Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Fall Frolics Stars
Della Reese, Preps

Song stylist Della Reese and the
humorous singing group, the Four
Preps, headline the Interfraternity
Councils (IFC) Fall Frolics Nov.
8 at 8:30 p.m. in the Florida
Gymnasium.
The statuesque Miss Reese has
risen as one of Americas top

The Florida
Alligator
University of Florida, Gainesville

Vol .56, N 0.39

Atom Experts
To Meet Here

Nuclear researchers from all
over the world will gather here
Monday Wednesday to discuss re recent
cent recent progress in the field of noise
analysis in nuclear systems.
About 100 experts on nuclear
systems from Europe, Asia and
America will participate in the
three day symposium. Itisspon Itissponsored
sored Itissponsored by the UFs Department of
Nuclear Engineering and the
Atomic Energy Commission.
This symposium will provide
an exchange of ideas on the state
of the art among the worlds leading
authorities on nuclear systems.
Dr. Uhrig explained the growing
field of noise analysis as the study
of statistical fluctuations which
occur in a nuclear system in order
to determine the characteristics of
the system.
The sessions, set for McCarty

Millhopper To Become Beauty Area

One of the UFs most popular
c oeducational meeting grounds will
be transformed from a -hole in
the ground" to an idyllic
rendezvous if the dream of pro professor
fessor professor Melvin J. Frost comes
true.
Devil's Millhopper, Florida's
largest sinkhole, is undergoing
plans by the UF Geography Club
to become an area of natural
beauty.
Under the supervision of the UF
Geography Department's Frost,
the Club plans to clean up the
area and add trails in and around
the sinkhole.
The Millhopper is being abused
by UF students,* Frost said.
Cars driving in and out are
destroying the natural setting and
causing increased land erosion."
Members of the geography club
have investigated the area with
1963 HC Spirit
Now Costs $25
Seven UF students charged with
stealing Homecoming decorations
were fined $25 each in Gainesville
City Court Tuesday in the spirit
of Homecoming.
Judge Wade Hampton, aUF
alumnus, told the students, Under
other circumstances Id give you
jail terms, but in the spirit of
Homecoming, I fine you $25.

vocalist via television, radio, night
club appearances and records.
One of the lively ones, Miss
Reese's distinctive stylings have
gained her national acclaim
appearing on television shows such
as the Jackie Gleason Show, the
Perry Como Show and more than

Thursday, 0ct.31,1963

Auditorium, will hear 24 authori authorities
ties authorities in the field.
UF speakers include Dr. Uhrig
and Dr. Ralph G. Self ridge of
the UFs Department of
Mathematics.
Other speakers will come from
Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory,
the University of Michigan,
Atomics International in Canoga
Park, Calif., Milletron Corpora Corporation,
tion, Corporation, oak Ridge National
Laboratory, Saclay Nuclear Re Research
search Research Center in France, lowa
State University, Massachusetts
Institute of Technology, Cornell
University, Queen Mary College,
London Argonne National Labora Laboratory,
tory, Laboratory, the University of Arizona,
University of Washington,
Westinghouse Electric Co. and
General Electric Co.

UF Grounds Superintendent Noel
K. Lake.
The UF grounds committee
has promised to care for the Mill Millhopper
hopper Millhopper if students will respect it
when it is cleaned up." Frost
said.
The Millhopper is one of the
largest topographic features in

1 GREAT PUMPKIN RIDES TONIGHT
/fKr"
41

20 appearances on the Ed Sullivan
Show.
Miss Reese has also appeared
in such leading clubs as the
Fountainebleau in Miami, the
Flamingo in Las Vegas, the
Cocoanut Grove in Hollywood, the
Copacabana in New York and
Mister Kellys in Chicago.
Miss Reese began her singing
career in her hometown of Detroit
in 1957 and had her first golden
million sales record in the summer
of 1959 with the ballad Dont
You Know.
The Four Preps will bring to
the UF campus an assortment of
humorous song renditions that have
won them enormous popularity at
college campuses across the
country.
The Four Preps have entertained
from San Francisco to New York.
One of their latest albums,
Campus Confidential, has been
the Four Preps most successful
to date satirizing campus life
through songs.
Tickets are $1.75 per person and
go on sale Friday at the
Information Booth across from
the Student Service Center (Hub).
A 'Wet 1
Christmas
Gainesville may be wet in
time for Christmas, according
to city zoning clerk Kenneth
Wilson.
The 12 liquor licenses allotted
to Gainesville after the wet-dry
referendum in September, will
soon be given. Seventy-three
license applications have
already been processed,accord processed,according
ing processed,according to Wilson.
The majority of the
applications processed so far
have been for beer-wine permits
for grocery stores and
restaurants, Wilson said. No
limit on these yet has been
established.

this area, according to Frost,
who said it is a growing sinkhole
and is eroding naturally all the
time.
The actual hole is more than
200 feet wide and 100 feet deep,
Frost said, and the area is covered
with a variety of plant life.
Geography club members are

.
If
HjgMk jfljH
9B ***
Hk
v
d EE
H[ S" 1
m e
K *H
E
f 1
p : IH Eh : S
i
VIVACIOUS DELLA REESE
.. will appear here this month.
Greeks Offer
Time, Services

UF fraternities and sororities
have volunteered their services
for the entertainment of children
at the J. Hillis Miller Health
Center.
According to Miss Barbara
Gentry, head pediatrics nurse at
the health center, many fraterni-

hoping UF fraternities will become
interested in the project. Saturday
work parties are being planned to
begin rehabilitation of the area.
The Millhopper has always
been spoken of in a derogatory
manner," Frost said.
We feel that by transforming
it into an area of natural beauty
the respect of the students will
be gained.
4th Quantum
Institute Here
i
A fourth winter Institute on the
Quantum Theory Project for Re Research
search Research will be held here and at
Sanibel Island from Dec. 9 through
Jan. 18.
The quatum 1 eory Project is
a joint program of the chemistry
and physics departments here de devoted
voted devoted to the understanding of the
modern quantum theory. The
project was established in the
winter of 1960 at the UF.
Per-Olov Lowdin, graduate re research
search research professor of chemistry and
physics, is director.
Lowdin spends about half of
his time at the UF and half at
Uppsala University,Sweden, where
he is professor of quantum
chemistry. He is active as the
scientific director of both groups
and is now in Sweden.

ties and sororities, have offered
to give time to read and play
with the children in the pediatrics
ward.
A program has been arranged by
the Childrens Extra-Curricular
Affairs Committee whereby parti participating
cipating participating sororities and fraternities
choose one month to be responsible
for visiting the children, Miss
Gentry said.' About four members
from the. group will sit with the
children each day.
Two student nurses will inform
visiting students of hospital rules
and regulations. A planned
program of entertainment also will
be set up.
We are also encouraging the
groups to pick one room as their
own special project, Miss Gentry
said. This room can be decorated
for the children or perhaps
something special for the child
ran be placed in the room.
The Childrens Extra-
Curricular Affairs Committee
holds monthly meetings to decide
items which are most needed and
the means to obtain funds.
This program is mostly for the
older children who can understand
and appreciate students giving
their time to visit with them,
Miss Gentry said.
Wells Selected
As FBK President
Charley Wells is the new
president of Florida Blue Key,
mens leadership honorary here.
Other officers elected this week
Include Jim La r che; vice
president; Mac Melvin, secretary,
and Mike Jackson, treasurer.
All elections were recorded as
by acclamation.



