Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
The Florida
Alligator

Vol .56, N 0.32

HC '63 Operation
To Rival Canaveral

By DAVID LAWRENCE, JR.
Editor-in-Chief
A student organization rivaling
Cape Canaverals assault on the
moon spearheads the UFs drive
toward a successful Homecoming.
An estimated 4,000 student
workers, all bent on putting on the
most successful production ever,
will climax their efforts Friday
and Saturday with the 1963 edition

IT'S TWO GATORS AND A TIGER
You can't tell from what has already been built, but
that's what Alpha Tau Omega fraternity is planning
for its Homecoming house decorations.

UF 'Burning Issue
Nears Solution

The UFs burning issue is
nearing a solution, UF Physical
Plant Division head Calvin C.
Greene says.
Greene reports Vincent D.
Patton, director of the State Health
12 Coeds
Needed
Army Reserve Officers Training
Corps (ROTC) cadets are looking
for 12 attractive coeds to act as
sponsors for 12 drill companies.
Application forms have been sent
out to the 13 sororities and the
womens dormitory councils to get
nominations for the 12 positions.
Forms should be returned to
the Florida Union lobby desk by
Tuesday.
All coeds applying are invited
to the Oct. 28 Acquaintance
Social Tb b# held in room 324
of the flofidA union from 7:30
9.
Coffee and doughnuts will be
served.

! University of Florida,Gainesville Tuesday,

of Homecoming.
Led by Charley Wells, junior
law student from Orlando and
general Homecoming chairman,
preparations have been divided into
divisions.
Armed with an organizational
chart and ready commands, Wells
began his work in April with the
appointments of the division
chairmen.
Homecomings 19 events are

Departments industrial wastes
division, appreciated the UF
Agricultural Experiment Stations
immediate need for an incinerator
to dispose of diseased animals.
According to Greene, Patton,
however, said before any action
xould be taken, he must first see
the UF's plans for improving the
trash dump near the J. Hillis
Miller Health Center.
B. C. Pafford, Alachua Countys
environmental health department
director, considers the open trash
dump the worst potential air
pollution problem in the county,
it was reported recently.
Greene is presently seeking a
suitable area near 5 for
refuse disposal in accordance with
the State Board of Health.
Pafford said in view of the UF's
immediate need for the
Agricultural Experiment Station
incinerator, he would contact
Patton and work out a plan to
authorize the request.
Authorization of the incinerator
would have been routine if the dump
-.sue had not been brought in,
Greene said.

, Oct. 22,1963

divided into divisions. Under each
division head are various
assistants and coordinators,
neighboring about 100 persons.
Assistant General Chairman is
M. J. Menge.
Keystone of the divisions is
Butch Wootens personnel staff,
which does most of the paper
work for Homecoming.
Unsung hero of Homecoming is
finance chairman Dennis Flanagan
whose division is responsible for
budgeting the funds in a fair and
equitable manner. In other words,
Flanagan has to keep everyone
happy on a small budget and still
get the bills paid.
Alumni coordinator Maurice
Plumb is in charge of a division
acquiring an ever growing
importance. Plumb, a first year
law student, must make sure
alumni are registered and brought
to the Plaza of the Americas for
the reunion celebration.
Displaying his share of Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming headaches is Wilson
Atkinson who, as special functions
chairman, is in charge of: the UF
showcase, the John Marshall Bar
Association (JMBA) skits, the
Homecoming Ball, campus
decorations, the welcome booth,
the Swimcapades and fraternity
and sorority house decorations.
Mike Colodnys honored guest
division has closer tabs on visiting
VIPs than any one other group.
If they need, this division supplies.
Also requiring tack and
regimentation is supervision of the
Florida Blue Key Banquet division.
Here, chairman Ron LaFace
entertains state and national
dignataries as well as active Blue
Key members.
Also in the organizational chain chainof
of chainof command is Tommy
Kenningtons Gator Growl division.
Charlie Edwards, head of
Homecomings technical division,
(See HC Page 7)

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THEYLL BE BEATING THE TIGER WITH A CLUB
Delto Upsilon fraternity is following the Homecoming theme with its decorations.
Members and dates will enter the house through the tiger's mouth.

Cl Picketers
Add To Ranks

By JIM SIMMONS
Os The Gator Staff
The Student Group for Equal
Rights, which is picketing the
College Inn Restaurant has
received additional picketers from
the University Liberal Forum and
will be joined by the Council of
Human Relations next Sunday.
The University Liberal Forum,
a student organization sponsored
by the local Unitarian fellowship,
marched in the picket line from
noon to 3 p.m. Saturday.
Bill Warinner, president of the
organization, said, Although the
University Liberal Forum is not
a social actions group, it has
Parking Slots
Are Called
Too Small
Short spaces between parking
spaces in some campus parking
areas apparently are not quite
large enough for standard size
cars - but ample for sports cars
and scooters.
Sports cars and scooters parked
in short spaces, however, run the
risk of getting parking tickets.
Campus Police Chief A.L. Shuler
parallel parking places,
including those across from
Norman Hall and along Union
Drive, are designed so that cars
will not be blocked in.
We cant let sports cars park
in short spaces because there
wouldnt be enough room for other
cars to get in and out, Shuler
said.
Were always yelling for more
space, he said. Who wouldnt
be with about 13,000 cars and
4,100 parking spaces.
Relining the parallel parking
areas would not give any additional
space, Shuler said. If the short
spaces were eliminated, regular
ones would have to be enlarged
for cars to get in and out, he
added.
Parking is a problem that grows
bigger every year on the UF
campus, Shuler said. There has
been a slight increase in the amount
of parking space in recent years,
but a much greater increase in
the number of cars, he added.
There are 1,400 more cars
registered this year than last year,
while the amount of parking space
is the same. Shuler said.

joined the picketing as an
expression of its feelings on the
situation at the C.1.
The Council of Human Relations
is a Gainesville bi-racial organi organization
zation organization whose main objective is
peaceful integration by opening
lines of communication with local
clubs, churches and business
establishments.
The group, a branch of the
Southern Regional Council of
Human Relations in Atlanta,
formed here in 1955.
The Council is joining the picket
line at the Cl because it feels
it should support other
organizations of similar goals.
The council picketers who expect
to be integrated, begin Sunday
from noon -1 p.m.
David R. Sheehan, faculty
sponsor of the Student Group for
Equal Rights, said, he is very
pleased that other groups are
joining the movement.
Bond Vote
Is Urged
Writing letters, telephoning
students and car pooling on
election day are activities of the
newly formed Council of Higher
Education.
The organization was made
official last week in Legislative
Council with a function to get the
$75 million bond issue for higher
education amendment passed Nov.
5.
Letters already are being
written to each students parents
to inform them of the amendments
importance.
Telephone calls to registered
voters on campus will remind them
to support the bond issue. Car
pools will provide student voters
transportation to the polls.
....... ...
Dr. Kammerer
Talks Friday
Dr. Gladys M. Kammererofthe
UF Political Science Department
will address the annual Mortar
Board Homecoming buffet Friday
in the banquet room of the Student
Service Center (Hub).
The dinner is held in conjunction
with Florida Blue Key to honor
Mortar Board actives, alumnae and
special guests, including the wives
of state legislators.



