Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
The Florida
Alligator

Vol .56, N 0.33

|j|i|k'Go Away/ HC
IgpflSavs To Ginny

By DAVID LAWRENCE JR.
Editor-in-Chief
UF Homecoming officials had
their fingers crossed late last
night as gyrating Ginny, an Atlantic
Ocean spawned hurricane,
threatened to wreak havoc with
UF Homecoming plans.
Were doing our very best to
prepare for all eventualities,
Homecoming General Chairman
Charley Wells said last night.
Were hoping for the best, and
Homecoming will go on no matter
what happens.
The Miami Weather Bureau last
night was optomistic about the
Gainesville weekend weather
picture.
Weather forecasters said
weather in the Gainesville area
should improve considerably
Homecoming
Dance Swings
On Saturday
The Homecoming Blast dance
set Saturday night, predicted to
be the largest and most successful
in recent UF history, will feature
The Jokers, a victory bonfire,
and jazz and folksinging groups.
The jokers, a four-piece band
which was formed only a year
and a half ago, will be the main
attraction.
Composed of students Sandy
MacDonnel, Bob Samuelson, Tom
Sheehy and Ron King, the band
has played at the Sigma Nu, Phi
Kappa Tau, Pi Lambda Phi and
Sigma Chi fraternity houses.
(taToR.? Big BtosT
ARtfVtS ToMoRK?W
I
Tomorrow's Gator will
feature the big annual
HOMECOMING
MAGAZINE
12 fascinating pages
with full-color pictures,
portraits of the many
Homecoming guests and
personalities, and a
complete Homecoming
schedule of events. A
great souvenir for all
HC '63 celebrants!

University of Florida, Gainesville Thursday,

Friday and be back to normal by
Saturday.
At 10 p.m. the Miami Bureau
placed Hurricane Ginny about 100
miles east of Cape Canaveral,
with w.inds up to 75 mph. It
was expected to continue a west westward
ward westward drift at about five mph
throughout the night.
Preparations outlined by Wells
to prepare for Hurricane Ginny
itself or its by-product of heavy
rains include:
1) John Marshall Bar
Association skits;
Well hold them in University
Auditorium if worse comes to
worse, Wells said.
2) Homecoming Parade:
Well do our very best to go
ahead with this unless something

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I HOPE IT DOESN'T HURT
... Homecoming efforts is the sentiment of general
chairman Charley Wells, but he's making plans to provide
events with shelters if a hurricane approaches.

Special IDs Ready
For Greek Parties

UF fraternity men will carry
special identification cards this
weekendln an effort to keep parties
in a fraternity men-only
category, interfraternity Council
(IFC) Executive Vice President
John Wolf announced yesterday.
Fraternity men often wont like
paying money for parties and
having independents, who have no
group or financial responsibilities,
attend them, Wolf said.
Its not fair when a fraternity
pays SSOO for a band, and then
Deadline Today
Today is the last day for foroff-caripus
off-caripus foroff-caripus residents to pick up
copies of the new student directory
at the information booth across
from the Student Service Center
(Hub).
Hours are from 2;30 5 p.m.

, Oct. 24,1963

really impossible happens.
3) Gator Growl;
Itll go on. Only thing were
worried about is if it gets so
muddy that it would injure the
field. In this case, well make
alternate provisions.
4) Alumni Barbecue:
Probably move into the Florida
Union or University Auditorium if
we have to.
5) Alumni Reunion:
Its really not affected since
its being held in the Florida
Gymnasium.
6) Florida Showcase;
Dont know exactly what well
do because wind could hurt that.
Well go ahead with tentative
plans.

members find the house is too
crowded with non-members to
enjoy it, he added.
Greeks will required to show
identification cards at the door
of each fraternity house visited
for a party. Individual houses
will be open to all IFC members
for most weekend parties.
Wolf believes the system can
strengthen social events for inde independents
pendents independents as well as the Greeks.
Campus social events will be
better attended, Wolf thinks, if
independents do not have the
fraternity houses to visit.
Fraternity strength will be
boosted too, Wolf said, asinde asindependents
pendents asindependents should have a stronger
desire to join.
The card system goes into effect
Friday.

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HOMECOMING IS WORK
But it's fun, too, for literally thousands of UF Students.
Typical are Alpha Chi Omega sisters Sally Montgomery
and Annie Curtis. (See Story, Page 2)

HC Ushered
In With 'Peel'

Homecoming begins a day early'
-- today -for readers of the New
Orange Peel, a UP-sponsored
general interest magazine.
The New Peel, born just last
January, hits the stands today in
five locations around campus.
The magazine, a combination
of satire, cartoons, opinions, fact
articles, and fiction, celebrates
Homecoming with a special cover
by artist Ken Fischer and two
football articles.
Otherwise, according to editor
Stan Huguenln, a senior in
journalism, the magazine is
devoted to a variety of subjects
something for everyone, he
explained.
The New Orange Peel was
chartered after a series of clashes
with the administration forced the
original Peel into oblivion. Under
editor Marcello Truzzi, now
graduated, the magazine met with
little commercial success.
They tried to limit it to a select
few. it was too arty, Huguenln
said.
We like to think the magazine
is better in layout, format, and
material than anything else around
here.
I think we have top-notch
humor. Our cartoons, for example,
are original as well as funny.
HC Coordinator
Is Betty Pound
Elizabeth Anne pound, an arts
and sciences senior, is office co coordinator
ordinator coordinator for Homecoming '63
efforts.
Shes done a heck of a lot of
work on Homecoming, said
Charley Wells, Homecoming
general chairman.
Her name was omitted from a
story about top Homecoming
personnel in The Alligator earlier
this week.

'Me didnt have to borrow from
(/anyone, he said.
According to Huguenln, the New
Orange Peel is the only college
magazine in the U.S. withafoldout
pinup girl in the Playboy
manner.
Im proud of that, he said,
and of the magazine in general.
Im also very proud that Don Addis
thinks enough of our efforts to
draw for us. He didnt have to, you
know.
The magazine also features, in
addition to Addis cartoons, the
Story of a College Football Fix,
a moving series of photographs on
the world of a little girl and an
interview with Dean of Student
Affairs Lester L. Hale on drinking,
sex, and religion in student life.
Some students seem to have
gotten the idea that the magazine
is censored, Huguenln said.
It just isnt so. The only
censorship is done by students,
he said.
Coed Curfew
Is 1:30 A.M.
Womens curfew for
Homecoming weekend will be 1;30
a.m. Friday and Saturday .nights,
according to Dean of Women Marna
V. Brady.
The 1;30 curfew for major
weekends was set by the Committee
on Student organizations and Social
Activities about five or six years
ago, Dean Brady said.
Committee members decided
1:30 a.m. was a reasonable hour
due to the strenuous weekend
festivities, Dean Brady said.
A 1:30 a.m. curfew for Friday
and Saturday nights will be used
this year for Frolics also.



The Florida Alligator Thursday,Oct.24,l963

Page 2

Trip Set For
Georgia Game

The Graham Area Council is
offering round-trip transportation
for the Nov. 9 football game with
the University of Georgia at
Jacksonville.
The price of the trip by bus
is $4.25 per person or $8.25 per
Dames To Form
Wives of psychology students
interested in forming a Psychology
Dames group may call Mrs. Aria
Rosmarin at FR 2-5543.

