. AVE.
->

to be too costly by itself, so the
entire college was moved into the
old hall, Mautz said.
The two-story, frame structure,
occupied in past years by under undergraduate
graduate undergraduate males, females and male
graduate students, may exist
indefinitely.

' jjH
GATOR GIRL
. . today is sophomore
Marion Arey. A nursing
major, the blue-eyed bru brunette
nette brunette is 5 feet 6 and has
34-23-34 statistics.

Page 5



The Florida Alligator Friday, Nov. 1,1963

Page 6

editojri als
A Battle At FSU
Florida State University, UFs sister school, is having problems
with its -- or her newspaper, the Florida Flambeau.
The Flambeau, according to a story in Saturdays St. Petersburg
Times, is fighting for its life against a petition urging withdrawal
of university funds from the paper, in view of the few benefits
the Flambeau offers to the campus.
There are answers to every attack, of course, and editor Lana
Murrays goes something like this; As a campus newspaper under
fire from a faction of the student body which is at once our consumer
and our financial support, the Flambeau has been trying to glean
from a rather amorphous body of charges some sort of concrete,
definable objections that could be called constructive criticism.
And, according to the Times, there is another angle to the issue--
the conservative and segregationist students at FSU are against
the paper because of its liberal policies in reporting and editorializing
on picketing activities of the students.
So far, a little over 1,000 names have been signed to the petition,
or about 1/10 of the student body. Whether they signed because, as
Miss Murray suggested, It is too easy for anyone who didnt like
the fact that his name was spelled wrong in the paper to sign his
name to a petition, or because they were just fed up with the paper
for one reason or another, is a matter for conjecture only, so far.
The Flambeau is not a good paper, in many ways. It looks bad
dull, old-fashioned, cheap and the writing, iri many cases,
is terrible. Yet it does cover the news, sometimes surprisingly
well. If it were twice as bad, however, the petitioners approach
would still be wrong.
For a college newspaper has certain irreplaceable values. It
is often the only outlet for student feelings about a specific problem
or college life in general. It can be a watchdog of the students welfare,
a collective voice that always reaches the ear of the administration
or student government. It carries, as no other media could, the
campus events of the day -- meetings, public speakers, entertain entertainment
ment entertainment and treats campus issues from a campus rather than
outside viewpoint.
Now, quite possibly the Flambeau has not been doing the job it
should have. Perhaps new editors should be brought in. Perhaps a
larger reportorial staff is needed. Perhaps the budget is not large
enough to attract good personnel for responsible (and therefore
salaried) positions.
But the answer certainly should not be to destroy the Flambeau.
Why is oiir first solution always to destroy? The petitioners have
evidently thought not at all of a replacement for the dead Flambeau,
nor of what they'will do when an urgent need arises for some sort of
student voice.
We hope, therefore, that the student petitioners reconsider, or
that the issue does not come to an irrevocable vote. If the Flambeau
needs improvement, then let it be improved, through carefully
thought-out steps. But let it not be totally destroyed. The death of a
newspaper is an unpleasant event, enjoyable only to those who wish
no voice for the people.

Gains From The Amendment

By EARL FIS HE R
UF Council For
Higher Education
The gains derived from the sale
of bonds in the State of Florida
are both direct and indirect.
The major purpose of the
Amendment is to provide needed
college buildings throughout the
state. Approximately half of the
money acquired will be used for
construction of science facilities,
while the remaining half will be
channeled to provide dormitories
and general-use classrooms.
Dai ring 4lve first-biennium-^
seventy-five million dollars will
be collected and then distributed
to finance approved construction
projects. Floridas universities
will receive $45 million worth and
ou rapidly enlarging junior
colleges are alloted S3O million.
Floridas junior colleges
presently, and even mor so in the
future, serve as basic educational
institutions for incoming fresh freshmen
men freshmen and the universities are
tending towards concentrating
their efforts on upper division
and graduate work. The rising
increase in entering college
freshmen makes it mandatory to
support the growth of Floridas
junior colleges. (Last fall more
than fifty per cent of Floridas
entering students were enrolled

in public community junior
colleges.)
The direct gain for the
University of Florida in terms
of money will amount to around
sl3 million. Instructional buildings
are of utmost necessity in the
fields of science and engineering
if further advancements in these
areas are to be made. Classroom
buildings now being used at the
University of Florida are far from
meeting the necessary require requirements
ments requirements essential to meet enrollment
increases. At present 15 per cent
of university facilities are housed
s#4h te tirptrrarry World War ff"
buildings.
Money allotted to the University
of Florida will also be used to
improve present inadequacies in
our Library system. There are
books now that are being stored
in the basement of the University
Auditorium and the Century-
Tower due to the lack of space
in our library.
The college and University Universitybuildings
buildings Universitybuildings planned will also have
side benefits, such as grants and
support from various research
foundations.
A requirement is made in the
bond implementation bill that the

A THREE-PART SERIES
UF vs. Big 10 Schools

By NEALE J. PEARSON, 7AS
A favorite topic of discussion
among some UF students and
faculty members, and state
political leaders is comparing the
UF with other southern schools,
and, infrequently, with northern
institutions or the university (now
Multiversity) of California. The
topic is of interest to the writer,
who once had visions of attending
Ohio State University while a
youngster -- probably more on
the strength of a naive belief in
there being a positive correlation
between football excellence and
academic excellence.
Residence in Lakeland, Florida,
however, disqualified him for
admission to Ohio State because
of the pressure of WW II veterans
on Ohios state university
facilities. The UF was not an
academically superior institution.
One decade later, the State of
Florida has improved her public
school and higher education
system. The writer therefore took
advantage of a weeks stay in

An Ugly Picture

EDITOR:
Poverty, malnutrition, disease,
students grovelling for food in the
streets its an ugly picture,
isnt it? especially to those
Americans who are free from
worrying where they will find their
next meal. But it is these things
which prevent students from
continuing their education in many
countries which desperately need
more trained personnel, world
University Service(WUS) program
raises money in the united States
in order to help students help
themselves in the developing
countries. Residence halls,
sororities, and fraternities will
begin contributing to this program
November 11-16 by sponsoring a
candy sale.
World University Service in increases
creases increases the impact of its
contributions by concentrating on

State Board of Education make a
study of the vocational technical
education needs so that the 1965
Legislature can proceed in this
area where financial aid is also
needed.
Not only the students, but the
whole State of Florida stands to
benefit from the Bond Issue. Highly
trained and skilled personel will
attract additional industry to the
state.
We must upgrade our educational
facilities not only if we are to
to attract othexJughlv
technical and desirable industries,
but if we are to retain those we
already have.
When the Florida Constitution
was drawn up, it was not
unreasonable to place a limitation
on the issuance or sale of bonds.
However, the constitution was
formed in 1885, three -quarters
of a century ago, and our present
day needs were, of course, not
realized then. Therefore change
this law in time of near crisis,
an amendment must be initiated
The college building problem is
not only a near crisis, it is an
immediate dilemma, if Florida
is to meet her needs and obli obligations,
gations, obligations, it is necessary that an
immediate plan of action be taken.
The College Building
Amendment, Issue #2, is a must.

