Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
College Conservatism No Longer Creeps: /
, dm
' 4ff>
"Onward!"

The Florida
Alligator

V 01.56, No. 18

Long-Awaited Lights
Approved For Dorm

By JANET CAMPBELL
Os The Gator Staff
Long awaited lights for the Bro Broward
ward Broward Dormitory tennis courts yes yesterday
terday yesterday were unanimously approved
by the UFs Campus Planning and
Development Committee.
A Student Government(SG) issue
since the late 19305, it was re reopened
opened reopened again this year by present
Student Government officials.
The proposal was presented to
the planning committee this year
by SG Pres. Paul Hendrick, Court
Lighting Project chairman
Maurice Plumb and Mike Jackson,
administrative assistant to the
student body president.
17 Bands
To Play
' M
More than a 1,000 bandsmen
from surrounding communities
will perform at the pre-game and
halftime festivities of the Florida-
Richmond game on Saturday as the
UF Athletic Association holds
Band Day, 1963.
Seventeen bands will visit
Florida Field. Visiting majorettes
and flag corps will be featured
with the Gator Band.
Dr. Harold B. Bachman will
take the baton for the performance
of Floridas state song and the
national anthem.
Visiting bands are from Bartow
in Pasco County; Mulberry, Apopka
Paxon senior High in Jacksonville,
Citrus County, lee, Trenton,
P.K. Yonge, Gainesville, DeLand,
Grove land, Chiefland, Santa Fe
High School, Alachua-High Springs
Hawthorne, Crystal River, Ocala,
Oak Ridge and Orlando.

University of Florida,Gainesville Wednesday,'

After approval of the lights,
Maurice Plumb said, We are
really excited about the tennis
court lighting approval. I appreci appreciate
ate appreciate the cooperation of many student
and administration leaders who
have helped us to see this prbgram
through to approval.
Bidding procedures for the light lighting
ing lighting contract are expected to start
this week.
Work on the installation of the
lights will begin as soon as
money has been appropiated for the
purpose and a bid is awarded,
Hendrick said.
The completed job will cost
several thousand dollars, he
added.
Plans call for about nine metal
poles at Broward tennis courts.
The lights will be the most advanc advanced
ed advanced type available, with a time
device to cut off the lights auto automatically
matically automatically at a prescribed time
Thetas Join
VOTE Party
Kappa Alpha Theta sorority has
affiliated with the V.O.T.E. party.
Political representative
Meredith Grey, cited two reasons
for this recent action.
Through our affiliation, we feel
the girls will be prepared to
participate in the spring
elections, Miss Grey said. They
will establish more interest, builo
up enthusiasm and work more
diligently.
She said after careful thought
they chose V.O.T.E. because they
believed it was the best party in
that it offered the most opportunity
through its candidates.
There is presently no other
formally organized political party
on campus.

0ct.2,1963

to be set later, Hendrick said.
The installation of the lights
will give students more hours
to use the tennis courts and will
give them a chance to take advan advantage
tage advantage of the courts in the cooler
hours of the day, the president
said.
If Browards lights prove
effective, plans for lighting the
West University Avenue handball
and tennis courts will start,
Hendrick said.

IN It 1
I jjl
...presents many problems. Shown here is an uniden unidentified
tified unidentified police officer directing traffic at University
Avenue and NW 12th Street. The cause of Monday
night's problems was a break in the gas line which feeds
into the electric plant.

Elections Set
For Thursday

Thursday "is the day of
reckoning for six candidates for
freshman class offices and 46
hopefuls for legislative council
seats.
William c. Wood and Charles
T. Woodham will vie for the frosh
presidency. Daniel Davis and
Clifford Davis run for the vice
presidential slot, and Nancy Cal Calhoun
houn Calhoun and Sharon Morland will vie
for the secretary treasurer post.
Adding spice to the campus-wide
elections will be a special
referendum in which students will
be asked to vote either, yes or
no to the UFs proposed entry
into the controversial National
Student Association (NSA) and a
straw-vote" between President
John F. Kennedy and GOP front frontrunner
runner frontrunner Sen. Barry M. Goldwater.
Candidates for legislative
council seats are:
Hume Hall -- Mike Roach and
Paul Simons.
Tolbert Hall William
Campbell 11, Arthur Joe Wood 111
Jim Melvin and Philiprookstone.
Graham Hall -- Michael
Pleskovich, Douglas Wilkinson,
Pat Linehan and Michael Do rW n.
Murphree Hall -- John Shea,
Karl Beck, Mike Minton and Bill
Mcride.
Broward -- Lee Ann Draud,
Edith Kaufman and Arlene
Kleinberg.
Yulee Linda Richmond.
Rawlings Mary Finley.
Jennings -- Barbara Horn.
Graham (girls section) --Susie
Star ns.
Trimester On Trial

Massive Trimester
Study Continues

By PEGGY BLANCHARD
Os The Gator Staff
One years trial of the trimester
system is not enough to judge it
either good or bad, according to
UF officials.
The entire state university
system is now undergoing a
massive study of the trimester
plan to determine its effectiveness
according to George W. Corrick,

Off-Campus Students George
Koontz, Tom Still, Henry Rgattama
Louise Weadock, James Cooner,
James Hauser, Steve Shewbrooks,
Jean Salisbury, Douglas Rhoads,
Judy Smith, Patty Connors,
Carolyn Watt, Donald Jones, Frank
Faircloth, Charles Goodyear and
Judith Lee Hill.
Schucht Village (Married
students) -- Kenneth Joyce.
Flavet I (married students)
Lionel Robinson Jr.
Flavet II (married students) --
Jay Haviser and William Slippy
Jr.
Flavet 111 (married students)
Pete Liston.
Corry Villages (married
students) -- Floyd Price, Robert
Sifrit and Edwin Stuart.
IFC Chooses
Wolf As Veep
John Wolf of Kappa Sigma social
fraternity is the new
administrative vice president of
the interfraternity Council (IFC).
Wolf, whose term ends in April
when he graduates, was elected
Monday by the IFC Presidents
Council.
He has been house manager,
social chairman and vice president
of his fraternity, in addition, until
Monday he was rush chairman of
the IFC.