-fcSV*
W PRODUCE
yf Size 64 Turkey Knob Apples 10$ each
\f Six Ornamental Halloween Gourds 50$
V Coconuts 23$ each
\/ Pie Pumpkins... 12$ lb.
\/ Oranges.. .55$ dozen
/ Pink Grapefruit... 10$ each
\/ Irish Potatoes...s lb. for 33$
\f Lettuce.. .25$ head
v/ Tomatoes.. .4 for 19$
y/ Indian Corn.. .35$ bunch
FANELLI & EDWARDS
MARKET
2410 NEWBERRY ROAD Within Walking Distance
across from Beta Woods Os Corry Village

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'
'mi 1
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.,iiiii iii r -*' r
'
and neither are the stores who sell them!
You cannot sec the difference in diamonds...

you mustlrely on your jeweler's knowledge and
reputation for honesty. We're different from others
because we've earned the title Registered Jeweler,
awarded by a non-profit Society of educators and
gemologists called the American Gem Society. Only
a limited number of jewelers in the country hold this
title, your assurance when you buy diamonds here.
11 Gainesville's Quality Jewelers
1 B gem society
103 W. If Univ. Ave.

couple. The bus will leave Graham
Area at 10:45 a.m. and will make
stops at Broward and possibly at
other dormitory areas.
Students will be transported
from the UF campus to the Gator
Bowl in Jacksonville where they
will take part in the football game
festivities. At 6:30 p.m., they will
climb back onto the bus and return
to the UF.
Trip tickets may be obtained
through Nov. 4 from 5-8 p.m.
in the Graham Hall lobby.

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HH SB
B B
RELIGIOUS CENTERS COMPETE FOR TROPHY
Freshman Bev Barrington and sophomore Janet Parker are
working hard to help the Baptist Student Union win the
trophy for the best UF student religious center Homecoming
decorations.
' - 1 ~ ;- -n - 1 -' ;, -ti xrrr -.
v# f
j Jarmans
Genuine Moccasin with
HAND-SEWN VAMP
-'''' ; ~ ~- *
This genuine moccasin slip-on is quite an improvement over
the original Indian version! Made for miles of comfortable
walking; styled for distinction and good looks, with
that intangible bit of quality which comes only from fine
hand craftsmanship. Easy-to-shine upper leather
has a polished look that rivals genuine cordovan.
Let us fit you in a pair.
Tflr.TflHxheir*
"Where Educated Feet Meet"
1127 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE.

Decorations
Judging Set
Friday Night
Judging of the traditional Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming house decorations will take
place Friday night from 9;30
midnight.
The displays are currently being
constructed in front of many
fraternity and sorority houses.
Nineteen fraternities and 10
sororities have entered the
competition.
Decorations will be rated
according to a point system, based
on a total of 100 points, with 40
points for originality, 20 for
workmanship, 20 for integration of
theme, 10 for animation and lighting
and 10 for planning.
Although not required, house
displays are usually planned
around the Homecoming theme.
Trophies will be awarded for
first place, second place, most
original and most beautiful.
Bill Olinger, Homecoming
chairman for house decorations,
said, with better planning,
judging should run more smoothly
this year than it has in the past.
Moos May
Be Cheaper
A cow will be able to eat at
$5 less per ton of feed as the
result of a new development by
the UF Agricultural Engineering
Department.
A mechanical system for
handling citrus pulp now being
developed when perfected will save
about $5 per ton on storing pulp,
the department said.
Citrus pulp is used as feed for
livestock particularly dairy and
beef cattle. The pulp, which is a
by- product of citrus fruit
concentrate, is dryed and stored
in bags.
The cost of handling the bags
is $5-8 per ton. The mechanical
system of handling pulp would
completely eliminate the use of
bags, officials said.
Dairy Meet Set
Radioactive fallout, milk
packaging and population growth
will be discussed at a Dairy
Products Conference here Nov.
7-8.
Presiding over the session will
be John F. Warrington, Inter International
national International Paper Company in Miami.
TRAVEL? jL
... to see places, things,
and people? To shop?
Where? When? How?
We can arrange everything for
you, make reservations for ships
or planes, hotels, and all details.
Independent travel if you wish,
or Brownell escorted tours.
Europe South America
Hawaii Alaska
Africa e Round the World
World
Travel Service
808 W. Univ. Ave.
Phone FR 6-4641



Educator To Speak
At Mortar Board Fete

Dr. Gladys M. Kammerer, well
known educator and administrator,
will be the guest speaker at the
annual Mortar Board buffet Friday.
The buffet, an annual
V I'"
% A
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<* mmm H i
GATOR GIRL
.. .today is Mary Jo Fenton,
a 36-26-38 gatorette. She's
2UC broadcast major.

One Fire Escape
Ready At Benton

One of two fire escapes being constructed behind Benton Hall is
ready for use by physical Science (C-2) students and both escapes
should be completed by the end of next week, E. C. Taylor, construction
boss of the project, said yesterday.
Taylor, employed by the Guy E. Cleveland Construction Co., said
at least one of the two escapes will be in use at all times until the
two are finished. He also said they will be used not only as fire
escapes but entrances and exits for students going to thtj third
and fourth floor.
Students will be able to enter Benton from two doors on both the
second and third floor. Several windows have been replaced with
wire glass to stay in line with the fire escape code.
Dr. Harold L. Knowles, head of the physical science department,
said the new fire escapes will cut the time in half for emptying
the building.
He said about 300 people are on the second and third floor during
the day. The two escapes will handle 150 of these people, Knowles
said.
The head of the C-2 department gave two reasons for the con construction
struction construction of the new fire escapes.
Since it takes more than six minutes to clear the building now
with the one stairway, it presents both a fire hazard as well as
causing a shorter class break for the students going to other classes,
he said.
Knowles said a new roof for Benton Hall has been proposed, but
because of a lack of funds the work on the roof has not started.

Radio Center
Is Expanding
Radio Center, an adjunct of the
UF Journalism and
Communications School, is
growing at a tremendous rate,
Radio Center engineer Arthur H.
Hallam said this week.
Radio Center has ceased to
expand. It has exploded, he said.
If it grows any more we wont be
able to take care of the demands,
with our present staff and
equipment.
Radio Center duplicates
recorded tapes of UF public
service programs to be sent to
radio stations throughout the state.
The center also serves as a
training classroom for
broadcasting majors.
The center presently has $50,000
in equipment dnd tape facilities.
Hallam, an engineer with the
National Broadcasting Company
(NBC) for ten years before coming
here three years ago, said that
additions to staff and equipment
have been made but they are still
inadequate.

