Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Reitz Ponders Drinking Crackdown

By DAVID LAWRENCE JR.
Editor-In-Chief
UF administrators are
considering a get tough policy
concerning illegal student drinking
as the result of last weeks Alachua
County voting approval of legalized
liquor sales.
Tighter enforcement of regu regulations
lations regulations concerning drinking here
could be entirely possible, UF
Pres. J. Wayne Reitz said this
weekend.
Reitz forsees few or no changes

The Florida
Alligator

V 01.55, No. 140 University of Florida Gainesville Monday, Sept. 9, 1963

Convocation Will Spotlight
Top-Grade Students Today

Top-grade students will be spot spotlighted
lighted spotlighted at the 10th Ann ua 1
Scholarship Convocation in the
Florida Gymnasium today -- the
first day of classes.
The convocation, which points to
academics as the core of university
life, begins with a formal academic
processional at 10:15 a.m. The
public may attend.
Enrollment Nears
Record Figure
A total of 14,190 students were
registered by noon Saturday, UF
officials reported.
Included in the total were about
2,700 freshmen.
Officials said there is a good
possibility that late registration
beginning today and continuing
through 3 p.m. Wednesday, will
bring UF fulltime enrollment to
14,500. This would be a record
figure for the states oldest and
largest state University.
An official breakdown will not
be available until Friday. s

Mi ra

BEING A FRESHMAN CAN BE FUN
, *-'-~*
.. .if yog live in Graham Hall/ which was recently converted into a residence area
for both men and women. Students here, from left, Ellen Gray, Larry Denmark, Deb Debby
by Debby Gessler and Mike Hannon. (See story Page 17.)
< **-.. ~

in basic administrative policies
concerning drinking, but simply
Its more or less a problem of
enforcement.
Dr. Reitzs statements followed
approval of legalized liquor sales
by county voters last Thursday by
a 2,000-plus vote margin.
Earlier, Reitz had spoken to
members of his church advocating
a dry vote. No official statement
of UF feeling toward the election
was made by administrators, how however.
ever. however.

Dr. Raphael Demos,Greek-born
authority on Plato and Professor
Emeritus of Philosophy at Harvard
University, will speak on Plato
and the Modern World.
will be given for
scholastic achievement to 23
students as well as sorority and
fraternity and mens and women's
residence halls having the highest
academic averages.
Os the 20 J. Hillis Miller
Memorial Scholarship awards, the
10 carrying monetary awards will
go to five freshman and five
sophomores withoutstanding
scholarship records. The
remaining recognition awards will
go to upper division students
representing each of the upper
division colleges.
Awards and trophies will be
presented by the Gainesville
Womens Panhellenic Association;
Phi Kappa phi, campus wide
honorary society; and the Inter Interfraternity
fraternity Interfraternity and Panhellenic
Councils.

Following : Wet Victory

Alachua County had been dry
since the early 1900's when the
UF campus was moved from Lake
City to Gainesville with the
understanding that legalized liquor
sales would be prohibited.
According to Reitz, any plans
for stricter enforcement of UF
regulations concerning drinking
would be studied by Dean of Student
Affairs Lester Hale and his
student-faculty advisory
committees.
No target date has been set'

Convocation Chairman Dr. John
H. Davis of the department of
botany said, the UF is probably
the only school in the nation that
begins the year with such a pro program.
gram. program.
*
We try to vary the program
from year to year by alternating
the types of speakers, he said,
but it always emphasizes
scholarship.
. '1 i iThis
This iThis year the speaker, Dr.
Demos is one of the greatest
teachers and scholars of all
times, he said.
_ si V
Morning classes will be
shortened to 30 minutes each to
allow students and faculty to attend
the convocation.
The first period runs from 7:30
to 8 a.m., second from 8:10 to 8:40,
third from 8:50 to 9:20 and fourth
from 9:30 to 10:00 a.m.
Afternoon classes will follow
the regular schedule.

for completion of the studies, Reitz
said.
We're in no particular rush
since it usually takes quite awhile
to actually begin liquor sales,
Reitz said.
Close to 50 per cent of almost
27,000 registered county voters,
including a large number of
students, turned out for the
election. About 60 per cent favored
the legalized liquor sales, and 57
per cent approved the package and
bar sales as opposed to package

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PREPARING TO VOTE
..."wet" or "dry" in last Tuesday's county election are
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Coleman. He's a fifth year en engineering
gineering engineering student.

Equal Rights Pickets
May Set Sights On Cl

By PEGGY BLANCHARD
Os The Gator Staff
The College Inn may again be
the target for picketing by the U F
Student Group for Equal Rights.
Present plans call for picketing
to begin possibly within the next
two or three weeks.
. a __
Picketing at the College Inn was
carried on during the summer and
was somewhat successful/ Jerry
Essick, 2UC, reported.
Essick, immediate past
executive chairman of the group,
said the College Inn must have
felt some loss of business frotn
the picketing because they were
offering specials to bring students
in as customers during the time
of the picketing.
X
Picketing activities at the Inn
were slight during the spring and
summer because pickets were also
active at. the Gold Coast Cade and
the Humpty Dumpty Restaurant,
ESsick said.
Later this month,the group plans
to concentrate on the College Inn
alone.
Working in conjunction with the
Gainesville Youth Council of
the National Association for the
Advancement" of Colored People,
(NAACP), the group plans to con continue
tinue continue picketing until the College

only sales.
Precinct 31, composed of UF
campus residents voting in the
Florida Union, voted 231-62 for a
wet county. Many other students
however, voted in other city and
county precincts.
Turing the tide for the wet
forces, led by the Gainesville Motel
Association, were city precincts
which favored legalized liquor
sales, 16-0. Os the 15 county pre precincts,
cincts, precincts, 12 voted dry.

Inn is integrated.
The College Inn is the only major
business in the city of Gainesville
which has not let down .color
barriers, Essick said.
Picketing was not the only
activity carried on by the Student
Group during the summer. Mem Members
bers Members also worked on voter
registration, providing speakers
for campus organizations and
publishing a weekly newsletter.
Speakers will be provided to
campus organizations this term.
Essick said he hopes the group
will be able to provide speakers
to groups who were inactive
during the summer and dont know
about the racial issue.
Before resuming the College inn
picketing the Student Group for
Equal Rights will attempt to arouse
student opinion against the. non nonintegration
integration nonintegration policies of the College
Inn through their newsletter,
Common Sense.
Although the newsletter has not
yet been recognized'by the Student
Board of Publications, Essick said
the group is hopeful of recognition
soon so the newsletter can be
placed in campus containers. If
it does not receive recognition, it
will be hand distributed, he said.
Membership in the. group is open
and any student may Join.
Serving as executive chairman
this year is Con OoUevey.



The Florida Alligator Monday, Sept. 9,1963

Page 2

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1 IT'S JUST UP THE STREET! I
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IFANELLI & EDWARDS I
"THE LITTLE STORE WITH EVERYTHING" j
Fresh Green Vegetables /
Co'd Cuts (Complete Line) I
§ Cold Party Snacks 1
Picnic Supplies /
Beef Specials %
i Quality Beef: H.S. CAMP & SONS, Ocala j
I For Meat Orders Call FR 2-5282 4
| jflffV Ms(
Open from 7 a .m. to 11 pm j
(0 a.m. to 10 p.m r Sunday.) i
\fanelli & edwards]
I MARKET
\ 2410 RooH Wt tbtr \ty~ ,l -*r~ i
. * >"" Tl "*

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ADMINISTRATOR WORKS FOR AIR FORCE
...Colonel Roger H. Miller, Staff Judge Advocate (right) gives a pointer to Colonel
Robert B. Mautz, special assistant to Major General Leighton I. Davis, Commander,
Air Force Missile Test Center. Col Mautz and Col. Miller combined forces to study
the new NASA-Air Force working agreements with regard to the Merritt Island land
acquisition. *Mautz is also IJF Dean of Academic Affairs.

