Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Gator Growl
Sets 6 Skits
By ERNIE LITZ
Os The Gator Staff
Two fraternities and four sororities were chosen Wednesday night
to present skits in the annual Gator Growl at Homecoming, Friday,
Oct. 25.
This years Growl skit tryouts were the smoothest ever run,
Growl Program Director Howard Kelley said.
Winning groups and their skits, in order of appearance, were:
Kappa Alpha Theta- Hail to the Witchs Witch.
Beta Theta Pi The Old, The New, and Thats Not All.
Alpha Delta Pi The Homecoming Carol.
Phi Kappa Tau- That Wonderful Year.
Delta phi Epsilon The Wizard of odds.
Alpha Epsilon Phi 26u3 Oh, Me!
About 3,000 people watched 14 Greek groups put on skits during
the tryouts, held in Plaza of the Americas.
Judging the skits were Dean of Student Affairs Lester Hale, Dean
of Women M.V. Brady, past Executive Director of Growl Ken
Henderson, political science professor Walter Rosenblum, local
attorney William Watson and General Homecoming chairman Charley
Wells.
Judges deliberated two and a half hours before announcing the
winners.

The Florida
Alligator

Vol .56, N 0.30

Students To Receive
Polio Protection Soon

By ROBERT GREEN
Os The Gator Staff
UF students will be able to get
complete protection from polio poliomyelitis
myelitis poliomyelitis when a massive
vaccination campaign begins next
month.
Dr. Samuel Wright, head of the
UF infirmary,announced yesterday
the first of three doses of Sabin
Oral Vaccine will be available
to all students who wish to take
it, the week of Nov. 4-8 from
6-9 p.m. in the infirmary.
We have a chance to completely
wipe out polio if everyone willll
take this vaccine, Dr. Wright
said. The three doses gives those
who take them complete protection
from all kinds of polio.
According to Dr. Wright, oral
vaccine was superior to the Salk
vaccine in that it gives lifelong
protection whereas the Salk shot
Fiavet 111
To Protest
Conditions
A grievance report is expected
to be presented soon to UF
Housing, listing adverse conditions
in Fiavet HI, the newly elected
mayor of Fiavet HI, Thomas E.
Floyd said.
A Grievance Committee, set up
by outgoing mayor Lewis A.
Stanley, is preparing the report.
Floyd is a former member of
this committee.
Many conditions buildings
which are in need of paint, Fiavet
HI having to pay half of the salary
of the village policeman, having
only one elderly groundskeeper
when more are needed have
made such a report necessary,
Floyd said.

University of Florida, Gainesville Friday,

requires booster shots, protects
others from getting polio from a
carrier where Salk only protects
the person getting the shot and has
little if any reaction.
The Oral vaccine is also easy
and painless to take. Three drops
of the vaccine* are placed on a
sugar cube and the cube is eaten.
The Salk vaccine must be given
in short form.
Dr. Wright said anyone who has
not had any polio immunization,
just Salk shots or only part of
the Sabin series should take the
vaccine in the current series.
If a person is not sure if he fits
into these catagories, he should
take the vaccine anyway since it
is harmless.
Many students here during the
summer had all or part of the
Sabin series under a program
sponsored by the county medical
department. That program was for
w
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DR. S.S. WRIGHT
Barrys Backers
To Meet Monday
Homecoming participation plans
will be discussed at a meeting of
the Students tor Goldwater organ organization
ization organization Monday night, in the Law
School Auditorium at 7:30 p.m.

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"HAIL TO THE WITCH'S WITCH"
was acted out by Kappa Alpha Theta sorority sisters in the Gator Growl skit tryouts.

Oct. 18,1963

all Alachua county residents.
There are three doses for the
three different types of polio and
the doses must be taken in four foursix
six foursix week intervals. Type one will
be given in November; type three
will be given next from Dec.
9-13, and type two from Jan. 20-
24.
Makeup vaccinations for those
who miss these times will be
announced later. A 25 cent donation
is requested to cover cost of the
vaccine.
Dr. Wright said about 60 per
cent of an areas population should
receive the vaccine to prevent an
epidemic. There have been small
outbreaks of polio this year in
different areas of the country
where many people did not have
the vaccine.
Alumni Office
Offers Ducats
Advance reservations for the
UFs Homecoming barbecue and
Gator Growl can now be made
through the Alumni office on
campus, Alumni Affairs Director
Bill A. Fleming announced
yesterday.
Alumni who have contributed
to the 1963 Loyalty Fund may
purchase up to six tickets to the
barbecue and receive four
reserved seats for Gator Growl,
Fleming said.
The alumni barbecue held
annually from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
on Saturday prior to the Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming football game, attracted
2,000 persons last year. Tickets
cost $1.50 and may be obtained
from the alumni office in the
University Auditorium before next
Friday.
Deadline for alumni ordering
tickets by mail is Monday. No
tickets will be sold at the door.

ffr
BET^HET^^RATERNITY^^^^
.. .brothers act out part of their award-winning skit,
"The Old, The New and That's Not All".

County Plans
Vote Checkup

Students here who are registered
to vote in Alachua County soon may
lose that privilege if they did not
vote last year, according to Mrs.
Alma Bethea, county supervisor
of voter registration.
After the t>ond issue referendum
in November, Mrs. Bethea said she
is planning to purge the list of
registered voters.
Purging is the process of re removing
moving removing from the list the names of
all those who did not vote the
previous year.
She said she is delaying the purge
until after the referendum to give
voters one more chance to vote
and stay on the registration list.
County precinct 31, which in includes
cludes includes the UF campus, has 1,599
registered voters. Mrs. Bethea
said she expects a heavy purge
from this precinct.
Some student voters who are
residents of Precinct 31 may have
moved away and just not cancelled
their names from our list yet,
she said, or maybe many of the
voters In that precinct just havent
voted in the last year.
Mrs. Bethea said her office had
no record of how many of the
voters in Precinct 31 were
students.
It isnt hard for a student to
register in Alachua County, she

said. He must be 21 years old,
a citizen of the United States, a
resident of Florida for a year, a
resident of Alachua County for six
months, and must not be registered
to vote in any other county, she
added.
The last requirement means that
a student voter must remove his
name from the registration list
in the county where he last resided
before he can register in Alachua
County.
Mrs. Betheas office also helps
students who wish to vote by
absentee ballot in their home
counties. Only a very few students
have asked for help of this kind,
she said.
A spokesman for the UF
Registrars Office said that no
statistics were available yet on
how many students meet the
requirements for voter registra registration
tion registration in Alachua County.
Agriculture
Sets HC Fete
Floridas agricultural industry
members and their families may
join UF agricultural alumni,
faculty and students in a Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming Breakfast, Oct. 26.



Page 2

I The Florida Alligator Friday,Oct. 18,1963

2 UF Students Win Contest

A UF student and a former
student here will be honored this
year in Story magazines
national short story contest.
This contest, sponsored by
Story magazine and the
Readers Digest Foundation, is
held annually to determine the
best fiction written by students
in American colleges and
universities.
A first prize of SSOO is awarded
each year for the winning story.
A $350 second prize and a $250
third prize are awarded. Eighteen
additional prizes of SSO are also

P* ' - l >
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by
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Wilson's Men's Shoe Shop-H sr


given.
A hard bound collection, taken
from the winning stories, is
published each year by Random
House. The title of this years
anthology will be Prize college
Stories 1964.
John D. Morefield, a student in
English at the UF, received word
this week that his story, A Bear
in the Street, had been selected
for one of the top three awards.
Morefield came to the UF from
Davidson college in North Carolina
where he received a B.A. degree
in English. He came here to study

creative writing under M. Smith
Kirkpatrick of the English Depart Department.
ment. Department.
Morefields story will be
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SWEETHEART
.. .of the Sigma Nu pledge
class is Beth Gregory,2UC.
She was chosen from a group
of 19 giris.(see story pages )o
Coed Club
May Improve
Facilities
UF Food Service has replied
to a petition signedby 250 Broward
Hall residents and has promised
improvements in service and
expansions in physical facilities.
The petition said Food Service
physical facilities were
inadequate.
The petition reads, . . the
lines often go past the limits of
the cafeteria and it takes 15 minutes
to be served and five minutes more
to pay for your food, in which
time the food becomes cold.
Food Service Director Gay H.
Welborn said he hopes to have
Broward remodeled next summer
increasing kitchen space and
improving serving facilities.