Columbus, Ohio, in late August
to talk with Ohio State adminis administrators,
trators, administrators, faculty and students in
an attempt to make a comparison.
Ohio State is one of six state statesupported
supported statesupported institutions of higher
learning -- out of a total of 65
institutions in Ohio. UF is
one of three state supported
four-year schools among 34
institutions -- 21 of which are
junior colleges. OSU currently
has over 27,000 students on its
main campus and has been over
the 20,000 mark since 1950. UF
has 14,200. Both schools have about
500 foreign students. OSU had 1,370
full-time faculty members in 1961-
62 while the UF had 893. OSU
has a main library which reached
the 1.5 million mark in 1960. UF
reached the 1 millibn mark this
past spring. In-state tuition for
Ohio residents is SIIO.OO per
quarter; in-state tuition for
Florida residents is $113.00 per
trimester.
Pertinent data affecting the
quality of higher education in both
states include the following:

the following types of services:
the establishment of health
clinics at universities in Africa,
the treatment of TB students in
Asia, and the providing of medical
supplies to ill-equipped student
wards in South America; the
building of student dormitories
and cafeterias in Asia and South
America where undernourished
students live crowded together in
substandard rooms. . or in the
streets; community development
conferences in Africa which lead
to literary classes conducted by
students in the villages, and the
establishment of book banks in
Asia, where students cannot afford
to buy their own textbooks;
scholarship and loan assistance
to refugee students (Chinese,
Algerian, Angolan, Hungarian) and
emergency aid when floods ravage
universities in Asia and earth earthquakes
quakes earthquakes destroy facilities in South
America.
Since the beginning of WUS in
1919, over 50 countries have joined
in this helping hand program in
an effort to help fellow students
and colleagues who are struggling
for education in the midst of
poverty and disease. The students
in recipient countries will try to
match, as best they can, the funds
contributed by us.
WUS is entirely supported by
students; it is left to us, then, to
support such a worthwhile cause.
Whether in Asia, Africa, Europe,
or the Americas, the students
road is hard; their needs critical.
They can count on friends. One
is WUS, sponsored internationally
by major religious and student
organizations. You are the most
important part of WUS and the
dollar or two you spend in the
candy sale will go a long way in
promoting international
understanding and cooperation;
Wont you help?
Carolyn Smith
Publicity Chairman, WUS

The Florida Alligator
Editor-in-chief David Lawrence Jr.
Managing Editor \ Bob Wilsn r
Sports Editor *.*. *. *. *. Dave tterkowitz
Editorial Page Editor John Askins
Layout Editor Ron Spencer
City Editor Cynthia Tunstall
Copy Editor Hammock
THE FLORID/ ALLIGaTOR is the official student newspaper o:
L niversity of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
the months of May, June, and July, when a weekly issue is published.
T..E FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is entered as secono class matter
e United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida.

(1) Direct supervision over The
Ohio State University, as it t s
formally called, is exercised by
a seven-man Board of Trustees
appointed by the Governor f or
over-lapping six year terms.
Ohio politics is that of a two-party
state. The Governors have been
Republican except when Frank
Lausche (now a u. S. Senator)
ran.
(2) Historically, about 45 -50
per cent of OSUs budget comes
from legislative appropriations
from a state legislature dominated
by small town attorneys and
farmers -- but in a state with
two party politics, in the last
decade, about 60 65 per cent
of the UF education and general
budget came from appropriations
of a state legislature dominated
by what is known as the Pork
Chop Gang. Budgetary data for
both universities vary and are
complicated by the fact that both
universities are attracting -- and
becoming dependent upon in some
areas money from other than
state tax sources.
The State legislature has been
dominated by Republicans except*
for a two year period in 1949-50.
The Board of Trustees is headed
by United States Senator John w.
Bricker, who was first appointed
to the board shortly after leaving
the governors office for
Washington in 1948. Four of his
colleagues are high officials of
Republic Steel, Owens-Illinois
Glass, and the Kroger Company.
The two other members are
corporation lawyers from Toledo
and Columbus.
Direct supervision over the
University of Florida, its policies
and affairs, is vested in the Board
of Control, a body composed of
seven citizens from different
regions of the state who are
appointed by the Governor for a
four year term. Traditionally,
Florida Governors have been
conservative Democrats who have
come out of an every man for
himself type of state politics.
Although four members of the
current Board reflect the interests
of businesses of varying sizes,
three &tfeers reflect views of an
attorney, a dentist, and a veter veterinarian.
inarian. veterinarian. w
(3) Novice G. Fawcett,
president of OSU since 1956, is a
former Superintendent of the
Franklin (Columbus) County
Schools and a long-time Republican
activist. Dr. J. Wayne Reitz,
President of the UF since 19jj>
is a former provost of the l
College of Agriculture. Dr. Reitz
has not been openly active
partisan politics in Florida.
(4) Both schools started on.
as Land Grant Colleges: OSU in
1870 and UF in 1853 although one
might date the more modern
beginnings from the 1905 But km
Act. OSU, originally a cow college
has become a school heav.
oriented to business and indu
Floridas agricultural emphasis
was reflected in the Boar
Control and University curriculum
decade or so has the chang.
make-up of the population
economy of Florida been refit
in greater expenditures in othe
areas also.