UF-' presidential administrative
assistant.
Ignoring all the various aspects
of the trimester and the effects
it has had would also be unfair,
Corrick said.
Behind the establishment of the
trimester was the growing concern
of the state legislature for the
rapidly Increasing student popu population.
lation. population. The program was designed
to move students through quicker
and to eliminate to some extent
the amount of new buildings needed,
he said.
Counteracting the plan is the
tendency for students to take
slightly lighter loads, Corrick
said. Corrick cited a student who,
on the semester system might
be taking 18 hours each term and
finishing with a total of 36 hours
in one school year. Now the student
might be taking 13 hours each
trimester and earning 39 hours
in three terms in one year.
Corrick also said university
College counsellors are advising
students with average or lower
than average grades to take lighter
loads.
Fewer disciplinary problems
and fewer admissions to the
infirmary also were listed as
possible results of the trimester.
Corrick cautioned, however,
against the possibility of taking
any one of the facts found in last
year's experiences and saying it
will be true of the entfre system
all the time.
Lerer Services
Memorial sefvlces for Roger
Lerer, 21, UF student who died
Saturday night of undetermined
causes, will be conducted tonight
at 7:15 at the Sigma Chi fraternity
house.



Page 2

The Florida Alligator Wednesday.Oct.2,l963

Among Souths Universities

UF In 'Top Ten 1

The UF would definitely be
included in a list of the top 10 or
12 colleges and universities in the
southeast, according to George
Corrick, administrative assistant
to the UF President.
Corrick said, however, there is
no nationally accepted yardstick
for measuring academic work at
the various schools in the country.
The UF would not be in a list
of the top 10 schools in the country,
he said, but the UF would be
in a list of the big league state
colleges and universities
nationally.
The UF is the largest university
in the southeast, with more
academic variety than most
universities, Corrick said.
The UF has more breadth and
scope than many other schools,
he added.
For example, he said, the UF
Health Center is an organizational
umbrella over the health related
services. It encompasses all the
medical services under one roof,
he said.
The UF is one of the pioneers

University Inn
always featuring
CREAM CHEESE
LOX and BAGELS
TONGUE CORNED BEEF
SALAMI
AND OTHER KOSHER DELICACIES
U.S. Route 441, South Phone FR 2-6333
Gainesville, Florida

VOTE FOR
/ JUDY HILL
OCTOBER 3
(OR LIGISIATIVE COUNCIL
- JJ.

V INDEPENDENT CANDIDATE
>/ NOT PLEDGED OR COMMITTED TO ANY GROUP OR ORGANIZATION
WILL WORK TO SUPPORT LEGISLATION BENEFITING ALL STUDENTS
>/ WILL WORK TO SUPPORT LOW COST STUDENT HOUSING
V WILL NOT SUPPORT RENTAL RATE RAISES ON EXISTING CAMPUS HOUSING
vpaid political advertisement)

in general education, Corrick said,
with great strength in its nuclear
chemistry, journalism and in the
graduate programs. The Latin
American program here is the
largest in the country, Corrick
said.
Union Opens
Chairmanship
The Florida Union Board for
Student Activities has announced
the opening of the chairmanship
for the Special Projects
Committee.
The committee has no limited
area of operation and is free to
work on developing new projects
which fall outside the areas of
other committees.
Interested students may apply
in room 315 of the Florida Union
before Thursday at 3 p.m.

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RECIEVING THE FRANCES MILLIKAN REITZ AWARD
.. .is Peter DeWitt, 4AS, for the outstanding student musician at the UF during
1962-63. Looking on is Mrs. J. Wayne Reitz, wife of the President, and Dr. Reid
Poole, head of the Music Department.
. T s
Book Reviews

Mailers New Novel Unlike
'The Naked And The Dead

BARBARY SHORE
By Norman Mailer. Introduction
by Norman Podhoretz. 312 pages.
Grosset & Dunlaps Universal
Library. $1.65.
Barbary Shore is Norman
Mailers second novel radically
different in tone, outlook, and style
from The Naked and the Dead.
It was written out of the political
chaos and despair of America in
the 50s and, in such an unfavorable

climate, its publication was
received with bafflement and out outright
right outright hostility by most of the
established critics.
The current Universal Library
edition, with an extensive intro introduction
duction introduction by Norman Podhoretz, a
leading younger critic, was issued
in that belief that the time has
come for a revaluation of this
important work.
In the introduction, Mr.
Podhoretz, editor -in chief
of Commentary magazine and a
frequent contributor to Show
and Esquire, discusses
Barbary Shore and its place
in the body of Mailers writing.
Characterizing the novel as one
of cold, tense, claustrophobic
brilliance. . such as might have
been written by one of those
brooding distracted students who
haunt the pages of Russian liter literature,
ature, literature, Mr. Podhoretz shows how
out of the complex relationships
of six people in a Brooklyn rooming
house two women, three men,
and a child--Mailer has extracted
the dilemma of our society and our
time.
*. *******
GHOSTLY TALES OF HENRY
JAMES. By Henry James. Edited
and with a New Introduction by
Leon Edel. 450 pages. $2.25
Grosset & Dunlaps Universal
Library. Publication date: October
12.
Leon Edel, winner of the 1963
Pulitizer Prize and the National
Book Award for his multi-volume
biography of Henry James, has
selected, for this edition all the
appartional ghost stories ever
written by James.
The Turn of the Screw is
the most famous of these tales,
but the others are equally well
regarded, though perhaps not as
well known to the general reader.
Each of the ten stories exhibits
James fundamental theory of the
ghostly tale; namely, that
traditional ghosts those
spectres that walk at midnight
emitting howling noises and
clanking their chains are. on
the whole pretty dull, with an
extremely limited repertoire of
horror and suggested evil.
The ghostly tales of Henry

James achieve their mystification
in an entirely different way: by
introducing the uncanny in per perfectly
fectly perfectly commonplace, everyday
settings.
Henry James was only twenty twentyfive,
five, twentyfive, and living in Boston, when
his first ghostly tale. The
Romance of Certain Old Clothes.
was published in the Atlantic
Monthly.
As more of Henry James work
became known, and he moved to
Paris and London, he continued to
be intrigued by the ghostly tale.
What made them so frighteningly
real was, in part, his choice of
locale.
Although not specifically named,
for example, The Ghostly
Rental reflects the authors
student days at Harvard where he
had briefly attended law school.
As Mr. Edel shows, in the
individual prefaces accompanying
each of the stories, the characters
and events are not completely
fictional.
Mr. Edel has placed the stories
in the chronological order in which
they were written. In doing so he
has given the reader an opportunity
to experience the changes and
development of James as an
author. Mr. Edels prefatory notes
also provide the biographical
background of these years, giving
the reader great insight into the
authors personal development.
**********
THE SLEEPWALKERS. By
Arthur Koestler. 624 pages. $2.65
Grosset & Dunlaps Universal
Library. Publication date: August
16.
In the Sleepwalkers, Arthur
Koestler has written a compre comprehensive
hensive comprehensive history of the great
astronomers--. Pythagoras,
Ptolemy, Copernicus, Galileo,
Kepler, and Newton and of the
discoveries which changed man s
vision of the universe.
Jennings Social
Graduate men and seniors are
invited to a coffee social a
Jennings Hall, Thursday, 8 -1
p.m.
There will be refreshment,
dancing and music.