Friday Specials
1'
ALL THE CEDAR KEY MULLET YOU CAN EAT
French Fried Potatoes; Cole Slaw; Hush
s-1 t SI.OO
- : l
LARGE JUMBO SHRIMP PLATTER
Seafood & Tartar Sauce, French Fried
Potatoes, Hush Puppies & Tossed Salad i
$1.50
MAC'S HOUSE
520 S.W. Second Avenue

included in his masters thesis,
entitled A Bear in the Street,
and Other stories, according to
Kirkpatrick.
In the story, Morefield deals with
the region around his home in
East Tennessee during the time of
the Civil War.
A former UF student, Wesley A.
Patterson, has been awarded one of
the honorable mention prizes of
SSO. His story, TomorrowNighty
Too, was written for a class in
creative writing taught by Kirk Kirkpatrick.
patrick. Kirkpatrick.
Patterson, now residing in New
York City, received his M.A.
degree in psychology from the UF
in 1963.
The UF should gain much
favorable publicity, according to
Kirkpatrick, if Morefields story
wins first prize. No UF student
has ever been selected for one of
the contests top prizes.
in last years contest, a UF
student, Francis H. Hannold,
received an honorable mention
award of SSO. Hannolds story
also was written for Kirkpatricks
class in creative writing.
TftE (j/kToR,
WANTS YouH
.. .FOR GATOR GIRL
We invite readers to
submit pictures of
their favorite gals
for use in this fea feature.
ture. feature. We'll give
'em back.

*' I"2
mm
''' A //y
HR
. M,
GATOR GIRL
...today is Barbara Fel Felsenthal,
senthal, Felsenthal, 2 UC, an Alpha
Epsilon Phi. Barbara is a
19-year-old elementary
education major. She is
a past orientation group
leader and present under
secretary of the interior.

Speakers
Considered
Instructors
By JIM SIMMONS
Os The Gator Staff
Since speakers who address
students here are considered as
instructors, the UF must be
concerned with the qualifications
of these speakers, according to
the UF administration.
This is the function of the
Committee on Public Functions and
Lectures headed by L. L.
Zimmerman, associate professor
of speech.
The general policy of this
committee is to welcome any
speaker qualified to speak on a
topic of recognized educational
value.
While the UF acknowledges its
responsibility to evaluate the
qualifications of these speakers
it cannot assume responsibility
for any statements made, ideas
advanced, or conclusions drawn
by them. The speakers must also
be persons of acceptable
reputation and character.
Policy exceptions are speakers
invited by officially recognized
student organizations to speak at
a meeting of that organization.
These organizations are urged to
keep the general policy of the
committee in mind and to comply
with it.
UF faculty members who speak
to student groups other than in
class sessions are also exceptions.
When controversial speakers
are involved, UF Pres. J. Wayne
Reitz often decides whether the
speaker will appear.
An instance came last fall when
the communist Party attempted to
get permission to let recognized
members of the party speak on
campus.
George W. Corrick, administra administrative
tive administrative assistant to the president,
said although Reitz felt the student
body was mature enough to judge
the validity of Communist
propaganda, he did not think it
would be appropriate to make the
UF a platform for this type of
speaker.
Corrick also said prim an
reason for the committee is to.
insure a well balanced calendar
of activities here.



CONTEST CALLED FARCE

f King Ugly
Not Happy

Frank Edward Menke is not
happy reigning as UFs King
Ugly, because of what he calls
lack of support from the student
body.
The annual King Ugly contest
is sponsored by Alpha phi Omega
honorary service fraternity. Con Contestants,
testants, Contestants, each sponsored by a
campus group campaign for penny
votes towards a mens tuition
scholarship.
Menke, sponsored by Sigma Chi
fraternity, has reigned as King
Ugly on the UF campus for three
years. He refuses to compete a
fourth year.
The contest itself has no
significance because of the lack of
Audition Set
For Singers
If you like to sing, members of
the Homecoming Dance committee
are searching for talented students
who would like to entertain at this
years street dance Oct. 26 at 8
p.m.
Auditions will be held this
weekend, Joe Marinelli chairman
of entertainment, said.
Appointments for auditions may
be made by contacting Marinelli
today at 2-9118 or at 31 Simpson
dormitory.

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PLEDGES CARRY SIGNS
Alpha Delta Sigma (ADS) pledges have been carrying
sandwich signs around this week as part of their init initiation
iation initiation into the professional advertising fraternity.
University Inn
i always featuring
CREAM CHEESE
LOX and BAGELS
TONGUE CORNED BEEF
SALAMI j,
AND OTHER KOSHER DELICACIES
*
U.S. Route 44!, South Phone FR 2-6333
Gainesville, Florida
. ~ \

support from the student body,
Menke said. At other campuses
this contest is a big thing --a
popularity contest but here its
nothing.
King Ugly is a farce here, but
it could become effective through
proper support and organization.
If something isnt done to improve
the whole thing, I feel the contest
should be done away with.
SG Checking
Trash Can
Possibility
The possibility of installing
waste cans around the campus will
be investigated, according to Bill
DeGrove, secretary of the interior.
He said his student government
(SG) office has not been able to
work on the trash can problem
because of other more immediate
concerns, including recent
elections and matters pertaining
to the student insurance program.
DeGrove said he will find out
how much money is available for
the project and determine what
must be done to place the waste
cans.
Meanwhile, grounds superinten superintendant
dant superintendant N.R. Lake said his office
will pick up the cans if SG pro provides
vides provides and places the waste cans.

§ w
i
A MOST PRETTY
.. .member of the UF's
Angel Flight troops is
Miss Nancy Ward. One
of her jobs as a Flight
member is uplifting the
morale of the Air Force
ROTC students.
Coeds To Party
Jennings Hall will hold a coffee
social for UF senior and graduate
male students 8-10 p.m. in the
Jennings Recreation Room.
There will be music for dancing
and listening.

U F
STAFF ond FACULTY MEMBERS
READY TO ROLL ON CAMPUS
SOON WITH A SLEEK NEW \py W/
64 MODEL? mAI / f~\
7 Better see your
T i\ 1 M- Credit Union Treasurer
r TODAY
Uy
Try this for size:
Interest rate on new cars:
9/10 of I per cent per month on the
unpaid balance.
Amt. of payment each month
No, of mos. including interest.per SIOOO
12 88.29 2
18 60.43 Monthly payment 65.28
24 46.51 No. month s X 36
30 38!18 Total repaid $2,350.0#
38 32.64 Original amount
Purchase price $2,500.00 borrowed -2,000,00
Cash and/or trade 500.00 Actual cost to
To be financed $2,000.00 borrower ONLY $ 350.08
o
Main Office building j

Friday/Oct. 18,1963 The Florida Alligator

Vet Nancy Ward
Leads Angel Flight
The Reserve officers Training Corps (ROTC) program here may
someday be on a voluntary basis, but UF men probably will think
twice when girls like Nancy ward march by in a blue Angel Flight
uniform.
Miss Ward, a 5 feet 4 brunette from Fort Walton Beach, is a charter
member of Angel Flight, a coed drill team sponsored by the Arnold
Air Society. She was amont the 25 girls selected on the basis of
appearance, personality and scholarship for the first Angel Flight
group.
l felt Angel Flight would be an excellent way to meet people,
especially boys planning a career in the Air Force, which I feel is a
wonderful vocation, she says.
Military life is not new for Miss Ward, for her father recently
retired from the Air Force after 23 years of service.
Ive spent most of my 20 years traveling, she says.
I had the opportunity to visit places I probably otherwise would
never have seen.
I have always been proud of being in an Air Force family, Miss
Ward says. This was one of my main reasons for applying for Angel
Flight.
A junior majoring in music, she has won several beauty titles in
the past few years. She was the 1962 Festival Queen of Fort Walton
Beach, a finalist in the 1961 Miss Northwest Florida contest, and a
semi-finalist for Military Ball Queen.
Angel Flight is not her only campus activity. A member of Zeta
Tau Alpha sorority, she also sings in the UF Choir.
Unitarian Universalis! Fellowship
1204 NW 10th Ave.
11 to 12 Sunday Services 11 to 12 Sunday School
This week's speaker:
Glenn Hoffman: Does the American Tradition of
Individualism Have a Future?