EMnim]

Prejudice
EDITOR:
Today, the Negro has finally
stood up and said, I want to
collect on this four-generation
old IOU of equality--and collect
in full. He has found that he
had to fight nonviolently for what
was due him a century ago. The
Negros fight is not one of
desperation. It is a fight born
of hope hope that America is
truly the land of equality, the land
where men ask, not What is he?
but rather What can he do?
Never before has he been so
close to his long-overdue rights.
Now, the tempo of emancipation
has greatly accelerated, just as a
long-distance runner finds enough
energy left for one last spurt
down the home stretch.
Now, many want the last spurt
to be slowed down. Just when the
finish line is in sight, the Negro
is told, The goal is rightfully
yours, but dont get it yet. Let
people adjust their attitudes, their
amotions.
But four generations have gone
by. Attitudes have had plenty of
time to change, especially in
America, the melting pot. Every
minority group was discriminated
against upon arrival here --
Germans, Japanese, Italians,
Irish, and Cubans alike. And yet,
most of this prejudice is gone
today.
But why not in the case of the
Negro? If America could over overcome
come overcome its prejudice against every
other minority, why not against
the Negro, especially in a hundred
years? certainly time enough has
been given for attitudes to change,
unless
unless the prejudice was built
on really strong and basic
emotions-- emotions which could
not be changed in 10, in 100
if segregation
continues, because parents teach
their children their prejudices,
before the young minds can reason
or can ask, Why, mommy?
The Negro must not, cannot
show down with the finish line
so near. Many will feel pushed,
yes, even some non-segregation non-segregationists.
ists. non-segregationists. But how long must the
Moseses say to the Pharaohs, Let
my people go; ? How long must
the Negro wait for something due
to his great-great grandparents?
All the Negro wants is his rights
as an American, much as all the
colonist wanted was his rights as
an Englishman. Declarations of
Independence cannot and should not
say, We want what is ours, we
want to be free--later, and the
Negros unwritten Declaration is
no exception.
During the War of Independence,
there was by no means an over overwhelming
whelming overwhelming majority in favor of
separation. The scarcity of men
at Valley Forge bears this out
easily. No~ doubt-many-people who
were not Loyalists felt pushed by
the drive for equal rights, and
resented it. yet the colonies knew
that there would never be a time
free from resentment. They thus
decided to separate at once from
England, to gain equal rights
rising resentment (at least)from
a part of their own people.
But would you rather they had
n ot run that risk?
Burin Kantabutra,
3BA from Thailand
A Request
EDITOR:
For some time, students of the
University of Florida, when
parking their cars waiting for
trains at Waldo Railroad Station,
have been ignoring the cross arms

at the railroad crossing which
clearly indicate a railroad
crossing.
This becomes a problem
because the students not only park
in the road, then leave their cars
in the road while the train is in
the station, but they are so far
up the track by the time the
train leaves that all traffic is
blocked and no one can cross
over the railroad.
Complaints pile up on Sunday
mornings when residents of Waldo
wish to cross the tracks to go
to Church Services. This is not
the only time complaints come in,
and were their a fire, they would
prevent the fire truck from passing
down this street. The City does
not want to continue giving tickets
to these thoughtless students, and
so we are asking their cooperation
in keeping the street over the
railroad, located southwest of the
newly erected section of the
station, open to all traffic. Please
ask them to park elsewhere.
H. L. Croft
Chief of Police, Waldo, Fla.

SIXTH IN A SERIES
Womens Education

True continuing education
stresses these practices: orienting
the college-age girl to her life
pattern, helping the young married
woman to stay current, and
counseling the mature woman
returning to study to find exactly
what she needs. It is more than
adult education as it involves both
the young girl and the returning
adult woman and focuses the re resources
sources resources of the whole institution
upon their education. The contin continuing
uing continuing education unit of an institution
becomes the identifiable focus for
all inquiries and plans concerning
the education of mature women
and has a strong influence on
that of younger women.
This is the basic plan of most
of these programs -- those of
the University of Minnesota and of
the University of Wisconsin, for
example. Many other institutions

T
WE RE NOT OPEN FOR BUSINESS
YET, BUT WE ARE OPEN FOR
BROWSING.
r Mil
I Ifiountree]
r _r
I 1227 West University Avenue
V

Correction
EDITOR:
We note with interest the article
appearing on page 4of the
Homecoming edition of the
Alligator. However, we would like
to correct one statement. This
statement is the one concerning
beginning salaries in which your
reporter stated a salary of S3OO
a month. While it may be true
that some of our graduates accept
jobs at this rate, our average
salary for the past trimester was
in the range of $435 to $450.
Many of our registrants are
employed at substantially higher
salaries.
We would appreciate the
opportunity to make this minor
correction and again to thank you
for the opportunity to tell our
story to the University community.
George R. Sims,
Placement Officer

are setting up similar programs.
An advantage of such a program is
that it can be undertaken simply
or elaborately, depending
on available financing.
Some institutions are meeting
other needs of the mature by
special, identifiable programs: for
example, Douglass College of
Rutgers University has one in
mathematics; Sarah Lawrence
College has an undergraduate
degree program for women
returning to college; Radcliffe
has an Institute for Independent
Study for the extremely talented
and highly trained women whose
influence is reflected upon the
undergraduate; the University of
Wisconsin program has one for
Ph.D. candidates; and, the AAUW
Educational Foundation program
has one for women long away from
their studies, for career positions
on college faculties.

Friday, Nov. 1 / 1963 The Florida Alligator

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BOSTON 9TMPHONT ORCHESTRA
ERICH LEINSDORE
Romantic masterpieces! The en
chanting music of Mendelssohn,
spoken passages from Shake Shakespeare
speare Shakespeare combine for this lovely
new album. Also available in a
limited dc luxe edition. Leins Leinsdorf/Boston
dorf/Boston Leinsdorf/Boston Symphony and
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Mono: LM/LMD-2673, Stereo
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Page 7



The Florida Alligator Friday, Nov. 1,1963

Page 8

GATOR CLASSIFIED

For Sale

KEROSENE Heater for five rooms
like new, with all appliances, $42.
Two navy wool suits, one tuxedo
size 38 long, $20.00 each. FR
6-7860. (A-39-ts-c).