Page 2

The Florida Alligator Tuesday,Oct.22,l963

State Industry
Could Expand

Greater use of the expanding
foreign trade market through
Florida ports could prove a boon
to the states industries.
This suggestion comes from a
report just released by the UFs
Bureau of Economic and Business
Research.
Florida industries would do well
to explore the profit in using home
ports for exporting their products
as well as importing foreign
commodities for processing in the
state, Dr. Felix Muehlner,
associate professor of
management here, says in the
current issue of Economic
Leaflets.
Floridas ports showed a rate
of increase in foreign trade larger
than that of the United States as

Something different in eating experience. Gourmet
Shop, delicatessen & dining room. Open daily 11 am
to 9 pm, SEVEN DAYS A WEEK
or
706 West University Avenue

ri i
ENGINEERING OPPORTUNITIES
for Seniors and Graduates in mechanical,
AERONAUTICAL, CHEMICAL,
ELECTRICAL, NUCLEAR,
and METALLURGICAL
ENGINEERING
ENGINEERING MECHANICS
APPLIED MATHEMATICS
PHYSICS and
ENGINEERING PHYSICS
CAMPUS INTERVIEWS
I FRIDAY, NOV. 1
I Appointments should be made
I in advance through your
I College Placement Office
Pratt & jj
Whitney OIVISION OF COF*.
Aircraft
| An Equal Opportunity Employer
SPECIALISTS IN POWER. . POWER FOR PROPULSION-POWER FOR AUXILIARY SYSTEMS.
CURRENT UTILIZATIONS INCLUDE AIRCRAFT, MISSILES, SPACE VEHICLES, MARINE AND INDUSTRIAL APPLICATIONS
A

a whole from 1956-59. During that
period it increased from $631.8
million to a record $805.8 million.
In 1960 and 1961 Floridas share
declined but rose again in 1962,
according to figures from the U.S.
Department of Commerce Bureau
of the Census.
The recent overall lag in
Floridas foreign trade was due to
the lag of exports, an examination
of available charts revealed.
in respect to imports, Florida
has done as well as the nation
in rate of gain, he says.
Dr. Muehlner notes the imports
reflect Floridas population growth
as well as a rise in her level of
living'as indicated by an increase
in personal income.

TV
/' y/'/sfy 'f <

'Krazy Kampus Kontest
The KKK has finally succeeded?
Last week the Florida Alligator-sponsored Krazy Kampus Kontest reached its most difficult peak as
no one was able to win.
This week extragavant prizes are being donated by Alans Cubana, the Alligator, the Florida Theatre
with an added bonus of a free tour of the Student Government offices.
Answers should be brought to the Florida Alligator, room 9, Florida Union.

by REID POOLE, head of Ilf music department

The internationally renowned
Amadeus String Quartet of London
will appear in concert in University
Auditorium tonight at 8:15.
The appearance is the second
regular Lyceum council
presentation of the current season.
The Amadeus has received high
acclaim for its excellent artistry
in virtually every country of
Europe and on a number of
American tours during the past
decade. The quartet has also built
a fine artistic legacy in its
recordings of dozens of master masterworks
works masterworks on the Westminster, H.M.V.,
Angel and D.G.G. labels.
Balanced Program
One could not ask for a finer
program than that to be heard
tonight. From the 18th century
classical period the offering is
the Mozart Quartet in D minor,
K. 421; Brahms Quartet in C

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minor, Opus 51, No. 1 is one of
the great chamber works of the
romantic nineteenth century; and
the Fourth Quartet by Bela Bartok
is without question one of the
enduring imaginative masterworks
of the 20th century.
Students still outside the pale
of chamber music have an
opportunity for an experience
which will be not only rewarding,
but indeed may be a personal
revelation.
About Tickets
Students are admitted on
identification cards.
General admission for regular
Lyceum events is $2, high school
students and children sl.
Season tickets may be purchased
for the remaining seven events at
a 25 per cent discount, or $10.50.
UF faculty and staff may purchase
two adult tickets at 50 per cent

EMPTY MIRROR ...Allen Ginsberg
THE ADOLESCENCE OF ZHENYA LUVERS
... Boris Pasternak
THE CRIME OF IMPRISONMENT
.. .George Bernard Shaw
THE ETHICS OF AMBIGUITY ...Simone Deeauvoir
THE INQUISITION OF THE MIDDLE AGES
.. .Henry Charles Lea
DESI RE CAUGHT BY THE TAIL ... Pablo Picasso
THE ANGRY BLACK SOUTH .. .Mitchell & Peace
TECHNICAL AND REFERENCE BOOKS
WOOD IN ARCHITECTURE ...Monies
A SUMMARY OF EXPERIMENTAL FACTS
... Thorndike
THEORY OF ELASTIC STABILITY
.. .Timoshenko & Gere
CAMPUS SHOP AND BOOKSTORE

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discount for season or single
attraction.
No discount is given on
childrens tickets.
Tickets are on sale at infor information
mation information Booth across from the
Student Service Center (Hub), and
at the door.
Music Seminar
Edward Troupin, conductor of
the UF Symphony orchestra, and
first violinist of the Florida String
Quartet, will speak on the string
quartet and its literature at the
regular Tuesday afternoon Music
Seminar in the Music Building
Auditorium today at 2;30. His
discussion is Four Axes To
Grind. All students may attend.
The seminar, as usual, is related
to the evening concert.



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DORIS DAY AND JAMES GARNER
.. .star in "The Thril lof It All", a great comedy.

