Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
UF Students Go To Polls Today

By ROBERT GREEN
Os The Gator Staff
UF student voters will go to the
polls today to cast ballots on seven
constitutional revisions and 30
Legislative Council seats as well
as expressing sentiments on two
other issues.
In addition, freshmen will elect
a class president, vice president

The Florida
Alligator

V 01.56, No. 19

Plumb Views 'lnside Story
Os Constitutional Revisions

Here is the inside story of
the constitutional revisions as
viewed by Secretary of Legislative
Affairs Maurice Plumb;
The most recent constitutional
revisions, passed in Spring 1962,
made some provisions for the

Election Day
Information
Polls will be open today from
8 a.m. 6 p.m. for the annual
fall student elections.
UF Honor Court officials will
supervise the 15 polling places.
Students must vote in their living
areas and must bring identification
cards.
Freshman must vote in areas
with designated freshman
machines, off-campus freshman
will vote in the Student Service
Center (Hub).
All students will be allowed two
minutes in the voting booth and
must leave the polling area after*
voting.

Heres A Sample Election Ballot
V fffISTrrJTRHfIE THTTTnmS
rcs ra rres ra res ran res ra pres ra ires ~ttb res ; wr
Question 1 Question 2 Question 3 Question 4 Question 5 Question 6 Question 7
ARTICLE 111 ARTICLE IV ARTICLE V ARTICLE VI ARTICLE VII ARTICLE VIII ARTICLE IX
EXECUTIVE JUDICIAL FINANCE PUBLICATIONS SUMMER SESSION FROSH COUNCIL IMPEACHMENT
GOLDWATER KENNEDY
L L ~ LrejrsTATr/E rcmirerc ~ ~ ] TffcgHtfAi rares
V.O.T.E. CANDIDATES
STUDENT CANDIDATES
o ... .
UNAFFILIATED CANDIDATES
tf.S.A. POLL
res' a i raiimr rirgr 1

and secretary-treasurer.
Students will be asked for their
opinions as to whether the UF
should join the National Student
Association (NSA) but this is still
subject to Legislative Council
approval and is not a binding vote.
A straw vote will be taken
between president John Kennedy
and Arizona Senator Barry Gold Goldwater
water Goldwater for U. S. President.

University of Florida,Gainesville Thursday,

then-upcoming trimester system.
The most obvious changes
necessary were related to the now
defunct summer session. Student
Government (SG) president, vice
president and treasurer now serve
year round.
Cabinet officers have been added
secretaries of athletics, alumni
mm
W~ W' w
if
MAURICE PLUMB
.. ."inside story"
on revisions.

Goldwater is considered the
leading Republican nominee to run
against President Kennedy in the
1964 national elections.
Students living on campus will
vote in their dormitory areas only.
Off-campus students as well as
fraternity and sorority members
will vote in the walkway in front
of the Hub. polls will be open
from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

0ct.3,1963

affairs, housing and traffic and
safety which SG believes will
provide better and more efficient
services for the student body.
The latter two are now
commission positions, but an
increased volume of wor.. indicates
a need for a change to secretariats
Plumb said.
Revisions in the judiciary
section spell out procedures and
student rights under the jury
system which were not clear in
the past and allow a more flexible
system of penalty assignments.
Another revision provides for
more rigid control of financial
operations by Leg. Council
specifically, it says a larger
number of council members must
approve fee allocations than in
the past.
The position of student
publications in relation to student
government is clarified for the
first time, and eleetion by the
student body of student publications
board v members is made
constitutional. It had been provided
for in the publications board
charter, but not in the constitution.
Finally, operation of the
freshman council is made more
flexible, and conventions have been
taken out of the orientation
program.

Students will need to show
identification cards (not picture
activity cards) and elections
officials will punch the cards after
voting. Constitutional revisions
will be on the top row of the
voting machines.
On the NSA issue, students may
vote yes or no on the UFs joining,
or undecided if they feel they do
not know enough about the group.
Student Body Pres. Paul
Hendrick said he considered the
passage of the seven revisions
the most Important part of the
election with the election of council
members next in line.
The revisions, deal with changes
in the presidents cabinet, in the
honor code, the method of activity
fee allocation, members of the
freshman council and methods of
impeachment of student govern government
ment government officers.
The revisions would also do
away with summer session pro provisions.
visions. provisions. The revisions, if passed,
take effect Wednesday.
To pass, revisions must be voted
by 25 per cent of the student body.
This includes both yes or no votes
and a minimum of 12 1/2 per cenl
plus one of those voting could pass
the revisions.
Under-Secretary of the Interior
Wayne Ezell, whose office runs

Our Town
(An Editorial)
Today is Election Day, Fall Edition 1963.
This fall's balloting is an Interesting one, primarily because
of several out-of-the-ordinary issues.
(One) NATIONAL STUDENT ASSOCIATION:
It has its bad points, its tainted image, perhaps, but it
will furnish the university student government valuable
information on how to better run student affairs here.
Incidentally, NSA, as far as we can tell, is not Communist Communistoriented.
oriented. Communistoriented.
(Two) CONSTITUTIONAL REVEIONS: Were for them.
Each one is designed to improve student government services
in line with trimester system changes.
(Three) LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL ELECTIONS; May the
best man win. One note, Incidentally, maybe worth considering,
and that's the efforts of Independent candidate Judy Hill whos
done some solid groundwork in preparing a campaign based on
off-campus housing conditions. Its no easy task to run
independent against a virtual one-party field.
(Four) KENNEDY VS. GOLDWATER: The former stands
for progress.

UF elections, said almost every
legislative post has two candidates
with V.O.T.E. Party running a
candidate for almost every office.
A spokesman for Student Party
losers to V.O.T.E. in the last
election, said, You can consider
Student Party as disbanded for
this election. We are not running
any candidate. Some people from
our party may be running as
independents but we are not giving
them any support.
i /
/
PAUL HENDRICK
.. .revisions most
important.



Page 2

The Florida Alligator Thursday,Oct.3,l963

Newsletter Aims To Give
"A Basis For Judgement

By DAVID BERKO WITZ
Os The Gator Staff
The Student Group for Equal
Rights newsletter Common
Sense aims to give UF students
a basis for judgement on integra integration,
tion, integration, according to a spokesman for
the group.
The groups faculty sponsor
David R. Sheehan said the news newsletters
letters newsletters belief is that anyone who
has to make a judgment should

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The mood of tropical moonlight ... the style of
youth and action... new, new TROPIC STAR* has cap capt
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Ij Gainesville's Quality Jewelers
MWenJix m>
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m \f/. *1 traditional Camel Color
Jr/M // 1 3 button, natural shoulder, lap
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/ JtU 1 i jgW 1 t0 : cranberry, navy, and bottle
It it I \ l Other fine natural shoulder sport
ij J 4) C<>atS fr m $ 35 00 t 0 50 00
Si
ITS THE CUM LAUDE Next to Fla. Theatre
Free parking at rear

have a basis on which to make
the judgment.
The newsletter costs the group
about S4O an issue to print the
10,000 copies. Revenue for the
enterprise comes from members
of the Student Group, faculty and
students who are sympathetic with
the organization.
We print every time we feel
there is something of news value
regarding integration in

Gainesville, Sheehan said. The
newsletter plans to publish every
7-10 days or when events demand
it.
The newsletter has no charter,
but the organization is an official
student group and is recognized
by the administration. TigertHall
has given permission for
Common Sense to be distri distributed
buted distributed on campus.
Common Sense has a regular
staff of eight persons, all members
of the Student Group, but outside
contributions are accepted by
Editor Pincus Gross.
Sheehan said the newsletter
works with the Student Group to
further the groups efforts.
When picketing resumed in front
of the College Inn (C.1.) Wednes Wednesday
day Wednesday the newsletters lead story
was about Student Government
Pres. Paul Hendricks meeting
with the C.I. Management.
The meeting between Hendrick
and C.I. owner George C. Loomis
failed to bring about an agree agreement.
ment. agreement.
Common Sense was begun
last summer after the Student
Group was formed. The group was
formed to inform students of the
facts concerning the racial vio violence
lence violence in Gainesville, Sheehan said.
Our goal is the integration of
all business establishments
in Gainesville which rely on student
trade, Sheehan said, if this
is accomplished we will
have satisfied our aims.
Barrys Backers
Elect President
Students for Goldwater has
elected officers and adopted a
constitution.
President is Merle Dimbath;
vice president, Jerry DeVane; cor corresponding
responding corresponding secretary, Sam
Ullman; recording secretary, Bar Barbra
bra Barbra Keller; treasurer, Bill
Gillespie, and members-at-large,
Ray Boswell and Ron Smalley.