Page 3



Page 4

The Florida Alligator Friday,Oct. 18,1963

THIS IS A LEFT-HANDED CUSTOMER-GETTER.
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IT WORKS ON RIGHT-HANDED CUSTOMERS, TOO
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OVER 13,000 STUDENTS, FACULTY AND STAFF MEMBERS READ IT EVERY DAY
CALL ALLIGATOR ADVERTISING, UNIVERSITY EXTENSION 2832



UF Students
May Tutor
Negro Pupils

A plan for UF students to tutor
Negro high school pupils is well
underway, according to graduate
student Roger Larson.
The need for such a program
is apparent, Larson said. Esti Estimates
mates Estimates state that the Negro schools
are approximately three grades
behind white schools, he said.
With such serious deficiencies
in education, participation in the
community is almost impossible.
Immediate aims are to prepare
Negro students for possible
transfer to Gainesville High
School and entrance into college.
The long range goal, however, is
to help young Negroes to take a
more constructive role in the
community after graduation,
Larson said.
The project, established with
the cooperation of the Student
Group for Equal Rights and the
National Association for the
Advancement of Colored People
(NAACP), will use UF students
as tutors.
Prospective tutors undergo
attitudinal as well as scholastic
screening. Anorientationprogram
follows for both tutors and
students.
Present plans call for tutors
to work with two or three students
each.
A faculty group will supervise
the tutoring groups activities and
provide guidance in methods and
teaching techniques.
The group includes J. Dukes of
Lincoln High School, Mrs. L.
Griffin and Dr. M. B. Jones of
the UF Department of Psychiatry,
Dr. V. McGuire, and Dr. W. Olson
of the UFs College of Education
and J. M. Welch of Alachua High
School.
Pledges Select
A 'Sweetheart
Miss Beth Gregory, 2UC, was
selected recently as the first
annual Sigma Nu pledge class
sweetheart.
Miss Gregory was selected from
13 coeds each representing a pledge
class of the 13 sororities on
campus. Miss Gregory, the Delta
Gamma representative, is a
transfer student from Wake Forest
majoring in psychology.
Contestants were Jacque
Maynard, KD; Lisa Hall, DDD;
Joan Goreski, ADPi; Susan Amme,
PM; Kathy Wilkins, XO; Babs
Morgan, KAT; Joye Schwartz,
DPE; Georgia LaFaye,ZTA;Cindy
Pike, AXO; Gretchen VanDenerg
SK; Paula Richman AEPhi, and
Connie Swan, AOPi.

Student Terms
I Dicmonds j I
I Jewelry Watch Repair 111
I 'QUALITY GIFTS AT BUDGET PRICE" I
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THEY'LL PLAY FOR THE "GATOR HOP"
The Playboys, a student band, will provide music
for the "Gator Hop" Friday night at the Graham
Hall Recreation Room. Sponsored by Student Gov Government
ernment Government and Graham Hall Council, the dance will
run from 8 until midnight.

Post-Game Fetes
'Old Hat To UF

UF students inclined to post postfootball
football postfootball game street celebrations
arent pulling anything new.
Gainesville police used tear gas
to break up a 1954 mob of 3,000
students and the fire department
was called to extinguish fires in
the middles of streets after Florida
beat Georgia Tech.
Restaurant picketing is also far
from a recent innovation. Students
launched a boycott and picketed
Gold Coast Restaurant overprices
in 1950. The merchants sued the
UF, but eventually gave in and the
boycott ended.
Bob Setzer, research director
of the 1963 Gator Growl, has
compiled a Gator Growl
Historical Sheet to prove that
students havent changed much
down through the years.
For example, 1936 was a year
of achievement. The Florida Union
building was completed, and a
Human Fly scaled the wall of
a dormitory all the way to the roof
to win a $5 bet.
In 1937, students staged a sit sitdown
down sitdown strike, objecting to the long
walk from the campus to Norman
Hall. The strike ended when the
professor said he would think the
matter over. The professor was
Lester L. Hale, present UF Dean
of Student Affairs.

A big question in 1941 was
legalized liquor versus milk
runs, and as early as 1942
students were voting on the
character of the Orange Peel.
A barrel stolen in 1950 from the
Civil War cannon on the steps of
the capitol at Tallahassee was
thought to have found its way to
UF campus.
And 1958 was the year of the
beer riots, in protest to the no
beer for minors rule.
And the cycle apparently
continues.
Choir Opens
World Fair
The UF Choir will sing at the
opening of the 1963 Worlds Fair
in New York City in April as the
climax of an eight-day choir tour
of the Atlantic Seaborad, according
to tour manager Marsha Costa.
The group will perform in five
major cities enroute to New York
including Jacksonville, Savannah,
Washington, D.C., and Philadelphia
and will also sing at the Naval
Academy at Annapolis, Md.

Friday/Oct. 18 / 1963 The Florida Alligator

Alumni Vie
For Governor

Two of the five leading
candidates for the Florida
governors seat are UF
Frederick B. Karl and Scott Kelly.
Karl attended the UF but
received his law degree from
Stetson university. He is presently
a representative in the state
legislature. Kelly is a state
senator.
The other three candidates --
Haydon Burns, Fred O. (Bud)
Dickinson and John E. Mathews
did not attend UF. However, Burns
present mayor of Jacksonville, is
an honorary member of the UF
Alumni Association.
Five of Floridas last seven
governors were one-time UF'
students.
Spessard L. Holland was first
to attend the UF' and later become
governor from 1941 1945. He
attended Emory College in 1912
and received his law degree from
the UF in 1916. He is presently
Floridas senior U.S. senator.
Millard F. Caldwell, governor
from 1945 1949, did not go here
but is an honorary member of the
UF Alumni Association and the
Florida Blue Key.
Fuller Warren, governor from
1949 53, attended the UF and
later received his law degree from
Cumberland University, while at
the UF he was elected to the F lorida
House of Representatives, serving
in the 1927 session at the age of
21.
Daniel T. McCarty, governor in
1953, graduated from the UF in
1934 from the UF College of
Agriculture. He had a heart attack
shortly after his inauguration and
died in September 1953.
Charley E. Johns, who received
an A.S. degree in 1923, became
acting governor after the death of
McCarty.
Leroy Collins, governor from
1955 1960 never attended the UF.
Incumbent Gov. Farris C. Bryant
attended Emory University in 1931-
32 but completed his undergraduate
studies at the UF, receiving his

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Fresh Baked Pastries
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11:30 am to 2:05 pm Large Air-Conditioned
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B.S. in business administration in
1935. He earned his law degree
from Harvard in 1938.
All but one member of Floridas
current executive cabinet -- State
Comptroller Ray E. Green
attended the UF.
Auditors
Now Sought
Public accountant auditors I and
II are being sought to fill vacancies
in Pensacola, Tallahassee, Jack Jacksonville,
sonville, Jacksonville, Tampa, St. Petersburg
and Miami.
Examinations for the positions
with the State Auditing Department
are open to holders of Certified
Public Accountant (CPA) certifi certificates
cates certificates and college graduates who
are prepared to take the CPA
examination.
A state wide'examination is set
for Nov. 9.
Applications and information can
be obtained from the F lorida State
Flmployment Office or from the
Florida Merit System, Doyle E.
Carlton Building, Tallahassee.
KLEAN-A-MATIC
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UNDER NEW
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QUALITY IS
OUR SPECIALTY
1722 W. Univ. Ave.

Page 5



The Florida Alligator Friday,Oct. 18,1963

Page 6

ediitojri als

Thoughts On The Movement

A lot of hokum is associated with the civil rights movement in the
4Jnited States -- phony folk songs and the like -- until it has become
almost a new fad for the young modern. It is possible to foresee a
day when everybody will be getting into the act and having a great
time -- except, of course, the Negro, who will.stand forgotten in some
corner at a sit-in-party while debutantes and social climbers
regale each other with stories of fire hoses and police dogs.
*****
indeed, the movement (even that word begins to sound somewhat
self-conscious) is in danger of losing the natural dignity with which
it began. Publicity often has that effect.
** **
So it is comforting and even moving to read the student letters we
get every day on the various issues, both national and local, that are
lumped under the phrase civil rights.
*****
The letters are mostly in favor of equality, of course, but that is
to be expected on a college campus. The moving quality Is within the
phrases of each letter, written obviously from the heart by students
who are under no obligation save that of conscience to defend the rights
of others.
*****
Is there any value to such statements of personal belief? Only if
one believes in the old American tradition of speaking out, as an
individual, for those things in which one believes. That tradition
more and more forgotten in these days of pass-the-buck bureaucracy
and organization mam? thinking is the foundation of American
democracy.