Homecoming project of Mortar
Board, national woman's honorary
organization, in conjunction with
Florida Blue Key, will be held
upstairs in the banquet room of
the Student Service Center (Hub),
starting at 4:15 p.m.
Attending the buffet will be
Mortar Board actives, alumnae and
advisors, faculty wives, special
guests of Florida Blue Key
members and wives of state
legislators.
Dr. Kammerers topic will
concern the role of women as
leaders of the local and state
communities.
Dr. Kammerer graduated Phi
Beta Kappa from Washington
University in St. Louis, received
her M.A. at the University of
Wisconsin, and her Ph.D. at the
University of Chicago. She has
taught political science for the past
20 years, and since 1958 has been
a professor of political science and
director of the Public Adminis Administration
tration Administration Clearing Service here.
She has served as special con consultant
sultant consultant on public administration
research and problems to several
states and has received numerous
grants and fellowships to further
projects in this field, including

It is with pride and excitement
that we announce the opening l \
of ROUNTREE, LTD., coming II i
soon: a new merchandising JjL N /
adventure in traditionally
tailored apparel for men and / V-Â¥~-
women. We will cater, spec- / f
ifically, to those in college V^
and career with the expression
and confidence of time-honored
styling and quality combined / / VY m'
with the imagination of the new V\ f /
and different. Our carefully -jl
, selected presentation is
designed to enhance your
wardrobe with distinctive "... THE APPAREL OFT
f ~ ...... ... PROCLAIMS THE MAM.*
fashion and individuality. shak* ap ar
When the manner of dress is a question of attitude,
, we hope you will think of ROUNTREE, LTD. We
cordially invite your inspection.
Sincerely yours,
Melvin & Peggy Rountree

Ford Foundation and Guggenheim
Fellowships.
Dr. Kammerer is an acting
member of several professional
societies of which she has served
as an executive on the national
council.
' U.S.' Bonds
To Sing Here
Gary (U.S.) Bonds, one of the
nations most popular entertainers,
will be brought to campus this
weekend by Tau Epsilon Phi(TEP)
and Sigma Alpha Epsilon (SAE)
fraternities to sing at a closed
party.
Bonds has made several best bestselling
selling bestselling records including New
Orleans, Quarter to Three,
School is out and Seven Day
Weekend.
Bonds will give two 45-minute
performances at the TEP house
Saturday night. Admission will be
for TEPs, SAEs and guests only
by card. Bonds, who sings on the
LeGrand label, will be backed up
by the Mystics from Tampa.
jp
MENTAL WIZARD
... and hypnotist Franz
Polgarwill perform Thurs Thursday,
day, Thursday, Oct. 31, at:lsp.m.
in the University Auditorium.
He is sponsored by the Florida
Union's Forums Committee.
Admission is Free.

Thursday,Oct.24 7 1963 The Florida Alligator

I 17 NORTH MAIN
I REMOVAL SALE 1
I IT COST MONEY TO MOVE WE MUST I
I REDUCE OUR INVENTORY. 1
I Nothing Overlooked Every Shoe Reduced 1
I to Cleor. SAVE 30% to 70%! I
I LADIES FAMOUS BRAND MEN'S I
MBS SHOES LOAFERS
All styles
I |AV prices from WJ I
Actual Values I
to $21.95. All
heel heights
Sixes 4 to 10
I -% sizes I
L ~{P
I AND K\\ SOFT CREPE 0R HARD SOLES I
1 1 CONTNENTALS OR PENNEY I
JJ _ STYLES. VALUES UP TO $8.95 I
I MEN'S, LADIES' FAMOUS BRANDS I
DRESS-WORK SHOES
nsvg?
FROM OUR OWN ALREADY CUT PRICES
I OF 5.99 TO 17.99. SOLD NATIONALLY FOR
\ f UP TO 34.95. SAVE AN EXTRA SI.OO ||
I One Group One Group One Group I
CHILDREN'S LADIES' MEN'S I
SHOES SHOES DURA-HYDE |
AA
P % >Tj@l
II 1 TfJJ HURRY FOR ESE I l TK., W.. I
I **** LONG U **>" I
MEN'S NAVY LAST I
DRESS SHOES SBB
Il rT 2-EYE TIES I
/ I I J All Our Own
Icy I cl Cr 1 stock of
P/ A I AND V V\ Already I
/d L J 1 CUT PRICES I
I / J 1^I front I
p "! y / y 4.99-4.99 I
I L J *l. y VALVO TO IJ.J I
I Loafers and P I A T P
rLAi j |
I from our already i, I
actual values S MM a I
to $14.95. Sizes f M IW I
AAA-AA-A45- But M 111
kiaiiatyHHiiuiuiWi I
IT N. MAIN OPEN FRIDAY NIT* TILL Q P M J

Page 3



The Florida Alligator Thursday,Oct.24,l963

Page 4

editorials

With All Deliberate Speed

Old-line Gainesville residents are getting steamed-up by what
they consider the use of force to push integration here.
We were made aware of how they feel by a nice lady with a Southern
accent, who talked to us this week on the phone for about 15 minutes
about the situation in town.
Her call was prompted by Hugh McArthurs column Tuesday, which
discussed the Cl problem at great length. The column was pro-civil
rights.
The lady was not a fanatic. She was not even, as she said more than
once, a segregationist. Her voice was never raised during the entire
conversation. Nor was she insulting or even abusive, except as regarded
McArthur and his column; both of which, she suggested, were probably
un-American.
Well, we doubt that. But a lot of things our caller said were well
worth listening to, and remembering, because in many ways she
represented the views of a lot of Southerners, Southerners who are
not bigoted nor blind to progress, but resent being pushed:
The Cl will never integrate as long as this business keeps up.
Theyll close the doors first.
If it comes to a point where the Cl is losing business because
of this pressure, then the citizens will get out and keep it going. They
did it this summer. All it takes are a few phone calls.
* If this mess hadnt come up, the Cl would have been integrated
two years ago.
Its no longer an issue of black or whites its become political
now. Folks downtown dont even mention the idea of race anymore.
If all this makes Gainesville sound like a hotbed of organized
bigotry, such is not the impression we were trying to give, nor the
impression we got from our caller. Gainesville is rather moderate,
as Southern towns go. There has been very little actual violence,
and not even much public display of defiance. But many of the citizens,
especially members of the business community, feel that pro-civil
rights efforts such as picketing, Alligator columns and professors
meddling are subtle forms of coercion and invasions of basic
rights. Ahd the feeling is common throughout the South today. It is
a feeling that may defeat President Kennedy at the polls in 1964, and
it represents the integrationists greatest hurdle. It results from the
convictions of honest, respectable citizens that they are being pushed
beyond endurance from many different sides.
And they have a point. There is no letup in the strife by either
side, and those citizens mentioned a moment ago are caught in the
middle. Because they are not radically for or against integration,
both factions bombard them with pressures economic, social, and
personal. And they are getting tired of it. They do not side with the
extreme racists, but, because of their Southern heritage, they tend to
see the outspoken integrationist as the main source of their troubles.
It is easy to dismiss the sincere feelings of these people as outdated,
bigoted, ignorant, inhumane or lazy. It is easy, but it is also a
mistake. Because from their point of view, they are right, and, with
the sort of determination upon which America was founded, they will
resist any intrusion upon what they consider their personal freedom.
In past issues of the Alligator, we have urged consideration for all
men as brothers. Let us not forget that all men includes those we
oppose as well as those we seek to defend. It is difficult in these
times, and it will grow increasingly difficult in the future, but we
must have compassion for those whose customs we are seeking
to uproot. We must recognize their problems and be sympathetic to
them.
The Supreme Court uses an important phrase in its civil rights
decisions all deliberate speed. integration should be accomplished
by all means but time should be allowed for the adjustment of
lifelong ideas and customs. So far, many integration groups have not
been satisfied to rely upon all deliberate speed, mostly because
they do not believe that the Southerner will ever integrate without
continuous pressure, partly because Negroes are impatient to assume
their long-withheld rights, it is for these same reasons that we have
run numerous letters, columns and editorials in the Alligator urging
speedy integration in Gainesville.
But partly because of a ladys phone call, we realize that many
Gainesville citizens, while potentially ready to accept integration as
inevitable, are angry and even bitter at having their toes stepped
on, and are not about to give in to what they feel is unfair pressure.
We asked the lady a final question: Did she think that such business
concerns as the Cl would accept integration if the pressure were eased?
I dont know, she said. Itll be a long time before men like
Harry Loomis and C. K. Hammond will be able to forget the names
theyve been called. it is precisely this sort of reaction that convinces
integrationists that the South is stalling. On the other hand, it may well
be true that it will take a long time for Mr. Loomis and Mr. Hammond
to forget this summer and fall and the personal attacks they sustained.
But if integration is to proceed with all deliberate speed, they
must forget. We are going to cut down on the number of letters
published and other material about the Cl and similar local establish establishments,
ments, establishments, and we urge the Student Group for Equal Rights to slow down
on picketing for a while.
The reason?
To give Gainesville citizens a chance to cool off, a respite from the
pressures upon them, so that when they hear a civil rights message,
they might think about it instead of reacting to it blindly in anger.
And we hope that with such evidences of understanding on one side,
more understanding will be generated upon the other.
You will notice we use the word hope, rather than urge or
expect. no pressure.