Movie Review

'L-Shaped Room Interplay
Os Love, Beauty, Humanity

By DON FEDERMAN
Movie Reviewer
The L-Shaped Room is a
most delicate love story. So human,
it is real. So poignant, that it
reminds us of the beauty that it
is a part of such suffering. So
honest, that it can be only love.
The L-Shaped Room is also
about a cross-section of humanity.
It concerns strange, desperate
persons who long for grace, and
yet, are grace itself, for none
is so hardened that they cannot
give a part of themselves to
alleviate anothers despairthat
they can love despite themselves.
The L-Shaped Room is an
interplay of these two stories such
that each illuminates the other.
The story is beautifully simple.
A young French girl named Jane
is two and a half months pregnant
by a man she never really cared
for. She finds an apartment in
which to isolate herself, uncertain
as to having an abortion performed.
What she finds in this tenament
house is a most interesting assort assortment
ment assortment of characters. There is a
Negro jazz musician, a lesbian,
vaudeville actress who lives in her
nostalgic past, a typically
conniving landlady, two prostitutes
and a young writer named Tobie.
Tobie is taken by Janes beauty,
and at first is quite forward in
his speech in an effort to impress
her. She, because of her previous
affair and family background, is
quite reticent.
After the first few self selfconscious
conscious selfconscious scenes, the two come
to know and need each other more
and more. Their growing love is
set against a background of broken
and inane relationships plus the

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attitudes toward love of the
tenament dwellers. Thus, there
develops a stark contrast such
that Jane and Tobies love is set
apart from their world which is
in part a denial of love.
But Tobie does not knowof Janes
pregnancy. It is just after their
love has led to a consummate
experience that Tobie learns from
the Negro that Jane is pregnant.
Tobie cannot accept the fact
that the baby is not his, and their
love begins to drift apart. Jane,
previously repulsed by the idea
of abortion, now accepts some
pills from her vaudeville friend.
But they do not work.
She is heartbroken, and Tobie,
touched by her plight, renews the
relationship. But the Christmas
season finds the drift further
intensified. Jane is so upset
that a premature birth of her
baby is brought on.
Tobie visits her in the hospital
and it takes but a glance of the
eye to bring back their longing
for each other. She, nevertheless
tells him she is going back to
France to face up to the hell of
her parents. As a last gift, he
gives her his latest and best
piece of writing which deals with
their relationship.
Once again, she returns to her
room to pick up the last of her
belongings. She pauses before
Tobies door, and then enters. In
a most touching scene, she
returns the short story with a
note which implies that parting
does not necessitate a finality to
love. It is on this note of
perhapsness that the movie ends,
or should I say stops in motion.

Leslie Caron and Tom Bell are
magnificent as the lovers. They
are so bound up in their roles
that one forgets this is acting.
No less worthy are the
performances of Bernard Lee,
Cicely Courtneidge, and Patricia
Phoenix as the tennants.
There is a timelessness to The
L-Shaped Room, as timeless as
Jane and Tobies love. One thinks
of other times and places, of
situations which are all so vividly
brought back by this movie.
Perhaps, the greatness of this
movie is that it brings to light
the hearts greatest joy. . and
pain.

'"vote
\ .
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1963
ON REVISIONS FOR YOUR STUDENT BODY
CONSTITUTION
The revisions provide for:
1. Student finances improved to give students more representative voice in
how money is spent.
2. Judicial spells out rights of students under the Honor System and proced procedures
ures procedures of the new jury system.
3. Executive modernizes cabinet duties for greater service to the student
body.
4. Summer Session student government reorganization to meet new tri trimester
mester trimester needs.
5. Publications greater autonomy and student control over funds.
PLEASE NOTE: Over 80% of votes cast last spring favored these revisions, but
ratification failed because the number of students voting did not meet the
prescribed minimum.
VOTE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, ON CONSTITUTIONAL REVISIONS
|
I

Wednesday, 0ct.2,1963 The Florida Alligator

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STARTS THURSDAY AT STATE

Page 3



The Florida Alligator Wednesday,Oct.2,l963

Page 4

editorials

In Appreciation Os Greatness
What makes a great teacher?
people have been searching for an answer to that one for a long
time, with the idea that perhaps a formula might be evolved for
producing such teachers on a mass basis. No one has yet succeeded,
and it is not likely anyone ever will. Because there is no rigid com combination
bination combination of factors that will bring forth certified great teachers.
All we can do is note the qualities great teachers display.
They have, in the first place, a great and abiding interest in things
not only their subject, but many other facets of life. They are
enthusiastic about nearly everything, and that enthusiasm spreads
among their students contagiously until all are equally infected.
Secondly, they are learned -- not just in their particular area,
but in all fields of knowledge. And they can relate that learning, so
that a student is likely to find that mathematics, poetry, and football
all have things in common, and each becomes more easily understood
because their connection is made suddenly clear.
Thirdly, they maintain warm, personal relationships with students.
Every person in a class is treated individually, with attention to his
Individual problems if such attention is sought, sometimes even when
it is not. Almost any student will verify that he performs better when
trying to attain a level of perfection set for him by a professor he
respects. And that brings us to the fourth quality.
The great teacher demands more than average interest and effort
from his students. He does not set goals they cannot reach, but he
keeps the goals always high enough so some hard stretching, perhaps
even a little leaping, is necessary. He does not teach down to the
common denominator; he brings the mediocre up to his level of the
best students.
Fifth, perhaps an indispensable quality, is personal magnetism. It
does not alone guarantee greatness there are far too many
teachers who are living proof of that -- but it is necessary. Mag Magnetism
netism Magnetism does not depend upon striking physical characteristics, nor
a fine speaking voice, nor the making of clever phrases. It is, rather,
we think, a sort of unconscious projection of the personality, coupled
with complete honesty.
And so we have described, at least partially, the great teacher. He
is rare, as rare and valuable as a perfect diamond. He awakens
slumbering minds, excites dull imaginations, challenges and stimulates
bored intellects. He is an intellectual oasis in a desert of mediocre
instruction, reviving the parched student and sending him on refreshed
to the next oasis, many miles distant.
This editorial has only one purpose: to thank those few great
teachers who are advancing undaunted through an increasing emphasis
on the advantages of averageness; to encourage those who may be
feeling unrecognized and useless because of it.
Above all others, they are indispensable.