EDUCATION FOR WOMEN, PART II

The development has come about
through the interaction of a number
of forces in American life. The
strongest of these has been the
fact that for man or woman,
married or single, this Nation has
placed its top life value on pro productive
ductive productive activities. But in modern
times economic, technological, and
political changes have decreased
the job satisfaction of the
housewife. Simultaneously, these
same forces have conspired to
permit and encourage many women
to find their prime goals in work
outside the home.
In the search for their goals
and in the success with which they
have achieved them, education has
been at once both tool and
inspiration. It was education that
taught women to want to attain
these goals. For women of
academic ability, higher education
with freedom to choose their
specialization has become
all-important. It has so reversed
the situation since the beginning
of the century that the talented
woman now finds herself being
sought for the labor force;
Americas first goal is hers.
National, manpower needs have
played their part in this reversal.
The need for the highly skilled
is now so acute that the objections
to womens employment outside
the home have all but disappeared.
Society now approves, such em employment,
ployment, employment, if the woman needs or
wants it, even a woman with
children, provided the childrens
needs are properly met.
Ever since U. S. colleges and
universities opened their doors
to women, controversy has raged
around the nature of the education
they most needed, on the one side
it has been argued that women
should take what is already
offered; on the other, that a

What Better Can B e Done

special program should be
developed centered on their major
function, the family. Through both
have run strong words about
liberal education and
vocational training. These
divisions of opinion persist, as do
the practices based on them; with
them or despite them, intelligent
women have benefited and con continue
tinue continue to benefit from their college
experience. But the question now
is, What better can be done?
In answer, many of us would say
that education should not be con concerned
cerned concerned primarily with the past nor
with past theories; it must be
with past theories; it must be
concerned with the demands of
the approaching 21st century, with
the preparation of able women to
meet the future with reasonable
confidence and considerable
wisdom.
How can something even
better" be devised? For this
assessment, observation and
supporting research are the first
resource. Women themselves, by
their actions and their attitudes,
make evident the demands made
on them by an increasingly urban
civilization. They have already
made obvious, as the statistics
cited earlier show, one fact of
prime significance: they are
determined to go to college. Many
interrupt their college work
principally for marriage, although
it is maintained that in recent
years more who enter college
finish. Os those who go straight
ahead to earn the bachelor's degree
70 per cent marry within 3 or 4
years. Contrast this with, for
example, the Yassar College class
of 1904, 38 per cent of whom never
married, of those who do not
marry, from 81 to 87 per cent
remain in the labor force until
retirement.

/fc, ','V ~ ; it- < ''/'"''S' W&&'' %, '' HH ''4- %' M
THIS IS A PRIVATELY OWNED BUSINESS
It is not based In or located on Municipal, County, State,
or Federal Property
It is not a Public Utility, School, Church or Polling Place
We receive no grants or subsidies from any City, County,
State or Federal Funds
Arty person creating a disturbance on these premises after being
denied service will be prosecuted
:
IIS 11 Wm 1 i i'
THE COLLEGE INN SIDE OF THE STORY

UNANIMOUS OPINION SO FAR

Against States Rights Group

(EDITORS NOTE: The following
two letters are all replies to Karl
Mullers recent letter supporting
segregation and states rights.
They are the only printable
reactions we have received so far
on this letter.)

Before marriage and after,
usually until the first child is born
these modern girls are at work.
In 1959, for example, 70 per cent
of the women 18 to 24 years of
age, married or single, with four
or more years of college education
were in the labor force.
After their children arrive,
college women generally feel that
they must center their activities
in the home for a while. They say,
and research confirms their state statement,
ment, statement, that this period is much
shorter than it used to be. If it
is estimated that the home period
ends when the youngest child is
in elementary school at age 6,
then today it is about 5 years less
than at the turn of the century
(10 years in 1959 versus 14.5 in
1890).
This means that women are, on
the average, free to return to the
work force in their early thirties
with more than half their lives
before them. And they are
returning, college women more
rapidly than other women. In 1962
48.2 per cent of the college women
23 years old and over were working
outside the home in contrast to
41 per cent in 1950. Comparable
figures for women without regard
to educational attainment are 33
per cent in 1962 and 21 per cent
in 1950. Furthermore, even the
older college women are returning
to work. For example, in 1959,
46 per cent of college women 35
and over, married and living with
their husbands, were in the work
force. The recent increase in
mature women workers is said to
be the revolutionary change taking
place in the labor force; and among
these, the major increase is among
college women.

EDITOR:
In response to the letter from
Mr. Muller, the segregationist, we
would like to wish Mr. Muller a
Bon Voyage! However, we would
like to suggest that he reconsider
South Africa as his destination,
as he would be in minority there,
and even they are more
progressive in their thinking than
our friend Mr. Muller. So you
see, Mr. Muller, you just wouldnt
fit there. We do have a constructive
suggestion as to a destination for
you. We propose that you alight
on the moon via some passing lunar
expedition, we are sure that you
will find yourself in a majority
there, and you will not have to
mix with any other races, creeds,
or even other ethnic types, just
think no picket lines!
We are sure that you will note
that in closing, we have withheld
our names. We do this because
we are afraid. We are not only
afraid of you, Mr. Muller, but
of all segregationists, for some
are rough and tough people.
i Names Withheld
*********
EDITOR:
I would like to state my views
on Karl Mullers letter Monday,
Oct. 14. I ask all the readers of
this letter to follow with me. Mr.
Muller states his views very early
in his letter; i.e., Im a very
staunch SEGREGATIONIST!This
naturally places Mr. Muller in a
certain class of people. Now look
further: Mr. Muller says, i
have only been a resident of that
glorious section of our nation

The Florida Alligator

Editor-in-chief Lawrence jr.
Managing Editor. Bob Wilson
Sports Editor ... walker Lundy
Editorial Page Editor Askln s
L a ( y u E ( dl,or Ron Spencer
- lty I t * r * Cynthia Tunstall
Cop\ Editor Karen Hack
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
the months of May, June, and July, when a weekly issue is published.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is entered as second class matter at the
United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida

known as Dixie for 3 1/2 years.
I remind Mr. Muller that this type
of sectionalism was one of the
causes for the Civil War. if Mr.
Muller wishes to overthrow the
government and establish a
separate state, I remind him that
this is one of the aims of the
Communist Party, which he claims
is backing the integration move movement.
ment. movement.
*****
Perhaps it is a little-known fact
but Mr. Muller is organizing a
segregationist group imaginatively
called Student Group for States
Rights. I ask anyone thinking
of joining this group to look at
the leader. I also ask those people
who could care less to look at
themselves. I ask them to have the
intelligence and fortitude to
establish some principles. I ask
them to realize that aside from
race differences, every human
being has a worth, and this worth
should by no means be degraded.
*****
Finally, I charge Mr. Muller to
look at his views. The United States
believe it or not, Mr. Muller, is a
nation not comprised of separate
states and separate sections, but a
whole and unified nation which, at
this time needs the support of every
individual in the country. I suggest
that Mr. Muller should shift his
zeal from sectionalism to
nationalism; and that he shift his
moral ideas and realize that he,
as a human being, is not a god
deciding who is better than whom,
but an individual American who has
the same basic worth as everybody
else.
Larry Zimmerman, lUC