Page 2

The Florida Alligator Thursday,Oct.3l,l963

Famed Hypnotist
Performs Tonight

Dr. Franz polgar, who has
hypnotized more than one million
persons, will present Fun With
The Mind at 8;15 p.m. today in
the University Auditorium.
There is no admission charge.
A former student of Sigmund

WE RE NOT OPEN FOR BUSINESS
YET, BUT WE ARE OPEN FOR
BROWSING.
tCcDg
I 1227 West University Avenue
* '
Artcarved
LXi DIAMOND and WEDDING RINGSJ
II Gainesville's Quality Jewelers
K. i
1% ||l L wr IRB
| M wJUIhP tAdi WafllWv
103 W. If Univ. Ave.

Pupil Os Sigmund Freud

Freud, holding doctorates in both
psychology and economics, Polgar
says a hypnotist cannot order a
subject in a trance to do anything
going counter to a basic code of
right and wrong.
Dr. Polgar performs before

about 300 audiences a year, in
addition to frequent television
JKk
r
DR. FRANZ POLGAR
. o operforming tonight.
guest appearances with such
persons as Arthur Godfrey, Garry
Moore and Dave Carroway.
In his 50s Polgar scorns the
Svengali approach to hypnotism
with crystal balls, bejeweled tur turbans
bans turbans and mysterious powers from
the East. Polgar appears in
conventional attire, utters no
mumbo-jumbo incantations and en entertains
tertains entertains his audiences in a refined
manner.
NTE Exams
Scheduled
Seniors planning to teach school
may take the National Teacher
Examinations (NTE), Feb. 15.
NTE scores are used by many
large school districts for
employing new teachers and by
several states for granting teacher
certificates.
Future teachers may take the
Common Examinations, testing
their professional knowledge and
educational background, and one
or two of 13 optional tests,
measuring their mastery of the
subjects they expect to teach.

# S PRODUCE
Baking Potatoes 3 for 10<:
Reg. Irish Potatoes 5 lb. for 33$
Bell Peppers 5$ each
Large Delicious Apples 10c each
Eating Apples small 2 for 5$
large 5$ each
Pink Grapefruit 10$ each
Indian River Oranges 55$ doz.
Lettuce 25$ head
Celery 15$ stalk
Coconuts 18$ each
FANELLI & ED WARDS
MARKET
2410 NEWBERRY ROAD Within Walking Distance
across from Beta Woods Os Corry Village

AEC Atom Exhibit
Now On Display

A special free exhibit of the
United States Atomic Energy Com Commission
mission Commission (AEC), Atoms in
Action, will be shown at the UF
by the Department of Entomology
on the third floor, Unit B of
Dan McCarty Hall through Nov. 7.
The exhibit will be open to the
public at 9 a.m. noon until Nov. 6.
Atoms in Action is a display
of colorful panels and models ex explaining
plaining explaining the peaceful uses of
atomic energy simply and
graphically.
One panel describes the
principal components of the atom.
Another explains how useful energy
is obtained by atomic fission - the
splitting of atoms of heavy
elements such as uranium and
plutonium. Other panels describe
the uses of radioactive materials
in agriculture, medicine and
industry.
Several island exhibits are
featured--an animated model of
an atomic power plant, an illumin illuminated
ated illuminated explanation of nuclear fusion,
where power is produced by uniting
atoms of light elements at
extremely high temperatures and
pressures, and a model of the
Radiation
Short Course
On Campus
An international short course
on Radioisotopes and Radiation
in Entomology, the first of its
kind in the world, will last through
Nov. 29 here.
Purpose of the short course is
to acquaint the UFs 19 foreign
visitors on the use of radioisotopes
and radiation as a tool for re research
search research in entomology, Dr. John T.
Creighton, head of the entomology
department said.
The UF is fortunate to have
such an outstanding short course
offered, Creighton said.
Some of the areas discussed are
the effects of radiation and sterile
male control of codling moths,
screwworms, tropical fruit flies,
mosquitoes, cockroaches, bed
bugs, house flies and body lice.
The International Atomic Energy
Commission and the Food and
Agricultural Organization of the
United Nations are sponsoring the
course.

nations first nuclear powered
merchant vessel, the n.S.
Savannah.
THE AECs free traveling
exhibits are part of the
commissions continuing program
to keep the American public
informed on the nations progress
in nuclear research and
development.
IK: W
GATOR GIRL
00 0 today who likes bowling
is freshman Chris Hummel.
An engineering major, this
5 feet 6,freen-eyed bru brunette
nette brunette has 36-23-36 ; for
statistics.
Democrat
Meet Set
UF Young Democrats will attend
a workshop in Orlando this week weekend.
end. weekend.
Former UF professor William
Carleton andU.S.SenatorSpessard
Holland will address the workshop.
Each of the gubernatorial hopefuls
will be available for questions.
UF students interested in attend attending
ing attending the workshop may get informa information
tion information at the main desk of the Florida
Union. Registration deadline is
4;30 p.m. today.
Potter To Speak
Here Tonight
Dr. Robert Potter, philosphy of
education instructor, will be the
featured speaker at the Student
Florida Education Association
meeting tonight at 7:15.
Dr. Potter taught at the Univer University
sity University of Hawaii last summer.
This meeting will be in Norman
Hall, room 214.
twiq says its
tacy ShltS
one* one-three-one west
( university avenue



WILLIAM W. DEEN
. .engineering 'wheel 1
Law Students
Are Debating
Civil Cases
By PEGGY BLANCHARD
Os The Gator Staff
A little boy ran across the
street to see Santa Claus with some
other children.
A worried mother ran after him.
When she was almost to the other
side she was struck by a car.
Loss of working time, personal
inconvenience and loss of complete
physical capacities resulted from
the accident. Does the driver of
the car stand liable in this case?
Practice court lawyers will
debate the pros and cons of this
and other civil cases during the
remainder of the trimester.
Criminal cases were handled
by senior law students during the
first part of the trimester.
Cases are now civil in nature,
according to Law Professor H. O.
Enwall, who handles the court.
Trials are held in the courtroom
of the county courthouse to lend
authenticity he said. Cases are
prepared just as they would be
for actual tiral, the professor
said. Cases may be actual,
fictitious or adapted for trial.
Jury panels are composed of
freshmen law students while
second-year law -tudents serve
as witnesses. Witnesses and jurors
are given a set of facts pertinent
to the case. It is the duty of the
lawyer to obtain the information
from the prospective jurymen and
witnesses, by questioning, he said.
Juror challenges are permitted
in practice court as in real court.
The facts possessed by the juror
determines if he can serve after
he has been questioned.
Witnesses are questioned and
sworn depositions taken before
the trial date by the lawyers.
FU Goes
On Radio
The Flo r Ida Union T FuYfras taken
to the airways in the form of a
new radio show aired three times
weekly over WRUF Radios
Your Florida Union Speaks
is heard at 10:05 Monday,
Wednesday and Friday nights and
featu as news o FU-sponsored
events plus guest interviews.
WRUF is at 850 on the radio
dial.
Rendezvous
Halloween
Dance
The Playboys will be featured
Friday night at the Club
Rendezvous.
The dance will be from 8 p.m.
until midnight.
Club Rendezvous in the
Florida Union basement.

