Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Goldwater, JFK On UF Ballot

By RON SPENCER
Layout Editor
The names of President John
F. Kennedy and UJS. Sen. Barry
M. Goldwater will be placed on
the ballot for a special straw
vote accompanying the Legislative
Council elections Oct. 3.
The names of Kennedy and Gold Goldwater
water Goldwater -- perhaps Americas two
foremost contemporary national
political figures will be included
on the ballot to stimulate student
interest in the fall elections, bring
to the forefront some of todays
important political issues, and to
stimulate discussion of national
politics on campus, Student Body
Pres. Paul Hendrick said.
The comparative popularity of

The Florida
Alligator

V 01.56, No. 8

Grad Research Plan
Gets $67,400 Grant

A $67,400 boost to the UFs
graduate research program was
announced yesterday following
State Board of Control approval
of a grant from the National
Science Foundation (NSF).
The boost supports research
by Dr. Harry Sisler, head of the
chemistry department, in
expanding the uses of a versatile
chemical substance called
chloramine.
Dr. Sisler developed a method
of making chloramine 10 years ago
in the process of synthesizing
rocket fuels.
Interest in uncovering the
possibilities of the use of
Cabinet OKs
Salary Hikes 1
For Prols
TALLHASSEE (UPI) The
cabinet authorized salary raises
yesterday for 9,669 university pro professors
fessors professors and other employes whose
proposed pay raises didn't draw
fire at last weeks session.
Salary boosts were given by the
universities without first getting
the okay of the cabinet Budget
Commission. More than 150 of the
proposed raises ran into opposi opposition
tion opposition from Budget Director Harry
Smith who said they were too
high.
For instance, the Board of Con Control
trol Control recommended increases total totaling
ing totaling $207,000 for a group of 147
employes. *Sm it h recommended
$114,000 for the same people.
The raises proposed for the
professors ranged from SSOO to
$2,400.
At last weeks cabinet meeting,
the porposed salaries were taken
under advisement for further
study by the budget director and
the State Board of Control.

Kennedy and Goldwater are big
question marks on campus and
JOHN F. KENNEDY
. . On the Left

University of Florida, Gainesville

chloramine in synthesizing new
substances with a variety of uses
including insecticides and drugs
has grown with knowledge born
of the UFs continued research
with the substance. Discoveries
in Dr. Sislers laboratory include
chloramines use in synthesizing
new textile softeners and new
inorganic polymers.
The UFs Department oi
Chemistry reportedly is the prin principal
cipal principal center of research on
chloramine in the world.
The two-year NSF grant will
support research on the reaction
of chloramine for three graduate
students and two post-doctoral
fellows under Dr. Sislers
direction.
Coming to campus to work on

a L J
9
jjffj I It
MODEL OF A MIGHTY MITE
...a chloramine molecule is held by Dr. Harry Sisler in explaining to Stephen
Frazier of Tarpon Springs and Robert McKenney, Deland, graduate students, some
of the research they will be doing in this new field of chemistry.

For Fall Election Here

throughout the state, said Hen Hendrick.
drick. Hendrick.
I hope this straw vote will
stimulate some fruitful discussion
and help to bring a larger vote
turnout for the important fall elec elections.
tions. elections.
Goldwater, the outspoken
Republican senator from Arizona
who has apparently inherited the
late Ohio Senator Robert Tafts
title of Mr. Conservative, is
presently the leading candidate for
the Republican nomination
for president. According to the
latest Gallup Poll Goldwater
commands a lead over New York
Gov. Nelson Rockefeller as the
GOPs choice to carry the Republ Republican
ican Republican banner against New Frontier

Wednesday, Sept. 18,1963

the project are two outstanding
chemists from England: Dr.
Cedrick Stratton, of Birkbeck
College in London, and Dr. lan T.
Gilson of the University of South Southhampton.
hampton. Southhampton.
The NSF funds and those of
W. R. Grace and Co., a leading
American industrial corporation
which has supported Dr. Sislers
work with chloramine since his
original discovery will support
the doctoral training of the
following students working with
the chloramine research: Stephen
Frazier of Tarpon James
Barrick of Newport, Tenn., Milton
Winyall of Baltimore, Robert
MeKenney of Deland, Ronald
Highsmith of Olney, 111. and Joe
Hoffman of Los Alamos, N. Mex.

forces in '64.
Rockefeller currently trails
Goldwater by some 10 per'cent,
ocr
BARRY M. GOLDWATER
... On the Right
followed by Michigan Gov. George
Romney.
An outspoken critic of
Liberalism in general, Goldwater
has condemned such diverse things
as the graduated income tax, the
nuclear test ban, the Kennedy Ad-

Growl Auditions
In Two Weeks

Auditions for Gator Growl will
be held Monday, Sept. 30 at 6:30
D.m. in the University Auditorium.
All students are encouraged to
audition, students with little or
no experience are especially
welcomed.
All types of talent, including
specialty acts, are being sought.
Specialty acts are miscellaneous
acts not classified under usual
catagories of singing, dancing or
drama.
Applications for auditioning may
be filled out in room 308 of the
Florida Union until 5 p.m., Sept.
30, Howard W. Kelley, who is in
charge, said.
Talent will be chosen partly on
the flexibility of the act because
the acts might be changed slightly
to fit the general theme of the
Growl, Kelley said.
The judges will be executive
members of the Growl staff as
well as faculty members.

ministration's handling of the
Cuban crisis, Big Labor, present
farm policies, the Welfare State
and the growth of statism.
Kennedy, now in his third year
of office is the virtually un uncontested
contested uncontested Democratic nominee for
president, and is opposed to the
Arizona Senator on many policies.
A similar poll held on campus
in the fall of 1960, immediately
preceding the 1960 elections, gave
Kennedy a razor-thin victory over
GOP standardbearer Richard M.
Nixon. Nixon according to
Hendrick, paced the voting until
the last minute, when a final aval avalanche
anche avalanche of Kennedy votes from the
girls dormitories handed the
straw vote victory to Kennedy by
a slim 14 votes.
Hendrick said about 30 rr cent
of the student body turned out for
the election.
The Oct. 3 voting will be analyzed
and the results made public to
students.