Unitarian Universalist Fellowship
1204 NW 10th Ave.
11 to 12 Sunday Services 11 to 12 Sunday School
Program: General:
General Discussion: "Action Unitarians Should
Take on Civil Rights".
SESBHn^^)
TODAY at 2:10,5:20,8:25 ljltl:lilT|l
TOLBERT AREA MOVIES South Hall Rec Room
8 pm, Friday & Saturday Raymond Burr
All area card holders 15$, others 30$
Midnite show 25$ and 40$. Dates Free.
Bring this ad with you and receive a free gift.
floidA Union movies
FRIDAY & SATURDAY. 7& 9 P.M.
CITIZEN KANE
ORSON WELLES
SUNDAY & MONDAY, 7 P.M. ONLY
THE YEARLING
GREGORY PECK
FLORIDA UNION AUDITORIUM

54 VOL. SYNOPTION SET, Great
Books of the Western World. Orig.
price S4OO. Will sell for $250 or
best offer. 1 1/2 years old. 201
A Flavet 111. (A-38-3t-c).
125 cc DUCATTI MOTORCYCLE
Excellent condition throughout.
Under 3,000 miles. 100 m.p.g.

60 m.pji. Call FR 6-5631 after
8 p.m. Must Sell. (A-38-3t-c).
SCUBA DIVING Equipment and
Misc. diving items. No reasonable
offer refused. Contact Ron Crist.
S-7581 until 6;00 p.m.(A-35-tf-c).

For Rent

CHILDLESS COUPLE, or two
students to rent furnished apt.
in Colonial Manor Apts. 1/2 block
from University. Come, phone or
write Scott Keller, 1216 S. W. 2nd
Avenue, 372-2722. (B-27-ts-c).
NEW FURNISHED Apartment one
bedroom. Air-conditioned. One Onethree
three Onethree persons. Close to campus.
376-6576. (B-40-st-c).

INDIA CLUB
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
PRESENTS
"KALPANA"
(Imagination)
On Saturday, Nov. 2, 1963
9:30 am at the STATE THEATRE

mmSEBX
_ 24QQJ1ov1honM Rood W. jMMgP
Tonite & Saturday
open 6, show at 7
see 3 as late as 8:30
4 Terror-Topping Horror Hits!
(9h
: Whin someoni II m W
. .. MIKD I
i her kiss was stinging death
THE WASP WOMAN
Starts Sunday ;
3 Adult Shock Hits!
see 2 as late as 8:30
what ReAliy Happened
in the Garden or Eden ?
Mamie Van Doren
#
Marty Milner
l.
Brigette Bardot
"THE BRIDE IS MUCH
TOO BEAUTIFUL"

SPACIOUS, Private room and bath
with central heat. In quiet modern
home. Kitchen privileges, ideal
for U. of F. coed. 372-7883.
(B-40-st-c).
COLONIAL MANOR APT.
Completely furnished for rent.
Air-conditioned. 7216 S. W. 2nd
Avenue. Apt. 105. FR 6-2781.
(B-38-st-c).
LARGE 3 bedroom r 2 bath house,
furnished with new furniture,
newly decorated, N. W. 13th
location. Phone 2 3019.
(B-38-3t-c).
ATTRACTIVE, QUIET, CLEAN,
bright room in new home. Excellent
for study. Kitchen privileges.
2-8944 or 6-6064. (B-37-st-c).

HEELS put on in 5* minutts I
9 SOLES put on in ISmmuits 1
|MODEmJsHO£|
jo cross from Ist ngtionol bonk |
if you saw and thought
CARRY ON NURSE
was funny-then you 1 11
RUPTURE A RIB ON
THIS ONE
SUNDAY
mMmmms
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P^ us / "^vFeaturesa
SPECIAI 1,3,5
26 min \Z7 $ 7,9 pm,
SHORTY^^/
A FASCINATING GHOST STORY
OF A DARK DUBLIN MIDNIGHT
Featuring
ORSON WILLIS
WEDNESDAY
limited run
ONE DAY ONLY!
__-Marlon Brando
STATE
*P s n watch our
cinema ads
| (found:! Mastercraftpipe)

Services

NESTORS TV, RADIO, HIFI
SERVICE. Tubes checked free.
Free Estimates. Next to Florida
Bookstore parking lot. 1627 N.W,
Ist Avenue. Phone FR 2 7326.
(M-36-MWF-c).
FOR A CHANGE OF PACE, Come
Horseback Riding at Lake Wauberg
Riding Stables,Tumbleweed Ranch.
Hay Rides and Night Trail Rides.
Student operated. 1/2 Mi. North of
Lake Wauberg. Reservations
and free transportation. Call
466-9295. (M-8-68t-c).

Help Wanted

PART TIME employment. Apply
at Tonys Pizza. 1308 W. Univ.
(E -39-2 t-c).
OPPORTUNITY for accomplished
typist,preferably student wife, to
train as Justowriter operator.
Approximate 40-hour week, time
and half for overtime, group
insurance. Afternoon and* evening
work, Sunday thru Thursday. Call
376-3261,ext.2832 for appointment.
(E-39-3t-c).
WAITERS NEEDED for lunch 11-
2:30. Apply in person at Larrys
Wonderhouse. 14 S. W. Ist Street.
(Behind Sears). (E-37-ts-c).

Lost &. Found

LOST -- A diamond engagement
ring with 2 baguettes, one on each
side. FR 6 3261, ext. 2194.
(L-40-6t-c).
LOST pair of glasses in brown
case. Name on case, Martins
optician. Reward. Call 6-3261, ext.
2784. (L-40-st-c).
LOST -- A mans brown wallet.
Lost on student side at the
Homecoming game. Name inside
wallet, Maurice D. Grubbs. FR
6-4524. (L-39-3t-c).
MANS GOLD WEDDING BAND
near Grove Hall about 2 weeks
ago. Concave surface with
impressions on the surface.
Reward. 6-3930. (L-38-3t-p).
LOST -a ladys
Wittnauer wristwatch. Reward.
Call 372-9162, room 2061, Kathy
Eberle. (L-38-2t-p).
LOST Pair glasses and case,
name on case, jax,
Fla. Call 2.-9275. Harry Ivey.
(L-38-3t-c).
MS T
.. .for fraternity men
to have their portraits
taken for The FJorida
Seminole. Friday,
1 to 4; 7 to 8 p.m.



m :
iMp \ Ip
; : j§v -iltltl l
? *f% \ /
' ,4
||||s %9H| v i# r~* i.. ?- J /V ,-.*Jf /-* - ;
,S| : : >'*gaflEs I BMfl HHH J
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& v^Brnter'i
1 :gmM H^lll^lil
* '?.V;k'£*?-
I PIANIST LEON FLEISHER
...will appear Monday at 8:15 p.m. in the University
Auditoriumo UF students will be admitted free via
I identification cards.