Splitting Atoms Old Hat
Prof Counts All The Pieces

Splitting an atom isnt unusual
any more but a UF professor has
come up with something new in
fission: he is counting the pieces.
The researcher is Dr. M. Luis
Mug a, assistant professor of
chemistry, who has devised a
method of counting the fragments
of Uranium 235 which fly off.in
different directions when the heavy
metal is bombarded by neutrons
from the UF's nuclear reactor.
Dr. Mugas work may lead to a

Vacationing Math Prof Drowns
In St. Pete Swimming Accident

Dr. Herbert A. Meyer, 58, pro professor
fessor professor of mathematics at the UF
died Sept. 1 while swimming at a
beach near St. Petersburg.
Dr. Meyer was spending the
Labor Day weekend at the motel
with his son George and daughter
Carol.
A native of lowa, Dr. Meyer
came to the UF in 1946. Later he
became director of the statistical
labbratory, which was a
predecessor of the present com computing
puting computing center.
More recently he was engaged
in research in the area of math mathematics
ematics mathematics and a consultant for the
State of Florida in tax matters.
Cause of death was a heart
attack.
Dr. Meyer is survived by his
wife, Mrs. Bloom McGregor Meyer
of Gainesville; son, George H.
two daughters, Carol and Mrs.

NOTICE
e
A limited number.of 1962-63 Fa 1 and Winter trimester Seminoles are now on
sale in Room 12, Florida Union,;at $2.00 each. They will be available for a
limited time.
P ' J
Those who ordered and paid for either a Fall or Winter trimester Seminole and
did not pick up their book last year may do so in Room 12, Florida Union, be between
tween between now and September 13.

basic change in the current view
of what happens when an atom of
Uranium breaks up in an atomic
weapon or a nuclear reactor. It
might also make it possible to get
more nuclear power from less fuel.
Looking into the future, Muga
explained, it might show us how
to reduce the size of the so-called
critical mass which can sustain
a chain reaction provided ternary
fission can be controlled.
Since the earlier development of

Marilyn Freeman, all 0 f
Gainesville; and two brothers
Robert Meyer of Des
es Moines, i owa
and Clayton O. Meyer of Phoenix,
Ariz.

SPORTSMAN
CYCLE CENTER
LATE MODEL (USED) SCOOTERS AT
ROCK BOTTOM PRICES
ALSO NEW 50cc & 80cc
YAMAHA CYCLES
FOR SALE
CALL FR 6-*4263 2209 S.E. 15th Street
m ** m * mm BHMM

nuclear science, it has been Known
that most of the atoms in uranium
fission will break into two atoms
--one a little larger than the
other.
Because it takes much less
energy to maintain the stability
of these two smaller atoms than
it took to hold together the big
one, vast amounts of energy are
released and can be put to con constructive
structive constructive or destructive use.
Scientists believe an atom could
break into three parts, instead of
two, Dr. Muga said. Looking
at the nucleus of the atom as a
water drop that might separate
when struck by some particle in
the air, it could as easily break
into three pieces as into two.
Because these so-called
ternary, or three-part fission
events are infrequent, there has
not been much progress in counting
the fragments to make sure they
were there.



First In A Series

Helping The Coed Balance Her Budget

EDITORS-NOTE: This is the
first of a series of five articles
written especially for the young
lady in her first year in college
this fall. Prepared here, the series
offers helpful tips and bits of
advice on college life and how to
survive Today: The Budget
and Finances-
Youve picked the schooland
theyve picked you.
Now how about the tab?
Its going to cost you at least
$5,200 to get your college edu education
cation education if youre heading for a state
institution like the University of
Florida.
Whether its you or a scholar scholarship,
ship, scholarship, or Papa who paid your way
to college this fall, one of your
greatest academicand social socialchallenges
challenges socialchallenges will be managing that
little greenback.
You'll have to make it stretch
and str-etch and s-t-r-e-t-c-h.
Three movies a week and fre frequent
quent frequent cross state bus rides to see
the old high school sweetheart
can flatten the pocketbook--not
to mention the devastating effect
on your grades.
The average student at the UF
spends about $650 per trimester.
Included in this amount is the
sll3 registration fee (for in-state
residents), SSO for books and
supplies, $45 for laundry and
cleaning, $350 for room and board
and SIOO for incidental expenses.
But any of these figures can be
doubled, even tripled, if you arent
careful.
Sit down with pencil and paper
sometime before., the term gets
under way and jot down your fixed
expenses per week, then your
casual expenses.
If the total is higher than you
can afford, strike out the extras
and see where other costs can be
cut down.
Brand new texts are nicebut
used ones are cheaper. Just make
sure you are buying the correct
edition.
Taking care of your own clothes
also helps.
Most college dormitories and
sorority houses are equipped with
laundry facilities that cost between
15 and 35 cents to operate. And
some downtown washaterias are
featuring do-it-yourself dry drycleaning
cleaning drycleaning facilities.
Time spent doing these chores
needn't be a waste of valuable
Student Book
* -w
Sale To End
The Student Government-spon Government-sponsored
sored Government-sponsored book sale, originated two
years ago, will end Wednesday.
The exchange allows any student
to sell books at his own designated
price and buy others at his con convenience.
venience. convenience.
Stocked with a huge variety of
*C-Course books, the program
will operate today, Tuesday and
Wednesday from 1 to 5 p.m. and
from 8-10 Wednesday evening
on the first floor of the Florida
Union.
Although Student Government
enables this direct student to
student service and acts as the
middle-man, we make no profit,
Chairman Fred Lane said. The
student receives all the money
. -.
involved.
White Elephant
Sale Set Tuesday
Mrs. Gordon Crosby will hold,,
an Architecture and Fine Arts*
Dames white elephant sale at 8
p.m. Tuesday at 3920 SW 4th
Place in Gainesville.

study time, washing machines drowns out the the ironing boards, you can con- or read several chapters of
While the steady whrrr of the campus gossip being traded across centrate on your trig assignment medieval history.

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Surveying The Well-Dressed College Man...

M
. <,
He's the young man of today ... his outlook is authoritative, imaginative
and energetic ... He takes pride in his scholastic achievements and
campus activities. He knows that correctly styled clothes can help give
him a feeling of confidence and personal satisfaction, v
Stock's is prepared to give your entire wardrobe the authoritative touch
it needs, the knowledgeable, confident look of a totally well-dressed
college man. We'll show you sport coats (from $39.95), suits (from
$59.95), trousers, (from $10.95), shirts, ties and outerwear . the
basics of a wel I -balanced wardrobe.
a s;
*--t.'. <
We cordially invite you to come look them over at your leisure.
..... 4 s ieL'.
'0 .
BOB
6 South Main Street
S .'- ' -* n '
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' 6v' . 1 w
we feature london fog corbin trousers lord jess sweaters .>. t
I

Monday, Sept. 9,1963 The Florida Alligator

Page 3



THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
FOOD SERVICE
THE FOOD SERVICE IS UNIVERSITY OWNED AND OPERATED TO PROVIDE FOR THE CONVENIENCE
OF THE STUDENTS, FACULTY, STAFF, AND THEIR GUESTS. THE FOOD SERVICE PROGRAM. IS
UNDER THE DIRECTION OF A PROFESSIONALLY TRAINED DIRECTOR AND STAFF WHO DESIRE TO
SERVE YOU TOP QUALITY FOOD WITH EXCELLENT SERVICE AT MODERATE .
WELCOME FRESHMEN AND ALL RETURNING J t
. 1 F.SJLTV. .. ...
ALL THESE PLACES TO SERVE YOU: X
MAIN CAFETERIA FLORIDA ROOM cafeteria fl|l\
CAMPUS CLUB snack bar RAWLINGS HALL CAFETERIA <6gP I
CO-ED CLUB cafeteria SERVICE CENTER CAFETERIA
JENNINGS CAFETERIA MEDICAL CENTER SNACK BAR
HUME HALL CAFETERIA GRAHAM AREA SNACK BAR
Snack Bar Remodeled
'' For Better Service -Plus _//
''Xllll TOLBERT SNACK BAR fig
"Gator Room" '''s//??
- X Remodeled For Pleasing .~~
Atmosphere and Better
Service.
SNACK BARS IN ALL CAFETERIAS
BREAKFAST LUNCH DINNER
Catering Service and Special Services Include:
SERVICES AT CAMP WAUBURG r
BARBECUES BOX LUNCHES
BANQUETS \ TEASES 'O
'_*
All Kinds of Food Prepared To Take Out:
' -1 , --v
FRIED CHICKEN
ii" .PASTRIES- POTATO SALAD
BAKED BEANS COLESLAW
SANDWICHES
' I .....
B| RTHDAY & DECORATED CAKES
The Food Service Division is self-supporting. Any money left after expenses ;< -
KEEP YOUR DOLLARS mPr Ve facM!HeS f r the Students