APODOSIS

The Great (Shush!) Issue

By RICK SCHUSTER
I have recently heard the first
minor rumblings of a great issue
soon to quake across the campus.
It will be debated in section lounges
throughout the dorms. It will be
the subject of intense discussion
in quiet corners during wild frat
parties. It will replace Haiku at
Zen meetings, and at many an
off-campus garrett, its discussion
will transplant strip bingo as a
means of diversion.
Among many, it is currently
the Great Unspoken. It is a
glimmer in the eye of many a
coed, a peculiar beat of the heart
among many education majors.
Some know and already speak of it.
Others know, yet fear to discuss
it publicly, knowing how a word
heard by another could light the
fuse which would unleash the issue
into open argument. But it is too
late for hope of repression. This
bubble must burst and we all
must face it sometime, so the time

The Florida Alligator
Editor-in-Chief David Lawrence, Jr.
Managing Editor Bob Wilson
Sports Editor :. Walker Lundy
Editorial Page Editor John Askins
Layout Editof .....1 Ron Spencer
City Editor Cynthia Tunstall
Copy Editor Bill Fuller
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during the
months of May, June, and July, when a weekly issue is published. THE
FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is entered as second class matter at the United
States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida.

might as well be now.
I come to you not to resolve
the issue,. nor even offer my
opinions on it. I am merely the
precursor to what will be The
Great Debate. Perhaps there will
be someone, someday who will
reveal for each of us our own
answer; I merely seek to define
the pertinent terms and issues of
this question.
The issue is, Are the students
at the University of Florida
intellectually stagnant?! Please
you may gasp, but do not recoil
with revulsion. Yes, you feel better
already, for you can no longer
hide from this burning issue, and
you are free to face it.
A very first attempt at mental
ping-pong with the issue brings to
light the need to decide precisely
what one is talking about. Who are
included in the category of
students; what is meant by
intellectually stagnant?
In order to help you with de defining
fining defining terms, I consulted Mr.

Certain Inalienable Right
"Yes sir! What'll it be, Mister Liston?"

LETTER FROM LEESBURG

Citizen Os The Cosmos

By EMMET PETER JR.
Students and faculty members of
the University of Florida probably
have a nodding acquaintence with
James Branch Cabell, whether they
realize it or not. Cabells bust
(often mistaken for that of
Socrates) has been a fixture in
the main library for a number of
years.
The Richmond novelist, who died
in 1958 at the age of 79, had
close ties with the University of
Florida, and his next to last book
the 51st of his 52 was

Webster of the G. and c. Merriam
Co. He presents two definitions
of students. One student is
a learner and scholar, while the
other is one who studies. Thus,
you can limit the group of students
in one of three ways: (1) Students
are only those who are learners;
(2) Students are only those who
study; (3) Students are learners
who study. The distinction must
be made before discussion can
begin, because of the implicit
differences in the three types.
After all, all learners do not study,
and all studiers are not necessarily
learners. At this point, you are
half way to final decision as to
who is a student. The scope
of the term must still be
considered. Is only what is
colloquially known as the _full
time student to be included? what
about part time students, such as
some employes are? And how
about the 37-year-old instructor
seeking his Ph. D.--is it fair to
classify him as a student?
Having rsolved the Student
problem, you can now define the
term intellectually stagnant.on
the word stagnant, Mr. Webster
gives us three possible usages for
our purposes. It can mean foul,
not active, or dull. Any choice
or its synonyms may be used to
replace stagnant, but, again,
choose only one, because each
meaning is inherently different.
Go to, go to, in dorm lounges,
at frat parties, in off campus
garrets. Join now what is soon to
sweep the campus next great
issue. Why is an elephant? is
dead.

-r-r--
brought out in 1952 by the
University Press with the title
Quiet, Please! He came to
Gainesville from his winter home
in St. Augustine to use the library,
and today Special Collections is in
possession of a pungent collection
of some 50 Cabell letters to Mar Marjorie
jorie Marjorie K inn an Rawlings. (He
addressed her as My dear
Hellion. ..
What makes all this timely is
a definite move on the part of
several knowledgeable critics to
upgrade Cabells position in
American letters. Among these is
Joe Lee Davis, professor of
American literature at the Uni University
versity University of Michigan, and a friend
of Dr. Lewis Haines of the u
of F Press. Davis is the author
of James Branch Cabell,
published as part of the American
author series by Twayne Press.
The Cabell cult of the 1920 s
now has all but vanished. He
is known today, by and large, as
the author of a naughty book
called Jurgen or perhaps
as a chap who wrote escapist
fiction, a sort of square Thorne
Smith. Dr. Davis suggests a second
look. He argues convincingly that
Cabell, more than any other writer
of his epoch, achieved timeless
ness and universality in his fiction.
Davis is careful to define his
yardstick of greatness; a sweeping
cosmic vision plus the artistic
ability to project and communicate
it. At one point he compares
Cabells vision with that of the
Poet. Wallace Stevens. Each was
a citizen of the cosmos who
incidentally occupied the body of
a Virginia gentleman and a New
England Yankee, respectively.
Cabells art is that of the
allegorist and the comic prose prosepoet.
poet. prosepoet. Each of his books is written
from a single human point of
view. He played with what he
considered the three main
approaches to human living; the
poetic (reflective); the chivalric
(vicarshipasGods representative)
and the gallant (devil-may-care).
In a very important sense, Cabells
works as a whole could be regarded
as an allegory. Between 1927 and
1930 he revised and bought out his
novels and stories in a uniform
Storisende edition of eighteen vol volumes,
umes, volumes, it is a Biography of the
Life of Manuel, the ignorant
swineherd of Figures of Earth
who became revered as a demigid
because his people insisted on
believing pleasant lies rather than

ugly turths. Cabells biography
continues as a sort of geneology
of Manuels progeny into the
twentieth century. Thus it
becomes a sort of never-ending
river of human living in which
Cabell makes shrewd observations
in the framework of a rich comic
prose.
Although Davis book is
primarily a critical analysis, it
does contain a brief and
informative biography that links
events in Cabells life to his
emergence as a philosophic rebel.
Cabell died with the unhappy
knowledge that he had lost most
of his following. Thanks to the
mature evaluation of Dr. Davis,
and of other like-minded scholars
Cabell may yet endure, at least
among the reflective few. Common
decency and simple justice, Davis
says, demand the ranking of Cabell
among the major rather than the
minor authors of the twentieth
century and in a world
perspective rather than merely
an American or Anglo-American
one.
This is one indication, among
others, that the University of
Florida may one day (and perhaps
soon, as literary merit is
reckoned) have reason to be proud
of its ties of the 1940 s and early
1950 s with Cabell. Then, perhaps,
the bust in the library will achieve
fame of its own, aside from its
resemblance to Socrates.