THE HARDER YOU PUSH HIM THE MORE HE DIGS IN

UN COMPATABILITY

By DR. JOSEPH W. ROMITA
Associate of Economics professor
United Nations Week is being
observed throughout the entire
world to commemorate the
strengthening of mutually
beneficial relations among the 111
member nations. The authority
of the UN has grown steadily during
the last 18 years since it pledged
to bring about by peaceful means,
and in conformity with the princi principies

Amendment
No. 1- What
And Why
By EARL FISHER
UF Council for Higher Education
The College Building
Amendment, popularly known as
the Bond Issue, is a constitutional
plan of borrowing in order to
immediately finance college and
university buildings in the state
of Florida.
In order to keep pace with the
heavy increase of college enroll enrollment,
ment, enrollment, it is not only mandatory
that existing colleges and
universities expand their building
facilities, but that provisions for
the construction of new institutions
be made. If Florida continues to
subsist only on the existing method
of financing oUr establishments of
higher education, the rapid
increase of students desiring to
receive and education will outgrow
our ability to accept them, due to
the shortage of sufficient
buildings.
This basic educational lack must
be provided for as soon as possible.
A method of immediate financing
needs to be devised if Floridas
youth are to be properly educated.
Because of this emergency, the
bond system, a previously tested
and successful tool of financing,
was reborn. It is now up to the
people of Florida to decide whether
or not this system will be put into
effect.
The responsibility of education
is (often unfortunately) imposed
upon the general population.
Florida must play its part in the
advancement of the United states
through education, and Floridas
voters must see to it that this
obligation is met. Education is the
improvement and safeguard of our
future, and the College Building
Amendment is the best feasable
means towards better education.
(Next article: The System of
Bonding)

Main Hope Os Survival

pies principies of justice and international
law, adjustments or settlement
of international disputes or
situations which might lead to a
breach of the peace.
Yet few intelligent citizens, even
among politicians, know much
about the status, powers, and
functions of the UN. It does deserve
intelligent understanding if
Americans think that international
organization is better than inter international
national international chaos.
The foundations of the UN were
laid at the Dumbarton Oaks
Conference in Washington in 1944
between the Soviet Union, the
United Kingdom, the United States
and China. The UN Conference
on International Organization was
called at San Francisco, where
from April 25 to June 26, 1945, the
Charter of the United Nations was
drawn up.
Today the UN is almost universal
in its membership. Its members
represent more than two billion
people. Many nations are yet
waiting to get in, including Com Communist
munist Communist China with its 670 million
people --a sizeable chunk to be
excluded.
In looking over the record of
the world organization, its
achievements, particularly in the
areas of economic and technical
assistance and in the application
of self determination, are
impressive.
The record is perhaps less
impressive in the field of main maintenance
tenance maintenance of world peace, but this
has been a fault of events, rather
than of the United Nations itself.
Also, as an organization tc
conciliate disputing or warring
governments the U. N. has
sometimes succeeded, sometimes
failed. While the UN has not been
able to prevent the outbreak of
hostilities,it has been instrumental
in preventing the greater spread
of hostilities and to mediate
differences among member
nations.
In the last few weeks, before
the UN General Assembly, Ameri Americans
cans Americans have again witnessed a world
dramathe human race brought

The Florida Alligator
Editor-in-Chief Dav id Lawrence Jr.
Managing Editor Bob Wilson
Sports Editor Walker Lundy
Editorial Page Editor John Askins
Layout Editor Ron Spencer
City Editor Cynthia Tunstall
Copy Editor. Hammock
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
the months of May, June, and July, when a weekly issue is published.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is entered as second class matter at
the United States Post office at Gainesville, Florida.

together, with all its virtues and
faults, its wisdom and folly, and
its good and ill will.
In his address before the 18th
General Assembly, President
Kennedy made a plea for peace peaceful
ful peaceful cooperation among all nations,
large and small. He noted that the
limited nuclear test ban treaty
signalled a pause in the cold war
but that continued effort to achieve
peace was essential. To this end
he pledged that the United States
would continue to work; alone, and
through the UN. The President
indicated that the UN must play a
larger role in helping to bring
increased material and social
welfare to all men. To these ends,
the United States delegation will
be prepared to suggest initiatives.
In still another sense, the voice
which the United States commands
in the UN has been cooperative
with the rise in influence of the
smaller and middle powers. The
safety of any single nation in the
free world depends directly upon
the substantial unity of all nations
in the free world. No nation out outside
side outside the Iron Curtain can afford
to be indifferent to the fate of
any other nation devoted to
freedom. The United States,** by
reason of its strength, can be a
prime mover in world affairs--
but it can only hope to do so in
concert with other nations in
modifying the views and decisions
of great and little powers.
The great imperative of the time
is to raise the standards of living
of the great masses of the people.
The United States fundamental
task is no less than to outline
the route by which the people can
achieve the material progress they
desire without any sacrifice of
fundamental human rights and
freedoms.
There can, of course, be no
absolute guarantee that any
organization on earth could surely
prevent a third great war and the
possible suicide of the human race.
But much can be done to make
that doom less likely; and much
of it is being done in the United
Nations.