Announcement of the winners
will be made on the day following
auditions.
Freshman
Caucus Set
On Thursday
A nominating caucus for the
Freshman class elections
is scheduled from 8-10 p.m.
Thursday at the Florida Union.
Candidates who i meet
qualifications must register
Thursday by 5 p.m. in Room 307,
of the Florida Union.
Candidates must be freshmen,
have scored 350 or more on senior
placement exams or the equivalent
and provide a $2 application fee.
Dormitory representatives are
required to attend the nominating
caucus.
Any candidate may obtain a list
of the representatives from the
Student Government offices.
Alpha Kappa Psi
First In Nation
The UF chapter of Alpha Kappa
Psi, professional business admin administration
istration administration fraternity, has won first
place in an efflcienty rating of
student chapters across the
nation, according to Chapter
Advisor Dr. John James.
James, assistant professor of
business administration, said the
group tied for first with 19 other
universities. The local group
competed with 111 other fraternity
chapters.
' *.
Hendrick Unveils
Sitter Program
Student Government President
Paul Hendrick has announced the
establishment of the student baby babysitting
sitting babysitting service.
Interested persons may register
in Room 310 of the Florida Union
from 10 a.m. noon and from
2-5 p.m. daily, he sakL



Page 2

Thfe Florida Alligator Wednesday, SeftfTT,l963

Democrats
Begin Drive
This Week
'The Young Democrats Club will
hold a membership drive this week
according to Pres. Allan McPeak.
Information and applications is'
available in room 208 of the Florida
Union today and Thursday from
3-5 p.m.
Secretary Bob Mounts heads the
current membership drive.
Program Chairman Frank
Harshaw has contacted state
gubernatorial candidates and
invited them to appear at the UF.
A kickoff workshop will be
held in Orlando, Nov. 1- 3. Sen.
Richard Russell, (D-Ga.), will be
the main speaker. He will be
assisted by sub-cabinet level
persons from Washington, D.C.

WELCOME STUDENTS
Bring this ad with you and save 25% on
ALL MERCHANDISE
Student Special: Watches Cleaned for $4.50
Swiss Watches at special low prices
Coppys Jewelry Co.
7 N.E. Ist Street FR 6-0384
(Across from Wilson's Off the Square)

SENIORS GRADUATING
DURING FALL,WINTER,SPRING TRIMESTERS
Seminole PICTURES START MONDAY, SEPT. 23
PLACE
ROOM 200, FLORIDA UNION
e
, 7>
HOURS
MONDAY thru FRIDAY lO am-12 ...
1 pm -5
7 pm-10
SATURDAY lOam-lpm
DRESS
MEN: WHITE SHIRT, TIE & JACKET
WOMEN: BLACK SWEATER
SIGN UP IN RESPECTIVE COLLEGES OR THE SEMINOLE OFFICE
COST $1.50
EDUCATION Sept. 23,24, 10 am 12, Ipm -5, 7pm- 10
ARTS & SCIENCES Sept .25,26, 10 am -12, lpm-5, 7 pm 10;
Sept. 27 10 am 12, 1 pm 2
PHYS. EDUCATION Sept. 27 -2 pm -5, 7pm- 10
AGRICULTURE Sept. 30 -10 am 12, Ipm -5, 7pm- 10
BUS. AD. Oct. 1,2,3 -10 am 12, Ipm -5, 7pm- 10
ENGINEERING Oct. 4,7,8 -10 am 12, Ipm -5, 7pm- 10
JOURNALISM Oct. 9-10 am 12, Ipm -5, 7pm- 10
ARCH. & FINE ARTS Oct. 10 -10 am 12, Ipm -5, 7pm- 10
FORESTRY Oct. 11 10 am 12, 1 pm 3:30
MEDICINE Oct. 11 3:30 pm -5, 7pm 10
HEALTH & RELATED SVC. Oct. 14 10 am 12, 1 pm 2:30
LAW Oct. 14 2:30 pm -5, 7pm- 10
PHARMACY Oct. 16 -10 am 12, Ipm -5, 7pm- 10 I
NURSING Oct. 15 -10 am 12, Ipm -5, 7pm- 10
' ..

GOLF COURSE TO OPEN SOON ...
The Gainesville Golf and Country Club, purchased by the UF Athletic Association,
will be open for student use in October. -

Council Offers Classes
To Help Foreign Students

The Gainesville Council for
International Friendship classes
began this week designed to help
foreign students feel at home in
their new environment, the council
has announced. Classes include
cooking, sewing and English.
Cooking classes begin today and
are held the first and third Monday
of each month at 7:30 p.m. Mrs.
Edwin W. Cake is the instructor.
Sewing classes begin next
Monday and will be held the
second and fourth Monday of each
month at 7:30 p.m. Both classes

are taught at the Gainesville High
School home economics
department.
English classes begin next
Wednesday and will meet every
Wednesday, 9-11 a.m., at the
Episcopal Student Center, 1522 W.
University Ave. Mrs. Bengochea-
Garcia is the instructor.
International wives may attend
classes. For more information,
they may call col. Glenn Farris,
UF Foreign Student Advisor at
376-3261, Ext. 2837.

GRESHAM DRUGS
LIGGETT REXALL AGENCY
Phone 372-2558 12 West University Ave.
FREE DELIVERY ON ALL COSMETICS
CANOE
.. \
\' f i #'
V-Mv.Vv; "*
~ "sTf" fit
f
J^Owwaw
a man s after shave, after bath cologne
made, bottled,sealed in France...*5,*8.50,*14.
PLUS TAX

Queen Contest
Said To Be
'Best Ever'
This year's Homecoming Sweet Sweetheart
heart Sweetheart Contest will be the best
ever, according to co-chairman
Judy Lynn Prince.
The winner will be given prizes
from local merchants including
gift certificates, clothes, jewelry
and cosmetics, Miss Prince said.
About 35 entries have entered
the contest from fraternities,
sororities and other campus
organizations.
The contest will be held at
Silver Springs this Friday and
Saturday to determine the three
princesses who will vie for the
winning spot at Homecoming Oct.
25.
The three princesses who place
at Silver Springs will then make
publicity tours of the larger cities
in Fla. where they will meet
mayors, be on radio and television
give interviews to the newspapers
and attend alumni receptions.
The contest will include three
phases. First contestants will
appear in bathing suits; next, in
sheath dresses and finally in
formals with a question to be
answered by each contestant.
Judges for the contest include
Miss Nancy Harkness,trainer for
the mermaids at Weeki-Wachee
Springs; William Carter, past
director of the Citrus Queen and
Miss Florida contests; Hoke Kerns
director of UF informational ser services;
vices; services; Charley Wells, director of
UF Homecoming, and Mrs. Jack
Wilson, wife of the president of
the Alumni Association.