I Starving
| Russians
| EXPERTS on the Soviet
I Union are puzzled by its
ideal with Canada to buy 239
\ million bushels of wheat or
[flour equivalent for a
i whopping SSOO million.
\ The grain will be
[delivered to Russia and its
; satellites, including Com Com\
\ Com\ munist Cuba, over the next
[ten months the largest
[transaction of its kind in
[history. We sent more
l surplus wheat to India, but
[over a three-year period.
I Canada's windfall seems
jj to signal a wheat shortage
lin Russia of disaster pro proportions.
portions. proportions. The need foi
bread could further ease
the emphasis on arms.
1... Miami Herald



I Best From Other Papers
| PHYSICAL fitness is considered almost as important as
| ideological soundness in Communist china.
I in every corner of the country there are basketball courts,
| soccer fields, table tennis sets and swimming pools. There are
§ few sports which are not played somewhere in china.
Newspapers regularly stress the need for all citizens to
| exercise regularly. The papers carry reports of millions of
| people taking part in every sort of sparetime sports activity,
| from tennis to parachute jumping.
I The Government has spent huge sums of money on providing
| more stadiums and other sports facilities, regarding the peoples
| physical fitness as an important aspect of Chinas regeneration
| not to mention its national defense needs.
| PERHAPS the most popular of all sports now is table tennis.
I The superbly agile young players who have dominated the last
| three world championships are national heroes here.
I Basketball ranks with volleyball as the second most popular;
I sport. But, as in many other countries, soccer attracts the;
Ibigger crowds and Chinese fans will brave any extremes ofj
I weather to watch a good game.
While these four ball games are still the most popular sports,!
| swimming, especially on an unorganized basis, is rapidly!
| creeping up on them. In Peking and other large cities, thousands
| of children and adults crowd large modern pools each hot
1 summer day.
| The patronage, example and authority of Communist Party i
|Chairman Mao Tzetung have done much to give swimming its;
| present popularity.
| The 70-year-old chairman has been a keen all-weather
| swimmer since his youth and is reported to have swum the
| wide and fast-flowing Yangtze River several times during his
1 60 s. Now, reports say, doctors forbid him to try it again.
I
£
SPORTS activities were temporarily curtailed during the
patter haliof 1960 and the early part of 1961, when food shortages
|brought official instructions to people not to do anything strenuous
|but to conserve their energies for production and study.
As soon as things began to get better again, however, late
| in 1961, the instructions changed. And, with the really startling
limprovement this year, a new set of mass calisthenics
|has been introduced.
| Under this program, millions of office and factory workers i
|of both sexes perform a prescribed set of exercises. They
| are done in unison, either to broadcast or specially recorded
| music, twice a day for 10 minutes during working hours, j
|. . Adam Kellett-Long of Reuters in the Philadelphia Inquirer;
I i
?** *
8 '
I 2
| INDONESIA, rapidly gaining a reputation as the bully of!
jj the Indian Ocean, is rocked by violence. Huge mobs, allegedly l
enraged by the birth of Malaysia as a new nation, sacked the i
| British embassy and seized British-owned plants throughout j
I the islands.
ji Mobs such as these dont just form by spontaneous combustion.
$ There are too many indications that the government is only j
I half-hearted in trying to control them.
The nations that resolute so passionately against colonialism ;
jiof the old-fashioned kind, which has almost vanished, are now
with the neo-colonialism of Indonesia.
Sukarno is playing a reckless game. He has already lost the ;
j; respect of nations that have befriended him and if he persists
[on the present course invites the risk of losing much more.
jj. . Miami Herald ~ I. j

We Tried...
to achieve equal rights for all students at the College
Inn through negotiations.
PAUL HENDRICK,
president of the student body, tried to
work out a satisfactory solution to the
on-campus integration off campus
segregation problem with the owners
of the Cl.
THE UNIVERSITY'S NEGRO STUDENTS ARE STILL
REFUSED SERVICE AT THE COLLEGE INN!
'-'u
We regret that we must resume picketing at the
College Inn.
The Student Group for Equal Rights
(paid advertisement)
__ A.

LETTERS letters LETTERS

Protest
EDITOR:
I would like to vigorously protest
the actions and attitudes of two
groups of individuals of our uni university
versity university community.
First, I would like to protest
the behavior of members of the
Phi Kappa Tau fraternity at the
Mississippi State football game.
My wife and I entered the stadium
and upon arriving at our designated
seats, found that they were
occupied. The couple sitting in
them refused to leave, refused to
show us their tickets, and were
reluctant to show us the numbers
of the seats they were sitting in.
T'ley also informed us that this was
a reserved fraternity block. This
was a lie. It appears that members
of Phi Tau were assigned seats
away from their fraternity block.
Those that were evidently decided
to move into the area adjacent the
block regardless of those whom
were rightfully entitled to the
seats.
My wife was forced to stand
while I went to seek help in the
form of a stadium employee or
campus policeman. I was unable
to obtain help from either of these
groups. They appeared reluctant
to offer to do anything about the
situation.
The attitude of the renegade Phi
Taus was exemplified by one
remark to the couple who legally
came to claim their seats. His
challenge was, Youll have to
get a campus cop to make me
move.
Other couples had the same
difficulty in getting their rightful
seats. Many couples left rather
than enter into a fracas with mem members
bers members of this fraternity. Finally
yielding to numerous requests for
help, a campus policeman did come
down and attempt to straighten out
the mess.
I have several suggestions to
make concerning this situation. I
do not feel that my wife and I
should have to fight to sit in the
seats which were assigned to us by
the athletic association. In fact,
one member dared me not to try
it.
I would like to suggest that the
Phi Taus sit in the seats which
are assigned to them but I feel
WHATS
NEW
IN THE OCTOBER
ATLANTIC?
"Speed and Women: While conva convalescing
lescing convalescing from his accident, Stirling
Moss, legendary racing driver, spent
many hours with Ken W. Purdy. In this
exciting Atlantic Extra, the two talk
about some of the fears, problems and
temptations that beset a racer.
ALSO
Vance Packard: Mr. Packard foresees
a dramatic improvement in TV fare due
to new cable TV, pay TV, tape TV to
buy or rent, and other new techniques.
"Britain's Policy if Labour Wins:
Labor Party leader Harold Wilson tells
what Britain's new foreign policy would
be under a Labor Prime Minister.
Poetry: by Robert Graves. Theodore
Roethke, Stanley Kunitz.
"Saying What One Means: Freya
Stark tells why accuracy of
language is the basis for
any writing style.
Month in and month
out The Atlantic's /s'
editors seek out ex exciting
citing exciting expressions of
new and provocative
ideas. And whether
these expressions '''
take the form of |||^|Hpi|
prose or poetry, tact
or fiction, they al
ways attain a re
markably high level
of academic value |||MB|i|ir
and literary interest. Wmmyr ON
Make room in your SALE
life for The Atlantic. Wir NOW
Get a copy today. \y