*
W* -J v EL 3
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vv?.. '39H ''' !§g|£ %w/m
ENGINEERING STUDENT RECEIVES AWARD
UF student George Doddington,4EG, received a S4OO
grant to continue his studies from H.M. Doud, repre representing
senting representing the Western Electric Company,

Succos
Services
Scheduled
Succos services will be con conducted
ducted conducted this morning at 9; 30 at the
Hillel Foundation in celebration
of the age-old Jewish holiday.
The joyous occasion may be com compared
pared compared to todays Thanksgiving with
the main emphasis on the thanking
of God for his generosity in bless blessing
ing blessing his people with a most fruitful
year.
It is the custom of the Jewish
people to symbolize this celebra celebration
tion celebration with the construction of a
Succah, a hut-like building in which
fruits of the fall harvest are dis displayed.
played. displayed.
Friday evening the traditional
Sabbath services will begin at 7:30
at Hillel and singing and dancing
will follow in the Succah for a
folk festival.

A
Something different in eating experience. Gourmet
Shop, delicatessen & dining room. Open daily 11 am
to 9 pm, except Tuesday.
706 West University Avenue

THE QfXoR
Wants Your
Starting tomorrow in
The Alligator,we
resume as a regular
daily feature the
GATOR GIRL.
We invite readers to
submit pictures of
their favorite gals
for use in this fea feature.
ture. feature. We'll give
'em back. Send
them or bring them
to The Alligator,
Florida Union.



'The Visit

Helming, Griess To Star
In Players Production

joAnna Helming and John Griess
will star in the Florida Players
production of The Visit, Oct;
16 19, at Norman Hall Auditorium.
Miss Helming has spent the past
two summers in stock theater.
Credits include work with the
Sarasota Asolo Theatre Festival
and the Arrowrock Lyceum
Theater in Arrowrock, Mo.
Os Claire, in The Visit

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REHEARbING A TENSE SCENE
...are Florida Players Sue Beath, 4AS; Carla Malzone,
2UC; Bruce Pettit, lUC; John Griess, 7AS and Lea
Gramling, 4AS.

Career Exams Set |

A wide variety of examinations
leading to career employment with
state agencies has been scheduled
in the areas of accounting, admin administration,
istration, administration, engineering and
enforcement, according to Gerald
L. Howell, Director of the Florida
Merit System.
Local offices of the Florida State
Employment Service maintain an
outline of training and experience
requirements and have application

Cucumbers.. .5$ each
Bell Peppers.. .5$ each
Pink Grapefruit... 10$ each
Indian River Navel Oranges.. .50$ doz.
Irish Potatoes...s lbs. 33$ j
Idaho Baking Potatoes.. .3 for 10$
South Carolina Delicious Apples...7s each
Egg Plant... 10$ each
Yellow Crook-Neck Squash... 6 for 25$
California Lettuce.. .25$ head
0ni0n5...4 for 10$
FANELLI & EDWARDS
MARKET
2410 NEWBERRY ROAD Within Walking Distance
across from Beta Woods Os Cony Viliog#

she said, The part is difficult
because of the double meaning
of everything. Yet one cant give
the appearance of cynicism. It
must be straight forward. This
is the most complex role I have
ever played. The main problem
is in indicating the double
meaning.
Miss Helming, 4ED, plans to

blanks, or they may be obtained
from the Florida Merit System,
Doyle E. Carlton Building,
Tallahassee.
Applications must be submitted
by Oct. 24,-for admission to the
Nov. 9, statewide examinations.
Applicants qualifying on these
tests will be ranked on registers
from which appointments to fill
vacancies can be made.

teach speech and drama after
graduation. She began with
technical work, especially light
and sound.
John Greiss, playing Anton
Schill, is a graduate student in
the speech department working on
his doctorate.
According to Griess, his role
is challenging, but the role of
Claire is even more so.
The most difficult part in playing
Anton is adjusting to the frequent
variations in character that he
experiences as the play develops,
Griess said.
Griess has had major roles
in Hamlet, View From the
Bridge, The Matchmaker,
Rashamon, Beckett and The
Silver Whistle. His future plans
include acting, directing and
writing.

VOTE
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1963
l-
ON REVISIONS FOR YOUR STUDENT BODY
CONSTITUTION
rtf-..*"'-'
The revisions provide for:
1 Student finances improved to give students more representative voice in
how money is spent.
2. Judicial spells out rights of students under tne rionor System and proced procedures
ures procedures of the new jury system.
3. Executive modernizes cabinet duties for greater service to the student
body.
4. Summer Session student government reorganization to meet new tri trimester
mester trimester needs.
5. Publications greater autonomy and student control over funds.
PLEASE NOTE: Over 80% of votes cast last spring favored these revisions, but
ratification failed because the number of students voting did not meet the
*
prescribed minimum.
i
!
#
VOTE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, ON CONSTITUTIONAL REVISIONS
L_

Thursday, 0ct.3,1963 The Florida Alligator

2
We Tried...
to achieve equal rights for all students at the College
Inn through negotiations.
PAUL HENDRICK,
president of the student body, tried to
work out a satisfactory solution to the
on-campus integration off campus
segregation problem with the owners
of the Cl
THE UNIVERSITY'S NEGRO STUDENTS ARE STILL
REFUSED SERVICE AT THE COLLEGE INN!
We regret that we must resume picketing at the
College Inn.
The Student Group for Equal Rights
(paid advertisement)

Page 3



The Florida Alligator Thursday, Oct. 3,1963

Page 4

The Domesticated Americans, The Tastemakers has written
by Russell Lynes < Harper & a dual study of Americans at
Row, $6.50): The author of home from log cabin times to
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Majoring in .the classics? Get lean, lithe Post-Grads in
65% DACRON* and 35% cotton. Solid-citizen pockets and
regular belt loops make your old school try authentic...s6.9s.
Other favorite fabrics $4.95 to $10.95. And get new torso torsotapered
tapered torsotapered h.i.s shirts $3.95 to $6.95. At stores flying h.i.s label.
h| *IM :.i llu f >*>! Pul;- t* i l>* r
jLS post-grad slacks

gnnnnroimnmmnnrrffTnnrswinnnnnnrfr^^
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o Those gentlemen who brook no compro-
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Ask About Student Charge o

BOOKS

United Press International

the era of split-level. On the
one hand, it describes in great
detail the houses, from base basement
ment basement to bathroom and garden
to garret, that Americans have
built over the years. On the
other, it tells of the manners
and way of living that con contributed
tributed contributed to the styles of these
houses and was influenced by
them. As a social commentator,
Lynes does not concentrate
only on the past. It is easy to
make fun of formal parlors and
Stilted manners; it requires
more insight to take a look at
the doings of todays society
that will seem foolish to future
generations. In the process, the
author finds that many of the
19th century customs we laugh
about have away of going full
cycle and returning. The parlor
is one example; the bathroom
another. Os the parlor, he
writes the downfall of a room
which placed such a burden on
so many members of the family
was bound to come sooner or
later, and notes its disappear disappearance
ance disappearance at the end of the century,
only to return in the form of
the living room in the contem contemporary
porary contemporary house, which is increas increasingly
ingly increasingly being reserved for com company
pany company while the family room or
recreation room serves for liv living.
ing. living. Similarly, the bathroom,
which began life as a fancily
decorated room, carved and
gilded, grew functional in its
later years, with exposed pipes
and tiled surfaces, only to re return
turn return to the ornate in recent
years.