Reply
EDITOR:
A reply is necessary to Mr.
Armstrongs letter concerning
American patriotism and
recruiting.
The fluctuating threat of the Cold
War on many fronts requires that
the United States and her allies
expend huge sums on armaments
and maintain the largest standing
armies and fleets in history. Each
branch of the military service must
maintain a high manning level.
Many jobs in this atomic age are
highly technical. Herein lies the
reason for the agressive and per pervasive
vasive pervasive recruiting program of the
Army, Navy, Marine Corps, and
Air Force. In these days of an
expanding economy and peace
expanding economy and peace
talks, the need for personnel is
not immediately apparent to the
public. The emotional and patriotic
appeal to young men during war
o r impending war is entirely
lacking.
Recent legislation exempting
married men from the draft makes
the recruiters job more difficult.
The services compete for men not
only among themselves, but also
with a high paying civilian labor
market for the best high school
and college graduates. Therefore,
it is necessary for the defense of
our country that the military
services use whatever means are
available to maintain their
strength. If patriotism does not
have an appeal in our complacent
age,then educational opportunities,
travel, glamour, and interesting
work must be used to attract and
win volunteers.
Lt. J. C. Dickinson, USNR-7AS
Society
EDITOR:
The request for printing this
letter goes to the entire staff of
editors., it is a request based not
upon the logic of generated political
circumstances but on the
foundations of social problems
much deeper and much more
relevant than the race issue.
Society includes not only
political and economic institutions
but also religious and family
institutions. The question is not
only what effect integration has
n society politically and
economically, but what its effects
a re religiously and domestically.
Because we choose to discuss
things as problems, we must have
mental disciplines,categorizations
and definitions. Are we to assume,
however, that the arbitrarily
rhosen problem effects only two
aspects of society? And further,
is it to be assumed that problems
can be more significant than the
institutions which transcend and
define the problems?
Where does an issue such as
the race problem originate. Is it
1 natural, spontaneous issuing issuingirth?
irth? issuingirth? Does its history begin with
the first slave traders thousands
Gs years ago? Does it arise
because of society making man
' as a result of man making
society?
Here in lies the nature of social
P-oblems. Since man is the social
cnganizer must he be the chooser
social issues? And where does
* influence begin? Why does he
oose things in his environment
influence him and give them
names?
H appears that we could go far
eeper in realising what the social
mes are in the environment that
fluence all of us. It would seem

M __ W yB j/B

that before we can choose social
issues we must first know the well
defined parts of society. Then we
might work together better for a
common solution, who can say
whether, economics, politics,
religion, or the family is the
greater influence? Is it not to
work within the established order
that men have dreamed social
dreams? William James in his
ethics has said:
With concepts we go in quest
of the absent, meet the remote,
actively turn this way or that,
bend our experience, and make it
tell us whither it is bound.
Don Watkins, 2UC
Complaint
EDITOR:
This, sir, is a complaint on
the part of the vast majority of
Florida women, we resent the
fact that we are expected to attend
classes with so-called Florida men
who are trying to play the part of

A7.111 ii'J f.l SMM ? ITM
57th ANNIVERSARY
THANK YOU SALE
''***&' "' ij
5
HI W.T. Grant offers Florida Alligator Readers Jn
M ONE PAIR OF SHOES
as advertised, for $1 .57 with this Coupon Sj
MANY MORE UNADVERTISED BARGAINS
STUDENT CHARGES WELCOME
AT THE GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER

little boys in short britches and
dirty tee-shirts.
Even our great minds aresome aresometimes
times aresometimes distracted from the
professors ever -so interesting
material by the flash of sunlight
on a hairy knee. These little boys
in knickerbockers fail to come up
to the standards of the average
wekk-dressed high school boy of
Southern Mongolia.
We cannot be expected to display
the full sophistication of a Florida
woman while being plagued by vast
hordes of the opposite sex clad
in their wide assortment of dirty
tennis shoes, complete with
matching sweat shirts (dirty).
Therefore, we would like to cast
our bid for a full revolution on
the part of the men. No, we dont
mean a revolution against us. We
mean a consideration by the men
in question as to just how they
really look.
So please, fellows, have mercy.
And, seriously, consider
yourselves as men, and dress for
the part! *.
Name Withheld

Friday,Oct. 18,1963 The Florida Alligator

%
f ______________________________
k s- .. w -*'y
SO SPECIAL ?
&
NOT BECAUSE SHE IS
V Miss University of Florida
>/ In Student Government
J An Alpha Chi Omega
But Because Shes The
NEW ORANGE PEELS HL
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HOMECOMING W?)
PEELMATE
WAITING FOR YOU AS \ ; >
THE ONLY FOLD-OUT -*f
PINUP IN ANY COLLEGE
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NEW
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Page 7



The Florida Alligator Friday/Oct. 18,1963

Page 8

For Sale

SCUBA DIVING. Complete outfit
for SIOO. 737 2618 Leesburg.
(A-30-3t-c).
1960 ENCYCLOPEDIA Britannica;
perfect condition, with atlas and
bookcase. Original cost S4OO will
sacrifice $l5O. call University ext.
2661 before noon, ask for Mrs.
Antrim. (A-30-lt-c).
COLUMBIA 360 Stereo.
Original cost $230 now S9O. Tan
naugahyde case and set of
speakers, new diamond cartridge.
Will trade for old auto or T.V.
Call 6-7947. (A-29-3t-c).
FENDER JAZZMASTER Electric
guitar with hardshell case.
Excellent condition. MUST SELL
THIS WEEK. Half Price. Call
Jeff FR 2- 1549. (A-28-3t-c).

Wanted

WANTED MALE STUDENT to
share apartment. Phone 6 1520.
(C-30-2t-c).
ORGAN PLAYER for experienced
versitile dance band. Must be
interested in all types of music
and in making money. Call FR
2-1549. (C-28-3t-c).

For Rent

NEW FU RN IS HE D Apartment.
One Bedroom. Girls*, boys or
couple. Air-conditioned. Call 376-
6303 or 1824 N. W. 3rd Place.
Apt. 6. (B-29-st-c).
K.C. Sirloin
STEAKS
16 oz. $1.95
Boz. $1.50
ALFORD'S
TOWFR house
210 E. Uni v. Ave.
fTITf] TODAY &
jl Alt I SATURDAY
1:00-3:35-6:10-8:40
Rodgers & Hammerstein
"CAROUSEL
Shirley Jones
Gordon Macae
SUNDAY
% Hkv .oo."' k' Jh ji'
Bess Picture 1963
INTERNATIONAL FILM CRITICS
Best Actor 1963
CANNES. FILM FESTIVAL
M RICHARD HARRIS 1
I Tl-IIS I
I SPORTING I
I LIFE
I RACHEL ROBERTS I
Vanquish
Vanderbilt

LARGE 3 BEDROOM, 2 bath
house, furnished with new
furniture. Newly decorated.
Suitable for 6 students. N. W.
13th Street location. FR 2-3019.
(B-29-2t-c).
FURNISHED APARTMENT. Room
in private home. Home atmosphere.
In good location. FR 6 0410.
(B-29-2t-c).
CHILDLESS COUPLE, or 2
students to share apt. in Colonial
Manor Apts. 1/2 block from UF
Write 1216 S. W. 2nd Ave. Apt.
114, or call 372-2722 from 4;15
p.m. to 12 midnight. (B-27-ts-c).

Help Wanted

UNENCUMBERED Young woman
free to travel, occasional light
housekeeping, small ranch, West
Palm Beach. Horsewoman
preferred. Small salary, good
home. Write fully P.O. Box 12487.
Gainesville. (E-29-3t-p).

Autos

1955 OLDSMOBILE Convertible
automatic transmission power
steering,radio,heater, whitewalls,
new top. Must sell immediately.
No reasonable offer refused.s3so.
FR 6-0787. (G-30-3t-p).
56 CHEVY, 6 Cylinder, Standard,
Radio and Heater. Excellent
condition. Phone 372 -9118. George
Lambing. (G-27-st-p).
1963 MONZA 2-door, 102 engine,
4 speed, all accessories. White
and Tan, low milage. Phone 372-
3142. (G-26-st-c).
RED MG -TF 1954, $1250 or
TRADE. A Classic in near mint
condition, 3620 S. W. Archer. See
after 5:30 today. (G-26-st-c).

Services

TV Technician, Experienced. Part
time only. Call FR 6-5348.
(M-30-st-c).