Experimental r obots
Man Fallout Shelters

Mechanical men here are
sweating it A out in fallout
Shelters across the nation.
The men actually simulated
occupants (Simocs) operated by a
research team of engineers from
the University in Gainesville for
the U. S. Office of Civil Defense
(OCD).
With OCD grants totalling s2ll,
000 since February 1962, and a
recent boost of $132,110, the
engineers are testing selected
community fallout shelters under
simulated conditions for periods
of two weeks each.
The goal is to determine safe
criteria on maximum capacity and
usage of various types of shelters.
The Simocs have already
occuDied family and public fallout

Prof Reports Bird
Carries Own Clock

A bird carrying its own clock
was the subject of experiments
by a UF professor, who presented
his findings in the area of bird
migration to the International
Congress of Zoology recently.
The researcher Dr. E. G. Franz
Sauer, assistant professor of
biology, showed the bird is not
merely born with a sense of
direction, but can learn to deter determine
mine determine its location op the earths
surface and navigate toward
its seasonal goal.
Not only is the bird, the arctic
dwelling Golden Plover, able to
judge accurately the positions of
the sun and the stars, but it also
has an internal clock which
enables the bird to relate these
celestial objects to latitude and
longitude on the earths surface,
he said.
A human navigator cannot fine
his position by measuring the
elevations of celestial bodies
alone.
He must know the exact time as
well. We have evidence that the
Golden Plover has an internal clock
which is set by the birds
observations of the hours of
daylight and darkness, Dr. Sauer
said.
To test his idea, Dr. Sauer
raised 10 of the birds on St.
Lawrence Island, a natural
breeding ground for this species
which lies in the Bering Sea, off
the western tip of Alaska.
After the birds had become
accustomed to the periods of light
and darkness and the positions of
the sun and stars at their birth birthplace,
place, birthplace, they were moved to Madison
Wis., where some were allowed
to view the normal sky and others
placed In an artifical environment
which imitated changes that would
be experienced by the bird in a
southward migration.
Later, the birds were moved
to San Francisco and released
into a specially designed cage
White House
Honors Spanier
UF professor John W. Spanier
has had one of his books selected
for the White House library.
Among the 106 books on military
history and the armed fojees se selected
lected selected after a year-long project
was Dr. Spaniers The Truman-
MacArthur Controversy and the
Korean War. It was published
by Harvard University Press in
1959.
Dr. Spanier Is an assistant
professor of political science and
social sciences. He joined the
faculty here in 1957.

* .a a__ : -
shelters in Gainesville, Houston,
Texas, Reading, Pa., and St. Louis,
Mo. simulating conditions of the
human body and the effect human
beings have on humidity and tem temperature
perature temperature conditions in an occupied
shelter. Two summer tests have
just been completed in Tuscon,
Ariz. and one in Artesia, N. Mex.
Present plans call for tests to be
conducted in Washington, D.C., and
Lincoln, Neb. next month. A winter
test is scheduled for February in
Bozeman, Mont. All were selected
for their climatic characteristics.
Developed by faculty members of
the Department of Mechanical En Engineering
gineering Engineering and the Engineering and
Industrial Experiment Station here
the metal devices are providing
life-saving information for a situ-

which recorded the direction of
their attempted flight.

ENGINEERS SCIENTISTS
the MAGNITUDE of th&
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...where a satellite may be just one element in a vast instrumentation system
Using a satellite to assist in monitoring flight performance of YOU ARE INVITED TO INQUIRE ABOUT THE FOLLOWING OPPORTUNITIES:
a Manned Space Vehicle is only one of the forward-looking proj- Systems Engineers-EEs, Physicists capable of assuming
ects under study by the Advanced Planning Group of PAN AMs complete project responsibility for mew range systems.
Guided Missiles Range D.v.s.on a. Cape Canaveral. Instrumentation Planning Engineer} EE s, Physicists to be
Since 1953, the need--to match range instrumentation systems resons,ble ,or specl,,c lobal ran 8* instrumentation concepts,
with the constantly advancing capabilities of new missiles and Advance Planning Engineers EE's, Physicists to evaluate
space vehicles has spurred PAN AM to create a whole new range *nd project the state of-the-art in all applications of range
technology for the Atlantic Missile Range. instrumentation,
, *j
- Experience in one or more of these areas: Pulse radar, CW
TODAY THE EFFORT IS ACCELERATING. PLANNING IS UNDER techniques, telemetry, infrared, data handling, communications,
WAY AT 3 TIME LEVELS. 1. To meet the specific needs of closed circuit TV, frequency analysis, command control, under underscheduled
scheduled underscheduled launchings immediately ahead. 2. To meet the re- 1 water sound, timing, shipboard instrumentation.
quirements of launch programs of the next 5 years. 3. To pre- j- PAMPIIC IMTCDUITIAIC
t( pare for manned lunar flights and work as far into the future IwAMHPUP IWlvfl w lkWr
as the late 70's projecting range technology for interplanetary SEPT. 23-24 MON., TUES.
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Or write to Mr. Harry Ensley
GUIDED MISSILES
RANGE DIVISION
; PAN AMERICAN WORLD AIRWAYS, INC;
750 South Orlando Ave., Cocoa Beach. Florida

ati o n their inventors hope will
never occur. >
s The shelter experiments
are being directed by mechanical
engineering professor Frank M.
Flanigan, with two field teams
composed of 14 UF graduate stu students
dents students and technicians under the
supervision of mechanical
engineering professors Dr. L. A.
Scott and J. O. Gonzalez.
The Simoc, a mechanical device,
comes in two forms for the shelter
tests, one is about the size of an
average man, and has the same
body temperature, produces the
same amount of moisture, and
gives off the same amount of heat
as the average human being at rest.
The se< ond is a multiple type
Simoc which oan be adjusted to
represent up to 60 humans.
Questions which the tests are
expected to answer include the
basic one: Can humans survive
in a shelter without mechanical
equipment to take the moisture out
of the air and dissipate the heat
created by the/human bodw?

Monday; Sept. 9,1963 The Florida Alligator

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CHECKING ON A MECHANICAL MAN
.. .is Frank M. Flanigan, UF associate professor of me mechanical
chanical mechanical engineering, who is making a final check on a
Simoc (simulated occupant) before beginning heat and
humidity evaluation tests in a fallout shelter in the Wash
inaton, D.C. area.