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THEY'RE PLANNING STRATEGY FOR TONIGHT
Hoping to surprise some UF men by practicing beforehand
for the Florida Union's "Ladies' Night" in the Game room
are freshmen Robin Potter and Cindy Pike, Alpha Chi 0-
mega pledges.
'Gator State Alumni
To Know Bond Story

The UF is going to take the bond
issue story to every UF alumnus
in the state, according to William
A. Fleming, director of alumni
affairs.
Through the Alumni Association
-sponsored University of Florida
Days, nearly every major area
of the state will know the
importance of the College Building
Amendment to be voted on Nov.
5, Fleming said.
UF Days, which now is being
expanded to cover the entire state,
has been an association project
for several years. Alumni Clubs
in different parts of Florida serve
as local contacts, club presidents
contact all the major civic groups
in their respective cities and
schedule UF speakers.
Under the plan, speaking teams
of administrators, and professors
visit various cities. Publicity from
the UFs Office of Informational
Services is expected to help build
interest prior to the speaking
engagements.
It is fortunate that we have

See What New in
The Browse Shop
QualitY Paperbacks
THE ART OF THE ANCIENT NEAR EAST
.. .Seton Lloyd
THE FUTURE OF FEDERALISM
...Nelson Rockefeller
THE IMPRESSIONISTS .. .Francois Mothey
PEDAGOGICAL SKETCHBOOK ...Paul Klee
NEITHER WAR NOR PEACE ...Hugh Seton Watson
GUERILLAS IN THE 1960'S ...Paret & Shy
OUTER SPACE & WORLD POLITICS
...ed. Joseph M. Goldsen
Technical & Reference
ADVANCED CALCULUS... .Fulks
ORGANIC COMPOUNDS ...Fuson
MATRIX THEORY FOR PHYSICISTS ...Heading
The BROWSE SHOP
Campus Shop & Bookstore

alumni clubs in nearly every major
city or county in Florida, Fleming
said. Since our clubs were
familiar with the UF Days pro procedure,
cedure, procedure, it was fairly simple to
mobilize quickly to get the
amendment story told throughout
Florida, he added.
Volusia and Hills' ugh
County Alumni Clubs nsored
highly successful programs in
September, and five other state
areas in the state have been
scheduled for October, Fleming
said.
Pre-Law Society
Membership Open
Pre-law students may pick up
applications for the Pre-Law
Society in room 123 of the Florida
Union between 3 and 5 p.m. today
and Friday.
A meeting of all applicants will
be held Tuesday in room 116 of
the Union.



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c LIFE-GIVING BLOOD
...is administered by Dr. John B. Henry and Mrs. Flora L. Goff, head technician at
the J. Hi 11 is Miller Health Center Blood Bank.

Health Center Accepts
Blood From Old, Young

By JOE KOLUN
Staff Writer
The J. Hillis Miller Health
Center is accepting blood from
persons 18 to 60 years old every
day of the week.
Those between 18 and 21 must
have written permission from a
parent or guardian.
The blood bank is on the first
floor of the health center, room
A-100. Donations can be made
Monday through Saturday between
8 a.m. and 9 p.m. and Sundays
between 1- 9 p.m.
Donors should not eat for three
hours prior to making a donation.
The blood bank takes one pint
at a time. Blood can be taken
every eight weeks, but no more
than five times in one calendar
year.
According to Miss Flora Goff,
chief medical technologist for the
blood bank, 6 positive blood
is most in demand because most
people are of this type.
Blood can be donated under one
of two plans. The first is a cash
payment for the donors blood by
the health center.
Under the recently inaugurated
Blood Assurance Plan a donor
can give one pint of blood and
receive assurance that all his
blood needs will be met, if needed
anywhere in the country for three
years.
The Family Plan portion of the
Blood Assurance Plan assures
blood to the donor, spouse and
all dependent minor children for
one year, anywhere in the country,
for one donation of one pint.
According to Miss Goff, the
blood bank must depend on students
and faculty donations for blood
needs.
They have been more than
generous, she added.
Because of student and faculty
donations, the UF is able to
perform two open-heart operations
a week, she said.
Annual Book
Sale Planned
Qainesville Friends of the
Library, will hold its annual
book sale Oct. 10-12 from 9-5
p.m. in the Margaret Ann building
115 NE Ist Street.
Books this year include Bibles,
cook books, encyclopedias, text textbooks,
books, textbooks, paperbacks, adult fiction,
dictionaries and childrens books.
Co-chairmen for the sale are
Mrs. James C. Wilson and Mrs.
Billy Brashear.

From 18 To 60


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A p wonderful skirt with
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active length,
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Pip-front closing.
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You'll find these, and many more at SILVERMAN'S
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Next to Florida Theatre

Thursday,Oct.3,l963 The Florida Alligator

jr CALL UNIVERSITY
}r EXTENSION 2832 \
A cU VJ,'
JMf\l 111 miiiMiiMmiffl
xm 11J lj ii ?id :M
ANNIVERSARY
THANK YOU SALE
GRANTS-OWN BRAND KNNUIGH*
MINS' STRETCH NYLON SOCKS
Sale 57<
REGULARLY 79*
Guaranteed to wear one year or a new pair free!
One size fits 10-13. Favorite solid colors.
Machine washable. Comfort-fitting elastic tops.
many more unadvertised specials
~Z / I Wont wrinkle |
£ j 1 bag or sag l
V A j \ .Run-resistant l
f 1 tnesh or plain I
f 0
i \\ r
' l| ;!
J V*
GRANTS-OWN BRAND ISIS
SEAMLESS STRETCH NYLONS
Sale 2?l
or 55< PR. REGULARLY 67 PR.
STUDENT CHARGES WELCOME
AT THE GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER

Page 5



The Florida Alliqator Thursday,Oct.3,l963

Page 6

od**o**i*ls -#
One More Open Letter
With the continued agitation for integration of our restaurants
and the continued inference that we do not wish to cooperate with
student opinion, it becomes necessary that our views be presented
to the student body. This letter will attempt to explain the situation
in which we find ourselves.
Our restaurants offer service to people of all races. To be sure,
Negroes are served only on a carry-out basis, but this doesnt
stem from racial hate or desire for inequality on our parts. We
have asked our customers what they preferred, and most of them
favored continuation of our present racial policy. (A poll of customers
at the Gold Coast, for exarnple, showed that 80% of the customers
polled did not wish to eat with Negroes, and only 10% did.) As we
explained to the Student Group representatives and to the student
body president, with whom we met, it is not economically feasible
for us to go against the wishes of four customers in five.
The Open Letter to the College Inn, published on campus, says
to us, All we ask is that you listen to the voices of your
customers. . . This is precisely what we have done. Our student
customers have expressed the desire that we remain segregated.
We have followed their wishes, and our business has not declined,
despite the agitation by the Student Group for Equal Rights, even on
days when pickets were outside our doors, trying to discourage our
customers from entering.
We feel that the University has sufficient facilities for the few
colored students. And we dont believe these Negro students would
want to eat in a restaurant where they were unwanted by a majority
of the customers.
On Sundays, we serve many dinners to white families who come in
from the area surrounding Gainesville. These families comprise a
large portion of our Sunday business, and they do not favor integration.
Our decision has been one for our customers. In a nation founded
on the principles of free enterprise, where personal property rights
do still exist, we will not be forced or coerced into surrendering
our rights, we have followed the wishes of our customers and shall
continue to do so. The decision was ours, by right, just as it is our
right to refuse service to anyone. We reserve that right.
Leonard C. Dew
Owner, Gold Coast Restaurant
George C. Loomis
Owner, College Inn
**********
With the publication of the above open letter, open war seems
to have been declared between the Student Group For Equal Rights
and the management of the Gold Coast and Cl. It promises to be a
bloodless war, unless someone should cut his finger on the sharp
edges of an Open Letter. It promises as well to be a somewhat boring
war, as the seiges of castles during the Middle Ages must have
grown deadly dull, both for those inside the castle and those without.
Probably the two business concerns are not going to capitulate
unless one of two events occurs: either they begin to lose money
because of their policies, or someone brings a suit under Kennedys
new public accommodations bill. The latter is more probable.
But the students could bring about the first effect -a loss of
business. Just as the managers reserve the right to refuse service
to anyone, so may students reserve the right to eat where they
please, and not eat where they please. It all depends upon how strongly
the individual student believes in human dignity, and how many
individual students there are like him.