The Thrill Os It All

Script Real Plus Factor

By DON
Movie Reviewer
What could be better than the
life of a doctors wife? Perhaps
the life of a TV commercial
personality is a more glamorous
alternative.
Carl Reiners screenplay
considers this in one of
Hollywoods more refreshing light
comedies, now playing through
Wednesday at the Florida Theatre.
Doris Day plays the doctors
wife who finds commercials for
Happy Detergent Products more
fulfilling than the blissful grind
of domestic living. James Garner
plays a handsome obstetrician of
a husband who resents his wifes
extra-curricular activities.
But the real plus factor of this
movie is Carl Reiners script. At
times, it is (now hold your breath
for the following words)... original
and funny in a very healthy way.
Sophisticated slapstick
occasionally works.
The opening scene with Arlene
Francis excited because after 20
years of marriage she is going to
have a baby, is presented like a
shaggy dog story, only with an
effective punch line.
The building of the swimming
pool and the soap suds scene
following, faintly remind one of a
20s silent comedy. The delivery
scene in a Rolls Royce is another
gem.
For satire, there are some fine
barbs on the sameness of TV
plots.
Nevertheless, this film is not
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***
GATOR GIRL
AT
...today is Sharon Ann
Morris, 2UC. The brown
eyed brunette Art major
has the unusual student
number of 35-24-35.

an Irma La Douce, in that it
lacks consistency, has a standard
plot, and occasionally degenerates
into corny youve seen it before
sequences.
Doris Day and James Garner
do their roles nicely. I think they
have found their calling. Arlene
Francis has a fine opening scene,
but slumps near the end. Everybody
and everything else can be summed
up in the word, sufficient.

- T
... -- : jp
....
WHO put the "roll
in Van Heusens 1
j Button-Down Collar? §.
Our designer has bowed to plaudits from the
college man for producing the exacting patterns
which create such a softly flattering collar roll.
While our cloth specialist proudly claims that
Van Heusens traditional shirt fabrics are
the finest, most supple ... an essential for such
ingenious draping!
However, upon reflection, it is our experienced
stitchers who, almost fanatically, tailor that
graceful roll into each individual collar that deserve
the most credit of all.
Come, see the Van Heusen 417 Collection of
Xw
dress and sport shirts at your local retailer. They are
7 featured in a choice array of stripes and solids
all cut in the new V-Taper trim, slim look. If you
happen not to be a Button-Down fan, then snap
to with our Snap-Tab! $5 00
M Dacron and Cotton $5.95
VAN HEUSEN* |
|j
V-Taperfor the lean trim look.
VAN HEUSEN SHIRTS AVAILABLE AT

Lacking the sting of a British
satire and the sensitive treatment
of a Wilder comedy and the out outlandish
landish outlandish satire of say, Laurel and
Hardy, The Thrill Os It All,
borrowing a little from each of
these styles, still provides enough
laughs to keep a college audience
from resorting to an
overabundance of obscene
outbursts and variations on a
jeering theme.

Tuesday, 0ct.22,1963 The Florida Alligator

Hi OMN NIGHT TIL 900
REMOVAL SALE!
yes we are moving to a NEW AND BIGGER LOCATION. I
we have taken markdowns thru out our entire I
store, here are just some of the savings you 1
CAN EXPECT TO fIND. 1
LADIES FAMOUS BRAND I
IDRESS SHOES \
From Our Own IHV
I ::r;.r $n I
I | "1
to 21.95. All I
Heel Heighfs I
| Sixes 4 to 10
MIN S LADIES' TUNS'
I LOAFERS FLATS I
% \n
ALL NEW FALL STYLES
1 CREPE VALUES AND COLORS. CORDUROYS, ?
1 SOLES TO 8.95 MADRAS, SUEDINES. 1
1 LEATHER SIZES ALL SIZES 4to 10 1
8 6 to 12 Actual Values to 3.95 8
I MEN'S FAMOUS BRANDS I
1 ENGLISH WALKERS 8
nDCCC CUACC RRITISH WALKERS
lUKt>j MiUtj :z:r n I
I MANY MORE 8
M AFP OUR ALREADY CUT PRICES
i ny urr from 599 *>
II Aoo OFF c: ex. I
R 99 to 17.99
* OXFORDS LOAFERS
J 2 EYE TIES SLIP-ONS
88 Actual Voluci to 32.95
1 CHILDREN'S ROYS' LADIES' TEENS 8
I DRESS SHOES TENNIS SHOES FLATS I
I * -ll 66 sAool
|sf OFF |:r: I
H To
I vif/-"-, " Mjteg Lm I
H All L.ath.r Upper,.
B Mundra of Pain to
Sues 8 to 12
H 12i M*i to G p Chootc From
I r get youp message thouQh~~
it r\ \
I IQMBI
j with alliQAtop AOvetisinq

Page 3



The Florida Alligator Tuesday,Oct.22,l963

Page 4

eaitoxia.lfli

School That Wouldnt Die

OXFORD, MISS. A year ago, they said Ole Miss was dead.
The almost unanimous opinion of newspaper reports and editorials
around the nation was that the University of Mississippi had had it.
The night before, a bloody riot against the admission of Negro
James Meredith had engulfed the otherwise sedate campus. Almost all
the rioters were outsiders, but that mattered little. Most of the
Northern press launched an anti-ole Miss campaign, as if the.
University itself had planned and carried out the riot.
. .The students also lost no time in displaying their determination
to uphold the Ole Miss tradition of excellence. The University
Players October production of Saint Joan was called by a drama
critic the best college production ever staged in Mississippi.
Honor Roll figures for the fall semester showed an increase in the
number of students on the Honor Roll and a decrease in the number
of students dismissed for academic reasons. The football team went
undefeated. The number of students selected for membership in
honoarary scholastic societies reached an all-time high.
Nearly $6,000,000 in construction was underway on the Oxford
campus during the fall, and the University Medical Center in Jackson
started construction on its new $3,150,000 research wing.
. . Enrollment in the 1963 summer session fell short by only nine
students of breaking the all-time high for a summer session. A
record number of doctoral degrees were awarded at the close of
the summer session -- ten in chemistry alone. Medical research
teams at the University Medical Center completed the first successful
lung transplant on a human being, and completed the first successful
transplant in this country of adrenal glands. The University acquired
Rowan Oak, Oxford homeplace of Nobel prize-winning author William
Faulkner, to be used as a center of scholarly research and as a
memorial to the famed writer.
"... The prophets of gloom and doom have been proved wrong.
What they did not reckon with was a 115-year history of adverse
conditions and dogged determination.
Ole Miss has refused to die --in fact, it has refused even to
sleep.
+ **r* *******
Above are exerpts from a press release. Although out of context,
they do not distort the overall flavor of the article, nor its basic
point -- that ole Miss has bounced back after the Oxford Riots,
despite predictions that the universitys reputation was ruined.
The point may be valid, but it seems to us that it ignores a few
issues. What has the university done in the area.of human relations,
both on and off the campus, to insure that another series of riots
will not occur? Has it tried to educate its students and the citizens
of surrounding communities to the equality of all men? Has it spoken
out against the rabble-rousing techniques of some of the states elected
leaders?
These issues and others are, it seems to us, somewhat more
important than the amount of money spent in construction, the winning
record of the football team or critical response to St. Joan.
At ANY university.
The Florida Alligator
Editor-in-chief David Lawrence Jr.
* lanaging Editor . Bob wilson
Sports Editor Walker Lundy
Editorial Page Editor John Askins
l Ron spencer
City Editor Cynthia Tunstall
copy Editor Karen Hack
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the~
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
the months of May, June, and July, when a weekly issue is published.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is entered as second class matter at the
United States Post office at Gainesville, Florida
' i