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Wednesday,Sept. 18,1963 The Florida Alligator

Page 3



The Florida Alligator Wednesday,Sept. 18 / 1963

Page 4

editorials
Echo Os A Bomb
Unless some immediate steps are taken by the federal government
to restore a sense of confidence in the protection of life, liberty and
property ... we shall see in Birmingham and Alabama the worst
racial holocaust the nation has ever seen.
That was Martin Luther King Sunday, telegraphing President Kennedy
from Birmingham, where four Negro children had been killed in the
blast from a bomb thrown into a church, and where incidents touched
off by the bombing caused another two Negro youths to die.
. . the worst racial holocaust the nation has ever seen. Prophetic
words which may soon come to pass. It is not impossible that a very
few fanatics may throw all of America into a second civil war.
This is not an alarmist view, nor is it at all far-fetched. There are
Negro leaders eager for the battlefield, men like Malcolm X, leader
of the Black Muslims. Up to now, they have not had great success in
recruiting, but their numbers are growing steadily, if slowly. How
many more bombings will it take before their ranks are overflowing?
It would not be aone-sided battle. Although the Negro is outnumbered
by odds of about 10-1 in this country, he is also much tougher than
most white Americans. He is in better physical condition, (ironically)
because of the menial work he performs. He has grown up because
he has learned how to fight every minute of his life, or he has not
grown up at all. And, to top it off, he may feel he has nothing to lose,
while most white Americans have very much to lose, and know it.
In the end, the whites would probably win. But at what great cost
in life, in property, in domestic tranquility, that time-honored
phrase. We have not had a great deal of such tranquility for a long
time, but it has been Heaven compared to a civil war environment of
fear and death.
And who are these fanatics, on both sides, but more overt among
the whites, who are inexorably pointing us toward that Armageddon?
The average bomb-thrower is not like us. He sees no tragedy in the
loss of six uncomprehending children. He has no understanding of
the possible future consequences of his actions because his mind is
that of a willful child with one modification; he possesses the savage
vindictiveness of a lifetime of frustration and obscurity, of contempt
and degradation. He knows but few emotions; hate, fear, envy, mistrust.
His awareness of himself extends only to the knowledge that he goes
unrecognized and ignored through life, and that somehow, whatever
the cost to others, he must do something Big.
A bomb is Big. Its noise and destruction are tangible evidences of
his presence that cannot be ignored. There have been 22 bombings
in Birmingham alone in the past eight years. The bombers have never
been caught.
Why? Because white police do not care. Because white governors
defy the law of the land, close schools, condone Bull Connors. These
are the men who encourage the bombers. These are the men whom
decent, misinformed, uncaring citizens have elected to lead them. These
are the men who may decide the fate of a nation.
In 1964, 100 years exactly will have passed since the last shot of the
Civil War .was fired. It was a romantic war and terrible, a war from
which the South has never fully recovered.
If there comes another civil war, it will iftost surely be less romantic
than the last and far, far more terrible. Whether it comes depends on
whether the bombers continue to spread their madness throughout the
land -- which in turn depends upon the actions of elected leaders.
And who controls those actions?**
We do. We must.
Coffee, sea Qr Kool-Aid?
t
The prices of tea and coffee, two staples basic to human life, have
been pushed up in Food Service establishments beyond the range
of our meager incomes.
Tea, which was a nickel, is now ten cents. Coffee, once sold for
eight cents, now goes for a dime.
Oh, weve tried drinking water. We even mixed our own Kool-Aid
for a while. But winter is just around the corner, and nothing takes
the place of a good, hot cup of coffee when its cold outside. Hot
Kool-Aid is out of the question.
What wed like to know: why tea, which costs next to nothing
wholesale, and coffee, which costs next to tea, should suddenly have
become so dear.
And what will happen now to the fine oIdUF tradition of the Eight
Cent Coffee Date?
The Florida Alligator
Editor-in-Chief David Lawrence Jr,
Managing Editor Bob Wilson
Sports Editor. . Walker Lundy
Editorial Page Editor John Askins
Layout Editor Bon Spencer
City Editor. Cynthia Tunstall
Copy Editor. Bill Fuller
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of
the University of Florida and is published five times weekly except
during the months of May, June, and July, when a weekly issue is
published. THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is entered as second class
matter at the United State Post Office at Gainesville, Florida.

The South

LETTERS...

Setting The Record Straight

EDITOR:
Your recent editorial in the
Monday Alligator was a good one,
as have been all the editorials
concerning the $5 charge for date
tickets to the Homecoming football
game.
This most certainly is a situation
that concerns all of us. As a matter
of record, however, I would, as
Executive Secretary of the Alumni
Association, like to set the facts
straight.
Frankly, I am concerned that one
sentence of your editorial may have
led students, alumni or faculty
to think that such a plan had been
proposed by the Alumni
Association, and I wanted to clear
the air on the subject.
First of all, the University of
Florida Alumni Association (the
organized body of alumni) knew
nothing about the plan to increase
the price of date tickets until it
was printed in the Alligator.
No request was made by the
Alumni Association that the
increase be considered or
instigated.
True enough, some individuals
(alumni and non-alumni) may have
voiced an opinion that more seats
were needed and any number of
plans may or may not have been
Offered, by INDIVIDUAL ALUMNI,
but there has never been a request
resolution or suggestion of any
kind made by the Alumni
Association, its Executive Council
or its athletic committee.
On September 28, the Executive
Council of the Association will
meet in Gainesville. Paul Hendrick
as President of the Student Body,
is a voting member of the Council.
At that time, he may report to or
recommend any kind of action he
deems necessary for the Councils
consideration. Paul knows that he
is always welcome to present any
report he feels necessary.
It will not be the first time Paul
or other Student Body Presidents
hkve done so. The sale of the Camp
Wauburg property, for instance,
was brought before the Council
last year, and a resolution was
passed that the property not be
sold to anyone other than the
Student Body if it was at all