'Peeping Toms': A Problem

Peeping Tom cases here average
two a month, according to Campus
Patrolman C. C. Goad.
The average offender at the
UF engages in voyeurism on a dare
or as a kick. He usually uses
binoculars .and often climbs a tree
for a better view, Goad said.
A popular spot is the tunnel
UF Engineer
Elected Head
01 ASAE
A UF student has been elected
president 'of the National Student
Society of the American Society
of Agricultural Engineers (ASAE).
William W. Deen, SEG from
Bunnell, was elected to succeed
Tony Brennan of the University
of Georgia as national president
of ASAE. He was elected at the
semi-annual convention held
recently at Miami Beach.
The UF student society was
represented at the convention by
100 per cent of its membership.
Representatives from all 50 states
attended.
Deen, past president of the UF
society of ASAE, ran for the
national presidency on a platform
stressing membership and pro professional
fessional professional registration.
Deen, a member of Phi Delta
Theta fraternity, has been under undersecretary
secretary undersecretary of Religious Affairs, a
Florida Blue Key speaker, a
member of Legislative Council and
secretary of the Benton
Engineering Society.
Ohio Stale
Prof Here
Dr. Anthony A. Nemetz,
professor of philosophy at Ohio
State University, will address UF
faculty members and graduate
students here Monday at 3:45p.m.
in the College of Law Auditorium.
Title of the speech will be,
Teaching in a sophistic age.
Dr. Nemetz is nationally known
for producing a seminar on college
teaching.
Dr. Nemetz has been a speaker
at numerous national and regional
conferences on graduate
education, said College of
Education Dean Joseph B. White.

IMPORTED TIRES
FOR SPORTS
CARS
FOR PASSENGER
CARS
DUNLOP
Dixie-Vim S 405 NW 13th St.
Tire City Ph. F.R 2-5030
" ' | 111 l

leading to Norman Hall, Goad
said. Such cases are charged with
trespassing and turned over to
the UF Dean of Men who usually
puts them on social probation, he
added.
The girls on this campus are
largely to blame for many cases,
said Goad. In hot weather, most
windows in the dorms are left
open and fully lighted. Naturally,
this is when we have our most
trouble.
A repeated offender usually
needs psychiatric help and is
turned over to the J. Hillis Miller
Health Center, Goad said.
The Peeping Tom is apathetic
instance of individual maladjust-
Vanilla
Still Tops
UF dairy lab technicians can
produce ice cream in almost any
flavor, but the average student
here will still choose vanilla.
At least thats the conclusion of
R. F. Bennett, manager of the
dairy plant here producing all milk
products for the UF Foodservice.
About half our total of 1,000
gallons of ice cream each week is
vanilla, Bennett said. Its the
most popular flavor all over the
country.
Other popular flavors here are
chocolate chip, chocolate, butter
brickie and strawberry, according
to Bennett.
Bennett said the UF lab produces
special ice cream for many
organizations throughout the state,
but these flavors seldom become
popular or can be sold on the
general market.
I recently made some honey
ice cream for a meeting of honey
producers and they loved it,
Bennett said, but I dont think
it would ever sell.
ALFORD'S
TOWER HOUSE
"CHAMPION"
half-pound chopped
STEAK 97c
hashed potatoes,slaw
tomatoes, bread
coffee
"Good eatin', Podner"

Thursday, 0ct.31,1963 The Florida Alligator

ment, but socially rarely harmful,
UF psychiatrist Dr. Robert
Williams said.
His activity is invariably
carried out in secrecy. When his
presence is detected by his
victims, of course he subjects
them to fright. Their first thought
is that his intentions are predatory
which, however, they rarely are.
He is the victim of a compel ing
irresistible urge and no amount
of imprisonment is going to effect
any change in his psychological

PENNEYS ~ s
ALWAYS FIRST QUALITV SPECIALS
FOR YOURSELF. FOR GIFTS!
j 1 >
SPECTACULAR VALUE
FRONTENAC WATCHES
12.88
Youll be proud to wear a Frontenac ... the
watch that has style ... Petites and Classics
for the ladies . Classics and Sports for
the men. Truly the timepiece of distinc distinction
tion distinction ... at a special Penney price!

2 PATTERNS
STAINLESS
STEEL
56 PIECES
988
Modern Nassau
Beautiful Rosemont Rosemontpattern
pattern Rosemontpattern serves 8. Un Unduplicated
duplicated Unduplicated in style or
price . its a spec spectacular
tacular spectacular value, 4 pc.
hostess set.

condition," Williams said.
The basic elements found in
sexual offenders are also to be
found in normal people, Williams
said.
'We all carry within us the
fundaments of the sexual offender,
but we have found away, by
severe repression or by
satisfactory sublimation to control
our original tendencies.
Sexual offenders are often what
they are because of denial to them
of two fundamental needs: security
and affection, Williams added.

m %
Vfe ,m)
f ?*> ior 4 S J
k4 4 1
- 3 "r~M
*> /ylfl
2 SMART
PATTERNS ;
63 PIECES IN
MELMAC* SET!
SERVES EIGHT!
1 8 88
I
Extra tumblers, des dessert
sert dessert plates... 8 each.
Covered butter dish
too! Melamine din dinnerware
nerware dinnerware molded by
o Brauchell.