Page 5



The Florida Alligator Monday, Sept. 9,1963

Page 6

editorials
The Presidents Bill
Still pending before Congress is president Kennedys anti-dis anti-discrimination
crimination anti-discrimination bill for public accommodations, including motels,
restaurants, theaters, and the like.
Chances are that the bill in some form -- will pass, unless
Congress decides that the recent March on Washington was an attempt
at intimidation, which is doubtful.
Undoubtedly, the battle will once again be carried to the courts, for
many communities, especially in the South, are not likely to give in
without some exploratory resistance.
Possibly thers willJje renewed violence, bloodshed, death. Perhaps
federal troops will find their battlefronts in theater lobbies and motel
parking lots instead of schoolyards and college campuses.
AND ONE DAY, perhaps in 2063, Americans will read about this
turbulent decade and feel a slight twinge of contempt for an age of
such marked unenlightenment. Now if they had had Martians to
contend with. . they may think.
For neither federal troops nor Supreme Court decisions will ever
change the universal pattern of intolerance and discrimination. Only
the principals of the street fights and court battles will change, and
perhaps one day there will be an N.A.A.W.P. to advance the cause
of white equality.
So what good can come of the Presidents bill? It can logically
serve the interests of only a few fortunate Negroes, those who are
not embarrassed or assaulted while attempting to secure those
conveniences which the new law will make theirs. The bill will not
even help the President himself, politically, for it will undoubtedly
cost him the all-important support of most southern states in the
next election. It is not inconceivable that his bill could result in
Kennedys losing in 1964.
Further, those private businessmen who feel their own rights
are being sacrificed may have a point. The right to refuse service
to anyone is not in the Constitution, and it has been greatly misused,
but the man who buys property and builds a store upon it should not
be condemned for assuming he has the right to decide who may trade
on his premises.
LOGICALLY, THEN, the disadvantages of the anti-discrimination
bill seem to outweigh its advantages, and it should therefore be
defeated.
But there is another angle to the situation, and it is more important
than any logical decision.
Although discrimination, intolerance, bigotry are all old stories
in the history of man, and although they will probably never be stamped
out, still they must never be condoned or ignored.
This summer, Gov. Farris Bryant came before the Senate Commerce
Committee to testify on the Presidents bill. He spoke against it, thus
joining a number of otheiy southern governors, including Wallace
of Alabama, Barnett of Mississippi, and Russell of South Carolina.
For the record, we would like to reprint some of Gov. Bryants
statements, and our own opinion of them:
ANY TRAVELER can decide not to stay at a certain motel because
he doesnt like the owner, his moustache, his accent, his prices, his
race, or his other customers. The motel owner should have the same
right to refuse to serve the traveler, the governor said.
Thats simple justice. The wonder is really that it can be
questioned, he pointed out.
Well, we will agree that it is simple, though the word justice
may not be so applicable. The governor's argument is hardly valid.
Os course a traveler can decide not to stay in a certain motel. Even
in totalitarian states, a traveler has a choice of lodging places.
It would be difficult to imagine an America where a traveler was
forced to stay in a certain motel, or eat at a certain restaurant.
Such injustice could not long be tolerated in the Land of the Free.
And yet, there are places in this same America where a Negro
cannot find ANY place to stay for the night. Is this just? Does it
represent the America we like to picture? The motel owner should
not ever have the right to refuse lodging to a person he doesnt
like, mustache, accent, race, or other considerations notwith notwithstanding.
standing. notwithstanding.
The bill, the governor continued, would take away some of the
rights of those who risked capital and security to acquire property,
and give those rights to those,who did nothing to earn them.
But the only right the private businessman would lose would
be that of refusing service to solely on the basis of skin
color, and it is doubtful whether that is a right at all. If it is, it is
one which should not be encouraged; everyone has the right to
bite their fingernails, but no one is encouraged to do so.
THE BUSINESSMAN will still have full authority to refuse service
to boisterous drunks and other persons who clearly do not deserve
the right of service, and the proprietor of any business may still
refuse to serve a drunken Negro just as legally as he does a drunken
white.
In our eagerness to make all things right with the world, let
not forget that inherent in and inseperable from freedom is the capacity
to make errors.
We have never before heard the proposition advanced that the
capacity to make errors is inherent in and inseperable from freedom.
In fact, we doubt very much whether there is any connection between
the two. The government of Russia certainly has the capacity to
make errors and, in fact, eveiy man and every government that
ever existed had that capacity. By the governors definition, then,
they must have, every last one of them, been free.
But it is not our basic purpose to attempt to answer argument with
argument, logic with counter-logic. For, as we said earlier, this is
an issue which cannot recognize logic, once the fact has been
established that injustice on a large scale is being done.
And so, despite all the arguments of segregationists and states
righters, despite the possible, though not probable, loss of business
for some private entrepreneurs, despite even the very real and grave
danger of further violence and tragedy, there can be but one answer
to the Negro plea for equality.
The answer must be yes.

YwsP ofWMl7 \ mrc^jJ

LETTERS...

(ED. NOTE -- Three well-known
figures on campus, one a professor
and the other two administrators
recently wrote L. W. Moore,
president of American Oil Com Company,
pany, Company, concerning the companys
option on the controversial SAE
corner (13th Street and University
Avenue).
The letter is reprinted here.)
Dear Mr. Moore:
A VERY SUBSTANTIA Land
bitter controversy Gainesville concerning a piece of
property which has been spot zoned
for a service station and on which,
we understand the American Oil
Company now has an option or
other agreement. This property,
located at the southeast corner
of the intersection of N. W. 13th
Street and W. University Avenue
across from the University of
Florida Campus, is the former site
of two fraternity houses purchased
by a real estate dealer for specu speculation.
lation. speculation.
In April, 1962, this property was
spot zoned for the construction of
a service station by the then
majority on the City Commission.
In doing so they disregarded
agreements bet ween the University
of Florida and previous City
Commissions, going back to 1953,
that certain types of business,
including gasoline service
stations, would not be constructed
*
on land adjacent to the campus of
the University of Florida. They
also overrode the City Plan Board,
which had twice recommended
against zoning this site for a ser service
vice service station. A petition protesting
the zoning of the corner and
requesting a reconsideration of the
zoning was signed by more than
400 Gainesville citizens, a large
portion of whom were business
people. However, the City
Commission refused to reconsider
its position, copies of the petition
with its letter of transmittal, three
Gainesville Sun editorials, and a
letter to the editor relative to
this situation are attached.
SPOT ZONING in general
and that corner in particular
was the major issue on which the
March, 1963 City Commission
campaign was fought. A majority
opposed to spot zoning won the
election by a better than 2 to 1
majority. However, the individual
who had purchased this property
obtained a building permit for a
Humble service station on the day
following the election; this permit
expires in September. The oermit
was issued prior to a reorgani reorganization
zation reorganization meeting of the City
Commission later that week.
Following this reorganization
meeting, a moratorium was de declared
clared declared in the issuance of building
permits at certain locations in
town. :

Professors Oppose Gas Station

Sometime following the issuance
of the permit, Humble decided that
it did not want to build its station
at the site in question. It had, in
our opinion, recognized that public
opinion in Gainesville was against
the construction of a service
station across from the University
of Florida campus (near the build buildings
ings buildings which house the Colleges of
Law and Business Administration).
FURTHERMORE, the nature of
the traffic at N. W. 13th Street
and W. University Avenue is such
that only vehicular traffic in the
outside north and east-bound lanes
can enter the former fraternity
house site (where one of the houses
is now almost completely razed);
the traffic light provides for traffic
to nqtove ahead and to the right
at one setting and to the left at
others. This means that west westbound
bound westbound traffic on State Highway 26
heading to West Gainesville or to
the intersection with Interstate 75
and south-bound traffic on U. S.
Highway 441 would not be able to
enter a service station built at
this location. With the opening of
Interstate 75 within the next year,
the traffic flow on u. S. Highway
441 will be almost entirely local.
Last month the City Commission
rezoned this property to BR2,
which permits certain types of
business other than service
stations. Earlier the new majority
on the City Commission passed
an ordinance concerning the dis distance
tance distance between schools and colleges,
and that of businesses such as
service stations selling flamable
materials. This is a reversion to
the old law on the books which
was changed to make possible the
construction of a service station
on this corner, it may be that the
individual holding title' to the pro property
perty property can now legally construct a
service station on the corner,
utilizing a Humble plan. But there
is some legal doubt as to whether
he could sell gasoline there. The
attorney for the real estate
operator concerned has requested
that the City Commission authorize
the substitution of plans for an
American service station for that
of the Humble for which the building

The Florida Alligator

Editor-in-chief. . David Lawrence Jr.
Managing Editor. # gob Wilson
Sports Editor ; Walker Lundy
Editorial Page Editor John Askins
Layout Editor. ... t # Hon Spencer
City Editor Cynthia Tunstall
Copy Editor. p u iier
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during
the months of May, June, and July, when a weekly issue is published.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is entered as second class matter at the
United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida.

permit exists. As expected, the
request was denied. A petition was
taken (improperly) to the Board
of Adjustment which refused to
consider the matter. The entire
matter appears to be headed for
the courts.
THE FACULTY, STAFF, and
student body of the University of
Florida strongly resent the Uni University
versity University being kicked in the teeth
by the former City Commission
and are practically unanimous in
their disapproval of the
construction of a service station
at the corner of University Avenue
and 13th Street. Our academic
faculty consists of some 1,800
persons and we "probably have
representatives of some 4,000
families who are nonacademic
employes of the University of
Florida, in addition, our student
body population, the largest in the
South, now approaches 14,000. Not
only is this group very unhappy
over the disregard of the Com Commission
mission Commission -University agreement
about business on the periphery
of the University, but they further
believe a station here would con constitute
stitute constitute a serious hazard to the
large volume of pedestrian traffic
crossing at the corner in question.
Since we believe that many of
the facts pertinent to the option
or other agreement which the
American Oil Company now has
for the development of a proposed
service station are not now known
to you, we felt it desirable to
acquaint you with some of the
events that have taken place and
some of the feelings which have
been generated as a result of the
actions.
THE SIGNERS of this letter are
members of the academic faculty
at the University of Florida. We
are writing this, however, as citi citizens
zens citizens of the Gainesville community
where each of us has lived for ten
years or more. We are noting our
University titles to indicate our
areas of responsibility at the
University.
Should you desire further infor information
mation information about the background and
(See LETTERS, Page 7) >