Wednesday 0ct.2,1963 The Florida Alligator

from the incidents of last Saturday
that they are not very likely to
take my advice or any one elses.
In view of this I would like to
recommend that stadium
employees do their job or be
replaced by those who will.
Furthermore, if the campus police
are not going to aid in maintaining
order in the stadium then I suggest
that they not wear their uniforms
and that they pay to watch the
games like everyone else.
Julian Webb
55 Days
EDITOR:
It was a long time ago that I
read a story about a city being
seized and burned simultaneously
by eight nations together.
That event was the major feature
of the Boxer catastrophe which,
without the foresight of a few
persons and the unwillingness of
a power to take advantage of the
incident, would have caused China
to be divided like a melon.
The scene was a chaotic and
disastrous one for the Chinese.
At the same time, it was con considered
sidered considered a miracle that some 500
defenders for the Legations could
withstand the attack of thousands
of troops of Boxers for 55 days,
in the North Capitol where the
Empress Dowager lived. What
really happened was that one of
the commanders of the attacking
troops, Wing Lok, kept his
soldiery playing with the defenders
as cats do with mice. Heavy but
aimless firing told the Palace how
fiercely the siege was going on,
while its half-hearted character
gave the defenders the chance to
live through it; for they knew very
well that the distruction of the
Legations would cost the Dynasty.
I am looking forward to seeing
the recurrence of the riot on the
screen. it would be an
incomparable experience.
Charlton Heston and David Niven
used to be my favorite actors.


YES...
IT MATTERS!!
;.._.
liiSf
HlpLy.
YOU
SHOULD VOTE ON
CONSTITUTIONAL REVISIONS
VOTE THURSDAY, OCT. 3
(appearing as first item at the top of your machine)
%. ...

That they were the heroes was
beyond doubt. But whose part would
Ava Gardner play: Empress
Dowager or Madame Goldflower?
The former believed in the
heretical sects and was
responsible for the whole disaster,
while the latter legendarily saved
the area from further calamity.
William choy
Jim
La Brec*
says...
All Premium Payments
Are Refunded as an Extra
Benefit if death occurs within 20
years after you take out The Bene Benefactor,
factor, Benefactor, College Life's famous pol policy,
icy, policy, designed expressly for col college
lege college men and sold exclusively to
college men because college men
are preferred risks. Let me tell
you about all 9 big Benefactor
benefits. No obligation. Just give
me a ring.??
*JIM LA BREC
1105 W. University Ave.
Suite 4
Gainesville, Fla.
372-2357
representing
THE COLLEGE LIFE
INSURANCE COMPANY
OF AMERICA
... the only Company selling
exclusively to College Men

Page 5



The Florida Alligator Wednesday/0ct.2,1963

Page 6

Lost & Found

FEMALE LOST Basset Hound
In vicinity of S.W. 12th and 6th.
Answers to name of Roxanne.
Contact Katherine Als op,
University Ext. 2767 after 5 call
2-2618. (L-18-2t-c).
LOST Pair of prescription
glasses. Address of Dr. Edward
K. Walker on case. Notify John
White, room 1065, Hume Hall.
Reward offered. (L-18-st-c).
'/
LOST Pair of black rim mens
glasses with straight pin in place
of 1 screw. Reward. T. Flaherty,
771 North Hall, 9-69289.
(L-14-st-c).

Employed Women
Offered Cosh
Assistance
Employed women in this area
are offered cash loans on
. signature only. Many women are
taking advantage of this offer
by Marion Finance Co. You can
repay a $109.24 loan by install installments
ments installments of only $ll.OO per month,
of course Marion Finance has
other loan plans up to S6OO with
repayment of only $34.39 per
month. A phone call to
FR 6-5333, or a visit to our
office is all thats required. .
do itnow.
MARION FINANCE CO.
222 W. Univ. Ave. FR 6-5333
Geo. L. Ellis, Mgr.

* 9 1 S4 ~X "w 1 - > '^fcs^^SSfeiM'^PV, *> , >
if | i ft n X' t,v #t, WSK j 'i*iimWi
> \ssv. lft 1 \.\ l> M 1 j jll r '"^;
I tlUm I fin Ms m f 111 /1 i 7 -2 U i >^w
J X M|
gi x m '
LOUIB JO UR DAN-ELSA MARTTNELU /
MARGARET RUTHERFORD MABBIE SMITH Tha 11.1. RS
ROD TAYLOR ORBON WELLES, IIIP ~I,KO/

GATOR CLASSIFIED

/
Autos

1955 CHEVROLET, 6 cylinder,
sMsCk shift. Excellent
transportation. 372-758 9.
(G-18-st-c).
BARGAIN! Due to unforseeable
circumstances (ie bankruptcy)
sharp car being practically given
away S3OO or best offer. Come
see 505 N.E. 3RD ST. (G-18-3t-p).
1962 VW SEDAN, white with red
interior, radio, heater, whitewall
tires, seat belts. S9O below
average list price $1450. Call
2-6018 after 5 p.m. (G-17-ts-c).
CLASSIC. 1961 Corvette Convertible
230 hp 2/4 spd. transmission,
radio, heater, WSW, Beautiful
interior, mechanically sound
- Best offer. Must sell. FR
6-9079. (G-17-st-p).
1959 FORD 6 cylinder, seat belts,
stick shift, in good shape SSOO.
Call 372 7577 after 6 p.m.
(G-14-st-c).