INSIDE STUDENT GOVERNMENT

The Reason For Constitutional Revisions

There is a danger poised atop
campus voting machines today--
a danger that CONSTITUTIONAL
REVISIONS, the most serious
question at issue, will fail.
If Constitutional Revisions fail,
your Student Body constitution will
run second only to the state
constitution in obsolescence.
These Revisions are the most
significant improvements in the
framework of student activities in
years. They will improve services,
clarify SG duties, strengthen
students' voice in money matters.
They are constructive. Final
passage by the Legislative Council
was unanimous; Why should they

The Florida Alligator
Editor-in-Chfof David Lawrence, Jr.
Managing Editor % Bob Wilson
Sports Editor Walker Lundy
Editorial Page Editor John Askins
Layout Editor Ron Spencer
City Editor Cynthia Tunstall
Copy Editor Bill Fuller
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is die official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during the
months of May, June, and July, when a weekly issue is published THE
FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is entered as second class matter at the United
States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida.

fail?
The sad fact is thar a vote on
Constitutional Revisions lacks the
glamor of a red-hot political race.
Constitutional Revisions,
nonpartisan as they are, must
compete unbolstered by the
candidates strong partisan
loyalty. Thus, for two years,
Constitutional Revisions have
faced the student body, and for
two years have failed.
This is why student government
is making an all-out effort now
for your support for Constitutional
Revisions. 25 per cent of the
student body must vote (either
yes" or NO") if the Revisions

The Taint on Our Educational
Jfe fk IJSRI
s' 7 PACKAfIe
"As I see it, it all began when they started admitting students from wet counties!"

POLITICAL SIDELIGHTS

Vote in the affirmative on the
referendum dealing with N.S.A.
If you happen to be one of those
people who have formed some
derogatory opinions about the
group, based on recent campus
chatter, please read on.
I attended the NJS.A. convention
last year as one of the University
of Floridas representatives.
Please accept my word that there
was more to be gained from
attending that convention than any
other activity student government
engaged in all year. The exchange
of ideas with outstanding students
over the nation; the opportunity
to make a comparative study of
the various student governments;
the chance to survey popular
student leader opinion about
matters of national import; and the
pure elation involved with being
a spectator to a sight that indicates
a reduction in national apathy
makes this organization

are to have a chance. This twenty twentyfive
five twentyfive per cent minimum rule
defeated revisions last year,
although above 80 per cent of those
favored passage.
Summaries of the Revisions are
published in the reminders in this
Alligator edition (seepp. 3,8). The
complete Revisions are posted
outside the Campus Club;personal
copies may be obtained at the
Student Government Office, 310
Florida Union.
Because of the cramped space
in voting machines, Thursdays
ballot can list only the titles of
Revisions articles. This increases
the importance of your being in informed
formed informed about the Constitutional
Revisions before you go to vote.
What are the Constitutional
Revisions all about? Here is a
brief, accurate rundown on what
youll be voting on;
L EXECUTIVE: changed to
require the Student Body President

Vote Yes For NSA

worthwhile.
THEYRE A BUNCHOF
COMMUNISTS! is the favqrite
chant of the avid, and usually
uninformed, N.S.A. dissenter. Well
Id like to say this about that:
there is absolutely no empirical
proof that such an allegation is
valid, it has become popular in
this country to brand any ultra ultra
ultra £
HUGH
McArthur
.. .political
sidelights
liberal, or for that matter any
ultra-anything, as being
somewhere between communist
red to a socialist pink. Not to
be facetious, but I would like to

to attend all three trimesters
during his term; to spell out duties
of cabinet officers and add a
Secretary of Athletics to protect
student interests on date tickets,
seating, etc.
n. JUDICIARY: changed to
clarify student rights under the
Honor System and guarantee fair
trial procedures.
111. FINANCE: changed to
provide more representative
student control of Student
Activity Fees through Legislative
Council.
IV. PUBLICATIONS: changed
to clarify relation of student pub publications
lications publications to student government,
giving publications more autonomy
and control of publications funds
by a student majority.
V. SUMMER SESSION: changed
to provide for full-scale student
government operation in the
summer trimester.
, 1
VI. FRESHMAN COUNCIL:
changed to give Freshmen more
flexibility and initiative in Fresh Freshman
man Freshman Council elections.
VII. IMPEACHMENT: changed
to clarify powers of removal of
student body officials for mal malfeasance,
feasance, malfeasance, misfeasance, or non nonfeasance
feasance nonfeasance through Honor Court and
Legislative Council.

point out that this country was
founded and has thrived upon the
philosophy of letting all the
ultras speak. N.S.A. happens
to be a group that lets everybody
have their say; if this constitutes
being categorized on the political
spectrum at some point between a
shade of pink and red, then they
are guilty. For more tangible
evidence, one might observe that
the communists are permitted to
set up a table at every N. S. A.
convention. This appears to be
amble evidence until it is seen,
upon closer examination, that
every paper coming from behind
that desk, by NJS.A. regulation,
is marked with a big rubber stamp
saying, PRODUCED BY THE
COMMUNIST PARTY, U.S.A., AT
THEIR OWN EXPENSE.
There is no effort on the part
of N.S.A. members to keep out
any ideology; they permit Nazis,
Fascists, Anarchists, Capitalists,
Communists, Hindus, Moslems,
Jews, and Christians to have their
say. There was a day when the
function of letting everyone speak
was, at least ideally, considered
Democracy.
I offer the following as a
compromise to those of you still
in doubt. Vote in favor of the
referendum, this in itself not
consumating membership, and then
do what I consider to be the
intelligent thing. Commence to
pressure student government
and in this case the pressure
need only be light, for I understand
they would like to cooperate, to
make one of two decisions; either
join N.S.A. as it is and try to
utilize the leadership abilities of
our leaders to change the
organization or launch an all-out
program to organize a new national
student organization of a similar
nature. If you vote for the
referendum now, then either
alternative will be open.
i
I belie\ ve all have an obligation
not to destroy or remain aloft
from anything that will help develop
an interest in and a knowledge
of our government. N.S.A. is he
only national organization of its
kind, it helps destroy apathy, our
singular greatest threat in this
country, and should not be banned
by anyone until replaced by some something
thing something better.
Someone once mentioned to me
that the surest way to get rid of
the Communist Party was for all
Americans to join it.



AMERICAN ANALYSIS

( can we do about it?
This seemed to be the typical
reaction to the news that Juan
Boschs democratically elected
government had been thrown out in
the Dominican Republic. Others
countered with We can send a
few Marines in there and clean
the place up, in the best T.R.
Daddy Warbucks tradition.
As is often the case, the most
likely answer lies somewhere
between the two extremes of armed
intervention on the one hand and
apathetic resignation on the other.

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But What Can We Do?

(Answer because there can be
no monolithic solution to problems
as complex as those of foreign
rtjrw f, cuff
y\y ) landers ...
l>crx' s L Latin American
Viewpoint
relations.)
Those who would send in the
Marines to restore Bosch to power

overlook the history of U. S.
Dominican relations. Much popular
resentment still exists in that
island nation as a result of Marine
occupation (1916-24). Some even
blame this country for the rise
of Trujillo, who was head of the
American trained constabulary
when he seized power in 1930.
Therefore, it seems indisputable
that any armed intervention by the
U. S. would have lasting popular
repercussions In the D.R. Is there
anything short of force that this
nation can do to restore Bosch?
Probably not, in light of past
U. S. policy in Latin America.
And there is no reason to suppose
that we will change our strategy
at this juncture. Let us examine
what this strategy entails.
As Barnard L. Collier points
out in an excellent N. Y. Herald-
Tribune article (Sept. 29), the
U. S. actually encourages such
military coups, by its espousal of
what he terms the Lesser Evil
Doctrine.
This doctrine holds that our
worst enemy is not
authoritarianism but Communism
in all its forms. Thus, it has been
cynically noted, America would
be happy to see twenty Trujillos
south of the Rio Grande.
By this is meant that the United
States, despite its avowed desire
for democracy in all nations of
the hemisphere, will tolerate
(some say welcome) a rightist
dictator who loudly proclaims his
anti-communist feelings. Such a
dictator is felt to be the Lesser
Evil.
Favoring The
Bond Issue
EDITOR:
The wave of children -- our
children -- that entered our public
schools in the early 1950s is now
about to break upon our colleges.
Their number has been increased
by the pressure of international
events, and by the economics of
living in an automated world.
We must provide the college
facilities: because these are our
children because without it the
growth of our state will be on a
low instead of a high level
because industrial development
cannot progress without it.
The benefits of this educational
surge will be a decade in maturing
and generations in effect. It is
not only economically sound to
spread the cost over the years
when this benefit accrues, it is
also just that the citizens in the
years when it does accrue shall
make some of the investment.
In each age, in each state and
nation, peoples face crises
challenges -- and their fate is
determined by their response to
these challenges. In this decade,
in this state, the need for college
education is our challenge, and
the college building amendment
is our response.
Farris Bryant
Governor