History
EDITOR:
The following is a submission
that I hope will be considered for
publication in the Alligator, in
the Letters to the Editor
section.
History, notwithstanding
attempts to ascribe to it the
attributes of a science, is more
of a reflection of present attitudes
than a recitation of long past events
and casual relationships. Tolstoy,
in his conclusion to War and
peace easily establishes this
conclusion. Perhaps another way
to state this is to say that no
mere mortal is the Perfect
Anthropologist -- none of us have
the ability to transcend ourselves
and perceive ourselves in this
act of transcendsion. With this in
mind, some are inclined to
speculate as to the various
historical views of Western
religion. The following may qualify
as one such speculation.
Western religion, as today
presented, has had two major
widely acknowledged failings. One,
specific in nature, consists of the
numerous torturings and deaths
meted out in its name. The
Spanish inquisition (and its auto autoda-fey)
da-fey) autoda-fey) and witch burnings are
most prominent examples. A
second, general in nature, has been
the opposition of Western religion
to scientific inquiry. By taking
unrelenting positions on points
later successfully refuted by
scientific inquiry, it has caused
itself great harm; e.g., age and
origin of the earth and of man,
the solar system, existence of
seven heavens, etc.
Without claiming even the
slightest degree of omniscience

I THE NEEDLES POINT

Old Peel 'Projects

By DON ADDIS
I think the psychologists call
it projection when one fancifully
assigns his own faults to someone
else. The Old orange Peels
vicious preview of the New
Orange Peel, then, is a classic
case.
The criticisms, which mirror
Old Peel itself, maliciously belittle
New Peel with no real attempt at
reviewing. The fact that the Old
Peelers went to the trouble to
sneak a pre-publication peek at
the New Peel apparently for
the sole purpose of stealing a
march attests to the petty
motivation behind the whole
article.
Old Peel charges New Peel with
a conscious effort to be naughty,
while old Peel itself bases its
whole economic success on
precisely this image. They charge
New Peel with employing heavy heavyhanded
handed heavyhanded broadsides against lil ole
us; a perfect description of the
very article in which the phrase
appears. They charge New Peel
from a great lack of
originality; this from a
publication which, but for. its
'borrowed humor, would read
like an unused sketch pad.
Most comical is the charge
that New Peel sufferstechnically
from a lack of color and
illustrations. A cursory thumbing
of Old Peel reveals how a magazine
can become a technical atrocity
Irom a misused abundance of color.
Old Peel, you see, is very strong
on color, and they would never
understand if you spent all day
rubbing their noses in the fact
hat it isnt color or lack of it
l hat is the measure of quality.
Its what you do with what you got.
In the UF art department, I have
seen work of real quality rendered
in chalk on wrapping paper.
Apparently finding themselves
stuck for any truly valid criticisms

and certainly not intending to scuff
the toes of any scientific historians,
an -fcrstorical truth that will be
widely acknowledged in the 21st
and certainly the 22nd centuries
is more than partially revealed to
us today, it is the third major
failure of Western religion in its
specific application to the United
States. I do not feel competent
enough to articulate it in term terminology
inology terminology that could withstand the
ravages of historical time; yet
this is not necessary so long as
the facts composing this failing
are known and understood.
Mans relationship with his
fellow man, the acknowledged
specific domain of religion, leaves
S
as much wanting today as it ever
has ( . .there is nothing new
under the sun .... Vanitae
vanitatus.) in fact, where one
would expect religion to have its
greatest impact on American
society in this period of stormy
structural social change,
religion in its totality -- has
had less effect than a single stick
of dynamite. Arguably, western
religion has not been defeated by
the challenge oi todays society
but only because it has not faced
up to this challenge. It has been,
if anywhere identifiable, in the
discreet background of struggle.
I submit that this is one of the
strongest religious indictments of
Western religion that history has
even offered us for inspection.

of New Peel, Old Peel editors
resorted to oily innuendo, shaky
sortees as literary critics, and
absolutely pitiful hair-splitting
(they knock New Peels switch on
the word playmate, question the
clarity of the headline Florida
Football Greats Scarce, and,
unable to find fault with an article
in which Coach Graves is
mentioned, find fault with Coach
Graves).
Then, all cranked up with no
place to go, they tore into other
areas of Student Publications,
creating their own fiction in
describing David Lawrences
supposed narrow escape from
impeachment, depicting me as
some kind of economic basket case
thoroughly cowed by Publications
overlords, and accusing Student
Publications of pocketing Old Peel
revenue.
Jack Horan listened to the
publications secretary explain her
honest mistake in processing an
Old Peel check mistakenly sent
to her office, and how the sum
would be returned as soon as
financial machinations permitted.
Then he went home and wrote
. . the sneaky devils quickly
stuck it in the UF account, probably
thinking wed never miss it. .
He neatly omitted the fact that
the Old Orange Peel has a past-due
bill on file for advertising in the
Alligator, and could thereby qualify
as a DEADBEAT ACCOUNT.
Old Peel is masterfully funny
in many places (Horan is a natural
humorist), but the good points are
smothered in immature practices,
shady ethics and lousy taste.
Nothing in their childish attack
alters my observation that the
New orange Peel, under Stan
Huguenin, is among the most
professional-looking amateur
magazines Ive ever seen, and the
Old Peel reigns as the most
amateurish of the professionals.

Filled churches are generally
acknowledged to be indicative of
the religious mien of America.
It ought not to be surprising,
however, if careful research
revealed that religious feelings
were inversely proportional to
Sunday attendance. Such research
would certainly include a study
of Gainesville church attendance
by college youth.
Each Sunday, the churches on
University Avenue fill up at their
respective annointed hours. At the
conclusion of each service, the
respective churches disgorge and
the College Inn fills up. A
spectator, naively unbiased and
unaware of the implications, could
conclude that the church attenders
were involved in some religious
procession culminating in some
eating edifice and that this cul culmination
mination culmination was part of the church
service. A relatively simple
conclusion here reveals itself; to
investigate the religious
experience and feelings of college
youth, of greatest significance is
not the church attendance but the
College Inn attendance.
If the summation of such
forfeitures of Western religion
ever outweigh the totality of the
benefits to be offered us by
religion, rational man may one day
come to totally reject religion for
its non-religious nature.
And the churches emptied. .
and the college Inns filled. . and
lo and behold, it came to pass that
when the College Inns emptied.-.
the churches did not fill. ...
The Newest Testament
Thank you very much for your
consideration.
Lester Brickman
College of Law
Seating
EDITOR:
I resent being discriminated
against* For the third time this
year, I have been allocated a seat
in the Stadium in Sec. 29 (15 -yard
line), even though Ive shown up at
the ticket window each time about
1:40, 20 minutes before the daily
allocation of supposed good
seats are made available to the
student body. I suppose this is the
fate I must accept, not being a
member of a privileged group
assigned a block of seats on the
30 to 50-yard lines.
Why must Florida delegate
seating on a reserved seat basis?
Apparently other great institutions
of higher learning find a general
admission seating arrangement for
the students to be much more
satisfactory. Ive attended games
at Stanford, UCLA, Michigan,
Michigan State, Notre Dame,
Miami, and, last weekend, by
arriving just a little bit early, I
enjoyed the pleasure of a seat
in the 19th row, on the 47-yard
line, at the FSU game. Even UFs
baby sister doesnt believe in
discriminating against its
students.
Being forced by the money moneygrabbing
grabbing moneygrabbing athletic department to
sit on the sunny side of the stands
is bad enough! But being deprived
of the right to sit behind our own
team to cheer them on is absurd.
In all the many other college games
Ive attended previously, the
students and the band always sat
on the same side as their team,
but not at Florida!
Every student on this campus
should voice his protest against
this discrimination by showing the
athletic department what they think
of the scheduling of the FSU game.
Even though many students wont
attend that game, they should pick
up their ticket and prevent its
being sold to the general public.
Perhaps the situation next year
will be different, if every student
expresses his or her opinion of
this discrimination in this way.
John B. Hyland

Thursdays 0ct.24,1963 The Florida Alligator

DONT HOLD
YOUR BREATH
ANY LONGER!
THE EVEN NEWER NEW
ORANGE PEEL WILL BE ON SALE
TODAY!
ANYBODY CAN BE OBSCENE
WE TRY TO BE ENTERTAINING.
fiilrc JlHpPiPi*
wrw/mmv
ife' *'.
H
jT
S'
j:
ON SALE AT 5 LOCATIONS
# FLORIDA UNION CAFETERIA
MAIN LIBRARY
v -s.
CAMPUS BOOKSTORE
MATHERLY
# PEABODY-BENTON
NEW
ORANGE
PEEL