Wanted

WANTED WAITRESS, part time
job, must be attractive, good
wages, no experience necessary.
Apply at Speakeasy, 604 N.W.
13th Street. (C-6-ts-c).
United Rent-All
Party & Banquet Equip
Rollaway Beds Tools
Trucks, Trailers, Tow
Bars.
625 N.W. Bth Ave.
FR 6-2835

Help Wanted

WAITER WANTEDExperienced
if possible, apply in person at
Larrys Wonderhouse, 14 S.W. Ist
Street, downtown. (E-17-ts-c).
COLLEGE FEMALE Students.
Earn from $7.50 to sls an hour.
No investment necessary. Car
needed. Phone 372-4863 for
appointment. (E-16-st-c).
FEMALE NEED A part time job?
you can earn up to SSO per week.
No soliciting, delivering, or
collecting. Car necessary. Call
372 4863 for appointment.
(E -16-st-c).

For Sale

1959 HARLEY DAVIDSON (74)
motorcycle. Small equity and take
up payment. FR 6-8236 between
8:30 and 10 a.m. (A-16-st-c).
WESTERN PLEASURE RIDING
HORSE. A paint, smooth gaited,
8 years old. Privately owned. Call
466-9295, Jerry Katz. If no
answer, call after 11 p.m.
(A-14-st-c).
* 11 " 111 wmm 111
Roy N. Green, Inc.
1118 W. University Ave
CAMERAS SUPPLIES

Services

NESTORS TV, RADIO, HI FI
SERVICE. Tubes checked free.
Free Estimates. Next to Florida
Bookstore parking lot. 1627 NW
Ist Avenue. Phone FR 2-7326.
(M-11-MWF-p).
BAND for hire. The Continentals
5 piece Combo. Will play anywhere,
anytime. Special rates to
Fraternities. Call Harold
Cunningham FR 6-7052 after 3p.m.
(M-18-st-c).
TENNIS INSTRUCTIONS: For
male or female students,beginners
or advanced. Week day afternoons,
Saturdays all day. Lee Norton,
FR 6-9745 after 3p.m.(M-15-st-c).
TUTORING French or Spanish
ALL COURSES. 3 yeai*s
experience Professorship at univ.
of Mexico, to students of all
nationalties. Will arrange times
suitable. FR 6-7402.(M-14-st-c).
FOR A CHANGE OF PACE, Come
Horseback Riding at Lake Wauberg
Riding Stables,Tumbleweed Ranch.
Hay Rides and Night Trail Rides.
Student operated. 1/2 Mi. North of
Lake Wauberg. Reservations
and free transportation. Call
466-9295. (M-8-68t-c).

Patronize
Gator
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York Named
To National
4-H Group
Dr. E. T. York, Jr., UF
agriculture provost, has been
elected to the board of directors
and named a member of the
National 4-H Service Committee,
Inc.
Dr. York is the only member
on the board from a land grant
institution. The membership of
the committee is composed mainly
of leaders in industry.
Named a director along with
York was Anthony G. De Lorenzo,
vice president in charge of public
relations of General Motors.
Membership on the committee
now totals 43, but the number will
eventually be raised to 50. The
committee of civic-minded leaders
of industry, education and agri agriculture
culture agriculture serves in an advisory
capacity.
The National 4-H Service Com Committee
mittee Committee has supported the National
4-H Club program for 42 years,
and launched the National 4-H
Club Congress held in Chicago
since 1922.
State Must
'Watch' Water
Florida must take immediate
steps to insure an abundant water
supply for futureLgenerations, State
Water Resources Director John
W. Wakefield urged Monday night.
Wakefield, speaking to the local
chapter of the American Society
of Engineers (ASCE), said his
department is working to correct
any foreseeable water shortage
situations.-
At the rate were going, he
said, Florida will at some date
in the future catch up with its
abundance of water resources.
According to Wakefield
cooperation by Floridas citizenry
is the essential key to preserving
the states water resources.
Wakefield also pushed for voter
approval of a proposed state con constitutional
stitutional constitutional amendment to authorize
issuance of bonds for outdoor
recreational purposes. The vote
will be Nov. 5.
I HEELS put on in 5* minutes
I SOLES put on in IS minutes I
I MODERN SHOEI
I REPAIR SHOP I
jocross from Ist notionol bonk |



I GATOR SPORTS |
_ FROM THE SIDELINES
Letters Complain
On Mural Coverage
By WALKER LUNDY
Sports Editor
poor intramural coverage by the Florida Alligator and the fate of
the Gator team were top topics in our mailbag this week.
Today well begin with OUR complainers and then, later this week,
when space permits, well air the football teams.
But first things first:
Editor:
This letter is in reference to the very small article in todays
(Sept. 30) Alligator concerning the winners of the fraternity water
basketball titles.
The Alligator stated at the first of this trimester that a new
policy had been started on intramurals and that full and complete
coverage would be given on all events.
..I was very pleased to see that good coverage was given on the
water basketball games leading up to the finals but I was disappointed
in the very brief mention on the results of the finals.
LXA and SN had to fight hard

I to get into and win their respect-
I ive titles. It was discouraging to
1 the players of these two teams to
I see such a small mention of the
1 finals.
[ Also I think that with a little
more care the Alligator could have
| seen that at least the correct score
I was given.
[ LXA and PGD were tied 12-12
I at the end of regulation play.
I LXA went on to win 18-14 in over-
I time.
Misf Hutcheson
I Intramural Manager
I Lambda Chi Alpha
We thank you sincerely for
I correcting our mistake on the
scores. We had planned quite a
story on the water basketball
finals. Someone moved the game gametime
time gametime back one-hour and our dead deadline,
line, deadline, which we had already extended
by 45 minutes to get the results
in the paper, came and went without
the story.
We were forced to fill in the
space with another story at the
last minute and had trouble
squeezing in anything in Mondays
paper with all the football news.
Believe us, we were as hoping
mad about it as you were. But
we think we'll be like good wine
and improve with age.
While were on the subject of
intramurals we want to make a
confession. A story elsewhere in
todays sports pages tells of how
the Alligator tried to instigate
a play-off between Sigma Nu and
Lambda chi Alpha, the two water
basketball champions from the
Blue and Orange Leagues.
Well, folks, its all true,
every last drop.
WEDUNNIT!
We felt a play-off of this type
to determine the university
champion would be a boon to the
intramural program. After reading
Alan Campbells story on the sub subject
ject subject we cant quite understand
why the play-off wont be.
Both sides SAY they are ready
willing to play anytimeunder
any conditions.
Both sides have shown they are
not afraid to put their talent on
the line against the other team.
Surely it would be a great game
between the cream of the crop
of water basketball.
Well then, why not. You ask
it both sides are agreeable? Well,
were asking the same question.
Why not?
And, oh yes, about the instigating
part.we guess we should apologize.
But were not.
The Alligator Spirts Department
w iU continue to instigate pro programs
grams programs around the campus that in
ur opinion are good. Thats why
we instigated the stories on
the date ticket price hike.