PLANNING A CAREER
A leading national chemical corporation is seeking chemical engineers and chemists
for development, research, a reproduction growth positions in its fast expanding
cherr'cals, metals, and plant food operations.
Mr. J.J.Wimberly, Administrative Director of the Tennessee Corporation, will be
at the University Placement Director's office October 11. He will be glad to dis discuss
cuss discuss your career possibilities with Tennessee.

Thursday,Oct.3,l963 The Florida Alligator

letters

Common Sense Misnomer

EDITOR:
The newsletter entitled,
Common Sense,' (a misnomer),
sponsored by the Student Group
for Equal Rights, has distorted
the facts. Specifically, reference
is made to the newsletter of
September 10 entitled, Discord
in Ocala. In the article, Zev
Aelony, a white CORE worker, is
upheld as a prime example of
saint-hood who has been per persecuted
secuted persecuted by the police in his fight
for Negro rights.
The truth is that Aelony was
arrested by a deputy sheriff of
Marion County in Dunne lion,
Florida on July 18, 1963. On this
date, Aelony was standing between
two parked cars on the main street
of Dunnellon and refused to move
in order to let a white woman leave
the parking area without striking
him. The deputy approached the
subject and asked him to leave
the area. The subject refused. The
subject was then asked to show his
identification, and he replied he
did not have to show it. The subject
was then asked to go to city hall,
and refused. He was then arrested
and removed from the scene.
Regardless of the state of
Aelonys mind, it can easily be
seen that this parking scene cannot


YES...
IT MATTERS!!
YOU
SHOULD VOTE ON
CONSTITUTIONAL REVISIONS
VOTE THURSDAY, OCT. 3
(appearing as first item at the top of your machine)
S I

be construed to have racial
implications. Aelony
explained what he was doing in
the street at Dunnellon. Aelony
was arrested for vagrancy (be (because
cause (because he said he was unemployed)
and for resisting an officer without
violence. The Student Group for
Equal Rights it seems, would con constrain
strain constrain police officers to leave
CORE workers alone regardless
of their disturbances, just because
they happen to be CORE workers.
While Aelony was in the Marion
County jail, Negro demonstrators
yelled and screamed for his
release outside the building.
Aelony was checked for mental
competency and then released on
bail after a doctors OK. While
out on bail, Aelony proceeded to
Americus, Ga., where he is now
in jail for inciting insurrection
against the government. These
further facts about Zev Aelony
could not be found in Common
Sense and their misrepresenta misrepresentation
tion misrepresentation of the facts.
My sources for this case were
the Marion County Judges Office
and the Marion County Sheriffs
Office. The student group must
have used hearsay as their source.
Ray A. Cates Jr., 3ED

Page 7



The Florida Alligator Thursday /0ct.3,1963

Page 8

For Sale

FOR SALE New Philco 8500
BTU Air Conditioner never used,
fully guaranteed, cost S2BO, will
sell $l5O. Phone 376 9074.
(A-19-lt-p).
FOR SALE Harley-Davidson
165 cycle. Like new. Call 372-
2730 after noon. (A-19-st-c).
1959 HARLEY DAVIDSON (74)
Motorcycle. Small equity and take
up payment. FR 6-8236 between
8:30 and 10 a.m. (A-16-st-c).

For Rent

BRAND NEW, Air-conditioned,
efficiency apartment, contact
Frank or Jim, Apt. 11, University
Manor Apts., 2026 W. Univ. Blvd.
(B-19-lt-c).

Wanted

WANTED WAITRESS, part time
job, must be attractive, good
wages, no experience necessary.
Apply at Speakeasy, 604 N.W.
13th Street. (C-6-ts-c).
MRS. NANCY GILBERT is looking
for all members of Pi Beta Phi
Sorority now on campus. Call her
at FR 6-8152. (c-11-4t-p).

Help Wanted |

WAITER WANTEDExperienced
if possible, apply in person at
Larrys Wonderhouse, 14 S.W. Ist
Street, downtown. (E-17-ts-c).
p. i.
T-O-D-A-Y STATE
1-3:40-6:15-8:55
A STUNNING PERFORMANCE!
. . Leslie Caron imbues it with
tremendous compassion and
charm!
New York Times
A beautiful and refreshing
film. A masterpiece of candor
and sensitivity.
-Time Magazine
I recommend the picture to
everyone.
-New Yorker Magazine
A bittersweet extravaganza
of emotionalism. . endlessly
suggestive.
-Newsweek
* * HIGHEST RATING!
Another film of award calibre.
Admirable performances!
New York Daily News
A lusty slice of life. . Top
notch entertainment for the
selective adult. . Brilliant.
We Have Nothing To Add
Except SEE IT!
.'CTuat
plus award-winner short
vkA W 4 W
if 11
- u

GATOR CLASSIFIED

s.
Help Wanted

COLLEGE FEMALE Students.
Earn from $7.50 to sls an hour.
No investment necessary. Car
needed. Phone 372-4863 for
appointment. (E-16-st-c).
FEMALE NEED A part time job?
You can earn up to SSO per week.
No soliciting, delivering, or
collecting. Car necessary. Call
372 4863 for appointment.
(E -16-st-c).

Autos

1955 CHEVROLET, 6 cylinder,
stick shift. Excellent
transportation. 372-758 9.
(G-18-st-c).
CLASSIC 1961 Corvette Convertible
230 hp w/4 spd. transmission.
Radio, heater, WSW, Beautiful
interior, mechanically sound
- Best offer. Must sell. FR
6-9079. (G-17-st-p).
1 ">
1959 FORD 6 cylinder, seat belts,
stick shift, in good shape SSOO.
Call 372 7577 after 6 p.m.
(G-14-st-c).
BARGAIN! Due to unforseeable
circumstances (ie bankruptcy),
sharp car being practically given
away S3OO or best offer. Come
see 505 N.E. 3rd St. (G-18-3t-p).

its emotions are measured In megatons?
MABBAHCTB^EHFOMM*BBIEgMm<
jl I
STARTS TOMORROW FI RST AREA SHOWING
GAINESVILLE ££2^ Rd
He was hired to mate them...
But not/to date them //1
MiTZI GAYN'QR GIG YOUNG
in Eastman COLOR
starts r AlMrc\/ll I IT Drive-In Theatre
tomorrow VJMIIVLS> VILLL 2400 Hawthorne Rd

Autos

1962 VW SEDAN, white with red
interior, radio, heater, whitewall
tires, seat belts. S9O below
average list price $1450. Call
2-6018 after 5 p.m. (G-17-ts-c).

Lost
FEMALE LOST Basset Hound
in vicinity of S. W. 12th and 6th.
Answers to name of Roxanne.
Contact Katherine Alsop,
University Ext. 2767 after 5 call
2-2618. (L-18-2t-c).
LOST Pair of prescription
glasses. Address of Dr. Edward
K. Walker on case. Notify John
White, room 1065, Hume Hall.
Reward offered. (L-18-st-c).

Services

KIDDIE KORT Child Care Center
Day, week, month. Pickup at
Littlewood and J. j. Finley Schools
open for BALL GAMES. PH 2-6667.
(M-19-ThF-c).
TYPING DONE ON IBM electric
typewriter. Will type on short
notice. Reasonable rates, phone
Mrs. Martinez FR 6-3261, Ext.
2575 weekdays or FR 6-1859
weekends or nights. (M-4-Th-c).