Page 5



Page 6

The Florida Alligator Thursdays 0ct.24,1963

For Sale

TABLE MODEL 58 Zenith, 21.
S3O FR 6-5988. after 3 p.m. 213
S. E. 2nd Place. (A-34-3t-c).
BRIDGESTON 50cc. Motorcycle.
2 months old, turn signals, dual
mirrors. 45 M.P.H. 200 M.P.G.
J. Silberman 6-9102. (A-33-3t-c).
1963 RALEIGH MO-PED,Excellent
condition. 1550 miles, owner has
dropped out of school. New SIBO,
must sell at SBO. 1414 N.W. Ist
Ave. Call 6 0044. (A-33-2t-c).
FOR SALE -- Two ampex tape
recorders: Model 1270, 4-track
$550. Model 960, 2 track, $250.
Also two Shure Mikes SSO each.
Call Irving FR 2 5422.
(A-33-3t-c).
MODEL 94 Winchester 30-30 rifle.
One year old. Perfect condition.
Call FR 6 9038 after 5 p.m.
(A-32-3t-c).
1959 LAMBRETTA Motor Scooter.
Runs real good, very reasonable.
Call Gary Stiller, 2-9490, between
6;00 and 7;00 p.m. Pi-Lam House.
(A-32-st-c).

For Rent

CHILDLESS COUPLE, or two
students to rent furnished apt.
in Colonial Manor Apts. 1/2 block
from University. Come, phone or
write Scott Keller, 1216 S. W. 2nd
Ave., 372-2722. (B-27-ts-c).
APARTMENT Furnished, air
conditioned. Like a small home
near campus. Also room or share
private comfortable home with
lovely garden. 376 0410.
(B-32-st-c).

Wanted

WANTED two adjacent tickets to
Homecoming game. Will pay $5.00
each. 372-8327. (C-34-2t-c).

--TODAY ONLY
. .| 'This Sporting Life
1- ,J 1:45-4:15-6:35-8:55

j -r iiijiii iiiiijiftn l, i"i. J
The Mightiest Motion Picture Os Them All! ft
KIRK LORRE
M m TECHNICOLOR ALUMNI AND FRIENDS*
TO HOMECOMING "63! |||

BB wy Bp iw/w / B w

Lost Found

LOST ONE PAIR Black framed
glasses, lost Sat. night between
Kappa Sig and Fiji house. $5
reward. Call FR 2-9495, room
4088, Richard Johnson. Leave
name, address and/or phone.
(L-33-3t-c).
LOST -- A GOLD Ring with 4
diamonds and a ruby. Reward.
Mike Josephs FR 2 9476.
(L-32-ts-c).
f \

Autos

59 RENAULT DAUPHINE. Must
sell. Good condition $250. Call
FR 2-5489. (G-34-st-c).
1959 CHEV. IMPALA Convertible.
Fully equipped. Any reasonable
offer. 1824 N. W. 2nd Ave. Apt.
4. FR 6-4733. (G-33-st-o).
JAGUAR XKI2O. Roadster. New
clutch, brakes and electric parts.
Needs paint. $695. FR 2 7691.
(G-33-3t-c).
1960\RED 14GA Roadster. Wire
condition. $995. FR
6-0084. (G-33-st-c).
MUST SELL -1962 IMPALA
Convertible. Black, red interior,
V-8, automatic, power steering,
brakes, radio, heater. Excellent
condition. FR 2-6857 or FR 2-
0356. (G-33-st-c).

Services

WILL CARE FOR Children in my
home. Prefer ages 2 or older.
Phone 2 1029. Put this number
away for future reference.
(M-34-3t-c).
NEED A BAND FOR TOMORROW
NIGHT? (Friday, Oct. 25) Call
the Movers. FR 2-9490 or FR 2-
9476. (M-34-lt-c).

Services

TYPING DONE ON IBM Electric
typewriter. Will type on short I
notice. Reasonable rates. Phone:
Mrs. Martinez FR 6-3261, Ext. ;
2575 weekdays or FR 6-1859:
weekends or nights. (M-4-Th-c).
KIDDIE KORT. Child Care Center.
Day, week, month, pickup at
Littlewood and J. J. Finley Schools
open for BALL GAMES. Ph. 2-
6667. (M-19-ThF-c).
BAND for hire. The Continentals
5 piece Combo. Will play anywhere,
anytime. Special rates to
Fraternities. Call Harold
Cunningham. FR 6 7052 after
3 p.m. (M-29-10t-c).
FOR A CHANGE OF PACE, Come
Horseback Riding at Lake Wauberg
Riding Stables,Tumbleweed Ranch.
Hay Rides and Night Trail Rides.
Student operated. 1/2 Mi. North of
Lake Wauberg. Reservations
and free transportation. Call
466-9295. (M-8-68t-c).
TV TECHNICIAN, Experienced.
Part time only. Call FR 6-5348.
(M-30-st-c).
the q/OoR,
Wants Youk
.. .FOR GAI'OR GIRL
We invite readers to
submit pictures of
their favorite gals
f for use in this fea feature.
ture. feature. We'll give
'em bock.

-£s&s ** I
SHE'S BLIND BUT ABLE TO SEE
...the happiness in life. She's UF student Leah Russel
who does much of her seeing via mechanical devices.
USES 'SLATE AND STYLUS
Blind Student
Still Studies

By JUDI BARNES
Os The Gator Staff
The C-ll professor has started
his lecture for the day, and the
class is quiet. All the freshmen
are taking notes, except for one
slender blonde coed. No sound of
writing comes from her desk--
instead she seems to be working
a puzzle.
Pretty Leah Russell is blind,
and instead of a pen and paper,
she is using a slate and stylus,
a braille notebook.
Leah has always been a straight
A student, even if she never has
used a textbook or taken a longhand
note.
Most of her books are on tapes,
and some are in Braille or on
records. She finds out what books
she will need ahead of time, and
either obtains them in Braille or
has them recorded. UF students
often help her with the recordings.
Leah takes notes from her tapes
with a Braille typewriter. She
f w m f
I
i 2400
LAST TIMES
doors open 6; show of 7
regular Ist-run admission
children under 12 FREE
[FIRST AREA SHOWING/
'WONDERFUL WORLD of
the BROTHERS GRIMM"
2d big -A
color hit JERRY LEWIS,
"THE NUTTY PROFESSOR'

takes exams with a reader who
reads the test to her, giving her
as long as she likes.
But this is not the whole story
with Leah Russell. She is also a
full-fledged member of the Gator
Marching Band, and marches with
precision.
The story of this remarkable
girls feat started back in the
ninth grade at a Miami high school
when a teacher taught her to play
the flute, similar to the piccolo
she now plays.
This opened a whole new world
for me, Leah said.
During her freshman and
sophomore years of high school,
Leah played with both the marching
and concert bands, but she sat
it out when the band marched onto
the field. At the beginning of her
junior year at Southwest Miami
High School, she burst into her
band directors office determined
to march with the band.
I get lonely just sitting there
while everybody else plays, Leah
told him.
Leahs band director coached
her individually, and she practiced
barefoot on the sidewalk to learn
t h e eight steps -to five yards
ratio marching bands use.
The cracks were exactly five
yards apart and they taught me to
take the proper step length, she
said.
Leah also learned to keep step
by listening to players on both
sides of her.
When Leah entered the UF as a
freshman this fall, few problems
were encountered. So far she has
marched in the Georgia Tech,
Mississippi state, and Richmond
games.
I HEELS put on in S minutts
I SOLES put on m 15*minutes
I modern~shoe|
REPAIR SHOP
Jocross from Ist notional bonk |
United Rent-All
Party & Banquet Equip
Rollaway Beds Tools
Trucks, Trailers, Tow
Ban.
625 N.W. Bfh Ave.
FR 6-2835