ENGINEERS-SC/ENT/STS HEAR
Tiir
IfSlk IriL
__ GFNFRAI
sL. *4, DYNAMICS
% ASTRONAUTICS
STORY
K A before you
\\s/f \ DECIDE ON
w' If
*** VI wl Listen to the voices of three men who have
played key roles in forging Astronautics
\ r l Jk into a complex of technical and management
KRAFFT A. EHRICKE \ Ml r
Director of Advanced studies m skills that has become a national resource.
/ It's a ** on a 33-1/3 r.p.m. recording and
\ / ft's yours for the askings
PI / See your placement office for a copy,
| / or visit our representatives who will be on
1 / campus soon. If you miss us, write to
\ Ms. R. M. Smith, Chief of Professional
j Placement and Personnel, Dept. 130-90,
jmgAi General Dynamics | Astronautics, 5871
Kearny Villa Road, San Diego,
HH
J. BOSSART Hm|
jt Gllilll ID
GENERAL DYNAMICS ASTRONAUTICS
An Equal Opportunity Employer

League __
Nix Intramural Play-offs

By Alan Campbell
Sports Writer
Interfraternity Council (IFC)
resolutions and Orange League
intramural managers overpowered
Alligator instigators and killed
chances of a play off between the
Sigma Nu and Lambda Chi Alpha
water basketball teams.
Taking a straw vote at a meeting
yesterday intramural managers of
the smaller Blue League fra fraternities
ternities fraternities were unanimously in
favor of competition with the
Orange League in all sports.
Conducting a straw vote of their
own at the same meeting Orange
Leagues fraternity managers were
silently opposed to play offs with
the Blue League.
The IFC President's Council
passed a resolution against com competition

Wednesday,Oct.2,l963 The Florida Alligator

petition competition between the two leagues.
Sigma Nu President Jim Davis
said he received a call from the
Lambda Chis yesterday
challenging his fraternity to the
game.
Davis stated, The Sigma Nus
felt they didnt have anything to
gain from the game and were being
pressured into it by the Blue
League fraternity and the
Alligator.
Sigma Nu will be willing to
play the game any time and any
place, but I feel it is defeating
the purpose of the present intra intramural
mural intramural program, said Davis.
Bob Anderson, Lambda Chi
Alpha president, stated, The
Alligator instigated the game which
neither house really wanted to play,
but would because of the personal

pride involved.
The Blue League would have
everything to gain while the orange
League had everything to lose,
said Anderson.
Monty Trainer, Sigma Nu water
basketball team manager, thinks
the game would be a good idea.
Trainer said, Sigma Nu will be
willing to play any time regard regardless
less regardless of the conditions or thelFC.
I think it should be up to the
individual fraternity, whenever the
Blue league thinks they have a
good enough team they ought to let
them play, stated Trainer.
The Lambda Chi Alpha intra intramural
mural intramural manager stated at the
meeting this afternoon that his
fraternity was still interested in
playing the Sigma Nu water basket basketball
ball basketball team.
I

Page 7



Page 8

The Florida Alligator Wednesday/0ct.2,1963

OF Looking
For Cohesive
Starting 11
Still looking for victory No. 1,
Floridas gridders will attempt to
regroup this week and find*a group
of athletes who can jell as a
cohesive starting team.
Immediately at hand is Rich Richmond,
mond, Richmond, and even those who figure
the Gators can breathe a little
easier this Saturday than the past
few shouldnt be caught off guard.
Our fourth quarter per performance
formance performance against Mississippi State
was very poor," head coach Ray
Graves said yesterday. That
kind of showing can get you beat
against anybody."
One bright spot in the 9-9 tie
against Mississippi State was the
running of virus-weakened fullback
Larry Dupree, who picked up 87
big yards in 16 carries.
Duprees weight is down to 185
pounds after the ordeal hes gone
through with the flu," says Graves.

m lP
ALLEN TRAMMELL
Several times Saturday he
became ill after making a long
run, but he stuck it out and looked
great."
Dupree leads the Gators in rush rushing
ing rushing by a wide margin, with 125
yards net on 27 carries. Next
in line is sophomore halfback Allen
Trammell, who has picked up 33
yards.
Trammell, incidentally, spent a
good portion of the time between
the Georgia Tech and Mississippi
State games in the hospital and
was down 16 pounds in weight,
playing at 157 pounds against State.
Floridas third-best rusher thus
far is also a sophomore, Jack
Harper of Lakeland. Harper im impressed
pressed impressed coaches with his efforts
offensively against State and
almost went all the way on the
final play of the game.
Trammell, Harper and
sophomore friends should get a
heavy workout Saturday against
Richmond.
Georgia Team
Edges Past
Gator Rifles
The Florida Rifles, UFs small smallbore
bore smallbore rifle team, was defeated
Saturday by Gordon Military
College of Barnesville, Ga., 1,284
to 1,279.
Tom Gray fired the high
aggregate score of 272 out of a
possible 300 and the high for
standing position of 87 out of a
possible 100 for the UF team.
Gordon Military College was
defeated by Florida last
year--also by only five points.
The next competition for the UF
Rifles will be with the University
of Alabama at Tuscaloosa, Oct. 12.

World Series Starts Today

By OSCAR FRALEY
UPI Sports Writer
NEW YORK Its Whitey
Ford of the Yankees against
Sandy Koufax of the Dodgers in.
the opening game of the World
Series today with the only thing
certain that theyre playing for
baseballs greatest payoff-apossi payoff-apossible
ble payoff-apossible $7-million jackpot.
The clash between the curve curveballing
balling curveballing Ford and the fire-balling
Koufax, completely recovered
from a virus, stacked up as one
of the potential classics between
On Radio
WRUF and WRUF-FM will
carry the World Series over
radio. Todays broadcast begins
at 11:45 a.m. j*
these one-time backyard rivals
who now are a continent apart.
When they go at it this after afternoon
noon afternoon a capacity crowd of more
than 70,000 was expected.
Another capacity crowd was an anticipated
ticipated anticipated for Thursdays clash be between
tween between another pair of left-hand left-handers,

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of seven playoff, with full houses
the order of each day.