Page 3



Page 4

The Florida Alligator Thursday,Oct.3l,l963

editorials
Women Enter The Fray
A LETTER TO THE WOMEN OF BIRMINGHAM
Mrs. NEUBERGER. Mr. President, among the lesson illustrated
by the recent savagery in Birmingham is that violence and hatred
are fueled as much by the silence and passivity of the good people
as by the lawlessness and polemics of the racists.
It was in the attempt to implement this lesson that on July 9 president
Kennedy formed the National womens Committee for Civil Rights.
And it was in recognition of the truth of the lesson that, last Wednesday,
the committee sent to the women of Birmingham an open letter which
read in part as follows;
The women of America are roused by your distress. * we
have too long accepted passively the fact of racial bigotry. The
privileged among us; took good fortune as their right. The under underprivileged
privileged underprivileged accepted deprivation as their fate. But this has changed
since we have seen that children, womens special care, have now
become the victims of our apathy.
The committee, under the leadership of Mrs. Douglas Horton,
former president of Wellesley College and former head of the WAVES,
and Mrs. William B. Harris, assistant professor, Howard University
Law School, spoke for 300 major womens organizations representing
50 million American women.
The letter ended on a note of hope, which all of us must share;
Let it be comfort that your tragedy has been a clarion call to women
everywhere to rouse themselves to build that better world.
Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that the letter be printed in
the Record.
There being no objection, the letter was ordered to be printed in
the RECORD, as follows;
To the women of Birmingham -- in memory of September 15, 1963;
It is not only you who grieve that your strong city was besmirched
with blood of innocent young girls and boys. From east to west and
north to south the women of America are roused by your distress.
Perhaps your children died that we might see the tragic folly of
our hate. Perhaps they died to make us know that women, blessed with
motherhood, must rise in might to safeguard youth from bombs and
guns and awful weapons of brute force.
We have too long accepted passively the fact of racial bigotry.
The privileged among us took good fortune as their right. The under underpriviliged
priviliged underpriviliged accepted deprivation as their fate. But this has changed
since we have seen that children, women's special care, have now
become the victims of our apathy.
The time has come to care about the kind of world we want for
children -- white or yellow, red or black. The time is now to build
that kind of world.
It must be built in genuine respect for all mankind, not scorn or
condescension, but respect. It must be built on trust in freedom as
the right of men, regardless of their race. It will require laws to
guarantee this right, it will require effort to adjust our lives to new
relationships with people previously unknown. It calls for courage
to speak out for justice and for love.
Let it be comfort that your tragedy has been a clarion call to
women everywhere to rouse themselves to build that better world.
. . Congressional Record
Friday. Sept. 20

LATIN AMERICAN ANALYSIS

Can You Answer The Questions?

By CUFF 1 ANDERS
Here are a few questions dealing
with Latin America.
1. Who is the president of
strife ridden Venezuela? (a)
Marcos perez-jimenez(b)Romulo
Gallegos (o') Romulo Betancourt
(d) Raul Leoni
2. Which of the following
countries can be said to be
enjoying a democratic tradition
dating back several decades? (ai
Uruguay (b) Paraguay (c) Argen Argentina
tina Argentina (d) Colombia
3. In which of these countries
have the two major political parties
agreed to divide all political offices
50-50? (a) Peru (b) Mexico (c)
Costa Rica (d) Colombia
4. Which of the following does
NOT have a large percentage of
native Indian population? (a) Peru
(b) Argentina (c) Mexico(d) Bolivia
5. The nation which has
experienced the severest post-war
inflation problems is (a) Honduras
(b) Ecuador (c) Brazil (d) Mexico
(Answers at end of column)
The average American will be
lucky to answer more than three
of these questions correctly, and
few other than students of the area
could be expected to obtain a
perfect score.
But this test was not devised to
point up our knowledge of Latin

American current events, but
rather to illustrate one of the
cultural differences between the
United States and Latin America.
M any Latin Americans, in
addition to professing complete
ignorance of the subjects
mentioned above, would not be able
to answer correctly the following
question; Who is president of
your country?"
Now this writer doubts that there
jj&ijnioi'-e- t h an.. one -per ceivt -of
entire population of the l S. who
could fail to identify John F.
Kennedy, no matter what the socio socioeconomic
economic socioeconomic level of the individual
queried.
But in Latin America there are
large segments of the population,
at the lowest levels of income and
education, who are not aware of
the identity of the nation's leader.
In Brazil, for instance, there are
dwellers of the interior who did
not know their nation had fought
through two world wars; the last
war they had heard of was the War
of Paraguay, which ended almost
100 years ago;
There are Brazilians, further,
who know of no national ruler since
Emperor Pedro II (deposed 1889),
but Brazil is by no means an
extreme example. The same lack
of communications and information
plagues most of Latin America --
not in the cities or surrounding

mo MI,4oRS
tfW.TTfll j

SPEAKING OUT

By DON FEDERMAN
Many people have wondered what
it takes to achieve the enviable
position I find myself in this
trimester. Most have assumed it
takes a blend of intellect and
creative thinking, a sense of
draHna, a sense of humor, a
memory for names, etc. But as is
typical of majority opinions, this
is wrong.
First, and foremost, it takes a
pair of speedy legs;::
Kind of shocks you, eh? If you
think like me, you would have to
come to the conclusion that it is
just this that makes a movie

areas, to be sure, but in the
backlands.
How can this be so in the 20th
Century? One of the chief reasons
is that in much of Latin America
there are large numbers of tribal
Indians who live -- speaking no
Spanish or Portuguese -- just as
their ancestors did at the time of
the Conquest.
Furthermore, in the vast area of
a country like Brazil, a man may
the interior, where little contact
comes through from the outside
world. And such persons are not
Indians, but caboclos, a type of
racial hybrid.
Some countries, such as Mexico,
have made an effort to bring these
exogenous people into the flow of
the national life, but the cultural
barriers are great. Success has
been far from universal.
But it is clear that as long as
Latin America remains an
unintegrated society -- i.e.. a
society with large sub-cultures
which make no contribution to the
overall economy and way of life
-- its hopes for growth and
improvement of the standard of
living are, inevitably, severely
limited.
ANSWERS: 1. (c) 2. (a) 3. (d)
, * (* 5. (c).

How To Be A Reviewer

reviewer. Anyone that reads a
paper knows journalism is the
lowest form of literature. It is
true the movie review occasionally
rises above wire service
mediocrity. Nevertheless, one
reads a movie review for generally
one purpose--to find out whether
the movie is good or bad.
So what does this have to do
with a pair of speedy legs? Simple!
Since no one expects much from a
movie reviewer, anyone is
practically qualified for the job,
like Fred Schneider, the reviewer
of a few years back, who seldom
attended the movies he reviewed.
Therefore, the man who asks for
the job first, gets it--thus the need
for a pair of speedy legs.
The second important attribute
(now that you have the job) is a
persuasive personality. For the
Alligator, a movie reviewer gets
no pay, so what good is the job
unless there is something in it?
Fortunately, there are free passes
to the movies for reviewer and
date, and, occasionally, numerous
friends he picks up to force upon
the theatre manager, who
desperately craves a-good opinion
of his latest Three Stooges epic.
The smart reviewer knows in
advance the theatre will come to
his terms--a good review means
increased revenue. But theatre
managers have their pride and
would rather say no to free passes
than give in to some obnoxious,
man-of-power movie reviewer.
So, the reviewer must play it
cool; First, there is the firm

i he Florida Alligator
Editor-ir.-c h;ef David Lawrence Jr.
Managing Twer ; t B ob Wilson
sports r ai-or Ber kowitz
Editor.page Editor. John Askins
Layout Editor Bon spencer
Cm Editor Cynthia Tunstall
Copy Editor jj m Hammock
THE FLORID ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University ot Florida and is published five times weekly except during
.he mond.a cf May, June, and July, when a weekly issue is published.
THE FLORIDA AL.LIGATOR is entered as second class matter at
the tnited States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida.