Exploratory:
H<>a/oR
"May be some life in him yet!"

S Other
%
| Fapers
if
| Governor Farris
i§Bryants ideas about the
if often advanced proposal for
fa lieutenant governor
fwould give Florida a
Iflieutenant governor (junior
| grade).
Bryant told a news
$ conference he still favors
$ creating the new office
% because it would fill a
fuseful purpose.
The he nullified that
with the idea
fthat the lieutenant governor
jf should not be permitted to
ffrun for governor following
fhis term. This would tend
if to create political
if machines, Bryant fears.
f£ The Governor worries
f too much about political
f machines and not enough
f about the effectiveness of
f the office he wants created.
Florida needs a
iflieutenant governor in his
f absence, to assure orderly
ftransfer of powers in the
fgovernors office in case
sos death and to provide
f additional executive
fexperience in the line of
f succession.
The state does not need
fan ineffective, junior grade
flieutenant governor as
fwould be assured by
f Bryants restriction.
We suggest that the
f question of whether a
flieutenant governor should
|b e promoted to the
fgovernors chair be left
f to Floridas voters,
f. .St. Petersburg Times
*******
John Gronouski, who
f says he licked a lot of
postage stamps for the
f Kennedy campaign in 1960,
fm ay lose some of his
f enthusiasm for political
f appointment when he
discovers that being post postmaster
master postmaster general is a
f thankless job.
. . Half the critics yell
for better service while
others demandbusiness demandbusiness|
| demandbusiness| like methods to reduce
the deficit, budgeted this
year at $565 million.
All this considered, its ;
good to have a man who has :
licked many stamps as;
postmaster general. Mr. i
Gronouski will need all the
reserves of experience he {
can muster. Oh, and his ;
sense of humor wont hurt, ;
either. i
. ,
. .St. Petersburg Times i
;.\ t
;> 4

POLITICAL SIDELIGHTS

Whos Keeping Cl Segregated?

By HUGH MCARTHUR
I had long ago decided to remain
apart from the C. I. conflict.
However, their subtle distor 4 ion
of the issues and a growing
misunderstanding on the part of
the student body concerning the
actions of the Student Group for
Equal Rights provokes the
following comments.
While I was talking with the
owner of a local segregated
restaurant recently, he remarked
that his business would be damaged
if he were to integrate. About that
time a couple came to the counter
and he asked the boy, Would you
come here if I were integrated?,
to which the student answered,
Well, Im here now arent I,
and the picketers are going
strong.
At this point I interjected,
Would you eat here if the only
Negroes served were university
students?
The reply: No, I dont believe
in force to make an owner do
that. I then asked, if the owner
was willing to do this and no force
was necessary, would you continue
to eat here?
His reply: That will never
happen, its a completely hypo hypothetical
thetical hypothetical case.
I hope what follows will do
something to clear up some
distorted viewpoints.
The College Inns policy makes
the owners sound righteously
indignant and, if you please, as
modern day martyrs striving to
overcome the scourge of unfair
pressures interfering with the
inalienable rights of an American
business.
The customers remarks sounded
as if he were upset because of
this same misuse of force, though
he failed to offer an intelligent
reply when offered a situation
where no force was involved.
For those who still care; The
Federal government imposes
pressures on restaurant owners
every day, The Pure food and
Drug Act is a 'most outstanding
example. The state government
does the same thing with outlined
minimum standards of facilities,
etc. The city also dictates building
standards, health requirements,
etc. There could be a tremendous
list compiled of the interference
of these agencies with the life of
the restaurant owner, and I
imagine you and I would be hard
put to find many of the regulations
we could disagree with. Society
also places a tremendous pressure
on them, because if their food is
not adequate in both quality and
quantity, business soon declines
until an adjustment is made to the
force of public-opinion aita the
business is accepted again.
Most of the forces mentioned
above are matters of health
preservation or considerations of
economics as practiced by the
consumer.
Here, in the last half of this
highly complex twentieth century,
the businessman is beginning to
experience a pressure he has
heretofore never felt in such
magnitude the force of social
opinion, in days past, if a
proprietors social decor was
unacceptable, people went
elsewhere to eat. it was also
proper to dissuade your friends
from eating there, but people
seldom paraded around before the
establishment with signs.
Os course, then there were few
conflicts that had the implications
of our current integration problem
in which a restaurant owner would
be directly involved.
Today there is a tremendous
social force which says that to
harbor and practice acts of bigotry
and prejudice on the basis of a
persons eugentical inheritance is