CONSERVATIVE VIEWPOINT

What Its All About
By JOHN HANCOCK

America is experiencing a kind
of political rearrangement as a
result of a growing movement
which has established as its un unchallenged
challenged unchallenged leader Arizona Senator
Barry
the workings of this conservative
development is a prerequisite for
comprehension of the American
political scene and is of vital
importance in view of the apparent
show-down which is imminent in
the upcoming presidential election.
v sa
The cry, Goldwater in 64!
rings throughout this nation, and
with it comes a doctrine of strict
constitutional interpretation and
decentralization of government.
Conservatives adhere to the con concept
cept concept of free enterprise without
government intervention or
restriction.
In weeks to come, this column
will examine the progress of the
so-called right wing in the
American politics and present the
writings of such outstanding con conservatives
servatives conservatives as William F. Buckley,
editor of National Review; Sen.
Barry Goldwater, M. Stanton Evans
editor of the Indianapolis Star; and
Dan Smoot, along with outstanding
conservatives on the Florida
campus. Organizations
represented will include Young
Americans for Freedom, Ameri Americans
cans Americans for Conservative Action and
the University of Florida Campus
Conservative Club.
*lt is first necessary to clear
up several standard misconcep misconceptions
tions misconceptions relative to conservatism and
briefly analize some of the more
positive aspects of it. The claim
that this is an eighteenth century
philosophy is trueit is. But those
who would oppose conservatism on
the grounds that it is
non-progressive Ijold a philosophy
of their own which dates back to
the Dark Ages. The type of
government which the framers pf
the constitution had in mind -'-
the type of government which
conservatives seek to conserve
is the newest concept for the
structure of government and
economics now in use in the world.
Under American capitalism,
each and every member of society
is required to produce or suffer
the economic consequences. As a
result, the total national output
is greatly expanded. Our tremen tremendous
dous tremendous surpluses result from the
fact that our technology has made
it possible for a worker to produce
more than his share of the national
LETTERS...
(Continued from Page 6)
0 l
status of the zoning controversy,
1L is suggested that you contact
Mayor Byron M. Winn, jr., Prim Primrose
rose Primrose Inn, Gainesville, Florida, or
Dr. j. Wayne Reitz, President,
University of Florida,Gainesville,
Florida. The contents of this letter
have been discussed with Mayor
Winn and Dr. Harry Philpott, Vice
President of the University of
Florida. Both concur in the
thoughts expressed.
Very truly yours,
(Names Withheld)

READERS:
< i
Please sign all letters. We will
withhold your name upo£
request. Thank you, ;
The Editors

product. On the other hand, under
a form of government which allows
those who can convince a govern governmental
mental governmental agency that they are not
capable of production to live off
of the the national output
takes a nose dive. Cubas
incredibly low sugar harvest for
the last two years is one example.
Just as legal manuvers allow some
to dodge their rightful share of
the income people will learn
to become indigent at the drop
of a subsidy when extended gov government
ernment government programs offer
assistance to those in need.
Hypochondria would become
Americas number one disease,
were the Medicare program
instituted and/or expanded.
- c*; - - ..
The communists in Russia
overcome this problem through the
use of forced quotas with
serious penalties for those failing
to come up with an arbitrary
potential. Karl Marx, in his Com Communist
munist Communist Manifesto, recognized this
and made provisions for the use
of terror in overcoming it. Feudal
Lords had similar provisions.

Although the proposals of
opponents of conservatism do not
measure up to the programs
of governmental control exerted
in Russia or during the Dark Ases,
they are comparable and some
measures of enforcement will be
necessary. These measures-must
necessarily become controls which
in turn, diminish freedom.
This brief explanation of the
conservatives* motivation should
give an elementry insight into
their thinking. More compre comprehensive
hensive comprehensive examinations of the myriad
aspects of the philosophy will be
undertaken in particular articles.
We invite remakrs, whether in
agreement or not.

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Monday, Sept. 9,1963 The Florida Alligator

Page 7



Page 8

/Tuiwm^SW
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THE OFFICIAL UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA BOOKSTORE I
ADJOINING THE HUB I
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TEXTBOOKS NEW AND USED V\***^\i
ARCHITECTURAL EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES N\ "^T
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SWEATSHIRTS COLLEGE JEWELRY AND CLASS RINGS
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COLLEGE SEAL PENNANTS AND DECALS
MASCOT STATIONERY COMPLETE LINE OF GENERAL SUPPLIES
FILM AND DEVELOPING SERVICE DRUGS AND SUNDRIES
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USED BOOKS SOLD AT 30% DISCOUNT FROM NEW BOOK PRICE
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The Florida Alligator Monday/ Sept. 9/1963



\
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WmmmS: f Mm :
EsEL IP
$A m AH jo^
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*. =_
. .X.. fMjk y ; _

UF junior Susan Miller, parti participated
cipated participated in the summer intern
program of the Na HoVa 1
Aeronautics and Space
Administration (NASA) in
Washington, D. C.
She was one of 18 college students
selected to take part in this NASA
program designed to give
journalism students experience in

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Coed Takes Part
In NASA Program

UF COED AIDS SPACE EFFORT

space-oriented public affairs work
and a basic knowledge of accom accomplishments
plishments accomplishments and purposes of the
space program.
The interns designed and
compiled a press kit for
distribution to colleges and uni universities
versities universities throughout the country.
Aside from their participation
in this joint project, the students

worked in various divisions of
NASA. Miss sMiller was located
in the NASA Historical Office.
She compiled a chronological study
of both President Eisenhower's
and President Kennedys views of
the space age.
The group visited the Goddard
Space Flight Center, Greenbelt,
Maryland, and Wallops Island
launchMacilities in Virginia.

Monday, Sept. 9, 1963 The Florida Alligator

Dismiss Suit
ONeal Moves

By MARY ANN WALKER
Os The Gator Staff
Gainesville attorney William O
Neal has moved to dismiss a
damage suit resulting from a 1959
accident in which Richard C. Coffin
.Tr., son of Flavet residents Mr.
and Mrs. Richard Coffin, received
an injury causing permanent loss
of sight in the right eye.
The suit names the UF student
body, 1959 and current student
government officials, the local
American Legion auxiliary and the
State Board of Control as defen defendants.
dants. defendants.
ONeal filed the motion to
dismiss on all defendants. The
motion was argued Aug. 23 and is
still under advisement. If the
court grants ONeals motion to
dismiss, the plaintiffs will have
to amend their suit.
The suit charges negligence on
the part of the student govern government-American
ment-American government-American Legion sponsored
Boat Squadron
Offers Classes
The Gainesville Power Squadron
is offering classes in piloting and
small boat handling to UF students,
faculty and staff free of charge.
Registration for this course,
including 10 weekly lectures and
discussion sessions, will be today
in the Municipal Court Room over
the Gainesville Police Station at 8
p.m. ~;

baby-sitting service during the
1959 LSU-Florida football game.
Student Body Pres. Paul
Hendrick said yesterday he had
not heard anything about the suit
for quite some time.
As far as we can tell at this
time, the plaintiffs will probably
take the case to court, Hendrick
said.
Named in the suit were Hendrick
Frank Harshaw, vice resident of
the stude'ht body; John Purcell,
treas ure r; 1959 student body
officers Joe Ripley, president; Bob
Alligood, vice president, and Allen
McPeak, secretary of Mens
Affairs, as well as the state board
of control, and the Haisley Lynch
Post 1C of the American Legion
Auxiliary.
GATOR
m
SELL*
.TT
d/fl Mt/wiafi Jhirijl

Page 9



The Florida Alligator Monday, Sept. 9, 1963

Page 10

'\>
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the trend
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The trend to Deci-Lon is easy
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This newest concept in slide
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Good reasons why: greater
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NEW! Now theres a Deci-Lon
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AT YOUR
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Seminole Returns
To Single Volume
- ... is .
The Seminole yearbook goes back to a one-volume edition this year
after an unsuccessful try at publishing by trimester.
According to Joe Coudon, newly elected Seminole editor, main
reasons for the return of the traditional one-volume yearbook were
a sharp reduction in sales last year and the failure of the never-edited
third trimester yearbook.
The new Seminole will cover all events taking place on campus from
September to April, and will include sections on campus life, Greek
organizations, sports, leadership and campus events.
Seminoles are on sale this month, with each edition costing $3.
Seminole staff members are needed. Applications will be taken at
the Seminole office, room 9, in the Florida Union from 2-5 p.m. daily.
Seniors graduating in December will have their pictures included
in the 1964 edition. All graduating seniors should watch the Alligator
for appointment dates.