|UF Enters Moot
Court Contest

A 7,000 word legal brief is the
first step in this years attempt
to capture the regional title in
Moot Court competition for the
UF.
The brief is written by senior
UF College of Law students.
Competition for the regional
trophy will be Nov. 21-22.
This years case involves an
Fraternity
Grade Point
Now Rising
Scholastic averages of fraternity
members throughout the nations
colleges have shown a consistent
rise for the past decade until they
now exceed the all-mens averages
on a majority of campuses where
fraternities are situated.
The figures include ones for
the UF.
Final figures for the academic
year, 1961-62, show the all allfi
fi allfi aternity average exceeded the
al!-mens average in 58.1 percent
the colleges reporting,
according to an analysis just
released by the National Inter Interfi
fi Interfi aternity Conference. (NIC) For
t :r academic term 10 years
pievious (1952-53), only 40.7 per
t>!lt of the schools reported
fi aternity averages as being above
{ he all mens averages.
Accompanying the increase in
th e number of schools with a
superior all-fraternity average
has be l he nationwide percentage of
individual fraternity chapters
r Ve the all-mens averages.
Luring 1961-62, 48.8 per cent of
' fraternity chapters reporting
Wer e above their respective all alliens
iens alliens averages, whereas only 41.9
per cent could show a superior
1 anlt ten years earlier.
The percentages were based on
uapters from whom comparable
Jata were available, comprising
iore than three-fourths of all
maternity chapters in the
iates and Canada.

appeal to the united States
Supreme Court of a criminal
conviction. The conviction, moot
court lawyer Perry Odom said,
is being appealed on the basis of
an infraction of constitutional
privileges.
The case in question, Odom said,
was prosecuted and conviction
obtained on evidence seized. The
case is being appealed on the
grounds that the seizure was
illegal and violated the Fourth
Amendment to the Constitution.
The UF team composed of law
school seniors Steve Gardner,
Edgar Moore and Odom must be
prepared to argue both sides of
the case before a panel of Atlanta
lawyers and judges who will decide
the appeal.
The future barristers will have
only 30 minutes to argue the case
before the appointed judges. If
victory is attained in the regional
competition, the team will argue
the same case in New York City
in December. Deciding that case
will be New York attornies and
at least one justice from the
Supreme court, Odom said. At
stake will be the national Moot
Court title.
Army ROTC
Adds Girls
The U. S. Army Reserve Officer
Training Corps (ROTC) program
now includes girls--T8 affracTive
coeds.
The girls were chosen from 43
applicants to serve as company
and brigade sponsors for cadets
at all parades and reviews.
The 18 ROTC sweethearts for
the 1963-64 school year are: Bucky
Anderson, Dianne Quattlebaum,
Betty Wendt, Mary Pfleger, Jeanie
Looney, Suzanne Hull, Jane Nilon,
Katherine Duda, Jean Maynard,
Sonya Hamilton, Beth Gregory,
Christine King, Joy Ann Green,
Bonnie Hanchett, Sharon Davis,
Sheryl Berk, Dolly Findley and
pat Carter.

try OUR 10c TIMBURGER!
CALL-IN 303 N.W. 13th St. OPEN til
* DRiyE-IN FR2-0388 3 am

'CITIZEN KANE

Giant And Genius

By DON FEDERMAN
Movie Reviewer
Orson Welles is a giant of the
cinema industry.
Seeing his first film, Citizen
Kane, I sensed this was more
than just a great first effort,
more than just a film way ahead
of its time, in the character of
Experiments
Help Combat
Heart Attacks
Experiments with rats may help
UF scientists to find away to
prevent heart attacks from
occurring in potential coronary
victims.
The experiments, no\v being
conducted in the animal center
of the UF Food Technology
Laboratory, are to establish the
effectiveness of bio-flavinoids
in deterring the formation of
cholestoral which causes coronary
thrombosis.
According to lab technician
Howard Povey, the rats are put
on a high fat diet consisting of
butter and cholestoral. The diet
is selected to induce coronary
thrombosis in the rats.
Then, Povey, said the rats are
fed various levels of bio-flavin bio-flavinoids,
oids, bio-flavinoids, which are derivatives of
citrus rind and tobacco pulp.
It is hoped, povey said, that
the bio-flavinoids will prove to
be a deterrent in the formation
of cholestoral and thus reduce
occurrance of coronaries in the
rats.
The results of the tests would
have to be highly conclusive
for the experiments to have any
significance, Povey said.
IFC ID Cuds
Used For HC
Interfraternity Council identifi identification
cation identification cards were used by about
2,800 fraternity men during
Homecoming weekend.
The cards serve as a means of
identifying fraternity members and
checking the flow of independents
at closed parties.
With the number of alumni
and out-of-town people here last
week, its difficult to evaluate the
actual stfccess of the cards, said
Bob Wolfe, IFC vice president.
This year the cards are taken
in a more serious manner, so we
are expecting better results and
a more successful evaluation in
future weekends, he said.
KLEAN-A-MATIC
LAUNDRY AND
DRY CLEANING
UNDER NEW
MANAGEMENT
QUALITY IS
OUR SPECIALTY
1722 W. Univ. Ave.

Friday, Nov. 1,1963 The Florida Alligator

Kane, is the devastating statement
of Western man, the man of the
alienated ego.
Citizen Kane plays today and
Saturday in the Florida Union.
Kanes vision is similar to that
of the paranoiac -- the world
consists as a set of objects from
which the ego feels a sense of
estrangement.
In order to make an identity
with this supposed hostile
environment, the ego attempts to
manipulate the objects of its
external world so as to create
a sense of order. For the ego,
the only alternative to order is
chaos. Without this sense of order,
there is lost the feeling of control.
To lose this renders the ego
helpless. Yet to have control is
the very mark of chaos, for what
is there to control?
Kane's life begins as a boy
with a plain wooden sled and ends
up with hundreds of statues.
Kanes first home is a modest
cabin; he dies in a huge, but
empty mansion.
Kane is first pictured as the
happy child and ends up a broken
man, incapable of love or feeling.
And as Kane gains more control
of people, he loses more control
of himself.
In the end, he loses the things
he once cherished. All that is
'UlendoCarrs
Latest Book
Ulendo, meaning journey in
the chinyanja tongue of Africa,
is the title of Dr. Archie Carrs
latest book.
Carr, marine biologist and
winner of two major writing awards
for the re-telling of his adventures
following a sea turtle along the
coasts of the western hemisphere,
has written this time of Africa
in his newest work.
The book is set for a January
release date.
Carr also has two other books
written for the Life Natural
Library series.