Services

FOR A CHANGE OF PACE, Come
Horseback Riding at Lake Wauberg
Riding Stables,Tumbleweed Ranch.
Hay Rides and Night Trail Rides.
Student operated. 1/2 Mi. North
of L ake Wauberg. Reservations
and free transportation. Call
466-9295. (M-8-68t-c).
BAND for hire. The Continentals
5 piece Combo.Willplay anywhere,
anytime. Special rates to
Fraternities. Call Harold
Cunningham FR 6-7052 after 3
p.m. (M-18-st-c).
TENNIS INSTRUCTIONS: For
male or female students, beginners
or advanced. Week day afternoons,
Saturdays all day. Lee Norton,
FR 6-9745 after 3 p.m.(M-15-st-c).

i

I HEELS pvt on in 5* minutes
SOLES put on in ISmnwns j
I MODERN SHOE!
I REPAIR SHOP I
Jo cross from Ist n olio no I bonk |

I open 6:30-show 7
Suites g jjjjijg
l 3'THRILL HlTSforth* PRICC ofQN
STARTS FRIDAY *FOR LWE Ok MONEY?

Coedikette
Application!
Available
Applications for editor,
assistant editor, art editor and
staff of the Coedikette will be
accepted until Oct. 23.
The Coedikette is a Womans
Student Association sponsored
publication explaining UF regu regulations
lations regulations to incoming freshman girls.
Applications must be picked up
by Oct. 14 in the sorority houses,
residence halls or the office of
the dean of women.
Senior Wins
SSOO Grant
Dennis F. Howerton, aUF senior
from Tampa, has been named
recipient of a SSOO scholarship
by Dr. J. W. Willingham, acting
head of the UFs School of
Forestry.
Howerton was selected for the
Rayonier Foundation Scholarship
on the basis of leadership and
scholarship.
The scholarship was presented
to the student by Ernest Davis,
woodlands manager of Rayonier
Corporation, Fernandina. It will
be presented each year.
Howerton worked this past
summer for the United States
Forestry Service in California.
Graduate Grant
Deadline Nov. 1
Deadline for filing applications
for a 1964-65 U. S. Government
grant for graduate study or
research abroad is Nov. 1.
Competition for scholarships,
available to qualified graduate stu students
dents students under the Fulbright-Hays
act, is administered by the
Institute of International
Education.
Applications and further infor information
mation information may be obtained from Col.
Glenn A. Farris, International
Center, Building AE.
ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
CALL UNIV. EXT. 2832
United Rent-All >
Party & Banquet Equip
Rollaway Beds Tools
Trucks, Trailers, Tow
Bars.
625 N.W. Bth Ave.
FR 6-2835



We all make mistakes.. S Jin
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Corrasable is available in light,
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i


' <* :',;V:.: V
a artistry of
j
Skirts & sweaters by Darlene & Petti,
Dresses by Carol Craig Marie Phillips,
Jr, Theme & Others.
Come in and ask about our special
charge account.

l-~ ... ^ & j|H|jEl^^S^HSS|Hn|Bn|jEps
9 ~uYfW£\
* j/ m m I
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Bj 1 Jl ikV
I
AFTER TWENTY YEARS
.. .a fraternity brother is welcomed back. Ken Hohla, 3EG, Robert Wheeler, 6BA and
Charles Woodham, lUC, sit on the front porch and discuss everything from the world
situation to coeds. Wheeler has come back to school after a 20-year leave of absence.
Living At Pi Kap House

Graying Student Returns
To UF After Two Decades

By JIM KELLY
Os The Gator Staff
In 1943 Robert Wheeler was 16
years old and a freshman at the
UF. Today, two decades later,
Wheeler is still a student here.
Actually the friendly, graying,
native Miamian received a BSBA
degree (Bachelor of Science in
Business Administration) in 1948
but now has decided to go another
year and earn a bachelor's degree
in advanced accounting.
Wheelers family his wife and
four children aged three to seven
--are living in Miami.
Songfest Tonight
Foreign and American students
will meet to sing songs from
numerous countries tonight at 7
in the Johnson Lounge of the
Florida Union.
Entertainment and refreshments
will be provided.

. Zmakp
HIMALAYA introduces the ultimate note
of ,uxuf y in a complete line of mens
mk. \ sweaters for '63. >
/Mm |r You can ** * HIMALAYA
/vg Jr \ for superiority every single time. Find
( I \ the mos Pristine wools, softest and
1/liT | | Jr silkiest mohairs and wools, and most
luxurious imported New Zealand suedes
sj# ** 611 West Univ. Ave. BjJR PLAYBOY

Thursday,Oct.3,l963 The Florida Alligator

The primary reason I came
back, he explains, is because
I felt I was being stymied in
getting ahead. I decided the best
approach to improving the situation
was through education.
Today employers are looking
for better education among em employees
ployees employees and are giving greater
consideration to those who have
it, he added.
According to Wheeler, he notices
many changes here in 20 years.
He recollects a student body of
only 300 in 1943. Now there are
more than 14,500.
I think today students as a whole
study a lot more.
Wheeler is working his way
through school. In addition to
serving as financial advisor and
bookkeeper to two Miami
businesses, he is a member of
the Army Reserve. In his spare
time, he enjoys playing bridge.
Now living at the Pi Kappa Phi
fraternity house, he has been a
pi Kap since first beginning
college.

If he does well this trimester,
Wheeler hopes to go to graduate
school.
I sure would like to get my
master's, he said.
His mother graduated from
here with a B.A.E. in 1940; his
father, who was also a former
student body president, with an
M.A. in 1941, his brother, from
the agricultural college in 1949
and his wife, with a B.A.E. in
1948.
Founders Day
Celebration
Alpha Kappa Psl, professional
businessmens fraternity, will
celebrate Founders Day,
Thursday at 7 p.m. in the J,
Hillis Miller Health Center, room
M-112.
All pledges and brothers may
attend.

Page 9



Page 10

The Florida Alligator Thursday,Oct.3.l963

FROM THE SIDELINES
Letters Go After
Gator Gridders
By WALKER LUNDY
Sports Editor
Ye Olde Mailbag is about to pop with comment on the Florida
football scene at present and although we disagree slightly with the
general run of thought, we suspect the letters we have received
exemplify the student bodys feelings on the matter.
Here are some of the less insulting excerpts from some of them:
More Letters
EDITOR:
Readers; please excuse the angry voice of a Florida student.
But after all, there are 14,000 students who have an axe to grind
and I would like to generate a few sparks.
Gripe one: Florida has a great team, win tie, or lose. Everyone
should see every Gator game. Everyone should yell and Im all for
spirit. However, during the halftime do we have to listin to some
nut on the loudspeakers yelling, Hold up your cards. ..Now flip
em! etc. etc. There is, in case no one heard them, a band on the
field. They play pretty damn well and Id like to hear them onetime!
Gripe two: Scheduling. Students arise. All seat tickets not
taken up by students will be sold to the public for five bucks. We
are scheduled to play F.S.C.W. that weekend, and many students will,
despite all desires to the contrary, go home for the vacation. Who
schedules these games and who will make money on your ticket if you
dont go?
You know the answer, so go get your ticket whether you are going
to the game or not. Then maybe well see some half decent scheduling
in the future. Anyway youll have your tickets in case they come up
with some smarts and reschedule. Maybe we could just play Miami on
Friday night, have roast seminole on Wednesday, and all have turkey
on Thanksgiving.
Two gripes, students; They should be your axes to grind so lets
do something about them since we can. Get your seat ticket;
'Carl J. Brown, 2UC
Mr. Brown, your angry voice is excused. We feel your Gripe No. 2
is a good one. We personally wonder why the Florida - FSU game
cant be moved back a week since both schools end their season then.
Keep watching and well look into it.
Looking Ahead
EDITOR:
After watching the opening game against Georgia Tech on TV and
attending the Mississippi State game, my brother and I are still
very much Gator fans.
Do you think it is possible the Gators were looking ahead to the
Richmond game?
Dean and Dale Dewbury (7ED)
Were not quite sure if you are serious or not. But to answer
your question, NO, we do NOT think it is possible the Gators were
looking ahead to Richmond.
At least, we hope not.
A Few More
We wish we had space to answer more of the .letters but those
above express the general consensus.
A WORD OF WARNING: The University of Florida STILL has
a good football team, regardless of what you or we might think right
now.
The Gators are going to surprise teams before the season is over.
Remember these words and make us a prophet.