almost inhumane. Such things
considered not only unacceptable
but intolerable, and if iio t
corrected, could ultimately lead
to the incitement of an internal
insurrection which could mark the
beginning of the end of this culture.
When matters of this import
arise, and when a restaurant
owners business may in many
ways determine the future of our
nation, it is no wonder a new and
more effective method to utilize
the always present social force has
been developed.
Despite the connotation of the
College Inns policy statement,
their rights are not being tampered
with, and anyone crossing the
picket line with the idea of
supporting states rights, rights
of individuals, private property
rights, etc., is simply deluding
himself.
To my knowledge, no reasonable
person gives a damn if the C.I.
serves only pigeon-toed, tri-eyed
people, if they want to. There is
no dispute that in this country they
should be allowed to set up business
as they please. The concern lies
with letting people know what they
are doing, in the hope that men
will have enough compassion for
the tragic condition of their
brothers to refuse to do business
with anyone who insists on
perpetrating ideals that are
disintegrating the very foundation
upon which this country was
founded. Thank God that picketers
are trying to use social and
economic influence via signs
rather than guns.
Nobody questions the privilege
of the C.I. to do as it is doing
but there is a big question as to
the moral right of any person to
cross that picket line; and, if I
might become only slightly poetic,
thereby place another scar on the
face of America a scar which
combined with other scars is
making our face a very ugly one.
If I knew a businessman who was
anti-American, it is quite possible
we could be friends. I would never
buy anything from him, however,
because some of that money would
be used to destroy my system of
government. To buy from the C.I.
is, with current ideologies, another
small contribution to the
destruction of this country.
Let them operate their business
any way they please, but dont
make it a profitable venture.
I conclude by saying that this
column is not a big campaign for
all-out integration. Few people
think such action is fitting and
proper at this time. I do hope this
column may bring about such
sentiment on the part of restaurant
owners in this area that they will
at least serve all University Negro
students. These Negroes are
displaying the characteristics that
segregationists so often claim are
necessary but seldom found.
The general Negro community
may leave a lot to be desired,
but these are a new generation,
and to ostracize them can only be
the function of a confused mind.
If you cross the picket line at
the C.1., you must intellectually
accept the responsibility of your
act. I sympathize with the owners
of the C.I. as long as their business
demands they ignore our Negro
students. You give the owners
this indication every time you enter
their portals.
If everyone were to eat
somewhere else for awhile, then
Im sure the owners would be
happy to live up to their basic
principle of customer demand apd
start serving ALL university
students.
My most profound sympathies
to the c.I. for their unfortunate
position and to the students who
cross the picket line under the
delusion that they are performing
a noble act.



:^=Rebuttal=
EDITOR:
My friend, Courtland Collier,
has, in his letter in Wednesdays
Alligator, tried to displace the
issue at the College inn from the
question of discrimination against
Negroes simply because they are
Negroes to the question of the
privilege of a proprietor to refuse
service to whomever he chooses.
In doing so, however, he failed to
check his facts on the history of
law.
In an article entitled, An Inn Innkeepers
keepers Innkeepers Right to Discriminate
in the University of Florida Law
Review, Vol. 15, pp. 109 ff. the
English common law is quoted as
follows:
The inkeeper is not to select
his guests. He has no right to say
to one, you shall come into my
inn, and to another you shall not,
as everyone coming and conducting
himself in a proper manner has a
right to be received.
The article continues;
This English common law duty
to receive has been adopted as part
of the common law of the United
States, except where modified by
local laws. . the 1957 Florida
Legislature passed a statute com completely
pletely completely abrogating this common law
duty. ... It is doubtful whether
the Florida statute is
constitutional. If it is, it controls
the Florida inkeepers duty to
receive; if it is not, the common
law controls.
So there is, historically, legal
as well as moral basis for
expecting a public restaurant
as distinguished from a private
club to serve all the public.
The issue at the C.I. is
discrimination against certain
persons solely because of their
race. That remains the issue,
whether or not any pickets are
there. The pickets only focus and
publicize the issue.
Edward M. Berckman
Inflation
EDITOR:
John Hancocks column in the
Oct. 7 issue cites an example of
the evils of inflation that seemed
to me to be out of place. He
asserts that a man who spends $lO
million to build a hotel will lose
money if he tries to sell that hotel
after the currency has been
inflated.
Assuming that the building was
in good condition and was not
obsolete, and assuming that the
tourist trade had not declined,
the value of the hotel could not
be less than what it was when it
was built. The only value that
would change would be that of
the currency; therefore if the value
of the currency decreased by one
half, the hotel would be worth S2O
million. This may look like a 100
per cent profit, but actually the
investor would merely breakeven.
Surely this type of investment
would not be discouraged by
inflation, because if he had kept
the same $lO million in the bank
he would, in effect, lose half his
money.
I do not favor increased deficit
spending, and I would prefer to see
;t opposed with reasoning more
valid than Mr. Hancocks.
H. Hollis Caffee. 4AS
Property
EDITOR:
The problem facing our country
of greatest importance today is that
f property rights. Many people
who claim to be prophets of
Progress would subordinate our
property rights in order to
propagate certain social ends.
The United States is a capitalist
a word upsetting to the left winger)
domain, and this is exactly our

basis of liberty and prosperity.
Private ownership to the individual
is a source of self-respect,
initiative, and personal reliance.
In our society, as a whole,
individual ownership promotes
social justice and civil rights.
Groups of men who own property
are always vitally concerned over
the way others are treated because
social reactions can endanger
property rights. When men do
not own property, they are left
at the mercy of the government;
and they are not tied to the
government by any common
interest beyond their own body.
Government legislative controls
which force the end of certain
social mores at the price of private
property will not promote real
social freedom. Force in such
matters only serves to make
groups more unreconcilable and
bitter. When government controls
exceed their traditional fields of
power -- taxation, police power,
and eminent domain -- and invade
the social realm, they threaten
our capitalisticsystetti.Blackstone
in his Commentaries defined
private property in a democracy
as That sole and despotic
dominion which one man claims
and exercises over the external
things of the world, in total ex exclusion
clusion exclusion of the rights of any other
individual in the Universe. When
at the governments discretion, a
democracy can disregard an
individuals right to admit or
exclude persons from his property,
then our democratic government
and capitalistic way of life are
swiftly moving toward socialist
ruin.
If legislation is passed which
will force men to relinquish their
right to the use of their property
in' -any way, they must
be compensated. The government
must show just cause for such
high-handed action in light of the
Fifth Amendment of the
constitution that provides no
person shall be. . deprived of
life, liberty or property without
due process of law; nor shall
private property be taken for public
use without just compensation.
It is not undue emphasis to state
that the fate of our way of life
hinges on the way we consider
private property.