WE FORGOT
... to mention that DON
FEDERMAN wrote yesterdays
guest column entitled 59 Steps
Forward.

possible to do so.
The University of Florida
Alumni Association is plagued
many times by misconceptions. In
fairness to the 32,000 alumni
represented by the Association,
I would be remiss in my duty if
I did not write this letter to let
you and the student body know just
how things stand.
As has been pointed out above,
Student Government and the Alumni
Association have worked together
for many years. The cooperation
has been most excellent. It would
be unfair to the students and to
the alumni if this false impression
about the raise in the price in
date tickets was to be interpreted
as an action of the Alumni
Association.
No group of people realizes more
the value of fair treatment to
students than does the Alumni
Association an organization
completely dependent on former
students for its success or

LATIN AMERICA ANALYSIS

After Castro, What?

Critics of the Kennedy
administration, as well as Cuban
exile groups centered in Miami
and elsewhere, seem to have
ignored one basic question; After
Fidel, what?
In other words, what are the
alternatives to Castro?
Ideally, we should like to see
the Castro regime collapse of its
own weight, to be replaced by a
democratic system founded on our
own capitalistic model. This is of
course unlikely to occur as long
as the U. S. S. R. continues to
support Communist Cuba as a
satellite outpost in the Caribbean.
. Even if the U. S. were able to
oust Castro without skirting
dangerously near the brink of
nuclear holocaust, who would then
fill the power vacuum? Obviously
this country would not tolerate the
re-establishment of a Batista-type
dictatorship, but just what would
the provisional government be?
There are many among both
Americans and Cubans who
distrust Jose Miro Cardona, and
there seems little doubt that his
is not the image needed to inspire
confidence in a Cuban public
granted the return of its liberty.
So this possibility must be dis discounted.
counted. discounted.
Should the reins of government
therefore be turned over to the
e*lle groups now in Miami, pending
the holding of free elections
similar to those of the Dominican
Republic? a moments consid consideration
eration consideration leaves only a negative
conclusion.
For does it not seem highly
unlikely that the almost 400

failure.
The Alumni Association is a
chartered non-profit corporation
with one goal in mind Building
a greater University of Florida.
NOT ONE CENT of funds collected
through its loyalty fund each year
goes to Athletics. . the Alumni
Association would not profit
financially from putting alumni
in students seats. Neither will the
Alumni Association profit in any
way by the misconception that it
had anything whatsoever to do with
the Athletic Department raise in
date ticket prices.
If this controversy has not been
resolved by the Sept. 28 meeting
of the Alumni At sociation, I am
sure the matter will be brought
before the Council. I hope it will
not be necessary.
Bill A. Fleming
Executive Secretary
Alumni Association

separate and dissident rebel
groups, unable to coordinate their
goals and activities in this country
should be capable of reaching
accord once presented with the
task of running a nation? Chaos
and corruption would be the likely
result of such a venture.
The crux of our problem vis -a
-vis Fidel, then is the
unavailability of a suitable
replacement, one whom the Cuban
people would follow with
confidence. One name does
present itself, however, a man
virtually unknown among the UJS.
general public, but famous from
Pinar del Rio to Oriente.
He is Hubert Matos, a school schoolteacher
teacher schoolteacher who fought with Castro
from March, 1958, till the
successful conclusion of the
revolution. On October 20, 1959
he was arrested and subsequently
sentenced to 20 years in what
has been called Cuba's equivalent
of the Moscow purge trials.
Matos was charged with
endangering the regime by his
abrupt resignation (the day before
his arrest) as military head in
Camaguey, where, he charged,
Communists were being placed
in numerous positions of authority.
Little is known of Matos
presently in Cuba, beyond rumor.
It is possible that almost four
years of prison has broken
in body or spirit. This may be,
but he is still a.beloved figuie
among Cubans and looms at this
juncture as the one man who could
fill the void left by Castros
disappearance from the Cuban
scene.



A man by the name of Art Buchwald who happens to write
i a syndicated column, decided to interview a representative
j group of college males to determine their national attitude
: concerning the subject of premarital sex, and came up with some
I rather interesting comments. Following are exerpts from his
| column:

liberal attitude

John Henry Obsolete

John Henry was a steel drivin
man. He beat that machine an'
lay down and died. But he was
the last to win.
The last to win. The beautiful
efficiency of the machine has
captured the" mind of the money
hungry. Workers are so much
cattle who tire easily and must
Matthew
J J ...Liberal
endlessly be given fodder. But
if machines complain and screech
about working conditions, they may
be appeased by a drop of purest
oil. John Henry beat that steam
drill, but he broke a rib in his
left han side and his intrels fell
or the groun. A miserably poor
machine is man.
In England, the Enclosure Acts
which concentrated the land into
the hands of a few, released the
small farmers from the land
altogether. These people became
the nurses for the infantile
machines which boosted their
economy into the industrial Re Revolution.
volution. Revolution. But now their machines
are able to run themselves, and
their government has begun to
socialize the industries.
The United States has also
matured from its Industrial
Revolution, industry has grown into
giants; John Henry's nine-pound
hammer looks mighty small beside
the Ford company, in 1960, the
United States problem with
unfavorable gold shipments began.
Eisenhower moved to curb the
outflow. Among his measures was
the order to return 15,000 dollar
- spending servicemens wives and
children to the UjS. The Ford
Company, because business was a
little slow at the time, bought
shares in an English company it
already owned to the amount of
360 million dollrs. This sum was
greater than all the estimated
savings in the first year of
Eisenhower's orders. This shows
the size and power of industry
in relation to the UJS. government;
it leaves John Henry tugging at
their shoelaces.
The worker has now become a
by-product of A
reject. As machines are more
efficient, as were large farms
at the time of the Enclosure Acts,
the worker is being released into
a pool of unemployment. Last
month Florida paid $3,203,446 for
unemployment. As jobs are not
available, dependency on the
government will continue; it will
increase as John Henry and his
hammer become obsolete.