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Featuring the CHICKEN SPECIAL 50$
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Richmond
Is Ready
For UF
RICHMOND, Va. Florida will
be tougher than Tennessee,
according to University of
Richmond Football Coach
Ed Merrick whose Spiders face
the Gators of Ray Graves here
Saturday afternoon at 2 p.m.
Richmond bowed to the Vols,
34-6, in its last game after
defeating East Carolina, 10-7, in
the opener.
Florida is not far from being
a real fine football team, said
Carl Wise, the Spiders backfield
coach who scouted last years
Gator Bowl champs (Florida beat
Penn State 17-7) in their 9-9 dead deadlock
lock deadlock with Mississippi State last
week.
ri's a very fine defensive team,
having given up only two touch touchdowns
downs touchdowns in two games (Florida lost
its opener to Georgia Tech, 9-0
in the mud) and its offense looked
very good in the first half against
Mississippi State.
Wise called Fullback Larry
Dupree and Center Roger Pettee
as good as any in the southeast.
He also was impressed with Half Halfback
back Halfback Jack Harper and the Gators
giant line, tackles Frank Lasky
and Dennis Murphy, weighing in at
270 and 262, respectively.
Merrick plans to go with the
same lineup which put up a battle
against Tennessee in terrific heat
at Knoxville two weeks ago. The
Spider mentor thought his club
should have come out of that one
with no worse than a 21-6 loss.
Merrick will continue to
alternate Bill Silvi, who threw a
54-yard scoring pass to Halfback
Kenny Stoudt in the win over East
Carolina (a team that later beat
Wake Forest, 20-10), and Ronnie
Smith. He thought Smith did a fine
job against the Vols, noting that
his nine for 23 pass completion
mark was deceiving since a
number of passes were dropped.
The Richmond touchdown came on
a 51-yard Smith to Halfback Ken
Wilbourne pitch.
The shifty 167-pound Stoudt,
averaging 5.1 yards per carry,
will be at left halfback with Mike
Smelser, tough defensively despite
his size (5-7, 154) opening at
right halfback. Larry Deco, who
averaged almost four yards in
seven carries against Tennessee,
is v an up-the-middle threat at
fullback.

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Sandy Handcuffs Yanks;
Dodgers Take First, 5-2


Los Angeles AB R H RBI
Wills ss 5 0 0 0
Gilliam 3b 4 0 10
W. Davis cf 3 10 0
T. Davis cf 4 0 3 0
F. Howard rs 4 11 0
Fairly rs 0 0 0 0
Skowron lb 3 12 2
Tracewski 2b 4 11 0
Roseboro c 4113
Koufax p 4 0 0 0
Totals 35 5 9 5
New York AB R H RBI
Kubek ss 4110
Richardson 2b 3 0 0 0
Tresh If 3 112
Mantle cf 3 0 0 0
Maris rs 4 0 0 0
E. Howard c 4 0 1 0
Pepitone lb 4 0 2 0
Boyer 3b 4 0 10
Ford p 1000
a-Lopez 10 0 0
Williams p 0 0 0 0
b-Linz 10 0 0
Hamilton p 0 0 0 0
c-Bright 10 0 0
Totals 33 2 6 2
a-Struck out for Ford in sth;
b-Struck out for Williams in Bth;
c-Struck out for Hamilton in 9th.
Los Angeles 041 000 000-5
New York 000 000 020-2
Po-A-Los Angeles 27-3, New
York 27-10. LOB-Los Angeles 6,
New York 7. 28-F. Howard. HR-
Roseboro, Tresh. SB-T. Davis. S-
W. Davis.
ip h rer bb so
Koufax (W) 9 6 2 2 3 15
Ford (L) 5 8 5 5 2 4
Williams 3 1 0 0 0 5
Hamilton 1 0 0 0 0 1

Pjama, Texas Picked!

NEW YORK (UPI) Alabama
and Texas, ranked No. 2 and 3
in the nation, are favored to score
lopsided victories Saturday while
top-ranked Oklahoma, which
meets Texas next week, takes a
day off.
Alabama, with quarterback Joe
Namath spearheading the attack,
is ranked a 23-point choice over
winless Vanderbilt in a Saturday
night game in a runfown of this
weekends college football odds.
Texas, also playing under the
lights is a 22-point favorite over
Oklahoma State. However, fourth
ranked Northwestern, which be began
gan began its Big Ten campaign by beat beating
ing beating Indiana last week, is rated
only a 7-point choice over Illi Illinois,
nois, Illinois, and fifth-ranked Georgia
Tech, playing Saturday night, is
only a 5-point pick over Louisiana
State.
Seventh ranked Navy sends
quarterback Roger Staubach
against his toughest test so far
ibis season on Saturday as a 7-
point favorite over Michigan.
Eight-ranked Pitt is a 13-point
chocie to score its third straight
win over a West Coast team at
the expense of California.
Southern California, the 1962 na national
tional national champion whose 12-game
winning streak was ended by Okla Oklahoma
homa Oklahoma last Saturday, is a 6
point favorite to start a new streak
by beating Michigan State in the
headline game of the Friday night
Program.
Duke is picked by 7 over Mary Maryland
land Maryland in Saturdays nationally tele televised
vised televised game.
In other college games;
East; Columbia vs. Princeton,
even; Penn state 4 over Rice;

NEW YORK (UPI) Dandy
Sandy Koufax downed the mighty
and favored New York Yankees
with record book pitching and a
three-run homer blast by John
Roseboro Wednesday for tense
5 to 2 victory which gave the
Los Angeles Dodgers the open opening
ing opening game of the World Series.
The slender southpaw with the
blazing fast ball struck out the
first five hitters to face him,
fanned a record total of 15 hit hitters
ters hitters and allowed but six hits be before
fore before a roaring crowd of 69,000
On Radio
The second game of the World
Series will be aired over WRUF
and WR U F- F M today starting
again at 11 ;45 a.m.
whose cheers shook massive Yan Yankee
kee Yankee Stadium.
And the supposedly anemic
bats of the battling Dodgers ham hammered
mered hammered out nine hits including that
payoff blow by Roseboro -to send
Whitey Ford down to defeat. Ford
gave up eight hits and five
runs in five innings to suffer a
record sixth series loss.
There were a hatful of heroes
for the underdog Dodgers as they
jumped into the lead by capturing
the classic's opening contest.
Cheers resounded for Bill
(Moose) Skowron a Yankee him himself
self himself at this time last year before
he was traded away -as he drove
in the first run and, in addition

Colgate 5 over Boston U.; Yale
5 over Brown; Dartmouth 7 over
Penn; Harvard 11 over Rutgers;
Syracuse 21 over Holy cross.
South: clemson 1 over North
Carolina St.; Georgia 1 over South
Carolina; Tennessee 3 over
Mississippi State; Virgina Tech 7
over Virgina; Oregon 7 over West
Virginia; Auburn 8 over Kentucky;
North Carolina 13 over Wake
Forest; Miami Fla. 16 over Tulane;
FLORIDA 26 OVER RICHMOND.
Midwest: Notre Dame vs. Pur Purdue,
due, Purdue, even; Xavier vs. Cincinnati,
even; Minnesota 3 over Army;
Colorado 3 over Kansas State;
Ohio State 6 over Indiana; Ohio
Univ. 10 over Kent State; Bos Boston
ton Boston College 12 over Detroit; Ne Nebraska
braska Nebraska 13 over lowa State; Bowl Bowling
ing Bowling Green 17 over Dayton.
Southwest: Air Force 4 over
SMU; Arkansas 4 over Texas
Christian; Texas over Tex Texas
as Texas Tech; Mississippi 19 over
Huston.
Far West; UCLA vs. Stanford,
even;' Oregon State 4 over Baylor;
Washington 6 over Iowa; Kansas
8 over Wyoming; Washington St.
12 over Arizona; Utah State 14
over San Jose St.
In pro games this weekend;
National Football League: Phil Philadelphia
adelphia Philadelphia 1 over Dallas, Minnesota
3 over St. Louis, Cleveland 4
over Pittsburgh, New York 7 over
Washington, Chicago 9 over Bal Baltimore,
timore, Baltimore, Detroit 10 over San Fran Francisco,
cisco, Francisco, Green Bay 20 over Los
Angeles.
American Football League: Bos Boston
ton Boston 3 over New York, Buffalo 4
over Oakland, San Diego 5 over
Denver, Kansas City 6 over
Houston.