Specialists Prepare CD Manual Here

A team of specialists from all
parts of the nation met on the UF
campus recently to prepare a
syllabus for a Civil Defense short
course on fallout shelters.
Dentists
Named
Fourteen Florida dentists were
appointed recently to the UFs
advisory committee for the
planning of a denistry college.
UF Pres. J. Wayne Reitz
announced the selection of the
group to help in the design of
the new college as a unit of the
J. Hillis Miller Health Center.
Dr. Lewis Marchand of Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville is chairman.

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The UFs Department of
Mechanical Engineering has been
selected by the U. S. Office of
Civil Defense (OCD) to develop
the manual for use on a nationwide
basis.
The manual will be prepared
during a pilot course on various
mechanical engineering aspects of
fallout shelters, and will be used
later in a special OCD
instructional program for
mechanical engineers.
It will contain material on de design,
sign, design, construction, operation and
maintenance of such shelters, plus
the latest information available to
mechanical engineers on shelter
construction, according to Johp C.
Reed, head of mechanical
engineering in the College of
Engineering.

' Jjf f t yP

COUDON

Authorities in the fields of
radiation protection, structures,
air- conditioning, heat transfer,
power systems, physiology and
medicine will participate in the
pilot course and contribute papers
for the publication.
The finished syllabus is
scheduled to be released by the
OCD in the fall for use in the
special instructional program.
UF mechanical engineering pro profess
fess profess or John A. Samuel will
coordinate the pilot course and
preparation of the syllabus.
Mechanical and civil engineers
at the university have collaborated
with the OCD on a number of
fallout shelter research projects
during the past three years.
800-Plus
Graduate
4
More than 800 students
graduated following completion of
term B of the third trimester.
The total of 852 represented
523 baccalaureate degrees and 329
graduate degrees, including 60
doctor of philosophy degrees, two
specialists in education, and mas masters
ters masters degrees earned from abroad
spectrum of academic programs.
The summer graduates, though
receiving their diplomas upon
completion of their work, will be
formally recognized at annual
commencement exercises in May,
1964.
Candidates for masters'degrees
included 32 in engineering, 115 in
education and related teaching pro programs
grams programs 63 in arts and sciences,
three in architecture and fine arts,
19 in agriculture, five in business
administration, five in rehabili rehabilitation
tation rehabilitation counseling, 11 in physical
education and health, two in
forestry and two in journalism
and communications.
The final term, closing Aug. 10
ended the UF's first academic
year under the trimester system.
It brought the total undergraduate
degrees conferred for 1962-63 to
2,350; masters to 526 and doc doctorates
torates doctorates to 122.
Directors Travel
Assistant directors of the UF
hospital and clinics Duane T.
Houtz, Charles w. Pruitt, Jr. and
'Charles D. Trexlerwere
admitted to the American College
of Hospital Administrators (ACHA)
Aug. 25.
Induction ceremonies took place
at the ACHAs 29th Annual Con Convocation
vocation Convocation in New York City.

Debate Group
Membership
Open To All
Membership in the UF Debate
Society is open to all students,
including both experienced and in inexperienced
experienced inexperienced forensic participants.
Special emphasis is placed on
the training of those who have
had no prior experience.
The society meets every
Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. in Room 331
of Tigert Hall. The first meeting
of the society, will be Tuesday.
All students interested in debating
are encouraged to attend this first
meeting.
Debate is under the joint spon sponsorship
sorship sponsorship of Student Government and
the Department of Speech. The
program is directed by William
B. Lashbrook, Instructor of Speech
Assisting in this years program
will be Mike Greenspond and Donna
Willoughby, both graduate
assistants in public address.
Leading this years debate team
will ,be John DeVault and Bill
McCormick. DeVault and McCor McCormick
mick McCormick have already started the
season in a winning fashion by
going undefeated at the recent
University of Pittsburg Summer
Debate Tournament. Both received
national ranking during last years
debate season.
This seasons schedule is: 1
September: Organizational
Meeting of the Debate Society;
International Debate Debate Con Contests
tests Contests on Campus.
October: Texas Christian Debate
Tournament at Fort Worth, Tex.;
Mercer University Debate Tourn Tournament
ament Tournament at Macon, Ga.; University
of Florida Group Action Tourna Tournament
ment Tournament here.
December: Wake Forest Debate
Tournament at Winston Salem,
N.C.; University of Miami Debate
Tournament at Miami.
January: University of Georgia
Debate Tournament at Athens, Ga.;
William and Mary Tournament at
Williamsburg, Va.
February: Harvard University
Debate Tournament at Boston,
Mass.; Northwestern university
Debate Tournament at Evanston,
Wis.
March; Tulane University De Debate
bate Debate Tournament at New Orleans,
La.; University of Kansas Heart
of America Tournament at Law Lawrence,
rence, Lawrence, Kansas.
April: National Debate Tourna Tournament
ment Tournament at West Point, N.Y. Campus
Problems Speaking Contest'here.
May: City College of New York
Debate Tournament at New York,
N.Y.
July: University of Pittsburgh
Summer Debate Tournament at
Pittsburgh, Penn.

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS
GET RESULTS.



* BOBBIE BROOKS ARROW FABERGE JONATHAN LOGAN LAIGLON
WELCOME /Sad I
s STUDENTS
J in the Gainesville""shopping T^. ; lip |
Be Ik-Lindsey welcomes you and invites you to visit J j I || J
-I North Central Florida's largest fine quality depart- I r v
ment store.. .Come in and get acquainted with the /(Jr J v \
Belk-Lindsey family, the nationally advertised lines f
of fine quality merchandise, and the many services If f BEL S*~W 1 (
0 available to make your stay more enjoyable. H f tl/ J!ft ) \
COME IN SOON F
1 REGISTER FOR r " 1

- $ 300.00 WARDROBE GIVE-AWAY ;
Ui Z
IT <
= $l5O CO-ED WARDROBE AND $l5O MALE STUDENT WARDROBE 2
o
U)
111
All Registered UF Students Are Eligible You May
Register for Wardrobe Drawing as Often as You Like
% No Purchase Necessary Nothing to Do or Write
~ And You Need Not Be Present at Drawing to Win.
V~ Hr- . A Winners May Choose Their Wardrobe From Our 30
H A so W* >1 Nationally Advertised Quality Merchandise. .{
'i i 55
15 r~^/" *? / /J| DRAWING WILL BE SATURDAY
W 5 ym\'V r T/ 1/ l^"^\ I) SEPTEMBER 28 at 7:00 P.M.
1 / / IIL ENTRY BLANKS AVAILABLE
0! '-i ar"fl V /'< / IF IN MEN'S AND LADIES' J
Laj ~ = ~ \Jr'l DEPARTMENTS j |
2 i _J_| Convenienl Charge Plans Available | |
Vj ir ' I. Shamina Ctnl.r 111. 1 1 I. ... j 2 or |
A f V J-f' Ll-I LU J
w v \ JLU J 7 UJ CO
* t- | < Qg < I
V SWANK SUSAN THOMAS DARLENE HIS