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left of the past is a vague
reminder of his childhood home,
enclosed in a small crystal ball.
The genius of Welles is not
only in his characterizations of
personality types, but in his
methods.
The photography is breathtaking.
Distortions and odd camera
angles add to the dramatic effect.
Cropping technique brings about
images that left this reviewer
breathless. The shots of Kanes
estate and the inventory scene
at the end of the movie are
overwhelming in effect.
' 1
There's
no Battle
|of the
I Bulge
when you
wear these
neat IVY
DACROMATIC
threads from
FREMACSI
The gals
love their
hip-hugging
good looks.
Make the
switch and
get your
long, lean
swingin'
f
pronto. 7.98
"Your Ivy Shop"
112 W. Univ. Ave.

Page 9



Page 10

The Florida Alligator Friday, Nov. 1,196

Auburn To Make Or Break UF

By GLENN LANEY
Os The Gator Staff
The Auburn game could make
or break the UFs 1963 football
season.
Right now the teams record
stands at 3-2-1. This represents
a very up and down type season
for the Gators. The peak was
Alabama. There have been many
low points. But the Gators have
a chance to start another streak
which may give them the
momentum for a 7-2-1 record and
a possible bowl bid.
The Gators will be up against
one of the hottest teams in the
nation Saturday when they face
Auburn during the Tigers Home Homecoming.
coming. Homecoming. Last year the Tigers
also entered the Florida Game with
an unblemished record and ended
up on the short end of a 22-3

SWEATSHIRTS
( J FLo IO A J \
SWEATSUITS (Jj k\
SWEAT SHIRTS GATOR stencilled
Russ-Cote lettering, long & short sleeve
SWEAT SUITS Plain, navy, oxford & white
GYM SOCKS Wool, cotton, nylon & blends
GYM SHOES Converse, Beacon Falls & U.S. Keds.
Jimmie Hughes Sporting Goods
Northcentral Florida's Sporting Goods Headquarters
1113 W. University Avenue FRanklin 2-8212
TECHNICAL AND REFERENCE BOOKS
S-MATRIX THEORY OF STRONG INTERACTIONS
...Geoffrey Chew
NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE
t .N, Bloembergen
THEORY OF FUNDAMENTAL PROCESSES
...R.P. Feynman
PARAMAGNETIC RESONANCE.. .George Poke
MA HEMATICS FOR QUANTUM MECHANICS
...John David Jackson
THERMAL PHYSICS ...Philip M. Morse
QUANTUM THEORY OF MANY PARTICLE SYSTEMS
...Hove, Hugenholtz & Howland
QUANTUM ELECTRODYNAMICS...R.P. Feynman
THE MANY BODY PROBLEM ...David Pines
FIBONACCI NUMBERS ...N.N.Vorobev
CAMPUS SHOP AND BOOKSTORE

score.
Gator Head Coach Ray Graves
said this will probably be to
Auburns advantage. You can be
sure they will be thinking about
last years game and will really
be up for this one, he said.
This will be the acid test for
our defense, Graves said.
The Gator defense will find two
new men in the starting end
positions. Gary Thomas and
Charles Casey will replace injured
ends Russ and Barry Brown. Lynn
Matthews, who was injured in
practice Wednesday, will make the
trip. It is doubtful he will see
any action.
Auburn had last week off to
prepare for the game, while the
Gators had their hands full with
tough conference opponent LSU.
Graves, asked if the layoff might
be to Floridas advantage, said

it might cause Auburn to lose
their fine fighting edge.
Graves was unhappy, however
with the way Gator practices are
going. The defense is having
trouble stopping the wide end
sweeps Auburn uses so well and
so often in their offense, Graves
said.
If they cant stop the B-team
I dont see how they expect to
stop Sidle, he added.
Jimmy Sidle is leader of the
Auburn backfield, considered by
many, including Graves, as one of
the best in the South. The scrappy
young quarterback is leading the
Southeastern Conference (SEC) in
rushing with 494 yards in 82

| GATOR SPORTS |

JWr IL.#JP |j 1 M, ft jfiP** bMh z jf. #
h TJffT,l^liwr 1
' Wf AH. I i hi JEmi & Ttii : "_Li jf j. Iff
; j i sMM milk;-.fqblffiV ~ 1 -S- dim^giiCgi^iKlS
I&1H
?aMF jaMi r 'V Cis wflP4 v i
TWO REASONS WHY
. . the 1963 Gators are ranked third in the nation defensively are defensive safe safety
ty safety men Ken Russell (16) and Bruce Bennett (14). Both are in a combined effort to bring
down Mississippi State's Ode Burrell.

Mural Scores
(Blue fraternity league flag
football)
PGD 27 DSP 0
LXA 6 PKP 6
Law League
flag football
Frosh I7- Soph II 6
Juniors 18 Soph I 6
Seniors I won by forfeit
Senior 111 27 Frosh II 6

. &
'' 1 v
Dance to the "Big Beats
Friday&Saturday
Dancing every night til 2 am
Friday & Saturday Gentlemen wear Ties
Ladies, No Sports Clothes, Please.
<&
North of the UF on 441

carries, an average of over six
yards a carry. He is fifth in the
nation in rushing.
Two other backs in the potent
Auburn backfield are Tucker
Fredrickson and Larry Rawson.
Both are from Florida. They pose
a serious inside running threat to
go along with Sidles wide option
play.
It will take three touchdowns
to win this game, Graves said.
If I had to rate the two teams
right now I would have to say we
have the edge on the line and they
have the edge in the backfield,
he added.