handshake and smile -- how
American, how friendly. Second,
there is the statement of policy,
which is not to exceed 5,000 words.
This is a very important.stage--
the pass hinges on it. Be careful
to use the words from Rogets
Thesaurus witn discretion -a
reviewer should never frighten
his prey. Always conclude your
interview with a statement that
suggests no panning of movies,
no matter how bad. This usually
results in the pass, a firmer
handshake, and in the case of
some emotional managers, a
kissing of the feet and a laurel
wreath. I am not fooling about this
last statement -- Fred Schneider
had a devestating effect during" his
term of office, such that a nice
word now sounds like salvation.
So now you aspiring movie
reviewers know how to get the
job and the pass. All you have to
do is write the review. This is
quite an art and requires a separate
column, so keep reading the
Alligator, for soon Part II on
How To Be A Movie Reviewer
will appear.
In that column, I will deal with
the art of writing a movie review
in relation to the type of cinema
shown and psychological state
of mind of the reviewer as
determined by the party he was at
or the last date he was with,
which itself relates to the general
condition of the party or girl, the
weather, and the progress of the
football team. Believe me, movie
reviews are quite an involved thing.



(emdiiijm]

Mascot
It has been brought to my
attention that there is a little
matter that needs immediate
correction and perhaps a little
disciplinarian action. lam in
reference to our mascot, Albert.
A mascot, as near as Ive been
able to ascertain, is a symbol
of an entire group, and as such
should have a certain reverence,
if you please, in that group.
There are certain individuals on
our campus that not only do not have
the spirit our mascot is intended
to inspire, but rather think its a
thing to be made fuji of and.
ridiculed. There are students who
get a "kick, or whatever it is,by
poking our mascot with coat
hangers, sticks, and other para paraphernalia.
phernalia. paraphernalia. This is not only a
dangerous practice, but on in
which students who have a pride
in the spirit of our school should
not indulge. This is to say nothing
of the discomfort our mascot must
go through at the hands of these
tormenters. A strong word would
no doubt do wonders to correct
this situation and would make at
least one student feel better in
the knowledge that our mascot is
not a symbol f debasement and
ridicule, but one of pride. We are
the "fighting GATORS, are we
not?
John R. Schuller, lUC
Left-Handed
EDITOR:
In one of more pensive moments
the other day, it occurred to me
that perhaps the energy of the
student group for equal rights is
a little misguided. They are
voraciously attacking the unfair
practices of a private business
while a minority group is being
treated unfairly in the very class classrooms
rooms classrooms they would be sitting in now
if they were not too busy walking
picket lines. Yes, it is true,
descrimination exists on the
University of Florida. The minority
to which I refer suffers not only

FIFTH IN A SERIES

Alternatives To The Amendment

By EARL FISHER
UF Council for
Higher Education
There are some people in
Florida who are opposed to the
upcoming Bond issue to be voted
on Nov. 5. They agree that the
state is in desperate need of college
ngsytrat disagree with the
proposed system and are desirous
of using another means of acquiring
money. Their alternatives are
usually either to raise the now
existing college tuitions or to pass
new taxes.
Clearly, the idea of raising
tuition costs to cover the needed
building financing is out of the
question. The amount would be so
gre. as to deprive all but the
wealthy of the chance of acquiring
a higher education in the State of
Florida. Indirectly this would
eventually influence society, in that
many brilliant students would have
either been wholly denied an
education or they would have been
forced to seek their education in
another state. At present,
Floridas tuition is already more
than double'the cost in 1950, when
it was SSO.
The citizens of Florida owe their
young people the ability to receive
a higher education, and if this

the humiliation of being treated
unfairly by our government, but
it suffers physical hardships as
well. I am, of course, speaking of
the left-handed people of all colors.
We, the left-handed students, are
forced to sit in desks which were
made for right handed people.
We, the left-handed students, have
suffered our backaches in silence
for many years for lack of a
champion to defend our cause.
Left-handers of the world, arise!
And to the student group for equal
rights, I say, clean up your own
backyard before you take your lawn
mower next door.
H. Hollis Caffee, 4AS
Recapitulate
EDITOR:
The moral and legal questions
concerning the rights of a
proprietor to keep his business
segregated have been covered, pro
and con, in these columns, but little
emphasis has been given to the way
in which the managers of the C.1.,
and a few other establishments,
let down their fellow businessmen
in the restaurant field here in
Gainesville.
Sinpe many students now on
campus werent here at the time,
let me recapitulate briefly. After
an evening of violence, early last
summer, the mayor appointed
a biracial committee. The purpose
was to keep Gainesville from being
torn by the bitter, prolonged racial
strife which has wracked
Tallahassee; Ocala, St. Augustine
and many other Southern towns.
One of the first projects of this
committee was to seek
desegregation of local restaurants.
The idea, of course, was that if all
operators would agree, then none
would be inundated, none would be
boycotted, none would be picketed,
and the city would be spared
turmoil.
It is reassuring that most men
in the restaurant business in
Gainesville were sufficiently
public-spirited to agree to the

necessity is denied through a raise
in tuition, our state will eventually
suffer.
The other alternative to bonding
is to raise existing taxes or create
new ones. This system is primarily
focused on acquiring a moderate
amount of money each year, and
gradually building new college
facilities. These people .Mye. not
taken into consideration the fact
that new buildings are a necessity
now. Five and ten years from today
will be too late; the thousands of
students wishing to enter college
will turn acutely worse. This basic
fallacy is also found in the plan to
raise tuitions.
Flofida needs new college and
university facilities as soon as
possible. To create new taxes,
impose higher ones, or to increase
tuition costs are plans not involved
with meeting the coming dilemma
as it arrives. Rather, they are
attempts to solve the problem
long after it has occured. The only
way to meet Floridas increasing
needs in the field of higher
education is to plan for the
immediate and the best means to
accomplish this is through the
College Building Amendment.
(Next Article: Where The Money
Will Go).