Monday, Sept. 9,1963 The Florida Alligator

Page 11



The Florida Alligator Monday, Sept, 9,1963

Page 12

"AND OVER IO THE RIGHT..."
...is perhaps what orientation group leader Skip Heydt, a junior from Pompano
_ Beach, is saying as he leads his group of freshmen followers

Imalone t s^^^B
I BOOK and SUPPLY '^£*zEr\
I We£ome |gjjj*
OF FUOTODA
lOn New & Used Uof F "T" SHIRTS g
Textbooks POCKET BOOKS 1
8 For All Courses BOOK ENDS 8
8 --
1 EnataeertngSl j ARCHITECTURAL SUPPLIES|
I Supplies II Uof F GLASSES & MUGS 1
B.r ...' 8 1 uof F SWEATSHIRTS H
3KS. E, Post, Dietzgen l 1 GREETING CARDS 8
8 RleHer fi I REFERENCE BOOKS B
8 Come in and browse in our I | j DESK FADS & BLOTTERS B
m self-selection book Ej .S USED BOOKS 8
8 department. 8 8 BRIEF CASES
I A ( i I BALL POINTS
; da I COMPOSITION BOOKS B
MALONE'S Book t Supply j |^g|||#
8 Textbooks School Supplies Novelties 8

Frosh Class
Largest Ever

The largest freshman class in
UF history, about 2,900 students
enrolled during orientation last
week. An additional 1,000
transfer students rounded out the
group of registrants.
The UF orientation program is
operated by students. For the 1963
fall trimester, a staff of 30 did
the clerical and organizational
arrangements.
These staffers prepared student
folders, IBM cards, and test
schedules. Housing arrangements
'63 Building
Values Rise
The value of buildings
constructed in Florida in the first
six months of 1963 increased Only
slightly over the same period in
1962, UF economists report.
The UFs Bureau of Economic
and Business Research monthly
Florida Construction Review re reports
ports reports a 2.2 per cent difference
in the two periods.
A comparison of the first quarter
in 1963 with the first quarter in
1962 shows a slight rise in total
value of new building, but a drop
in number of housekeeping units
authorized. The number authorized
in 1963 was 34,967. This is 400
below the number in 1962.
Second quarter comparisons,
however, show an increase in both
the value of new buildings and the
number of units.
Private construction during the
first six months came to $593,
483,000, as compared to $589,169,
000 in the same period of 1962.
Public construction amounted to
$78,519,000, an increase of 15.1
Leading in the value of con construction
struction construction for the first six months
of 1963 was the area erhbracing
Broward, Martin, St. Lucie and
Palm Beach counties. The activity
in those counties totaled $138,302,
000.

tDine at the Sign of Your
GRACIOUS HOST
OPEN DAILY & SUNDAY
Prime Roast Beef
carved to order
Fresh Baked Pastries
Largest Selection of
Fresh Vegetables, Fruits
und Fresh Salads in
Sainesvi I le
LUNCH Private Banquet Facilities
11:30 am to 2:05 pm La Air-Conditioned
DINNER Dining Room Seats 300
4:30 pm to 8:05 pm Short Drive from Campus
- OPEN
m /O *ss?s
\ i_
1212 N. Main St. 'cfm*
JUST 5 MINUTES EAST OF CAMPUS*
Hill 2. lliil
* NW 13 th St £
IMIBII 4? llllllli jfpark Lane ,1 > 1111
> N Main

and academic schedules were
arranged by UF officials.
The fall trimester orientation
program was headed by Mac
Melvin, freshman law student..
Supplementing the orientation
staff this fall were 150 group
leaders. These students mostly
Sophomores, were responsible for
t l ''' students weeks activities.
Traffic was controlled by three
walkie-talkie units donated by the
ROTC. c
Students serving as group
leaders were on campus a week
early. Staff members have been
present since Aug. 17.
Orientation week, chiefly a
means of registering incoming
students with an opportunity to
familiarize themselves with the
UF facilities and activities.
Registration and all programs
requiring participation of the in incoming
coming incoming student body were held at
the gymnasium. Students were
addressed by Lester Hale, dean
of student affairs and Paul
Hendriclj, student body president.
UF Pres. J. Wayne Reitz gave
the presidential address.

j| |
+ i m

MAC MELVIN
.. .orientation head



Fraternities Move
To New Houses

By TIM JOHNSON
Os The Gator Staff
r
Several UF fraternities have
made plans to move to new houses
within the next two years.
Fraternities and plans include:
phi Epsilon Pi The Phi Eps are
renting a house at 1106 SW 4th
Ave. It is the former Delta Phi
Epsilon sorority house.
The Phi Ep national organiza organization
tion organization will build a new house on
Fraternity Row within the next
few years. The house will
accomodate about 40 brothers.
Lambda Chi AlphaOn Tuesday
a meeting will be held with the
State Board of Control and the
State Auditor to make definite
plans. The fraternity wants to move
into their yet to be constructed
house as close to April 1 as
possible.
Phi Gamma DeltaThe Fijis
are plan ing to move into a new 1
house on Fraternity Row during
they Summer 1964. The house,
costing SIBO,OOO, will accommo accommodate
date accommodate 46 members.
Construction will be started in
December.
Delta Chi--The Delta Chis have
Hotel Thomas
Temporarily
DPhiE Home
Delta Phi Epsilon sorority
women are temporarily calling
Hotel Thomas* 1 home sweet home.
Many a sorority house might
well be called a small hotel, but
when these 45 sorority girls refer
to their present home as a hotel,
they mean just that.
With completion of their new
house at 1115 SW 9th Ave just
three weeks away, the coeds found
the hotel was the best substitute
housing for their needs. After a
week of hotel living both the girls
and the management have found
that there are differences betwee\
a *k ; *! a The D Pi i Es are still subject
to all UF rule., o this hasnt
r/reserted any policy changes. The
girls and their housemother, Mrs.
Grace Haft, are on the same floor,
and regular dorm rules are easy
to handle.
A girl and her telephone must
never be parted and the Hotel
Thomas switchboard is proving
this point beyond a doubt. So far
there hasnt been any overload overloading,
ing, overloading, but the coeds apparently can
strain the lines a little.
The DPhiE s have also found
private baths, air-conditioning,
and room televisions very much to
their living.
1 ransportation is hil only real
problem, said Lea Bus y. Ot Otht
ht- Otht wi.'- j its a.'r***st ideal.
The maid service isnt bad
though, Sara Widelitz added.
Ground Breaking
Kicks Off SAE
Construction
Ground-b re ak in g ceremonies
for the new Sigma Alpha Epsilon
(SAE) fraternity house was held
Sunday at 4;30p.m. near the corner
of Woodbery and Radio Road.
About 10 members of the alumni
house corporation took part in the
ceremonies, SAE Pres. Charlie
Edwards said.
The new house, to be built by
J. W. Wood, general contractor
from Winter Haven, will cost about
$250,000. Architect on the project
is Gene Leedy. The tentative date
of completion is the end of Febru February,
ary, February, 1964.

sold their house and will leave
the house by June 1 of next year.
Their new house will be on
Fraternity Row and will house 40
members.
Construction will be started next
summer or fall. Plans have not yet
been made as to where the fra fraternity
ternity fraternity will house itself while
construction is in progress.
Sigma Chi--Sigma Chis Friday
received funds to build anew house
on Fraternity Row. The house,
costing $275,000 will be air-con air-conditioned
ditioned air-conditioned and will accommodate 56.
Ground breaking will take place
next week and the fraternity will
move next April.
Delta Upsilon will renovate the
Sigma Chi house and probably move
into the structure next summer.
The DUs presently are at 928 SW
st Avenue.