Labor union attempts to meet
the problem are as selfish as
managements attempts to avoid

Sex And The College Boy

it. Teamsters president James
Hoffas vow to get only nation-wide
contracts would stalemate and
stagnate business.
One method of meeting the
problem is socialism, direct
government control of industry as
is done in Britain. This, however
makes everything dependent on the
government, an idea repugnant to
democratic and private property
tradition.
The United States problem can
be met by government control of
stocks and bonds, it must first
limit the number of stocks a single
person can own in order to prevent
undue concentration of wealth.
Then, it should replace the social
security system with a similar
system which would buy stocks and
bonds with the money for the
worker. These bonds would not be
able to be sold by the individual
any more than he can get his
social security money back if he
wanted it.
This compulsory buying of
stocks would do two things: it
would first provide large amounts
of money in industry which would
allow it to expand and create more
jobs, and it would make the worker
partially dependent on industry
rather than government for his
money. The government, however,
should guarantee a fixed return
on the investments. Then at
retirement, the worker would not
depend on the government, but on
his own stocks and bonds. The
income supplemented by stocks
would begin to make a 20-hour
week possible, without large
increases in pay.
There is, of course, still abetter
way. Each one could voluntarily
try to help the other. But weve
tried that before, i
j.

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We asked a Yale senior, home on vacation, if he believed
that a man should submit to relations before he is married,
Certainly not. he told us, College girls may call me old
fashioned but I think a nice boy should remain pure. j

A University of Southern California football player said, I
think there has been an over-emphasis on promiscuity on college
campuses. Its true that there are a few weak men who may
seccumb to a persistant coed, but the majority of college men
believe in chastity and wouldnt think of having an affair during
the happiest years of their lives.
A Georgetown sophomore told us: When Igoon a date
with a girl, I always take somebody along with me -- either a
professor or an older person. A lot of girls get mad at me, but
I promised my mommy and daddy I would never do anything
in school to make them ashamed of me.'
T ___ j '"V ..
Two Princeton men we met were first very wary about
discussing the problem, but finally one of them said; I think
its all right for college girls to be amancipated -- after all,
they have nothing to lose but as a man Im very idealistic
about such things. Besides, I think girls think so much less of
you when you give in. I dont want them saying in their
dormitories that I'm a loose guy. I prize my reputation above
everything else.
A Harvard man said, When I first came to Harvard several
of the students asked me if I would go all the way with a girl.
I didnt even know what it meant, but when I found out I reported
them to the dean. I believe a school is judged by its students,
and I would hate to believe the girls from Smith and Vassar
and Radcliffe would think Harvard men had such thoughts in
their heads.
We talked to at least 200 male college students and not one
of them admitted to having had a promiscuous relationship.
It was a very encouraging thing and gave us faith in the youth
of America. If our survey is correct, the college boy is keenly
aware of the inherent dangers of sexual emancipation and,
despite the enormous pressures from college coeds, he will,
in almost all cases, graduate as pure as the driven snow.

GO AHEAD!
/ : . / X
WASTE 25$ TOMORROW, THEN CONTRIBUTE TO THE EVEN
NEWER NEW ORANGE PEEL. WE ARE LOOKING FOR TOP'-'
RATE FICTION, POETRY, JOKES AND CARTOONS. SEND
OR BRING YOUR MATERIAL TO THE NEW ORANGE PEEL,
ROOM 12, FLORIDA UNION, ON CAMPUS.
- :
K

Wednesday,Sept. 18,1963 The Florida Alligator

Patronize
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cartridges fit
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Guaranteed for
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Page 5



The Florida Alligator Wednesday,Sept. 18,1963

Page 6

patrorninge gator Asvertisecs

BE MISLED!
K
THAT'S RIGHT. GO AHEAD AND REBEL AGAINST
AUTHORITY- BUY THE GENUINE 100% HUMOR,
OFF CAMPUS
old orange peel
ON SALE TOMORROW AT 736 LOCATIONS
(FLA. BOOK STORE, THE PUB, ALAN'S CU CUBANA,
BANA, CUBANA, LORD BYRON SUNDRIES, BROASTED
CHICKEN, MALONE'S BOOK STORE, SILVER
SHOP & REBEL LANES, TO NAME A FEW)
ONLY 25c
- ALSO
FREE PEEL PARTY 4 P.M. TOMORROW AT
THE SPEAKEASY. WOW!

SAVE 30 %
LORD BYRONS DISCOUNT SUNDRIES
EXAMPLES:

MENS ITEMS REG NOW
ALL BRANDS SHAVING BOMBS 1.00 69$
ALL BRANDS AFTER SHAVE LOTION 1.00 69$
GILLETTE SUPER 15s BLADES 79$ 59$
ZIPPO LIGHTERS 3.50 2.39
BENTLEY BUTANE LIGHTERS 4.95 3.39
RIGHT GUARD DEODORANT 1 - 69$
MENNEN SPRAY DEODORANT 1 -? 69$
OLD SPICE DEODORANT 1 -00 69$
PAL STAINLESS STEEL RAZORS 1 -95 > -36
TOOTHPASTE 8 3 TOOTHPASTE 69$ 48$

c EXTRA SPECIAL WOODBURY SHAMPOO, REGULARLY SI.OO, NOW JUST 49$
SALE To Continue Until The GATORS Win Th6 Next Football Game!
So. Please, GATORS, Lets Go Go Go !!!
OLD ORANGE PEEL ON SALE THURSDAY
LORD BYRON SUNDRIES & COSMETICS
* 1223 West University Avenue Off Campus Next Door To Larry s
| *Sorry, no discount on candy, cards, franchised cosmetics & cigarettes, 30$ package, $2.85 carton.