TOLBERT AREA MOVIES Sooth Hall Rec Room
8 pm, Friday & Saturday* Debbie Reynolds,Tony Randall
THE MATING. G,kME"

I r ,i v:/ 'QoTUjO" |

All area card holders 15$, others 30<£
Midnite show 25<: and 40<:. Dates Free

I ANYTIME IS
I A GOOD TIME
ITO ENJOY Tkg
jCSThrlll of
pifc it All /
- DORIS DAY DAY|axo~~TJAMES
|axo~~TJAMES DAY|axo~~TJAMES GARNER|

GATOR CLASSIFIED

HAVE A NEW FIGURE and
wardrobe for Christmas.
Relax-a-cizor removes inches not
pounds. Guaranteed. Singer
Feather weight with attachments,
FR 2-7385. (M-30 3t-c).
NESTORS TV, RADIO, HI FI
SERVICE. Tubes checked free.
Free Estimates. Next to Florida
Bookstore parking lot. 1627 N.W.
Ist Avenue. Phone FR 2-7326.
(M-11-mwf-p).
BAND for hire. The Continentals
5 piece Combo. Will play anywhere,
anytime. Special rates to
Fraternities. Call Harold
Cunningham FR6-7052 after 3p.m.
(M-29-10t-c).
WILL CARE for children or Infants
in private home. 317 N.W. 21st
Ave. FR 6-8348. (M-29-st-c).
TYPING: Term papers, theses,
dissertations. Electric IBM,
Reasonable rates. 1 block from
Norman Hall. 815 S. W. 10th Street.
FR 2-0328. (M-28-3t-p).
HORSE SHOWSaturday Oct. 19th.
6 p.m. Show grounds on Waldo
Road by airport. No admission.
For information call 372-0700.
(M-28-3t-c).
LADIES ALTERATIONS and
dressmaking by CAMILLE. 1116
S. W. 6th Ave. (behind 1114) phone
376-1483. (M-27-st-p).
FOR A CHANGE OF PACE, Come
Horseback Riding at Lake Wauberg
Riding Stables,Tumbleweed Ranch.
Hay Rides and Night Trail Rides.
Student operated. 1/2 Mi. North of
Lake Wauberg. Reservations
and free transportation. Call
466-9295. (M-8-68t-c).

Lost & Found

BLACK WALLET Lost Friday
(11th) between Jerrys and Hume
Hall. Has important papers, if
found, please contact Glenn Dunn
1033 Hume. Box 7019. (L-28-3t-c).

dUijWj |
B CANT MISS
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2400 Hawthorne Road rtf. 20 Phone FR 6-SOll
Held Over! 2nd Big Week W l
3 Technicolor Hits! 1 TQVC
children under 12 free \uT&* I
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MetroGoldwyn-Mayer
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Production # UmJif n§J
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shown first at
2nd Technicolor Family Lass Hit
Please do not reveal the middle of this picture!
= jERRy Lewis as ns
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Jerry Lew,s P f oduction)
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Got a Classified?
Call Ext. 2832



idM&t: v |raM iM , *, i^x
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frMlp y Vfj ' ;
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H|y
RICHARD HARRIS & RACHEL ROBERTS
...star in "This Sporting Life" starting Sunday.

f!l, Picketers
rade Arguments

College Inn (Cl) owner George
. Loomis and Student Group for
qual Rights leader David R.
leehan apparently stand in direct
jposition over the effect of recent
icketing on the restaurants
usiness.
I think the business speaks for
self, Loomis said.
Youre welcome to spend a day
ere (the Cl) and form your own
pinion.
Sheehan, faculty sponsor for the
roup, believes the picket line is
aving a definite detrimental effect
n the restaurants business.
lm sure the Cl feels an
conomic pinch because of the
icket line, he said.
Statistics compiled by the group
how a drop in the number of
unch-hour customers since
icketing began, Sheehan said.
Sheehan claims 110 fewer
ersons entered the restaurant on
ie Monday demonstrations began
han on the previous Monday,
'uesday figures, he said, showed
decline of 55 or 60 customers
fhen the picket line was in
deration.
But, he added, I wouldnt
are to make any great evaluation
n the basis of these figures.
The English instructor does
elieve however, the statistics are
f value.
I think our figures are of some
; ignificance because a lot of people
mossing the line are the ones
SUBURBIA
DRIVE-IN THEATRE
North on 441
FRIDAY, OCT. 18
7:15-Here Come the
Girls Bob Hope &
Rosemary Clooney
8:55 "Stripper Joanne |
Woodward
11:15 A Summer Place-
Richard Egan
SATURDAY, OCT. 19
7:15-Five Bold Women
3:59-Women of Nazi
Germany
0:30-Hercules & the
Captive Women
-PLUS -PLUS-11:15-Women
-11:15-Women -PLUS-11:15-Women of Rome

who buy a soft drink or cup of
coffee to say were with you
(the Cl). They re getting the nickels
and dimes but not the dollars.
Loomis said he has no definite
legal action in mind against the
picketers.
It just depends on how far they
go, he said.
According to Sheehan, the
demonstrations are not held to
arouse student apathy toward the
Cl or create violence.
&
The purpose of the picket line
is not to coerce the Cl, but to
voice an opinion. The important
thing is that this is a serious
expression of belief, he said.
Sheehan said the Gainesville
Council of Human Relations and
the Liberal Forum, a campus
organization, also plan to picket
the restaurant this week.
I think this is indirect response
to the student groups activities,
he said.
Loomis stressed that both sides
of the issue should be presented
fairly, which he said hasnt been
done so far.
Its a civil rights issue that
a man ought to be able to run
his business as he sees fit, C.K.
Hammon, manager of the Cl, said.
According to Sheehan, however,
the majority of Florida students
are opposed to the restaurant s
policy of segregation.

Dance to the "Big Beats
Friday&Saturday
Dancing every night til 2 am
Friday & Saturday Gentlemen wear Ties
f Ladies, No Sports Clothes, Please.
North of the UF on 441

BRILLIANT SCREENPLAY, INTENSE ACTING

f Sporting Life Poignant

By DON FEDERMAN
Movie Reviewer
This Sporting Life combines
a brilliant screenplay, intensely
involved acting and beautiful
photographic imagery to produce
the years finest tragic love drama
and a most sensitive picture of an
impasse between a man and a
woman.
The movie commences in the
midst of a Christmas rugby match.
Richard Harris as Frank Machin,
star fullback, is injured. During
his treatment, his recent past
recurs to him under anaesthesia
through a series of flashback
vignettes.
Machin, in the beginning, is an
insecure, impoverished miner who
is resentful, yet awed, by the good
times and success of the rugby
players of the city.
Determined to find some roots,
he uses his aggressiveness and
strength in order to get himself
a tryout on the rugby team. He
is impressive and successful.
At the same time, he becomes
interested in a fellow lodger, Mrs.
Margaret Hammond (Rachel
Roberts), a widow of a joyless
marriage. But her guilt over this
marriage has made her indifferent,
hostile, and withdrawing -- afraid
to give again.
Gradually, he breaks down her
will, until finally she yields to him
physically, but never with the whole
of herself.
After his minor operation,
Machin attends a Christmas party
at which he realizes some of the
inanity of his hero status and his
Malnutrition
World Problem
One half of the worlds three
billion people go to bed hungry
each night.
This is due to an underdevel underdeveloped
oped underdeveloped agriculture and a widespread
lack of knowledge and
understanding of nutrition in
developing countries, said
assistant UF animal nutritionist
Dr. C. B. Ammerman.
In many cases, he said, foods
may be available but are misused.
Some countries have an absence
of protective foods such as meat,
milk, eggs, vegetables and fruit.
A partial solution to the
nutritional problem, according to
Dr. Ammerman, may be the
provision of supplemental foods,
but in many cases this is not the
solution as the attitude of the
people of a country toward certain
foods may be a stumbling block.

Friday,Oct. 18,1963 The Florida Alligator

dependence upon rich patrons. He
returns to Mrs. Hammond to find
her very tender.
But their joy is brief, for
continued success renders Frank
cockier and more obnoxious, and
her fears convince her their
relationship is doomed.
They quarrel, their arguments
growing more and more violent.
Her guilt and his lack of
gentleness slowly destroy them.
Finally, Frank realizes his
problem, but it is too late. The
movie ends in the midst of another
rugby match with a brutally grim
message.
Richard Harris won himself the
Cannes Best Actor award for his
portrayl of Frank Machin. it is no
wonder, for his physique and the
emotive power of his speech are
overwhelming. His ability to
change from tranquility to rage
is the most artistic cinematic
metamorphosis Ive seen.
Rachel Roberts is no less
brilliant. There is a beautiful
sense of flow established by
Roberts as Harris softens her
aloof exterior. Her scenes of
hysteria are breathtaking
crystallizations of irrational fury.