750 Folding Chairs
Set Up For Game

By WALKER LUNDY
Sports Editor
Some 750 collapsing chairs will
be put up around Florida Field
Saturday in hopes they will take
care of all UF students who pre presently
sently presently without seats to the Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming football game against
Louisiana State.
Student Body Pres. Paul
Hendrick made the announcement
yesterday after talking with Assis Assistant
tant Assistant Athletic Director Percy
Beard.
We expect this to solve our
seating problems, Hendricksaid.
The athletic association will set
up 500 chairs along the sidelines
and another 250 along the top edge
of the north end zone stands. All
will be given out on a first-come first-comefirst-served
first-served first-comefirst-served basis, Beard said.
We think there are about 500
students who are still without
seats, Beard said. These extra
Students who do not have
tickets to the Homecoming game
should present their unpunched
picture identification cards at
Gate 13 at the north end of the
stadium before the game
Saturday for a seat.
Students will be seated on a
first come-first served basis
using the 750 portable chairs
until they give out.
No ticket is necessary for one
of the seats, only the unpunched
picture identification card.
seats should take care of all the
students who want to come.
While the announcement eased
seating worries for UF students,
it did little for those having non noncampus
campus noncampus dates. No more date
tickets will be given out, which
means any non-campus dates who
do not have their tickets now
can not attend the game.
Were just worried about
getting all of our students in the
game right now, Beard said.
He said the main stumbling block
towards trying to set the extra
seats up is getting them in place
in time.
Thats our b igge s t problem
right now, Beard said. There
are plenty of chairs on campus
but almost all of them are in
use Saturday morning with all
the Homecoming activities.
Its going to be a tight squeeze
to get them all to the field in time
but i think well make it, he
said.
The Athletic Association with
some help from the UF Physical
Plant Division will have actual
charge of transporting the chairs.
Student tempers were riled
earlier this week when the an announcement
nouncement announcement came that all seats in
the 44,000-capacity stadium had
been sold previously to the general
public or already given out to
students.
Before the 750 chairs entered the
picture yesterday, it appeared that
several hundred students were
going to be relegated to listening
to the game over the radio.
More than 16,000 student tickets
were given out for the game,
allowing for slightly more than
2,000 non-campus dates. This
turned out to be several hundred
short of the demand.
It was the same number of tickets
allowed for Lie Homecoming game
last year but did not take into
consideration the 1,000 student
increase in enrollment over last
year.

FLORIDA END BARRY BROWN

Up To Date
GAME RECORD
Florida Opponent
0 Georgia Tech 9
9 Mississippi State 9
35 Richmond 28
10 Alabama 6
21 Vanderbilt 0
TEAM STATISTICS
Florida Opponent
75 Points 52
36 Ist Down, run 22
23 Ist Down, pass 20
4 Ist Down, penalty 5
63 Total Ist downs 47
229 Runs from scrim 183
1015 Gain from scrim ..537
228 Lost from scrim 128
787 Net gain scrim 409
157.4 Rushing avg. per game.Bl.B
79 Passes attempted 85
42 Passes completed 35
53.2 Percent completed 41.2
6 passes had interc 7
480 Gain passing... 398
96.0 Passing avg. per game. 79.6
1267 Total net gain 807
253.4 Total offensive avg... .161.4
28 No. of Punts 32
1041 Total yards kicked 1299
37.2 Punting avg 40.6
0 Punts had blocked 0
22 No. punts ret 10
316 Yds. punts ret 75
14.4 Avg. punt return 7.5
13 No. kickoffs ret 14
283 Yds. kickoffs ret 281
21.8 KO return avg 20.0
34 No. of penalties 11
317 Yds. penalized 89
L2 Fumbles... .. ....*** .13
7 Fumbles lost 8
6 TDs running 6
4 TDs passing 1
8 Ex.pt. att. (kick) 2
5 Ex.pt. made (kick)., 1
2 Ex.pt. att. (pass) 5
1 Ex.pt. made (pass) 0
0 Ex.pt. att (run) 0
0 Ex.pt. made (run) 0
3 Field Goals att 5
2 Field Goals made 3
1 Safeties for Q
OPP. FUMBLES RECOVERED BY
Russell (3), Odom, Katz, Thomas,
pette, Matthews
PUNTING GAME
Kicks Yds. Blk. Avg.
Seymour 28 1041 0 37.2
PUNT REJURNS
Rets. Yds. Xvg. TDs
Bennett 7 108 15.4 0

Gator Stats
Trammell 5 83 16.6 0
Harper 2 58 29.0 0
Clarke 5 32 6.4 0
Kirk 2 22 11.0 0
Poe 1 11 11.0 0
INDIVIDUAL RUNNING
Runs Net Avg. Run
Dupree 86 396 4.7 38
Harper 34 165 4.9 22
Kirk 17 112 6.6 42
James 1 42 42.0 2
Trammell 9 33 3.7 13
Clarke 6 22 3.7 8
Campbell 6 21 3.6 6
Poe 2 12 6.0 10
Newcomer 5 11 2.2 11
Hall 15 5.0 5
Shannon 57 4 17
Seymour 1 -6 -6.0
Stephenson 3 -15 -15.0
Team 1 -15
INTERCEPTIONS
Caught Yds. Ret. TDs
Bennett 2 16 0
Clarke 1 11 0
Morgan 19 0
R. Brown 16 0
Russell 10 0
poe 1 0 0
INDIVIDUAL PASSING
Att.Com. pet. In.G. TD
Shannon 75 40 53.3 5 463 4
Stephenson j 4 2 50.0 1 17 0
INDIVIDUAL RECEIVING
Caught Yards TDs
Trammell 7 83 0
Casey 5 85 1
Clarke 5 67 0
R. Brown 5 52 0
poe 4 21 2
Newcomer 3 64 0
Kirk 3 27 0
Dupree 3 21 0
B. Brown 2 21 0
Harper 2 16 0
Thomas 1 10 0
Matthews 18 1
Jackson 1 5 0
KICKOFF RETURNS
Returns Yards Avg.
Harper 5 97 15.4
Dupree 3 54 18.0
Trammell 2 48 24.0
Clarke 2 46 23,Q_
KiTk 1 38 38.0
SCORING BY QUARTERS
1234 TOTAL
Florida 20 9 20 26 75
Opponent 10 3 6 33 52
f -