Florida State Tries
To Bounce Back

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) Head
coach Bill Peterson, smarting
under a 2-2-1 season effort this
year, said yesterday he hopes
the Florida State Seminoles can
snap back despite a depressing loss
to underdog Virginia Tech last

fte
j : WSFM
Wr >% <& W~
- mM* M I W Hf# n
L Jf ;: f
GARY THOMAS
.. .to start Saturday

week.
Our morale is ail right, he
said. We just need a solid win
to put us back on our feet.
The Seminoles go against
Furman here Saturday.
The Seminoles started the
season in high gear by upsetting
Miami 24-0. They took a 13-0
licking at the hands of Texas
Christian, but came back the next
week to shut out wake Forest
35-0. Theyve been winless since.
Peterson said the tribes kicking
game had suffered, and team effort
was below par.
Peterson said, the team is
working hard on its kicking igame.
We cant work any more hours
and theyve never let up.
Peterson isnt taking Furman
lightly despite the fact Florida
State is favored in Saturdays
game.
They have a good quarterback
and a real fine offense, Peterson
said. They are similar to Virginia
Tech in their style of play.



rFROM THE GATOR PIT

Not A Chance
To Win, But...

Theres not 3. chance for the Gators to win this week because*
1) The Auburn Tigers are unbeaten and sport a 5-0 record.
2) They are ranked fifth in the nation and are big favorites.
3) Auburn hasnt lost a Homecoming game since 1952, when
Jackie Parker and Mississippi State turned the trick 49-34 in a wild
offensive battle.
4) Since 1952 Auburns home record is 38-2-1.
5) The Gators have never won a football game at Cliff Hare Stadium
in Auburn.
6) The Gators will face, in Jimmy Sidle, the SECs leading rusher
and a boy who ranks in the top ten in the nation in total offense with
970 yards gained in five games.
7) The one foe in common for the two teams was Georgia Tech.
Florida in their season opener lost to Tech 9-0. Auburn beat Tech
29-21.
And so Gator fans how can we possibly beat the War Eagles? just
ask the Bear. We know a little secret about the UF football team: They
win when theyre the biggest underdogs; So it will be Floridas Fightin
Gators 23-Auburns kittens 17.
Team Send-Off
The team will be leaving for the airport from the parking lot
between Murphree Hall and the Music Building at 1 : 15 p.m. tomorrow.
A big sendoff with the band and all is planned for 1:00. Well be there
and we hope to see you, too.
They will return Saturday night at : 4op.m. See yall at the airport;
Send Telegrams
All those interested in sending telegrams (like we are) to the team
can do so in 50 words for the very nominal fee of $1.25 if sent Friday
night for delivery Saturday morning, if you want to send a direct
wire it will cost $1.60 for 15 words. Take your pick.
Send all telegrams to either: ~
Florida Football team Florida Football Team
Black Angus Motel OR Cliff Hare Stadium
Columbus, Georgia Auburn, Alabama.
Nuff said, the rest is up to you fans who care.
Fortune Telling
As a regular weekly feature I will get to make a fool of myself
by predicting the big weekend college games.
I've already picked Florida over Auburn (since thats REALLY the
weeks top game).
In other action LSU will face their traditional rival Ole Miss at
Baton Rouge. And if you dont think thats going to be a hell-raiser
lookout? Frankly Billy Truax and company really impressed us, but
the Rebels are a horse of another color. Tiger Stadium is rough
for any opponent. Well go with the Bayou Bengals, but dont hold
us to it. (This is the weeks number two game.)
FSU over Furman.... Seminole Pete is having a rough go of it
this year. Furman has looked good in early season play, but the
people in Tallahassee are hungry for a win and theyre about due.
Vanderbilt over Boston College.... Jack Greens Commodores
will be playing a team that is not superhuman this week. Well go
with our coaching staffs alumnus.
Georgia Tech over Duke.... this is a tough one. Duke lost last
week while Tech won, but Atlantas a tough town for any blue devil.
Alabama over Mississippi State .... The Bulldogs tied us remember?
Well go with the Crimson. Tide, but lookout Bear, this could be
another one of those days.
Kentucky over Miami.... Hey Gus; The Canes are overdue,
but we hear that the Wildcats are loaded. Theyre playing at Lexington
where Kentucky lost their Homecoming game last week to Georgia.
Ii Mr. Mira can get together with the rest of his boys it could be
a different story.
North Carolina over Georgia.... an upset here, the Bulldogs are
due for a loss.
Tulane over South Carolina... .Could be an upset here. The SEC
is tough through and through, ri|ht down to the Greenies.
Well this is our first week at this prognostication bit so excuse
Ms..,if.wgxe-n6l perfect* Soo y*nll next week *
Rod Hubbert get well quick.
And good night Kay Stephenson wherever you aie.

S/Ue
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By ERNIE LITZ
Assistant Sports Editor

Sloan Drills Cagers
For Season f s Opener

By JOHN CLENDENON
Os The Gator Staff
The name of the game is defense
this week at UF cage sessions as
Coach Norman Sloans charges
prepare for the season opener
RICHARD PEEK
Dec. 3 in Florida Gymnasium.
Our biggest problem last year
was our defensive work, Sloan
remarked at practice yesterday.
We gave our opponents too many

Russell Specializing
In Fumble Chasing

Ken Russell, a rugged 161-pound
corner linebacker, has added a
new speciality for the UF.
Russells primary job is
defensive replacement for Larry
Dupree. This has led to his new newfound
found newfound speciality.
Russell now specializes in
recovering fumbles, and Florida
head coach Ray Graves is cer certainly
tainly certainly hopeful he will get an
opportunity to continue his efforts
against undefeated Auburn
Saturday.
Russell has recovered four
fumbles in the Gators first five
games and is only one short of a
school record for recovering in a
single season. The title is now
held jointly by Bob Flowers (1950)
and All-America tackle Charles
La Pradd (1951).
Ken is a determined, alert boy
who manages to show up where the
football is, and when its knocked
loose hes always right near where
it falls, says Graves.
To say Russells work is trying
is underestimating the situation.
-When the 1963 season started,
this junior from Midland, Ra. was
a 182-pounder. He opened against
LSU at 161.
For this he takes a great deal
of r i bbirig" fro m fe 1 lo~w~deFe"ns ive
man. Bruce Bennett of Valdosta,