to that, the final Dodger tally in
the third.
There were more for National
League batting king Tommy Davis
who had three hits and a
stolen base for the weak hit hitters
ters hitters from Baghdad on the Pacific.
They roared, too, for big Frank
Howard when the massive out outfielder
fielder outfielder started the Dodgers rolling
by crashing a 460-foot double in
that big second inning.
And Roseboro played a major
role with, in addition to his home
run, a total of 18 putouts on
strikeouts and fouls to smash the
record of 14.
BUT THE BIG man was Koufax
even though Tom Tresh walloped
a home run with one on in the
eighth inning to spoil his shutout.
Because Dandy Sandy, as he
fired a final third strike past pinch pinchhitter
hitter pinchhitter Harry Bright with
two out in the ninth, 'with a total
of 15 strikeouts erased the 14-
strikeout record established by
Carl Erskine of Brooklyn just 10
years ago to the day.
And when he set down the first
five hitters in a row as the game
got under way- including Mickey
Mantle and Roger Maris-he
matched a mark established by
Mort Cooper of the Cardinals a
long 20 years ago.
It was a devastating day for
the record books and the total of
25 strikeouts by the two teams
15 by Koufax and 10 among Ford
and the two who succeeded him,
Stan Williams and Steve Hamil Hamilton-breaking
ton-breaking Hamilton-breaking the record of 22
established by the Cardinals and
St. Louis Browns in 1944.

Your College Life Team in Oainesville
J,m Larec Don Wiggins Lou Burns
The Original and
Trlmm BUK Insurance
Company Serving
college Men Only
FOOTBALL FORECAST
W Guest Predictions by:
C.L.I.C.A. Phi Delta Theta
Miami-Tulane Miami Miami
Arkansas-TCU Arkansas TCU
Duke-Maryland Duke Duke
Florida-Richmond Florida Florida
Illinois-Northwestern Northwestern Northwestern
LSU-Georgia Tech Georgia Tech Georgia Tech
Minnesota-Army Army Minnesota
Penn Stafe-Rice Rice Penn State
Purdue-Notre Dame Notre Dame Notre Dame
USC- Michigan State USC USC
LAST WEEK'S RESULTS: Missouri over Arkansas, TCU over FSU, Florida-Miss.State
tied, Auburn over Tennessee, Miss, over Kentucky, Miami over Purdue, Nebraska
over Minnesota, Oklahoma over USC, Wisconsin over Notre Dame,LSU overRice.
CLICA mispicked Arkansas, FSU, Florida, Tennessee and LSU for 5-5; Sigma Chi mis mispicked
picked mispicked Arkansas, FSU,Florida,Purdue and LSU also for 5-5. Score to date: CLICA
14-6, Guests 13-7.

Thursday.Oct.3,l963 The Florida Alligator

Jflb- - 4 />
undergraduate^Hp
underpinning H
to pack right MW,,
natural slacks
If its slacks Its SILVERMANS
Why? Hard to fit?
Like a complete line of colors
and materials?
Silvermans has the most complete
line of slacks in town. (Dacron
and cotton is our specialty at
$9.95. Theres a complete range .^/llfA
of prices too, so you can find the [/ I.
one for your budget.
In fact Silvermans carries
everything for the college man.
225 W. UNIVERSITY
Ask about the student charge.

Page 11



The Florida Alligator Thursday,Oct.3,l963

Page 12

Mural Playoffs
Appear Set

By ALAN CAMPBELL
Sports Writer
A playoff between Sigma Nu
of the Orange League and Lambda
Chi Alpha of the Blue League is
now almost a certainty as both
fraternities agreed to the match
yesterday.
Barring difficulties in securing
the use of the Florida Pool, it
appears the long awaited clash be between
tween between the two water basketball
champions will take place Friday
night.
John Schaeffer, Sigma Nu in intramural
tramural intramural manager, said,
Sentiment has risen to the point
in our house where we want to

. i
\ vtfS GVE
VOTE
V 'V"' ; ; I
i
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1963
ON REVISIONS FOR YOUR STUDENT BODY j
CONSTITUTION
The revisions provide for: y j

1. Student finances improved to give students more representative voice in }
how money is spent.
2. Judicial spells out rights of students under the Honor System and proced- i
ures ofthe new jury system.
!
3. Executive modernizes cabinet duties for greater service to the student ;
body.
4. Summer Session student government reorganization to meet new tri trimester
mester trimester needs. j 1 4 -*-
*
5. Publications greater autonomy and student control over funds.
PLEASE NOTE: Over 80% of votes cast last spring favored these revisions, but :
ratification because the number of students voting did not meet the
prescribed minimum. )
VOTE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, ON CONSTITUTIONAL REVISIONS f
1

play the Lambda Chis and put an
end to all this talk.
I am going to call the Lambda
Chis this evening and ask them
to play us Friday night, Schaeffer
said.
Sigma Nu water basketball
manager Monty Trainer said, We
are sick and tired of the Lambda
Chis telling people were afraid
to play them.
We will welcome the op opportunity
portunity opportunity to show the Lambda Chis
how afraid of them we are, stated
Trainer.
Lambda Chi Alpha president Bob
Anderson said, if the Sigma Nus
call us about playing a game, we
will be more than glad to play
them.

UF Linemen Stand Out

Center Jimmy Morgan and tackle
Dennis Murphy, who will lead
Florida against Richmond
Saturday, are two individual high highmm.
mm. highmm.
M:
Ip
Denis Murphy

lights in an otherwise unsatisfac unsatisfactory
tory unsatisfactory Gator line thus far.
Morgan, a senior from Lake
City, was voted as game captain

1 J m
%| m
Sydney Maclean

for the Richmond game and the
Alabama game the following Satur Saturday
day Saturday in Tuscaloosa.
Murphy, a 262-pound tackle from
Cairo, Ga., is starting to come
into his own and was voted al alternate
ternate alternate captain for the next two
games.
I think the varsity squad made
wise choices in these two boys,
head coach Ray Graves said yes yesterday.

FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION
Representatives of the Food and Drug
Administration, U.S. Department of Health,
Education, and Welfare, will be on campus
Tuesday, OCTOBER 8 to interview men
and women with 30 semester hours or more in
the biological and physical sciences. Positions
in research and product analysis are in Wash Washington,
ington, Washington, D.C., and in 18 District locations
throughout the United States.
Excellent opportunities for personal and pro professional
fessional professional development with an expanding
Federal agency dedicated to protection of the
public health. US. citizenship required.
Contact placement office for further details.
An equal opportunity employer. T
INTERVIEWS

terday. yesterday. Both of them played
well against Mississippi State and
have been the most consistent of
our linemen.
Morgan saw duty with both the
Blue and Sidewinder teams, spell spelling
ing spelling Roger Pettee a great deal
after the Bradenton junior sprained
his ankle on the opening kickoff.
Jimmy did well, offensively,
and his work as a linebacker was
encouraging, Graves said.
Biggest news in the Gator line
situation, although not surprising
to Florida coaches, has been the
rise of Murphy to the top of the
tackle list.
, jr~;
Murphy has shown us a great
deal in these first two games,
Graves said. He appears headed
toward an outstanding season.
Murphy will team With junior
Sydney Mac Lean of Jacksonville
to man the starting tackle slots
against Richmond.

Added help for Richmond could
come from Fred Pearson, a two twoyear
year twoyear letterman who has missed
the first pair of games with a
knee injury.
Theres a chance Pearson will
play some against Richmond and
he should definitely be ready to
take the field against Alabama.