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ORNAMENTAL HALLOWEEN GOURDS 50<; package
Pie Pumpkins... 12$ lb.
Oranges.. .55$
Pink Grapefruit. .. 10$ each
Irish Potatoes...s lb. for 33$
Lettuce.. .25$ head
Celery... 15$ stalk
Carrots... 15$ package
Tomatoes.. .4 for 19$
FANELLI & EDWARDS
MARKET
24(0 NEWBERKY ROAD Within Walking Distance
across from Beta Woods Os Corry Village

= Jubilant =
EDITOR:
I am jubilant today, for I have
discovered a remedy for those
obstinate cyclists who STILL insist
on their right of way on a one-way
street! This morning while edging
around swarms of pedestrians (all
outside of cross walks), I spotted
three separate cyclists heading for
me. inspiration struck. I hurridly
cranked down my window and as
each passed me, shouted to them
Hey youd better turn around
- theres a cop coming! What
TREMENDOUS RESPONSE! All
three leapt off their bikes and in
one blurred motion whirled their
bikes around in the right direction.
Needless to say, the idea tickled
me pink. W'hat a victory to go on
down the street, looking for more
guillible victims.
Os course there are certain
aspects not quite so amusing. For
example, I didnt laugh those other
27 times (we have a notch in our
steering wheel for each near miss)
that I nearly committed
manslaughter at 5 m.p.h., due to
the stupidity of those cyclists, it
is really amazing to realize that
it is the FEAR of losing $5.00
rather than of losing their lives,
that causes this electric response.
Sadly, it is NOT the realization
that they are asking for it when
they start playing one-way one-wayroulette.
roulette. one-wayroulette.
I admit that my remedy is
not permanent, for if enough of
us motorists should, in similar
moments of inspiration, take this
course, cyclists on campus will
eventually see through the hoax.
However, there are two rays of
light. We as motorists can get a
tremendously good laugh knowing
that we have scared these students
into the confines of the law. Most
wonderful to anticipate, however --
we can dream of the day when
there actually IS a member of our
police force there;
Mrs. Deborah Masing, 2UC
fDo your laundry
while you shop
s|||j
KoinKleen
704 W Univ. Ave.

Tuesday,Oct.22,l963 The Florida Alligator

HAVENT
THERE
MORE
GATOR AU-AMERICAS?
WHAT DO FLORIDA COACHES SAY?
HOW DOES THE U.F. RANK WITH THE REST OF
THE S.E.C. FOR TOTAL NUMBER OF A-As?
WHAT ABOUT THE FUTURE?
i WAS GONNA WEAR MY
EARS FOR THIS PICTURE,
BUT DISNEYS GOT ALL
OURS.
<
A behind-the-scenes look at whats
really happening on campus
PLUS:
i
ORIGINAL SATIRE JOKES
NEW CARTOONS TOP FICTION
ON SALE THIS WEEK
NEW
ORANGE
PEEL
I

Page 5



Page 6

The Florida Alligator Tuesday,Oct.22,l963

For Rent

CHILDLESS COUPLE, or two
students to rent furnished apt.
in Colonial Manor Apts. 1/2 block
from University. Come, phone or
write Scott Keller, 1216 S. W. 2nd
Ave., 372-2722. (B-27-ts-c).
APARTMENT Furnished, air
conditioned. Like a small home
near campus. Also room or share
private comfortable home with
lovely garden. Mrs. H. R. Boerner,
402 N. W. 18th Street, Apt. 15.
(B-32-st-c).
*3
NEW FURNISHED Apartment.
One Bedroom. Girls, boys or
couple. Air-conditioned. Call 376-
6303 or 1824 N. W. 3rd Place.
Apt. 6. (B-29-st-c).

Wanted

WANTED 2 Tickets on west side
for Homecoming game. Contact
M. R. Schmidt 376 3930 after
6 p.m. (C-31-3t-c).
FRED WARING
OCTOBER 30 AT 8:15 F.hJ\
Florida Gym
\
i£#f
FOtK J
LAST DAY FOR
STUDENT
TICKETS ONLY
- i
**
- FLOJRIO^^-SV

"BIS' Pl'; "JBI" '63 '3' r WED 1 STATI I I
BEST ACTQH" (or 1P63 r | ; 4s_4j 10-6;35-8:55

i GATOR CLASSIFIED|

For Sale
L

MODEL 94 Winchester 30-30 rifle.
One year old. Perfect condition.
Call FR 6 9038 after 5 p.m.
(A -32-3 t-c).
TICKETS for sale to Homecoming
Football Game. Priced Low!
Contact; Larry Perkins, 103 N.W.
14th Street. Phone 6 3416.
(A-32-2t-p).
1959 LAMBRETTA Motor Scooter.
Runs real good, very reasonable.
Call Gary Stiller,2-9490, between
6:00 and 7;00 p.m. Pi-Lam House.
(A-32-st-c).
FOR SALE or trade, 4 bedroom,
2 bath, nearly new, 1 1/2 story
home in South Idylwild. Over 2000
Sq. ft. plus garage and expansion
Attic. Center heat and
air-conditioning. Complete built in
electric kitchen. $23,500 with
$2,500 down or trade for 3 or 4
bedroom, 2 bath smaller home in
good shape. Vicinity St. Patricks
School. Call 372-7760.(A-31-3t-c).
HAVE A NEW FIGURE and
wardrobe for Christmas.
Relax-a-cizor removes inches not
pounds. Guaranteed. Singer
Feather weight with attachments,
FR 2-7385. (A-30-3t-c).
SCUBA DIVING. Complete outfit
for SIOO. 737 2618 Leesburg.
(A-30-3t-c).

Help Wanted

MALE DESK CLERK all shifts.
University Inn, 1901 S. W. 13th
Gainesville, Florida (E-32-3t-c).

Lost & Found

LOST BLUE LEATHER PURSE.
All personal items needed, glasses
needed urgently for work. Call 6-
9610. 3530 S.W. 24th Ave., Lot
8. Reward. (L-32-st-c).
LOST -- A GOLD ring with 4
diamonds and a ruby. Reward.
Mike Josephs FR 2 9476.
(L-32-ts-c).
ft
I 2400 *.JO
TONITE-2 COLOR HITS
doors open 6; show at 7
regular Ist-run admission
children under 12 FREE
(FIRST AREA SHOWING'I
'WONDERFUL WORLD of
Ehe BROTHERS GRIMM"
2d big
color hit LEWIS,
"THE NUTTY PROFESSOR

Autos

1955 MG, TF 1500, Metallic
Maroon with new top. Wire wheels,
excellent condition. Price S9OO.
1214 S. W. 13th Street. FR 2-3975.
(G-31-3t-c).
1955 OLDSMOBILE Convertible
automatic transmission power
steering,radio, heater, whitewalls,
new top. Must sell immediately.
No reasonable offer refused. $350.
FR 2-0787. (G-30-3t-p).