Thursday,Oct.24,l963 The Florida Alligator

| GATOR SPORTS |
Roberts Quits FSU

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) The
Florida State Seminoles lost senior
fullback Gene Roberts yesterday
when the offensive specialist
dropped out of school for personal
reasons.
He was a two year letterman,
and led the Seminoles in ground
gaining last season. He started the
first two games this year, but
hasnt seen action since. Coach
Mural Results
VOLLEYBALL
(Blue League)
XP bracket winner
XP over LXA
15-10, 11-15, 15-13
Semi-finals:
LXA o\er TKE
15-7, 10-15, 15-13
FLAG FOOTBALL
(Engineering)
Industrial 31 Chemical 0
Aerospace 12 Civil 7

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ZEN DICTIONARY ...Ernest Wood
THE BRUTE & OTHER FORCES .. .Anton Chekhov
HANDBOOK OF DREAM ANALYSIS
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IS SEX NECESSARY? ...James Thurber
FREUDIAN ISM & THE LITERARY MIND
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HIROSHIMA MON AMOUR .. .Marguerite Duras
TECHNICAL AND REFERENCE BOOKS
CONTROL ENGINEERING HANDBOOK.. .Trual
APPLIED ELASTICITY...Wang
POLYMETRIC MATERIALS.. .Winding
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Bill Peterson said, Roberts was
an offensive specialist and we
planned to use him a great deal
this season. However, the new
substitution rules kept us from
playing him as much as we wanted
to.
Peterson put the Seminoles
through a fundamentals drill,
stressing rough w'ork and passing.
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Page 7



Page 8

The Florida Alligator Thursday,Oct.24,l963

Graves Calls Game Toss-up

Head Florida football coach Ray Graves doesnt have much faith
in odds-makers -- at least when it comes to those who give the
Gators an edge over Louisiana State in Saturdays Homecoming
game here.
I dont see how we can be favored, he said yesterday, jabing
at one poll that gave Florida a five-point edge. LSU has abetter
record then we do (4-1 to 3-1-1) and theyre better offensively and
defensively.
I think our advantage of the home field should make the game a
toss-up, he said. But I think we can beat em. The team that wins
will be the one that gets the big breaks and capitalizes on them.
Graves watched his Gators go through their last full workout
before Saturdays 2 p.m. ball game with his fingers crossed. Several
key Gators are still slowed by injuries, including the teams top

Adjustment
t Needed?
If you still need to make
adjustments in your
"'ll
Homecoming wardrobe,
Ring's offers immediate
alteration on suits,blazers
and slacks. We have just
received a shipment of
Navy,Camel, Bottle Green
and Burgundy blazers.
Regularly 29.95, but over
Homecoming Weekend
fttngs
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Your College Life Team in Gainesville
Jim Larec Don Wiggins Lou Burns
The Original and
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FOOTBALL FORECAST
1 - """l" -- .
Guest Predictions By:
C.L.I.C.A. ATO PhiKT
FLORIDA LSU FLORIDA FLORIDA FLORIDA
FSU VIRGINIA TECH FSU FSU FSU
NAVY PITT NAVY PITT PITT
DUKE N. CAROLINA STATE DUKE DUKE DUKE
RICE TEXAS TEXAS TEXAS 1 TEXAS
MISS..STATE MEMPHIS STATE MEMPHIS STATE MISS. STATE MISS. STATE
GEORGIA KENTUCKY GEORGIA GEORGIA GEORGIA
IOWA PURDUE IOWA PURDUE IOWA
SYRACUSE OREGON STATE SYRACUSE SYRACUSE SYRACUSE
ARMY WASHINGTON STATE ARMY ARMY ARMY
I
LAST WEEK'S RESULTS: CLICA mispicked Georgia Tech, Clemson, Miami, Penn
State and SMU; Theta Chi mispicked Georgia Tech, Miami, Penn State and Ohio
State; Delta Chi mispicked Georgia Tech, Miami and Penn State. CLICA score
to date: 26-20-4.

offensive threat, fullback Larry Dupree, and Graves does not want
anything more to happen.
Dupree will not get a chance to go full speed until the game Saturday
because of his injuries, Graves said.
Tackle John Dent, who had his Saturday playing status clouded
when he injured his knee at practice Tuesday, may play after all.
Team trainer Jim Cunningham said yesterday, Dents knee .hasnt
swollen up very much and if it doesnt get any worse he will play
against LSU.
Dent, a senior two-year letterman from Tampa, is an important
cog in the Gator forward wall and would be missed sorely Saturday.
The Gators will hold a light drill today and a brief 45-minute
loosening up exercise Friday afternoon.
Graves said the Gator team will make a brief appearance Friday
night at Gator Growl.

UF Swimmers Getting
Ready For Alabama

By ERNIE LITZ
Os The Gator Staff
The cry of Beat Alabama,
heard two weeks ago for the UF
football team, will also resound
from Florida Pool this year.
The UF swim team has won 15
consecutive meets and 22 out of
the last 23 over the past two
years, while copping the South Southeastern
eastern Southeastern Conference (SEC) title for
the last eight straight years. They
have also had eight All-Americas
in the last nine years.
This year the team will face a
serious challenge to its SEC
supremacy in the form of the
University of Alabama who last
season became the first team in
eight years to score more than
100 points against the UF at the
SEC Championships.
The Gators will be led by
Jacksonvile star Jerry
Livingston, All-American for the
last two years. Livingston is

captain this season.
Should Livingston repeat again
this year as All-America he will
hold the distinction of being the
first UF athlete to be an All-
America for his entire varsity
career.
In addition to his swim team
chores, Livingston is, vice
president of the F-Club (letter
mens group).
To get anywhere this year
were going to have to depend on
our sophomores, Livingston said.
Theyre the backbone of the team.
We lost six lettermen through
graduation and we only have six
returning lettermen so those sophs
are going to have to come through.
One of the sophomores counted
on heavily will be Jimmy Roos
from Hialeah. Roos is abutterflier
and individual medley man. He
was slowed by illness most of last
season but is ready to go now.
Another important sophomore
will be Charlie King, whom head
coach Bill Harlan called the best
all-around swimmer in the south
and certainly one of the better
all-around swimmers in the entire
country.
His speciality is the individual
medley which includes all four
competitive strokes the fly,
backstroke, breaststroke and
freestyle.
As a freshman last year, King

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LEADING TANKERS
.. .this season is captain Jerry Livingston, an All-America
butterflyer.

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JIM ROOS

set freshman records in the 50-
yard freestyle, 100 freestyle, 200
breastroke, and 200 Individual
medley.
Bill Corbin, a sophomore, and
Al Lauweart, a senior, will battle
it out for the top distance man.
Both boys have done well here in
past seasons. Corbin holds frosh
records in the 400 and 500 yard
freestyle. Lauwaert holds the 440
yard freestyle record for the
varsity.
Another sophomore-senior
tussle will feature soph Rod
Hubbert against Dick Farwell for
the top backstrokers spot. HUbbert
holds the 100 and 200 back records
for the freshmen and Farwell holds
the same records for the varsity.
Others who will have to come
through include sophomore breast breaststroker
stroker breaststroker Sandy Chandler, divers
Lansing Price (a senior) and Jerry
Chaves (a junior), and flyers Dick
Harman and Ray White house, (both
sophomores).
Attempting to succeed the best
freshman team in UF history will
be frosh freestylers Lance Gerlin
from Miami Jackson, astateClass
A A champion and Mike Sheehe from
Cleveland, Ohio, Bob Reines a
prep-school All-America breast breaststroker
stroker breaststroker from Peekskill Military
Academy in New Jersey; Blanchard
Tual in the backstroke from
Nashville, Tennessee.