experiment, although many did so
with apprehension and some with
personal distaste. Only a few
refused to subordinate their
prejudices -- or their hope of
making a fast buck at the expense
of community-minded competitors
-- to the needs of the ocassion.
It is ironic that several of the
hold-outs serve mainly students
the segment of white
Gainesville most receptive to
change.
The desegregation was
voluntary; there is no question that
the balky restauranteurs were
within their rights in refusing to
cooperate with their business
colleagues. There is also no doubt
that they were unsportsmanlike in
so doing. Students who identify
with the causes of businessmen
might chat with two or three other
restaurant operators in
Gainesville, and get their
reactions, before making
martyrs of the C.I. management.
Name Withheld
The Words
EDITOR:
In accordance with numerous
requests, I would appreciate your
printing the following song as it
was sung at Gator Growl.
I cannot join a fraternity.
A GDI I will always be.
What hope have I for maturity.
For Im just a GDI.
CHORUS
Oh, woe is me, you cannot see,
Just how bad off I am.
Theres just one grace, that
saves my face;
I really dont give a damn.
I have no brothers with which
to dine.
I have no meetings to waste my
time.
People laugh at my three point
nine,
For Im just a GDI.
Iv no frat pin beneath my coat.
No status symbols do you note.
And no one tells me how to
vote.
For Im just a GDI.
I -have no cannon of sewer pipe.
I have no kitten for which
to fight.
I have no friends who like to
get tight.
For Im just a GDI.
I do not know a dirty song.
Ive no test files to help me
along.
And no big brother to tell me
Im wrong,
For Im just a GDI.
When sitting at games 1 obey
the rules.
I never take part in the liquor
pools.
And never cheer for the other
schools.
For Im just a GDI.
Thank you.
Lex Tinsley
''
K.C. Sirloin
STEAKS
16 oz. $1.95
Boz. $1.50 I
- ALFORD'S I
TOWER HOUSE I
2)0 E Univ. Ave. I

Thursday, Oct. 31,1963 The Florida Alligator

Pro-Goldwater Cartoon

EDITOR:
I rather enjoyed the
political cartoon (of the
pro Goldwater variety)
which appeared in Mondays
edition. The principle of
dissenting opinion was
again verified by the
freedom of all individuals
to speak as they see fit.
As for the cartoon itself,
Im afraid that the growing
\

Humane
EDITOR:
Henry Kramer, lUC, in an Oct.
23 letter, made the comment that
in this day and age. . tolerance
learned over a period of centuries
has finally let us all live in peace
and harmony with members of
other religious groups. Well. .
immediately this humble and
ignorant soul thinks to himself,

...ONE PIECE SUIT...
{-. .FARMERS
...THE COUNTRY COUSIN...
...BERMUDA DRESS SHIFT...
...TAPERS...
! HIGH LUSTRE CORDUROY and 65% DACRON
j 35% COTTON MUTED PLAID
True Junior Sizes 5-15 (Completely Washable)
THERMO -JAC
by Grove, St. Louis
fi&tidi
311-313 N.W. 13th Street FR 2-1581
J g|i -. :

conservatism bomb will
just never go off for
alas it is but a dud. Anyhow
it looked like rather an
older type bomb, which just
didnt seem suited to these
times.
Thank you for the
opportunity to express my
opinions,
E. A. Moone, 3BA

Now there is a humane and
understanding sort of fellow.
Unfortunately, Mr. Kramer then
says anyone who doesnt believe
what he does should be struck by
lightning.is this wish'a necessary
condition to Be a member of the
religion of brotherly love, as
he described his religion?
Obviously, Mr. Kramer is just
kidding us! Or was he?
Candler Hendry, lUC

Page 5



Page 6

The Florida Alligator Thursday, Oct. 31,1963

GATOR CLASSIFIED
- -

Autos
- -- - *

Services

TYPING DONE ON IBM Electric
typewriter. Will type on short
notice. Reasonable rates, phone
Mrs. Martinez, FR 6-3261, Ext.
2575 weekdays or FR 6-1859
weekends or nights. (M-4-Th-c).

GATORLAND
presents
The ROVERS
* JMBC
I OPS it J RHYTHM L \ T IJf
featuring GENE
( JE SVILLE'S TOP .1 Us S V O' LSI
I ridci) & SoHv fOy ; ,r \o OlH
F 11day Alt vn u 6 ..A p-r
1 Du l 11 -i 1 ij : y r 1 >i j i :
- - -- ~

1 I
r n
r- -i i
O Sf
F I I
I rl ] I
put a fence in front of these men...and theyll climb it...
put a wall in front of them...and theyll tunnel under it...
put a risk in front of them...and theyll take it...
put a great adventure on the screen and you will never forget it!
Steve McQueen james garner to ^^ 2s

Services

FOR A CHANGE OF PACE, Come
Horseback Riding at Lake Wauberg
Riding Stables,Tumbleweed Ranch.
Hay Rides and Night Trail Rides.
Student operated. 1/2 Mi. North of
Lake Wauberg. Reservations
and free transportation. Call
466-9295. (M-8-68t-c).
TUTORING for MS 205 prog. Call
6-6021 after 6 p.m. (M-38-2t-p).

Help Wanted

PART TIME employment. Apply
at Tonys Pizza. 1308 W. Univ.
(E -39-2 t-c).
OPPORTUNITY for accomplished
typist, preferably student wife, to
train as Justowriter operator.
Approximate 40-hour week, time
and half for overtime, group
insurance. Afternoon and evening
work, Sunday thru Thursday. Call
376-3261,ext.2832 for appointment.
(E-39-3t-c).
WAITERS NEEDED for lunch 11-
2:30. Apply in person at Larrys
Wonderhouse. 14 S. W. Ist street.
(Behind Sears). (E-37-ts-c).

1
TOLBERT AREA MOVIES South Hall Rec Room
r
8 pm, Friday & Saturday Raymond Burr
All area card holders 156/ others 30$
Midnite show 256 an Bring this ad with you and receive a free gift.

For Rent

COLONIAL MANOR APT.
Completely furnished for rent.
Air-conditioned. 7216 S. W. 2nd
Avenue. Apt. 105. FR 6-2781.
(B-38-st-c).
LARGE 3 bedroom, 2 bath house,
furnished with new furniture newly
decorated, N. W. 13th location.
Phone 2-3019. (B-38-3t-c).
NEW FURNISHED Apartment. One
bedroom. Air-conditioned. Save $,
now. Must rent before 31st. Call
376-6303 or 1824 N. W. 3rd place.
Apt. 6. (B-37-3t-c).
ATTRACTIVE, QUIET, CLEAN,
bright room in new home .Excellent
for study. Kitchen privileges.
2-8944 or

, Peter Sellers Birthday H
i tjj|',
THt Mluiowwisrw /
h s p hia :lr I
- today thru sat. 1 M 1 LOREN j
* STAMP OUT THE I "Nut"at
1 OBNOXIOUS "Million"at 1:15-4:10-8-10
last times tonight
!£fflMSsL Giant sug ahmh
U**~*!S!*'*-. '"**) 3 Creeping Crawling Shockers
Chiller at 7:00
TTiJC DAT See: Vampire
Ofl I Blood Lust! p|wj||3|fc MB
~
Trie FLY of Macabre! |
ThriMer *3 See: Th7w7b
THj SPltek f I SST*
see all 3- fW CAKeoAb f

For Rent
t

CHILDLESS COUPLE, or two
students to rent furnished apt.
in Colonial Manor Apts. 1/2 block
from University. Come, phone or
write Scott Keller, 1216 S.W. 2nd
Avenue, 372-2722. (B-27-ts-c).