Land Os Taj Mahal Comes
To Florida Union Thursday

India, land of the mysterious
Taj Mahal, will be the setting for
the falls first International Supper
Thursday.
Sponsored by the International
Committee of the Florida Union
under Paula Craig, the supper
will begin at 6 p.m. in the Florida
Union Social Room.
Ten waitresses donning saris,
/
Frosh Lose
M7O In Hume
Dorm Theft
Two UF freshmen residing in
Hume Hall have reported a $l7O
theft from their locked room.
The theft, reported by the
victims, Berton Samet and Richard
Lynn, occurred between 9 a.m. and
1:30 p.m. Sunday.
Lynn said he discovered the
robbery when he returned to the
room and found his wallet missing.
He later found his wallet empty
- in the room.
According to Lynn, he found his
roomates desk had been entered
and said his roomates wallet was
empty. Later, S4O of the missing
money was found under notebook
paper in a desk drawer.
Campus Police investigators
said a key was used to enter the
room.
No new leads were reported by
police yesterday.

the national costume of India, will
serve a variety of Indian foods
including murgo masala (chicken
curry), puris (Indian bread)
and kopra burfee (cocoanut toffee).
The menu has been planned by
two Indians Mrs. Nita Shah,
wife of a student here and Adi
Contractor, a doctoral candidate
in the UF College of Architecture
and Fine Arts. Both will work
closely with the UF Food
Service staff prior to the dinner.
On Thursday afternoon they will
be on hand in the kitchen to make
suggestions while the food is being
prepared, tasting each dish to
assure an authentic Indian flavor
and giving suggestions on cooking
India style.
Decor and entertainment will
play an important part in setting
the mood for an Indian supper.
Connie Ogle and Ram Kaipurapl
have been selecting materials,
handicrafts, posters and even

ST-
J? 1 llpl
f|f i|Pt Ifs lit
STUDENTS PLAN INDIAN SUPPER

WOMENS ITEMS REG NOW
ALL BRANDS SHAMPOO 1.00 69$
ALL BRANDS CREAM RINSE 1.00 69$
LUSTRE CREME HAIR SPRAY
SUAVE HAIR SPRAY 99$ 69$
VO-5 HAIR SPRAY 2.35 1.65
5-DAY DEODORANT PADS 69$ 49$
SECRET ROLL-ON DEODORANT 75$ 52$
GET SET 1.50 1.05
JERGENS LOTION 59c 41$
NYLONS 98$ 69$
TOOTH BRUSHES
TOOTHBRUSHES 98$ 39$

banana leaves to transform the
Social Room into an Indian dining
hall.
UF Indian Club Pres. R. Sun Sundaresan
daresan Sundaresan is helping committee
members plan a program of
entertainment, including singers,
dancers and a special
demonstration on how to wear
a sari.
Tickets are available at the
Florida Union program office,
room 315, or in Building AE, the
foreign student center, and will
be on sale until 2 p.m. today.
Ticket price is $1.25 for
students, and $1.50 for guests,
students, and $1.50 for guests.
Two other International dinners
will follow this one --a Japanese
dinner in October and a
Scandanavian buffet in November.
In addition, the International
Committee has expanded its
activities this year to include
international socials.



GATOR CLASSIFIED

For Sale

for SALE 40 Ft. furnished Trailer
w ith canopy. SISOO. Fenced lot
number 21 Glynwood Trailer Park
Archer Road. Back of Florida
power and Light Co. Call after
5 p.m. 2-9643. (A-8-st-c).
FOR SALE 1954 MGFT Red,
wire wheels, R and H nearly new
top and tires. 3620 SW Archer
Road Village, See around 6 p.m.
(A- 8- 5t -p).
1963 MOTORCYCLE, Yamaha
250 cc twin. Electric start, turn
signals, whitewall tires, saddle
bags, other accessories. S6OO
Bank financing arranged. Phone 2-
3038 after 5 p.m. (A-6-st-c).
1954 PLYMOUTH 2 door Sedan
$l5O. A Royal standard typewriter
S3O. Call FR 6-3382 after 5
p.m. (A-6-st-c).

Autos

1959 PLYMOUTH. Power steering,
4 New Tires, Excellent mechanical
condition. Reasonable. Phone FR
6-6286 between 5 and 7(G-8-st-c).
1960 HILLMAN convertible. One
owner, 16,000 miles. Best offer,
phone 2-6868 after 5 p.m. (G (G---8-3t-c).
--8-3t-c). (G---8-3t-c).
*SB HEALEY. New paint, wire,
overdrive, good top, windows.
Clean, healfhy. Call 2-6689 or see
at 1030 N. E. 9th St^G-7-tf-c).
57 FORD V-8 Stick. 2 door, S2OO
or trade for Motor scooter. %
Pinehurst Trailer Park, 35305. W.
24th Avenue. Lot 66. (G-7-ts-c).

DUive-iNrHiArTTJf^
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open 6:30 show 7:00
First Outdoor Showing!
The true story of Lt. John F.
Kennedy's incredible adven adventure
ture adventure in the South Pacific!
Jiff ROBERTSON S&S&fi.
2nd Smash Hit at 9:30
John Dean
Wayne Martin
Rio BRAVo
, color

1 UfjOWING
that goes
beyond what ] ; 15
men think A
I about- ~ ,r
because

Wanted
l

WANTED: Members for Horse Horseback
back Horseback Riding Club. For information
call Lake Wauburg Riding Stables
466-9295. (C-8-Bt-c).
ANYONE INTERESTED in starting
a folk singing group and has time
to make it an excellent group,
please contact Bob Jennings, FR
2-1476 after 6 p.m. (c-8-lt-p).
WANTED WAITRESS, part time
job, must be attractive, good
wages, no experience necessary.
Apply at Speakeasy, 604 N. W.
13th Street. (C-6-ts-c).
ELECTRIC BASS WANTED: Also,
Male or Female singer (s) for
experienced R & R group. Top
money. Call Steve or Richard
2-9490 or 2-9476. (C-7-st-c).
LAUNDRY PROBLEMS? Ill iron
your shirts -- 20? each (dress
or sport). Gretchen Krughoff,
phone 372-5715. (C-7-2t-p).
WANTED WAITER for noon meal
from 11-2 p.m. Apply in person
at Larrys Wonderhouse, 14 South
West Ist Street. Behind Sears.
(C-7-ts-c).