Friday/Nov. 1,1963 The Florida Alligator

easy baskets. To correct this well
be stressing defense at all our
practices, Sloan continued.
Sloan said the Gators would also
be working to improve rebounding
skills. Last year Floridas com comparatively
paratively comparatively small starting team
suffered from a shortage of
rebounds.
The team will be bigger this
year,however, and the rebounding
problem may be solved. Up from
the freshmen team are two of the
tallest cagers in Gator roundball
history.Richard Peek, a 6-foot-ll
giant from Pensacola, and Gary
Keller, a 6-foot-9 ace from St.
Petersburg, are two of the
reasons why Sloans eyes light
up when the word height is
mentioned.
Peek has caught the eye of
Sloan in preseason workouts and
has been playing at one of the
first team forward spots in early
scrimmage sessions.
Dick has a good outside shot
and hes also very quick for a
man his size, Sloan said. Hes
shown tremendous improvement in
the last year and has made the
change to forward with ease,
Peek played at the center post
on the freshman team last year.
Also coming in for special
mention from Sloan was Bruce

Ga. Bennett started the year at
174 pounds, and now weighs 163.
I started the season telling
Bruce not to worry, Id protect
him from all those big ends and
linemen, says Russell. Now
he outweighs me by two pounds
hes getting overly concerned
about taking care,of my health.
Florida coaches, however, are
not too concerned over either ones
ability to care for himself.
One of our most pleasant
surprises, and one of the biggest
reasons for our solid performance
on pass defense so far has been
the play of Russell and Bennett,
says Graves. Theyve done a
good job, and believe me theyll
get an opportunity to work against
Jimmy Sidle Saturday.
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Moore, 5-foot-9 sophomore from
Akron, Ohio. Bruce has good
speed and should be a capable
third man at guard behind Tom
Baxley and Brooks Henderson/
Sloan said.
a timely reminder
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Page 11



The Florida Alligator Friday, Nov. 1,1963

Page 12

Alpha Zeta
Initiation
Complete
The initiation early this week
of 31 Alpha Zeta pledges concluded
a week in which the pledges had
to obtain 50 signatures on a scroll.
While securing the signatures,
each pledge had to wear a coat
and tie with a wooden shield around
his neck.
This seems to be one of our
best pledge classes. Viewing their
excellent past record, we are
expecting much from our new
brothers of Alpha Zeta, Murdock
Gillis, chronicler of the Florida
Chapter of Alpha Zeta, said.
New brothers are Gladstone
Solomon, Jose Perolomo, Alvaro
Sanchez, Angel Cordero, Jack
Jones, issam Hassaballa, Henry
Morton, Edward Lewis, James
Eller, John Mitchell, Dale
Zimmerman, Leonard Lindahl,
Edgar Jowers, Jose Calvo, Donald
Bachman, Charles Salter, Darrel
Roberts, William McNab, Bobby
Damron, Cary Clark, Larry Britt,
Hector Sarmiento, George Drum Drummond,
mond, Drummond, Esmail Shokrail, William
Dampier, Alix Paez, Aurelio
Revilla, Luis Tergas, Manuel
Ruiz, Enrique Ampuero and Stuart
Polly.

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Hand, sewn vamps
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I 1
m mtkm l
m
M
EXIBITING HIS NEW INVENTION
...a telescoping box for packing Florida cirtus, is
William G. Grizzell.

FICUS Offers
Many Courses

A total of 117,553 persons have
enrolled for correspondence
courses since the UF program
began 44 years ago, General
Extension Division head Robert
V. Noble said.
About 3,700 students are taking

courses from the extension
division at the present time, Noble
said. The number fluctuates con constantly,
stantly, constantly, he added, due to people
adding and dropping courses.
The General Extension Division
of Florida was established in 1919
by Dean B. C. (Bert) Riley, who
served as its head for more than
40 years. Riley died only days
before he was due to retire in
the summer of 1962.
The name of the extension
division was changed to the
Florida institute for continuing
University Studies (FICUS) not too
long ago.
FICUS is a member of the
National university Extension
Association, along with 52 other
institutions. Students are able
to take courses from any of these
member colleges.

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Profs Device
To Aid Citrus

More man $90,000 probably can
be saved by the Florida citrus
industry in a single season if the
invention of a UF engineer is
adopted.
William G. Grizzell, marketing
researcher for the United States
Department of Agriculture,(USDA)
developed a device which greatly
reduces labor requirements for
forming and assembling two-piece
full telescoping fiberboard
cartons. This is the type of
container used in about a third
of the states citrus shipment.
Grizzell has been working on the
project for a year in cooperation
with the UF Agricultural
Experiment Station. He is an
industrial engineer for the Trans Transportation
portation Transportation and Facilities Research
Division of the Agricultural
Marketing Service.
Savings would be even greater
if the device were applied in all
citrus -producing states, Grizzell
said.
This is one of the many kinds
of improvements in moving
agricultural products through
marketing channels which help
keep consumers food costs from
rising.
From a third to two-thirds less
labor is required when the new
device is employed, Grizzell said.
It was developed for use with
4/5-bushel size cartons used as
shipping containers for citurs,but
it can also be applied with equal
advantage in packing houses
handling apples, peaches,
tomatoes or other commodities
shipped in the same type of
container.
The new invention was tested
in Florida packing houses, where
equipment presently used to form
cartons consists of either short
work tables or wood jigs that are
designed to hold tne inner piece
of the carton during assembly.
It was developed to meet the

need for a better method of
forming cartons to keep pace with
automatic filling machines.
One worker using the AMS
device can form, assemble, and
place cartons in a chute at a rate
of 488 per hour. A working using
older methods can handle only
about 136 to 288 cartons per hour.
According to Grizzell, the cost
of constructing and installing the
contrivance is estimated at $22,
including about $4 for parts, it
has an estimated useful life of
five years.
The USDA carton forming
device is made of half-inch round
steel. Rods are shaped to fold
the flaps of the outer piece of
the carton and to hold the carton
during assembly.
A metal guide is attached to one
side of it to aid the insertion of
the inner piece of the carton into
the outer, on a shoe-horn
principle.
Oversleeping
Is Os Past
Oversleeping in Gainesville is
a thing of the past, according to
Paul w. Starke, Gainesville
Telephone Answering Service
official.
The answering service will wake
up any UF student each morning
for $5.50 a month, Starke said.
A call is placed at any desired
time. A second call is made to be
sure that the party is up and
out.
The wake-up service, offeredby
the Gainesville; Telephone
Answering Service, has been here
since 1955, but is advertised for
the first time in the new student
directory.
Wfi will call at any hour, since
we are open seven days a week,
24 hours a day, S*arke said