Services

TYPING These, Term papers and
Reports. Fast, Accurate,
Typed on electric
typewriter with elite type. Mrs.
Betty Ogletree, 4105 N. W. 13th
Place. Phone 6-0995. (M-27-T-c).
BAND for hire. The Continentals
5 piece Combo. Will play anywhere,
anytime. Special rates to
Fraternities, Call Harold
Cunningham FR 6-7052 after 3
p.m. (M-29-10t-c).
WILL CARE for children or infants
in private home. 317 N.W. 21st
Ave. FR 6-8348. (M-29-st-c).
LADIES ALTERATIONS and
Dressmaking by CAMILLE. 1116
S. yj. 6th Ave. (behind 1114) Phone
376-1483. (M-27-st-p).
FOR A CHANGE OF PACE, Come
Horseback Riding at Lake Wauberg
Riding Stables,Tumbleweed Ranch.
Hay Rides and Night Trail Rides.
Student operated. 1/2 Mi. North of
Lake Wauberg. Reservations
and free transportation. Call
466-9295. (M-8-68t-c).
TV TECHNICIAN, Experienced.
Part time only. Call FR 6-5348.
(M-30-st-c).
7TIE
WAnTs
...FOR GAfOR GIRL
We invite readers to
submit pictures of
their favorite gals
for use in this fea feature
ture feature We'll give
'em bock.
United Rent-All
Party & Banquet Equip
Roll away Beds Tools
Trucks, Trailers, Tow
Bars.
625 N.W. Bth Ave.
FR 6-2835 |
I HEELS put on in S minutts
I SOLES put on in ISmimitts I
Imodernshoel
I REPAIR SHOP
Bacross from Ist notional bonk ]

Gators Limp
Through Drills

The Florida Gators adjusted
their bandages and limped a day
closer to Saturdays Homecoming
grid battle with Louisiana State
University yesterday with 15
Gators on the injured list.
Well hold light practices all
this week, head coach Ray Graves
said after yesterdays drill. Weve
got too many boys with minor
injuries now.
Among the 15 ailing were star
fullback Larry Dupree who is
nursing a pulled leg muscle and
numerous bumps and bruises.
Graves said most would return
to action by tomorrow and all
, would play against the Tigers
Saturday.
Well forget all our aches and
pains for those two hours Satur Saturday,
day, Saturday, the head Gator promised.
Graves took timeout from
straw-bossing the practice efforts
of his 40-gridders to discuss his
next enemy, LSU.
Their running attack is what

Blue Loop Volley
Finals Next Week

Theres not much in Intramural
action this week due to
Homecoming festivities.
Beginning early next week
competition will be in full swing
again.
The Blue League will not see
action in volleyball until next
Monday night, Oct. 28, when re rescheduled
scheduled rescheduled games are played.
Fraternities participating are;
Alpha Gamma Rho vs Tau Kappa
Epsilon, Chi Phi vs Delta Sigma
Phi, Pi Kappa Phi, vs Phi Gamma
Delta, and Delta Upsilon vs Delta
Chi.
The Blue League* volleyball
championship game has been re rescheduled
scheduled rescheduled for Tuesday night Oct.
29.
Drawings for the next Orange
and Blue fraternity league
competition will be held next
Monday.
Yesterdays Blue League volley volleyball
ball volleyball scores are: Phi Gamma Delta
over Phi Epsilon Pi by forfeit,

KVi #1
w- f &£
llillllill!I 'Js %ss&*w*§i£ t
fBP -''^BBBBpg
HH|

MURAL MUSE

Pi Kappa Phi 15 15 Delta Chi
8 15, Tau Kappa Epsilon 7 15 15
Lambda Chi Alpha 15 3 12,
and Alpha Gamma Rho 15 15
Delta Sigma Phi 4 4.
The bracket winners for the
Mens Independent Leagues are
all three undefeated. Winners are:
Bracket I Lizards, II Flavet
3, and 111 Cuban Comets. Play Playoffs
offs Playoffs for this league will be next
week. It will be a round robin
tournament.
Graham and Hume Areas started
dorm league handball competition
yesterday. Murphree and Tolbert
will begin next Monday.
Yesterdays scores are: Graham
Area; MacLachan over Henderson
by forfeit, and Crandell two singles
-Slams O. Hume Area: Bristol
over Farrah by forfeit, Heath over
Cockrell by forfeit, Turlington
over Little by forfeit, Crow over
Bigham by forfeit, Keppel one
single and one double GaddumO,
and Tedder two singels Abbot O.

weve got to concentrate on
stopping. They dont throw very
often, he said.
But when they do pass, it can
be very effective, he admitted.
They can dropabomb withaquick
pass easily.
He called the Tiger defense
one of the toughest the Gators
will face all year, second only to
gang-tackling Alabama.
The LSU team is bigger than
past Tiger teams but I dont think
its as fast, he said.
He singled out junior halfback
Danny Lalanc as LSUs top
offensive threat.
The Gators yesterday spent two
hours adjusting their defense to
the Bengals ground-game and
sharpening their offensive tactics
to test the LSU defense.
The game has been a sell-out
for several weeks and over
45,000 people are expected to
crowd their way into Florida Field
for the 2 p.m. game.



Tech Star Kicked
Off Tea m By Dodd

By DAVID M. MOFFIT
UPI Sports Writer

ATLANTA Georgia Techs once-vaunted end
corps was reduced to tatters yesterday when Ted
Davis, one of its two stars was dropped from the
squad for kicking an Auburn player in Saturdays
football game.
The other end, Billy Martin, suffered a knee injury
two weeks ago against Louisiana State and is not
expected back in the lineup before the Duke game
two weeks hence.
Two reserve ends, Steve Copeland and Dave Sewell,
are out indefinitely with injuries and two others,
Frank Sexton and Dave Austin, are on the doubtful list
for Saturdays game at Tulane.
Georgia Tech came into this season beating the
drums for Davis and Martin as being the best two
ends on any one team in the nation. Martin, a 23G-

Sailing Team Third

The Gator Sailing Club finished
third behind Tulane University
Sailing Club and Florida State
University Sailing Association at
the St. Andrews Bay Yacht Club
Invitational Regatta in Panama City
last weekend.
Finishing behind the Gator
Sailing Club were Spring Hill
College, Florida Presbyterian
College, Vanderbilt University,
and Georgia Tech. Skippering for
the UF in the four races were
Pepper Constable, Roger Straub,
Joe Parker and Frank Lucas. Jim
Field and Jim Borovay were crews
on the Fish Class boats which
sailed in light breezes on both