CAMPUS INTERVIEWS
' t
Monday, October 21
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David storeys screenplay is
frank, stark and poignant. The
electric exchanges between Harris
and Roberts are so graphic that
the viewer can almost sense the
two wills grappling with each other.
Highlighting the screenplay is
Lindsay Andersons direction. His
shots of rugby capture the violence
of Machins world. His flashback
technique, uSe of contrasts, and
selective cropping result in one
climax after another and
magnificent statements of moods.
Little more can be said except
that the praise bestowed upon this
movie has not been exaggerated.
What more could be said?
t *****
*
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Page 9



Page 10

The Florida Alligator Friday/Oct. 18,1963

Gators Out To Sink Vandy

Sporting a recently-acquired
victory over highly touted
Alabama, Florida's new-look
Gators do battle with Vander Vanderbilts
bilts Vanderbilts win less Commodores
Saturday night in Nashville, Tenn.
The Southeastern Conference
battle is far from a toss-up, the
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Gators being a solid two-touch two-touchdown
down two-touchdown favorite to hand Vandy its
fourth loss without a win this
season. Florida is after its third
win against one loss and one tie.
It is not definite today whether
first teamers Russ Brown, an
end, and guard jack Katz will
start the game for Florida because
of injuries. Brown has an ailing
shoulder and is listed as
probable. Katz, who sustained
a hip bruise in Wednesdays prac practice,
tice, practice, is given a 50-50 chance.
In Browns place would start
sophomore Charles Casey and re-
Listen Here
WRUF and WRUF FM will
broadcast the Florida-Vander Florida-Vanderbilt
bilt Florida-Vanderbilt football game Saturday night
starting at 8:45 oclock.
placing Katz if necessary is junior
Bill Richbourg.
After a lack-luster beginning,
the Gators finally arrived in the
grid world last Saturday when they
knocked off Alabamas third thirdranked
ranked thirdranked Crimson Tide 10-6 in
Tuscaloosa.
It was the first time Bama
coach Paul (Bear) Bryant had been
beaten on his home field since he
went to Alabama five seasons ago.
The Commodores, under
ex-Gator coach jack Green, have
had rough sledding so far this
season. They dropped decisions
to Furman, Georgia and Alabama.
The setback to Bama was not
as bad as it sounds since Vandy
was only beaten 21-7, good con considering

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sidering considering the Tide is rated the
Souths best.
Vandy is expected to be more
than ready to give the Gators a
rough time of it, however, it
will be the Commodores Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming and they have had a week
off to prepare for it.
i mm \
vo, '
JACK KATZ
.. .may not start Saturday.
Not Available
The Sigma Alpha Epsilon Tau
Epsilon phi Orange League
volleyball title game results were
not available at press time last
night.

FROM THE SIDELINES
Team Send-Off
At 3:30 Today
By WALKER LUNDY
Sports Editor
The Florida Gators, who just last week began playing football
seriously, leave town today after a scheduled 3:30 p.m. send-off by
the UF student body.
They will fly to Nashville, Tenn. and the lair of the stumbling
Vanderbilt Commodores for a grid collision tomorrow night.
Last week, student groups tried a send-off to wish the Gators luck
against powerful Alabama and the several hundred students and the
Gator band did themselves up proud. Led by a band member, Bruce
Matza, who knows more about cheerleading then anybody weve ever
seen, the spirited group outdid anything anyone had ever expected.
The send-off will be located at the same place as last week, between
the Music Building and Murphree Hall. The time originally was set
for 6;30 tonight but head coach Ray Graves decided yesterday to leave
earlier and have the team work out in Nashville this afternoon.
So today the student body has a chance to show the Gators that it is
behind the team all the time, not just on one-shot occasions when
Florida upsets a top team.
Classes will interfere with some attending, of course. But we will
be looking for the true Gator fans who care to be there today to wish
the team luck against Vandy.
Flapped Our Wings
Yesterday morning we had one of the most exhilerating experiences
of our young life our first flight in a light Diane.
Prof. Tom O. Neff Sr., who teaches in the School of Engineering
here, is a member of the local Triangle Flying Club and was kind
enough to offer us a flight in the blue.
Taking off from Stengel Field in a single-eingine job is quite a
thrill, especially when your pilot tells you its a four-cylinder motor
with less than 150 horse-power.
But it was big enough to do the job and as Neff banked the plane
towards our 1,300 feet altitude destination, we could see the dear
university, scattered out like odd-shaped pink boxes surrounded by
the bright green of vegetation.
Our flight was short but it was long enough to let us catch the
flying bug. Theres no sensation like it.
Our hearty thanks go to Prof. Neff.
Where Are They?
There is a species of the human animal that has us worried. We
cant find him. Its not a question of extinction. We know hes still
around.
Guess hes just hiding.
Were speaking of that old monster called the Sunshine Patriot,
which was the subject of one of our sermons in this column earlier
in the year.
Gator Russ Brown has touched on the animal today in his column,
Inside Report.
The Patriot was all over the campus last week, in the classrooms,
over at Gatorland, even on the front page of the Alligator.
But this week, its as if he has been wiped out. We dont get any
letters from him, or phone calls. He doesnt even stop us on the
street to complain about how Florida needs another coach or another
quarterback or a better line or a different color football.
We have tried to find him since Monday. We wanted to crow and
say, We told you so, about the Gators upset win over Alabama
last Saturday.
But hes nowhere to be found.

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Ducats Sold for Seats
Not Even Constructed

Non existant seats are being
given to students at the ticket
windows for the homecoming game,
according to Bill Hoppe, Student
Government (SG) independent seat seating
ing seating chairman.
Except for about fifty choice
seats that will go on sale at 2 p.m.
today, most of the student tickets
will be in temporary bleachers
in sections 28 and 35 and some
tickets in section 27. The tem temporary
porary temporary bleachers have yet to be
installed.
Student government received
16,000 tickets to distribute to stu students
dents students according to UF Athletic
Business Mgr. Percy Beard. The
tickets were divided in half. Half
went to the fraternities to the
south of the 50-yard line and half
went to the independents to the
north of the fifty.
Hoppe said that he alternates
seating ticket purchasers for the

Dupree Runs Ahead
Os 1 62 Rushing Pace

Florida fullback Larry Dupree,
who will captain the Gators against
Vanderbilt Saturday night, is well
ahead of last years running pace.
In 1962 Dupree was the South Southeastern
eastern Southeastern Conferences (SEC) lead leading
ing leading rusher with 604 yards gained,
and was named SEC Sophomore
of the Year and first team all-
Conference.
After four games in 1962 Dupree
had gained a total of 185 yards,
and scored a pair of TDs.
This season, with the Gators
currently 2-1-1, Dupree has picked
up 305 yards rushing and scored
one touchdown. This puts him
120 yards ahead of his sophomore
pace.
There is little comparison
between Dupree this year and
last, head coach Ray Graves
said. Hes a much better foot football
ball football player.
Just the normal amount of

Two Games
Sellouts
If you are supposed to get a
football ticket for a friend of
yours to either the LSU or Florida
State games, better send the money
back.
Assistant Athletic director and
ticket manager Percy Beard an announced
nounced announced yesterday that all the
regular reserved seats for both
games are gone, but he has a
suggestion that might help you out.
Plenty of good seats are still
available for the Gators Nov. 9
date with Georgia in Jacksonvilles
Gator Bowl.
'6
Right now it looks like the
Georgia game will be a real good
one, Beard said. They are
traditional rivals of ours, but it
looks like they are having a real
good season this year to make it
more interesting. Im sure they
will come to Jacksonville ready to
play us.
Georgias attack is built around
quarterback Larry Rakestraw,
currently the leading passer in
an aerial minded Southeastern
Conference race. In addition the
Bulldogs have an all-conference
en d, Mickey Baab, to receive
Rakestraws tosses.
Tickets are $5 and may be
purchased at the ticket office,.
Athletic Department, in the
stadium.