For Rent

TO FAR FROM CAMPUS? Single
room available now for male
student. 3 blocks from campus,
private entrance. $35 monthly. 327
N.W. 15th Ter. or 372-8929 after
3 p.m. (B-8-3t-c).
SAVE TIME, SAVE GAS, SAVE
MONEY Renta reserved parking
space across the street from
campus. At approximately 10?
a day. For reservation call by
1702 West University Avenue,
FR 6-3012. (B-5-st-c).

I HEELS put on in 5 minutes
I SOLES put on mIS minutes I
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REPAIR SHOP
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Tired of
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then be sure to see
A NEW KIND
OF LOVE

Shoulder Injury Ends
ODonnells Career

Fullback Jim ODonnell, one of
the monsters r in the Florida
defense of the same game, will
be out the remainder of the season
with a shoulder separation, head
coach Ray Graves said yesterday.
ODonnell, second team fullback
and a key linebacker on the first
defensive unit, was injured in
Saturdays Georgia Tech game but
it was believed as late as yester yesterday
day yesterday morning that the two-year
letterman senior from Clearwater
might be able to play against Miami
in November.
Yesterday afternoon, however,
doctors changed their minds
Graves said, and ruled ODonnell
out for the season.
Monday we thought he would
just be out a week or so, Graves
said yesterday, But yesterday
morning they (the doctors) looked
at him and said it would be late
in the season before he could
play.
Then they looked at him again
this afternoon and said his college
career was over, the head Gator
said.
ODonnells place as second secondteam
team secondteam offensive fullback behind
Larry Dupree will be taken by
Katz Is Captain
Guard Jack Katz was named
game captain for the Florida
Gators when they
Mississippi State in their home
opener Sept. 28 in Florida Field.
Head coach Ray Graves made
the announcement yesterday.

Lost 6l Found

LOST Eyeglasses lost Monday
on Campus. In brown case. Dennis
Rajala, phone 2-9495. (L-8-lt-p).
LOST On campus, in the Hub,
or in the Graham vicinity, a Star
Sapphire Ring with diamond chips
in floral design. sls reward Phyllis
Eisenberg, 6-9282. (L-5-st-c).
LOST Gold Signet Ring initial?:
W.J.B. Bill Buettner Kappa Sigma
House, FR 6-9198. (L-7-st-c).

Services

TUTORING in German, all
courses, GN 133 through GNSIO.
Mrs. Ursula Harder. FR 6-1426
from 12 p.m. 2 p.m. From
Germany. (M-7-st-c).
LADIES ALTE RATIONS and
dressmaking by CAMILLE. 1116
S. W. 6th Ave. (behind 1114) Phone
376-1483. (M-8-st-p).
FOR A CHANGE OF PACE, Come
Horseback Riding at Lake Wauburg
Riding Stables,Tumbleweed Ranch.
Hay Rides and night trail rides.
Student operated. 1/2 Mi. North
ot Lake Wauburg. Reservations
and free transportation call 466-
9295. (M-8-eat-c).

SUBSCRIBE TO THE
SUNDAY EDITION OF
S;lje
JvehJ JJork Sinte#
"Ail the News That's
Fit to Print"
.............. >
CALL 376-5851 OR
WKITt BOX 12189

Wednesday Sept. 18,1963 The Florida Alligator

converted halfback Marquis
Baeszler and his defensive slot
will be manned by converted-safty converted-saftyman
man converted-saftyman Ken Russell.
Ive called Jim our most
valuable player all along and were
really going to miss him, Graves
said. its going to cut down
considerably on the number of
different combinations well use

$2.50 Date Tickets,
* £
Inside Report Back

The date ticket rioting has been quelled and the Qeorgia Tech game
is over and peace and sobriety once again return to the Gatorland
campus.
Next stop for the Gators we understand is against the Mississippi

State Bulldogs here at Florida
Field a week from Saturday. Its
the first home game and one the
Gators need very badly to say the
least.
STARTING FRIDAY will be a
new feature of the Alligator sports
pages, one we think will serve both
to enlighten and entertain you.
Its called Inside Report and will
be just that.
The writer is Russ Brown, first
team end on the Gator football
team, who wrote the same column

Hallelujah And Thanks
We join the many students who have already done so and add our
thanks to the Athletic Department for reversing their decision on date
ticket prices for Homecoming.
We did our best to bring the issue to the students attention because
we felt they wanted to know about it but our primary aim was to see
if the decision cpuld be changed.
STUDENT GOVERNMENT, that so-called do-nothing organization
on the third floor of the Florida Union, rallied behind Student Body
Pres. Paul Hendrick, Homecoming chairman Charley Wells and Blue
Key Pres. Steve Gardner and went on the attack.
Six days and two meetings later, the date tickets were back down
to $2.50. We say hallelujah.
And thanks.
Well Wait A Bit
JUDGEMENT HAS pretty well been made on the Gator football
team. And not too much of it is favorable, particularly a few of the
states larger newspapers who werent too impressed with Floridas
showing against Georgia Tech Saturday.
Well, we werent too impressed Saturday either as youve probably
already gathered from our last column.
BUT:
We dont consider ourselves sunshine patriots. Its easy to pull for
a winner. Anybody can do that. Its when the chips are down that one
finds out his true friends. This is true in athletics too.
Were not sure what kind of team the Gators really have this year.
We suspect its not as good as pre-season forecasts claimed. But
we will reserve our judgement on them until after a few more
appearances. We hate to see anyone judge them on one bad day.

, Announcing: The Opening of
GENES WESTERN STYLED
BAR-B-Q
Gene's mouth-watering Bar-B-Q is out of this
world! I He also carries a complete line of
seafood and poultry. Introductory Offer: All
Bar-B-Q sandwiches 575. 1
BEEF PORK RIBS CHICKEN
See You at Gene's
376-6855 1008 N.W. sth Ave.
FREE DELIVERY Open weekdays 11 am til 1-am
24 hours on weekends.

FROM THE SIDELINES

By WALKER LUNDY
Sports Editor

to substitute with.
Only other ailment currently
bothering the Gators seriously was
an injured ankle belonging to half halfback
back halfback Alan Trammell, named as
one of the outstanding sophomore
performers against Tech Saturday.
Trammell is expected to be back
early next week in plenty of time
for the Mississippi State game.

for The Alligator this summer and
received considerable plaudits.
BROWN, A SENIOR from Miami
is majoring in broadcasting in the
UF School of Journalism, but is a
sportswriter of some merit too.
He will be giving you the * Inside
Report on just what's going on
in the football picture in his column
which will appear periodically
throughout the football season.
We repeat, first Inside Report
is Friday.