Lost & Found

LOST a mans brown wallet.
Lost on student side at the
Homecoming game. Name inside
wallet, Maurice D. Grubbs. FR
6-4524. (L-39-3t-c).
LOST at Gator Growl Blue
Saphire tie stick pin. Reward.
Call FR 6-0059. (L-39-lt-p).
MANS GOLD WEDDING BAND
near Grove Hall about 2 weeks
ago. Concave surface with
impressions on the surface.
Reward. 6-3930. (L-38-3t-p).
LOST -a ladys silver Longine
Wittnauer wristwatch. Reward.
Call 372-9162, room 2061, Kathy
Eberle. (L-38-2t-p).
LOST Pair plasses and case,
name on case, E. S. Barrack jax,
Fla. Call 2-9275. Harry Ivey.
(L-38-3t-c).
LOST Saturday night, east end
of campus, womens glasses. Dark
blue and clear plastic frames.
$5 reward. Contact Richard
Johnson, FR 2-9495. Room 408*'
Hume Hall. (L-37-3t-c).
United Rent-All
Party & Banquet Equip
Rollawayeds Tools
Trucks, Trailejs, Tow
Bars.
625 N.W. Bth Ave.
FR 6-2835 I
HEELS put on in 5" minutes f
jj SOLES put on in IST minutes I
I MODERhTsHOEI
REPAIR SHOP
across from Ist notional bonk |



For Sale

ZUNDAPP SUPER SABRE
Motorcycle, immaculate condition.
Contact Van Brody. Thomas G.
(A-39-lt-p).
KEROSENE Heater for five rooms
like new, with all appliances, $42.
Two navy wool suits, one tuxedo
size 38 long, $20.00 each. FR 6-
7860. (A-39-ts-c).
1963 RALEIGH MO-PED.Excellent
condition. 1550 miles, Owner has
dropped out of school. New SIBO.
Must sell at SBO. 1414 N. W. Ist
Avenue, Call 6-0044. (A-38-2t-c).
54 VOL. SYNOPTION SET,Great
Books of the Western World. Orig.
price $400.00, will sell for $250
or best offer. 1 1/2 yrs. old. 201
A Flavet 111. (A-38-3t-c).

I CARS IN I
; EUROPEjI £jg
MANUFA C
TAX-FREE PRICES
Your a.S.T.A. travel agent
1) handles all makes he is unbiased
2) handles EVERY detail incl. home-shipment
3) sells at the lowest, tax-free, official factor^ prices
4) sells only cars built for registration in the USA
5) provides WORLD WIDE service and
warranty according to the manufacturers
general conditions.
NOBODY CAN SERVE YOU BETTER IN THIS AREA OF TRAVEL
Come in or photic for details and free literature. MEMBER
World Travel
Service
808 W. University
376-4641
;
HALLOWEEN PARTY
"TRICK OR TREAT!
*i
Iw
I WEAR A COSTUME & GET A FREE TREAT
COED NIGHT PARTY FOR FEATURED SORORITY
I APPLE-BOBBING FOR FREE PRIZES
I THE SPEAKEASY
I 604 N.W. 13th Street

For Sale

125 cc DUCATTI MOTORCYCLE
Excellent condition throughout.
Under 3,000 miles. 100 mpg, 60
mph. Call FR 6-5631 after 8 p.m.
Must Sell. (A-38-35-C).
SCUBA DIVING Equipment and
Misc. diving items. No reasonable
offer refused. Contact Ron Crist.
6-7581 until 6 : 00 p.m.(A-35-tf-c).
NEW 50' by 10 MOBILE HOMES.
2 bedroom $2995. Payment low as
$52.40 a month. Why pay rent
when you can pay yourself. See
us at Fedleral Quality Mobile
Homes. Located at city limits
north on 441. (A-35-st-c).

O range, Blue Tank
Squads Meet Nov. 16

By ERNiE LITZ
A-- vtf Sports Editor
The annual Orange and Blue
intra squad swimming meet
for the UF tankers has been
tentatively set for Nov. 16, a
week which finds all other Gator
varsity teams at rest.
The traditional meet will pit two
equally balanced squads pairing off
both the varsity and freshman
teams in a free-for-all battle.
The winners will eat chicken, and
the losers beans at Head Coach
Bill Harlans home following the
contest.
4 The meet will give the boys
the chance to show me and everyone
else just how good we all are this

1963-64 Gator Swimming Schedule
FLORIDA GATOR SWIMMING TEAM
1963-64 SWIMMING MEETS
Date Team Place
Wed., Dec. 4 university of Alabama A
Thurs., Dec. 5 Vanderbilt university A
Fri., Dec. 6 University of the South A
Sat., Dec. 7 Emory University A
Thurs., Jan. 9 University of Georgia H
Sat., Jan. 11 Georgia Tech H
Sat., Jan. 25 Florida State University A
Thurs., Jan. 30 University of'North Carolina A
Fri., Jan. 31 East Carolina College A
Sat., Feb. 1 North Carolina State A
Sat., Feb. 15 Florida State University H
Fri., Feb. 21, 22 Southern Intercollegiate Invitational A
Mon. Feb. 24 University of Miami H
Mar. 5,6, 7 Southeastern Conference Championships A
Mar. 12, 13, 14 Eastern Intercollegiate Championships A
Mar. 26, 27, 28 National Collegiate Athletic Association A
(NCAA) Championships

: DBESS SHIRTS M
i Jim a stmm u
o There is vigorous color in the shirtings I
employed by the proprietor in his but- 0 I
ton-down and tab-collared shirts. / o I
Attention is called to banana oxford I
cloth, and maroon and white broad I o I
'% stripings. Both belong in the balanced *ip 7 3l
| Jin' I I ill'll ll' | ,1
j LfitL Men's Shop J
I Staj'nDrag 1
o -jl;: ;H 13 West Univ. Ave. p|
i STUDENT CHARGE FREE PARKING H
ioo 0 0 0 0 0 QQQQQQgQQQQQfIO gj fl fi iUUUJUJIJUU-lULfI JUULfI AAJLfI,ftJLg-g-fl.a.a fl, fI.P-fl.fi fl f 1.3