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Saturday and Sunday.
The Gators finished 5 1/2 points
behind the winner but only one onehalf
half onehalf point out of second place.
Florida State University
accepted a challenge race for Nov.
9, at Lake Wauburg.
On Nov. 16 and 17 the Gators
travel to St. Petersburg for the
Southeastern Inter Collegiate
Sailing Association Keel Boat
Championship.
On Nov. 23 the Gators will hold
an Invitational Regatta at Lake
Wauburg. The Gator Sailing Club
which is sponsored by the Intra Intramural
mural Intramural Dept, holds meetings every
week on alternating Mondays and
Tuesdays in the Florida Union.

pound, 6-foot-5 senior, was being heralded for
All-America honors.
Davis, a 225 pound senior from Memphis.
Tenn., moved squarely into the spotlight after Mart in
was injured and was regarded as a candidate for
post-season honors.
But yesterday he admitted he kicked Auburn
halfback Dave Rawson oi Pensacola, Fla, in the head
during the fourth period of unbeaten Auburn's 29-21
upset Saturday of the sixth-ranked Yellow Jackets.
And, although it was not known at that time, when
he was led from the field by an official, it marked the
end of his collegiate career.
Georgia Tech Coach Bobby Dodd yesterday sorrow sorrowfully
fully sorrowfully announced he was accepting Davisresignation.
Dodd said Davis would remain in school under his
grant-in-aid and complete his work for a degree
in industrial engineering.
All of us at one time or another do things that

we are ashamed of, Dodd said.
But few of us have the misfortune
to make our mistakes with 53,000
people looking on.
Auburn coach Ralph Jordan, back
in Atlanta to address the Touch Touchdown
down Touchdown Club here, said he was sorry
Davis had resigned.
Some disciplinary action was
in order, but Davis is a great
football player and were sorry
they felt he should resign, Jordan
said.
The Auburn coach said the
incident occurred in the heat of
battle and there are no hard
feelings either on the part of
the Auburn team or the Rawson
family.
These things happen, Jordan
said, it was a regrettable thing.
Davis was extremely upset
yesterday when he issued a state statement
ment statement announcing he would resign
rather than embarrass Dodd by
making the Tech coach put him off
the team.
Rawson, a 205-pound junior, was
admitted to Emory Hospital Sunday
here with a slight concussion.
However, he was scheduled to be
released Monday alter tests
showed he was perfectly all
right.
Doctors said Davis, kick may
not have been the blow that caused
the concussion but rather a hard
tackle he received while catching
a pass.
Faculty Wives
Meet Tonight
Faculty wives interested in
supporting the work of the Student
Group for Equal Rights will meet
to plan and coordinate activities
tonight, at the home of Mrs. David
Alt, 3908 S W. Ist Ave.
F aculty advisors Austin Creel
and David Sheean of the Student
Group for Equal Rights will attend
the 8 p.m. meeting to answer
questions about methods faculty
wives may use to assist in group
activities,

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Tuesday,Oct.22, 1963 The Florida Alligator

Eibner 'LSU Has
No Weaknesses

By STEVE VAUGHN
Sports Writer
Florida football scout John
Eibngr flew to Baton Rouge last
weekend, took a good look at the
Louisiana State Tigers, and came
home impressed.
Louisiana State," he stated
flatly, -has no weaknesses."
Eibner"s pronouncement came
upon his return to Gainesville
following LSUs 28-7 conquest of
Kentucky.
The Gators will face LSU in
Saturdays Homecoming get gettogether.
together. gettogether. The game will be the
first of several important future
crossroads to high or low national
ranking for Florida.
Most pre-season crystal ball
gazers predicted an off-season for
the Bayou Tigers, considering the
high quality of LSU teams of the
past few seasons. But Coach
Charles McC lendons suprising
crew has lost only to Rice so far
while annexing wins over Miami,
Texas A&M, Georgia Tech, and
Kentucky.
I Ills team is
typicali\ i.si
!: ib ne i said. Bp
T heii i, i mind B
attack will knock JgJjj'
you right out of fp|lf|
there. I'he (ie
tense, with a line
averaging 23 0
[ ll nin K i:, cic it,.
You just about BHBp^jI k Bb
have to throw the
ball to move against them.
Eibner was asked about
outstanding liSU individuals.
Lelanc (Danny) and Huckle Hucklebridge
bridge Hucklebridge (Robbie), he replied,
without hesitation.
Hjicklabridge is a 5 foot 11
Homecoming
(Continued From Page 1)
has four general duties to fill;
procurement of all technical
assistants and materials from the
Physical Plant Division, police
coordination, housing for all bands
requesting this and construction
of all block-letter signs used in
the Homecoming parade and Gator
Growl.
Office coordinator Cathy pierce
correlates her work with the
personnel division. She supervises
many ol the secretaries.
Mike Berke, chairman oi the
Alumni-Legislative Barbecue, has
the mammoth task (ft making sure
every UF alumnus and dignitary
has ,i full stomach and a good
time.
Potentially the biggest crowd
ol all plagues Hugh Wilson's parade
dh ision.

inch, 218 pound senior guard who
has been known to move people
around in the line. Lelanc, a
junior halfback at 5 feet 10 inches
and 190-pounds, is considered
one of the hardest runners in
collegiate football.
In addition to Lelanc, I.SU
offers a talented stable of ball
carriers headed by sophomore Joe
I.aruzzo, who runs 100 yards in
9.6 seconds, and Buddy Harnic,
an experienced 210-pound senior
fullback.
At quarterback, the Tigers were
hit hard in the Miami game when
highly regarded sophomore Pat
Screen was lost for the remainder
of the season due to a shoulder
separation. But another young
sophomore, Billy Ezell, came off
the bench against Kentucky and
moved the team with equal effec effectiveness.
tiveness. effectiveness. Eibner said Ezell did
not have to pass much against the
Wildcats, however.
Teaming with Hucklebridge to
give the Tigers a fine combination
at guard is Remi Prudhomme, a
230 pound junior.
LSU *}so has two good ends in
6 foot 5 inch, 235-pound Billy
Truax, and 6 foot 1 inch, 200
pound Danny N e u m a n n, E ibner
said. Both are two-year veterans.

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Page 7



Page 8

The Florida Alligator Tuesday, Oct. 22, 1963

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