Page 7



The FI on da Alligator Wednesday, Sept. 18,1963

Page 8

Students Applaud
Ducat Reduction

The reduction of homecoming
date tickets from $5 to $2.50
met with almost unanimous
approval yesterday from graduate
students right on down the line
to the lowest of freshmen. Random
comments were:
I like it said Tom McGarry
-lUC.
Tom Best, also lUC replied,
It's a good thing, at least now
the students can see their own
game.
Don Griner-2UC-was glad to
see student government taking such

Injuries Hit
Bama Eleven

TUSCALOOSA, Ala.--Ala Ala.--Alabamas
bamas Ala.--Alabamas 1963 football team opens
the season on Sept. 21 against the
University of Georgia in Athens.
In preparation for this game
through two -a day practices,
meetings, etc., the Tide has come
up with many problems. Some may
be worked out for the better prior
to the Georgia game, some may
not.
Big problem number one: In Injuries.
juries. Injuries. The Crimson Clads have
had as many as 17 players held
out of practice.
Other major problems; Shortage
of ends, inexperience in the line,
. and filling the shoes of eight de departed
parted departed starters from last year.
The only area of Tide football
not covered by the term major
problems is the backfleld.
Coach Paul Bryant expressed it
this way, if Mike Fracchia is
allright I think we will be ade adequate
quate adequate to say the least. Fracchia
is being groomed to play either
left halfback or fullback.
* Benny Nelson (plays both right
and left halfback), can play with
anybody. If anybody has a more
valuable back to them than Benny
is to us they really have a good
one. He does everything well.
Fullback Eddie Versprille is a
winning player offensively and can
be just as good as he wants to
be defensivelyr
About quarterback Joe Namath
1 s ~tn pm h h g
VERSPRILLE
Frat Meeting Set
Fraternity representatives for
block seating arrangements will
meet Thursday at 7 p.m. in room
121, Florida Union.

an active part in helping the
student. Im glad to see it happen.
Maung Tin, a graduate student
from Burma, answered when
queried, Im on the side of the
student. Im glad to see the prices
reduced.
Even though the girls were not
as directly affected by the price
hike as the boys they still had
their opinions. How does the
fairer sex feel about this. Pam
Rainey lUC summed it up fairly
well when she said, its fine!
This repreive may only be for a

Bryant said, I will be greatly
disappointed if he is not the best
in the country.
Looking over the teams reserve
backs the Tide head mentor termed
halfbacks Gary Martin, Ray Ogden,
Mickey Andrews, and Hudson Har Harris
ris Harris as certainly capable of play playing.
ing. playing.
At the fullback position Jackie
Sherrill will certainly help.jis.
Steve Bowman has the ability'io
play.
Defensively, Billy Piper can
play anywhere back there and
Wayne Capooth might be able to
play. in summing up his back backfield
field backfield situation Bryant declared, I
think we are going to be allright
back there. We have some proven
winners in the backfield.

W'XvyvV'-w.--
- : v -*
: v .
:'': ; } ;
B : :
i mm m
mam

Is this the reason
Horseless carriages weren't called horseless carriages
for nothing.
Gas engines may have taken the place of the horse.
But the horse left its mark.
Early Cars kept their whip sockets, long after there were
no horses to whip.
Dashboards once kept the horse from splashing mud on
the passengers.
And most cars have kept their engines op front, where
the horse used to be.
When the Volkswagen was designed, it was assumed
that horses would never be back.

MILLER-BROWN MOTORS,INC. M)
1030 East University Avenue "i authorized
dealer
4
"'~ ~ I. .HIM ...

year. The Athletic Department
Committee will meet after this
season to completely review all
facts and figures which are perti pertinent
nent pertinent in the decision on the ultimate
price to be placed on date tickets
in the future.
Fencing Club
Opens Classes
The UF Fencing Club opens its
1963-64 program Tuesday, Sept.
24 with classes in fencing for
advanced and beginning students.
Classes will be conducted for all
interested men and women (faculty
and staff included) and the clubs
will provide all equipment and
protective clothing.
The lessons will be given each
Tuesday and Friday at 5:00 PM.
Dressing rooms, showers and
lockers are provided on the
lower floor of Norman Hall
Gymnasium. Participants must
provide their own sneakers or
non-slip footwear and should wear
clothing which provides freedom
of movement to assume the
familiar fencing stance.
The club will teach in addition
to positions, motions and rules
of modern fencing some of the
historical background of the sport,
which began as training device
for combat. By the end of the
Fall trimester most beginning
students should be advanced to
the degree that they will be fencing
in round robin tournaments
with other beginners..

Qafifl CiaMlfeacU, fyduMdsl
when I
most |
dollar d
pens i'-'-'j
are h]
' M
out If
of ink ji the Scripto Wordmasterrefill has
enough left for a term paper
T
...and a couple of lab reports
Just about the time you figure your Wordmaster should
be running out of ink, unscrew the cap. The new see seethru
thru seethru refill says in no uncertain terms that youve got
enough ink leftto go on writing for quite a while. You
shouldn't be surprised. For even though Wordmaster
is slim and streamlined, it has a much larger ink capac capacity
ity capacity than ordinary dollar pens. And that makes it just
about the most inexpensive doiiar pen around.
By the way... you can get a handsome matching
pencil to go along with your Wordmaster. And thats
only a dollar, too.

VOLKSWAGEN Os AMERICA, INC.
most engines still arent in back ?
So VW felt free to put the engine over the rear wheels,
the ones that drive the car.
That way, you don't spin your wheels getting power
from the front to the bock.
Or horse around with h&pyy driveshafts.
You also get more weight over the drive wheels for
firm traction when the going gets sloppy.
Actually, the VW's air-cooled aluminum engine would
have been a sensation, even in front.
But the big idea was moving it to the rear.
It was a great step backward in the world of automobile
design.