Thursday,Oct o3l,l963 The Florida Alligator

year," Harlan said.
The regular season schedule
for the Gator tankers has been
officially released and is printed
in today's paper. The schedule
features some innovations for the
first time in the team's history.
The Gators venture to Yale Pool
in New Haven, Conn, for the
E astern intercollegiate Champion
ships next spring as well as meet
more than the usual number of
nationally powe rt u 1 regular
opponents.
This will provide an excellent
opportunity to score in national
competition, senior manager
Mark Valenti said. -lt will be an
extremely valuable experience for
the team, especially in light of

the fact that we will be getting
ready for the NCAA (Nationalcol (Nationalcollegiate
legiate (Nationalcollegiate Athletic Association)
championships in the same pool
two weeks later.
The schedule also represents
the first time the Gators will be
swimming against Florida State
University (FSU) before the Sout Southeastern
heastern Southeastern Conference Champion Championships
ships Championships (SEC).
In previous years the Seminoles
have presented difficulties in
scheduling such a meet since they
preferred to swim Florida after
the championships.
With only four meets at home
this year the Gators will be
swimming in foreign territory
most of the time. Included in
this group are FSU, an always
tough opponent for any UF team,
and the University of Alabama,
who at the moment present the only
real threat to UF dominance of
the SEC in the last eight years
that the Gators have taken the
SEC title.
In non conference action the
Gators will spend a three-day
visit to North Carolina next Spring
which could prove a real nightmare
to Bill Harlan's crew.
The visit, scheduled for Jan.
30, 31 and Feb. 1, will pit the
Gators against three powerful
squads in three days. Successively
the UF will have to face a great
team at North Carolina University
at Chapel Hill, a good East Carolina
aggregation at Greenville and
finally a strong North Carolina
State group at Raleigh.

Page 7



The Florida Alligator Thursday Oct.3l,l963

Page 8

PERSONAL
CHECKING ACCOUNT
i r
v, ) lz j q
...does it better!
What does it cost to live and learn at college? What
college bills have been paid? How much money is left
for future school expenses? See it all quickly and ac accurately
curately accurately with a ThriftiCheck personal Checking ac account.
count. account. With ThriftiChecks you look no further for
proof that a bills been paid your cancelled check
provides it.
ThriftiCheck is college-oriented and kind to budgets.
Just a few pennies for each check ... no minimum bal balance.
ance. balance. We welcome student accounts. Open yours now
at
CITIZENS BANK
Os Gainesville
110 E. Univ. Ave. Member FDIC i

Your College Life Team in Gainesville
IWI Larec Don Wiggins Lou Burns
(ll§s I
. The Original and
MMvf Only hfe
Company Serving
College Men Only
WHEN CONSIDERING LIFE INSURANCE, BE SURE TO SEE A COLLEGE LIFE MAN
FOOTBALL FORECAST
/
-Guest Predictions By:
The GAMES C.L.I.C.A. Pi Kappa Alpha Sigma Phi Epsilon
AIR FORCE ARMY AIR FORCE ARMY ARMY
FLORIDA AUBURN FLORIDA FLORIDA FLORIDA
GEORGIA TECH DUKE GEORGIA TECH GEORGIA TECH GEORGIA TECH
PL DUE ILLINOIS PURDUE PURDUE ILLINOIS
KENTUCKY MIAMI KENTUCKY MIAMI MIAMI
LSU MISSISSIPPI LSU LSU MISSISSIPPI
NAVY NOTRE DAME NAVY NAVY NAVY
NEBRASKA MISSOURI NEBRASKA MISSOURI NEBRASKA
WASHINGTON USC WASHINGTON USC USC
NORTH CAROLINA GEORGIA NORTH CAROLINA GEORGIA GEORGIA
LAST WEEK S RESULTS: CLICA mis-picked Florida, FSU, Duke and Iowa; ATO
mis-picked Florida, FSU, Pitt, Duke and Miss. State; Phi Kappa Tau mis-picked
Florida, FSU, Pitt, Duke, Miss. State and lowa. CLICA score to date: 32-24-4.

Lynn Matthews Hurt,
Russ Brown Still Out

By GLENN tANEY
Os The Gator Staff
Lynn Matthews, the Gators 6-
foot -1, 190 pound right end,
limped off the field at the beginning
of yesterdays practice.
Matthews turned an ankle during
the Gators practice and it was
immediately put on ice. The extent
of the injury will not be known
until today, but in all probability
he will be ready to go against
Auburn this Saturday, Coach Ray
Graves said.

UF Harriers Set
For State Meet

The State Junior College Cross
Country Championships will be
run Saturday morning over athree
mile course in and around Beta
Woods.
Dade, Pensacola, Central
Florida and several other junior
colleges will be running. The
Florida will be going after an
unofficial victory.
This is the first year of the
championship meet. Two years
ago, Coach Percy Beard started
the junior college track champion championship.
ship. championship.
The varsity harriers run Monday
morning, against Auburn over the
4.35 mile course. Coach Walter
Welsch said the team is in fine
shape and may upset Auburn this
year.
Two years ago, Jim Dozier set
the course record of 23:29.9, which
has been broken several times
since. Three varsity harriers

TEAM SENDOFF
Friday 1:15p.m.
Between Murphree
And Building R
Among other Gator wounded are
Russ Brown and Roger Pettee.
Brown has been out all week with
a shoulder injury. Graves said

--Jim Brown, Tom Harrell and
Charles Goodyear - have bettered
the mark.
If Goodyear has a good day,
he could break the present record
of 22:34.8, Welsch said.
Mural Scores
(Fraternity Blue League
Volleyball Finals)
XD iver PGD 15 -4, 13-15, 15-11
(Dorm League Handball)
Murphree Area
Mur. A over Fie M 2-0
Mur. L over Fie S 2-1
Tolbert Area
Spencer over South IV 2-0
Noble over Weaver II 2-0
Hume Area
Crow over Yeaton 2-0
Keppel over Yocum 2-0
Area finals today at 4:30 p.m.

ST I
h mmm^H
)h.i.s. ups your sartorial standing with this casual, patch patchpocket
pocket patchpocket camel blazer. Smarter than a Phi Bete ... great for
extra curricular projects ... $25. Complete your equation
with wash n wear black flannel Piper Slacks; no belt, no
cuffs, no inhibitions... $6.95. At stores flying the h.i.s label.
eyes on broad horizons? wear the llalaS blazer
AVAILABLE AT
* i

this may be the story on Brown
for the rest of the season as he
aggravates his shoulder almost
every game. Brown will play
, against Auburn.
Pettee, who has been out since
the Alabama game with a torn
ligament, is due to get his cast
off this Sunday. He will not play
in the Georgia game, but he is
definitely counted on for the Miami
game.
The Gators went through
offensive and defensive drills at
full speed yesterday. Gary Thomas
and Charles Casey were running
first string ends, but the rest of
the line up remained the same.
Graves said tackle Frank Lasky
had improved a great deal, but
he would still share the right tackle
duties with Sydney Mac Lean.

gpMt||fe W
i, f 111 'TWBiri
i war
Wmm m
ft
LYNN MATTHEWS