best seats. Independents got the
best seats for the Richmond game
section 31 so the blocks will get
the better seats for the Louisiana
State game, he added.
The reason not as many good
seats are available for individual
purchasers, Hoppe said, is that
we have three times the number
of persons previously sitting in
independent blocks.
Hoppe said of the tickets he gets,
several hundred go to married
housing and engineering to make up
the card section and about 100
go to SG.
The remaining are distributed
to give the blocks choice seats
in sections 31 and 29 and the indi individual
vidual individual purchasers the best
of Section 30 and 28. Indepen Independent
dent Independent blocks will take up about
1,200 seats with 300 seats in
section 31, 500 seats in 30 and

experience and increased maturity
makes a big difference. Dupree
is a dedicated football player who
learns because he works at
learning.
Graves rates Duprees biggest
jump as being in the blocking
department.
Not many sophomores are good
blockers, Graves said. They
lack confidence because they
havent had enough work and
experience.
Dupree has learned how to
block and I guarantee theres not
many better blockers in the country
now. His blocking in the Alabama
game, for example, was just as
good as his running.
This is saying something.
Against the Tide, which was limit limiting
ing limiting opposing teams to an average
of 50.7 yards per game rushing,
Dupree picked up 83 and had 50
more called back by penalties

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400 seats in 29. All of section
28 and most of 27 is reserved
for individual purchaser.
Except for Florida Blue Key and
the band all of the seats south of
the 50-yard line are taken by
fraternities. Fraternities are
given up to 200 percent of
membership.
There just arent enough
student seats to fill all the re requests,
quests, requests, Hoppe stated.
At 4 p.m. yesterday one window
had only three single seats remain remaining.
ing. remaining. Two were in section 28
and one in section 32. Another
window was out of tickets and
a third had only scattered single
seats.

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THE OPEN MIND ...J. Robert Oppenheimer
THE SPACE CHILD'S MOTHER GOOSE
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POINT COUNT BIDDING ...Charles Goren
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TECHNICAL AND REFERENCE BOOKS
FEYNMAN'S NOTES ...R.P. Feynman
THEORY OF PLASMA WAVES .. .Stix
RADIO ENGINEERS HANDBOOK ...Terman
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Friday,Oct. 18,1963 The Florida Alligator

Army, Air Force Tangle

It will be the Army vs. Air
Force Saturday at Camp Wauburg
at the Advanced officers Club
Field Day.
Feature competition of the day
will be the Army Air Force foot football
ball football and volleyball games.
A tug-a-war, egg throw, and
dizzy izzy contest will provide
other competition between
the forces.
The Field Day begins at 10 a.m.
and lasts until 2 p.m. The Field
is the first AOC function of the
current school year.
Transportation to Wauburg will
be provided at the ROTC building
at 9;30 a.m.

Saturdays planned junior train training
ing training program meeting has been
cancelled.

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Page 11



Page 12

The Florida Alligator Friday,Oct. 18,1963

FOR GRID TEAMS

'Pick-Up, Dost-Off,
Start Again Week'

Its Pick Yourself Up,
Dust Yourself Off and Start
All Over Again Week for the
nations top football teams.
In the Southeast the big
Bama Tries
Volunteers
UNIVERSITY, Ala. Alabama
will be seeking its fourth win of
the season Saturday as they go
against the Volunteers of Ten Tennessee
nessee Tennessee in Birminghams Legion
Field.
The Tide will be trying to re rebound
bound rebound after last weeks 10-6 loss
to upstart Florida.
For the past two years the Tide
has achieved complete mastery of
the Vols. In 1961 Alabama beat
the Vols,. 34-3, in Birmingham.
The next year Bama went into
Knoxville where they won, 27-7.
This meeting of the two teams in
the annual classic will mark the
46 time they have played. Ala Alabama
bama Alabama has won 20, Tennessee 19,
and there have been six ties.

£AST Cl#|e£
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sls Cash Prize Given In Alans Annual
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LSU Game Only
Runner-Up Will Receive a Free Cubana and Coke
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RULES
i**
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2. Entries should be mailed to ALAN'S CUBANA
318 W. University Avenue
3. Slogan should not be over four f 4) words
EXAMPLES: 1. Make Miss Mud
2. Hamma 'Bama
3. Gators Turn the Tide
4. Vandy's Dandy Gators' Greater
4. Entries will be judged on ORIGINALITY
5. All Florida students, faculty and personnel
are eligible.
6 DEADLINE is Sunday,Oct. 20
Maih,it or bring it in person.
Be sure to include your name, address and phone
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bounce-back should come from
Alabama. The Tide, unhappy over
a 10-6 upset loss to Florida, will
pit its eighth ranking against
Tennessees Volunteers.
The big game of the week should
Hurricanes,
Georgia Vie
MIAMI (UPI) Miami is
favored to beat Georgia in the
Orange Bowl tonight by a touch touchdown,
down, touchdown, something the Hurricane
offense has yet to produce this
season.
Main attraction of the game
should be a throwing match between
quarterbacks George Mira, the
goat of Miamis lacklustre season
so far, and Larry Rakestraw who
out-did Mira when the two met as
sophomores two years ago.
The kickoff will be at 8:15 p.m.,
EST. Forty thousand fans are
expected.
In winning two and losing two
this season, Miami produced its
only touchdown on a fumble re recovered
covered recovered by a lineman to help beat
Tulane.

take place at Atlanta when
undefeated Auburn ventures into
Grant Field for a match with
Georgia Tech. Tech is favored
by as much as two touchdowns.
Florida, shooting for bigger and
better things after upsetting
Alabama, journeys to Nashville,
to face Jack Greens Vanderbilt
Commodores. Green was an
assistant coach under Ray Graves
at Florida before going to
Vanderbilt.
Fur should fly at Baton Rouge
Saturday night when Kentuckys
Wildcats square of against
Louisiana States Bengal Tigers.
However, as usually happens in the
Tiger Pit, the opponent loses the
most fur.
Lime Tulane gathers its
resources Saturday for a battle
with undefeated, once-tied
Mississippi at New Orleans.
Mississippi is a four-touchdown
favorite.
Georgia rolls into Miami tonight
to face Andy Gustafsons hapless
Hurricanes. Miami has yest to
score a touchdown on offense.
Gustafsons dream team holds
a 2-2 record and has scored 13
points to the oppositions 27.
Surprising Mississippi State,
sporting a 3-0 -1 mark, hosts
Houston at Starkville, Miss. State
could have clear sailing until
Nov. 2, when it faces Alabama
at Tuscaloosa.
Florida State goes for victory
No. 3 Saturday at Mobile, Ala.,
when the Seminoles and Steve Tensi Tensimeet
meet Tensimeet Mississippi Southern.
Tampa tries to get on the winning
track with a game against
Presbyterian.

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"Say, Champ, what happened last week?"
==lnside Report
By RUSS BROWN
(EDITORS NOTE: Journalism senior Russ Brown is a first
string end with the Gators.)
I have been asked the question where has the Inside Report
been the last two weeks?
To answer this question Ill use an old saying, If you cant say
anything nice, then dont say anything at all. Believe me, there
were and still are a few things Id like to say.
People will not like this, but some students are not worth the
price of a rat trap. They write about anything and everything. They
condemn a talented football team for being a bunch of bums and then
meet us at the airport after a great victory. Are these sunshine
patriots? what are you?
Another thing, how can some students put themselves in the same
class as Coach Graves and criticize his coaching. Coach Graves is
one of the finest men I have ever had the pleasure of knowing.
He has taken blame for the teams failure when it was the teams
fault alone. But when something is done well, he gives everybody credit
down to the lowest freshman. Those are fighting words to a Florida
football player when you knock our coach.
We, the football players, would like to thank those who sent the
telegrams, and especially the Fans That Care. Football is a game
of emotion. Those telegrams gave us the feeling of playing for someone
other than ourselves.
The Gators are going to Nashville with a little twinkle in their
eye. The reason is a man named Jack Green, Head coach of the
Commodores. Green was head defensive coach at Florida last year.
So, we feel we should show Coach Green the results of his coaching
last year.
You can be assured that the Gators will be ready.