.i,
&
C-tP I 1 (m-ll BOX 768 CRYSTAL RIVER, FLORIDA
c/1 ender~s E. L HENDERSON, JR., Prop. TOWELS CARPETS RUGS BEDSPREADS LINENS
September, 1963
Faculty and; Students
' -Unlversity of Florida
Gainesville, Florida
Dear Floridians:
Ve want you to know about our new store. We
think you would enjoy a visit with us. Certainly it
would be a pleasure to have you here.
, n "'
We literally have TONS OF TOWELS of the luxury
type. We advertise that you can weigh and save. You see
tpe mill accumulates a varied assortment of styles some somewhat
what somewhat irregular. Since it is uneconomical for a production
unit, to reclassify and rematch, we can buy cases of these
towels by weight rather than by dozens. In these instances
we sell by weight, enabling our customers to find delight delightful
ful delightful towels and pleasing combinations at most attractive
prices. In addition we have continuity on six decorator
ensembles of irregulars priced 25$ to 50$ below regular
first quality prices.
Also we have authentically styled bedspreads,
bath rug 3, and room size carpets, slightly Irregular and
about a third off.
Our fabric department is growing week by week.
For example we have printed fall corduroys at 79/ a yard
that you will find elsewhere for sl*29. And many other
interesting fabrics priced accordingly--solid 3 and prints.
y
From time to time you will find suchthings a3
unhemmed printed beach towels at SI.OO each, blanket ir irregulars
regulars irregulars at SI.BB, etc.
In first quality we have Pepperell sheets and
blankets. Also Cabin Crafts accent area rugs and
in a dramatic array of fibers and textures.
Do plan a trip to Crystal Hiver with a group of
your friends and shop our store. We think you wj.ll return.
, Cordially yours
Jr.
. w
p q Parkin* -- Coffee Breaks --
P V* Central Air Conditioning Rest Rooms

4 J t \ J; s\ v, 'O
Jlkc. 4PS3I v* v91M989
lip ' < v \
:* POSING IN THE PALMS
.. .is Miss Jane Lightcap, last fall's Homecoming Queen.

Monday, Sept. 9,1963 The Florida Alligator

Sweetheart
Deadline Set
Deadline for campus organiza organizations
tions organizations wishing to enter Homecoming
Sweetheart contestants is Monday,
Sept. 16.
Groups wishing to enter
contestants should get entry blanks
in the Blue Key Office at the
Florida Union, room 214.
judging will be at Silver Springs
Sept. 21, 22 with three princesses
selected. The princesses tour
Florida on three different week weekends
ends weekends to places including Tampa,
Orlando, Jacksonville, Daytona
Beach and St. Petersburg.
princesses will return to Silver
Springs the weekend prior to
Homecoming, Oct. 25-26. The
queen and her court then return
to Gainesville to be featured at
the Blue Key smoker, the Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming parade, Gator Growl and
the LSU-Florida football game
Oct. 26.

Page 13



Page 14

The Florida Alligator Monday, Sept. 9,1963

Hi - Im
and I represent the little shop with the gaslights,
stable door, red back door, and me in the window,
sumptuously situate at one. one* three-one West
University Avenue. We specialize in country
(casual) clothes, with "a touch of Americana"
our theme. Stop by and browse, sign our guest
book, and be sure and make the scene this week weekend
end weekend when weH have our grand opening (you know,
registrations for prizes, and all that jazz.) Meet
the gals that make me shine, Pat Berry, Joann
Sloan, and some cute coeds, and my bosses, Jerry
and Shermy Rudderman. Hope to see you soon.
Twig

MORLEYS
SHOP^_
A FLORIDA FAVORITE
'V', ; \
SALAD BOWL SPECIAL SUPPER SPECIALS 67<
; i _j u_ -r^ - : : ~ ~ : v
OPEN 'TIL 1 A.M.
i t 1
Across from Univ. City Bank

Entomologists
Find Bugs Not
Easy To Know
The nations entomologists are
discovering that classifying
species of insects by structural
appearances can be as risky as
judging a book by its cover.
UF researcher Dr. Thomas J.
Walker, in a paper given before
the international Congress of
Zoology recently pointed out that
many species of crickets and katy katydids
dids katydids could not be detected readily
by such conventional means.
Dr. Walker, associate professor
of entomology in the College of
Agriculture reported one-fourth
of the sound-producing orthoptera
(crickets and katydids) were
cryptic or hidden species which
had to be recognized first by other
means.
And it is important from a
research standpoint that they are
recognized, he said. A researcher
checking for insecticide resistance
must know if theyre dealing with
more than one insect or his work
will be invalid.
There are two major means of
species identification in this group
other than noting structural dif differences,
ferences, differences, said Dr. Walker.
Varying recognition signals
among the species themselves
offer one clue to identification as
do differing seasonal life cycles.
The cone-headed grasshopper
for example, comes in two not noteasily
easily noteasily identifiable spec les. Both
look exactly alike, but each has
a distinct recognition signal and
each a different breeding season.

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Br j&SygHHHHBj 9BaHnBHHHHfii;
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',_' r>4'"* V J " '-*'i W jjfflF*"* V 7ff* f 3 '/ "''S C?£*.' fy'r'y 'V'f !( .; Y<"'>
l *' y,\ y-V,.' H .fIEF.
-i|P*J|P| w ;H£HHHP jBB|V 1
JP '"f^ * y f ' r

DEAN OF STUDENT AFFAIRS
.. .Lester L. Hale is Orientation Week speaker.

Forget Summer,
Hale Tells Frosh

Dont try to hold on to sum summertime,
mertime, summertime, Dr. Lester L. Hale,
UF Dean of Student Affairs, told
freshmen students Tuesday in a
forum session ending the first day
of orientation.
You will probably get just what
you came for here. If you want to
! *stop the clock and hold on to
summertime this can happen here.
You can be a kid all Fall if you
want to, but when you fail out
dont blame it on the bigness of
the school, the dean said.
You must understand that your

welfare here your education
your future is inevitably related
to your willingness to accept a well
ordered life in this community.
Self-control and respect for
authority must be woven into your
college life, he said.
If you came to the University
to learn to contribute
constructively to your generation'
through your acquisition of know knowledge
ledge knowledge and your maturation of
judgment and ability to think, then
you shall have an inner reward
that no man can take from you,
Dean Hale said.



Books Ineview

K?roups Explores
Iff a/if Post-Vassar Lives

ID PRESS INTERNATIONAL
GROUP, by Mary McCar McCar[arcourt,
[arcourt, McCar[arcourt, Brace & World
This is a story of eight
vho met and became friends
sar. The reader meets them
graduation freshly minted at
> and turned loose in the
n world (1933) to learn and
n some fundamental values,
story of each girl is uni oiled
jte with family background,
tions, collisions with life,
arriage and deviation. Miss
thy doesnt miss a trick in
:terizing the life and time of
iroines and their reactions,
versation and thought, to all
cperience.
a result her Vassar girls
e like people you might know
is a major accomplishment
y novelist.
*** *
E AMERICAN WAY OF
H, by JessicaMitford(Simon
uster $4.95): The funeral
val School
rticipation
riled Again
students and faculty may
ipate in the Naval Reserve
rs School again this year,
il N. Smith, USNR, comman commanfficer,
fficer, commanfficer, said no prerequisites
ecessary. All officers may
re retirement and promotion
for drills attended.
irses are taught at college
. National Strategy in the
1 War and Financial
gement in the Navy" will run
two trimesters. Ocean Ocean)hy
)hy Ocean)hy and Space Technology"
one trimester in length,
3e offered in the fall and again
? spring.
isses meet Thursday evenings
10 p.m. at the Naval Reserve
ing Center.
cers interested in enrolling
visit the center Thursday
> or telephone Smith at 376-
Ext. 2639.
sic e r s attached to other
ng units may obtain supple
al orders to NROS 6-11 if they
e to enroll in NROS courses.

O V
GALLERY PRINTS
y ,y : 4 .. y_ y
&
AND FRAMES FOR SALE
SEPTEMBER 9 through 13
1-9 P.M.
FLORIDA UNION SOCIAL ROOM
l
DECORATE YOUR APARTMENT AT
; REASONABLE PRICES
. J
l
I .1. i.
§ mm^m ___ mmmmm mmtmmmmmmmmmmm

industry in the United States takes
in about 2 billion dollars a year
through the sale em embalming,
balming, embalming, cremation, rental of
rooms and crypts, and the
rendering of other services.
Miss Mitford examines each
aspect of the business and finds
that the cost of dying is much
more than it should be. She takes
apart the whole costly process
from funeral parlor to grave or
crematory, showing how the fam families
ilies families of the deceased are grossly
overcharged for everything at a
time when their resistance is low.
She points out that in 1961, the
average funeral cost $1,450.
Its a most informative book that
sheds light on a situation that
concerns everyone eventually.
*****
A KIND OF MAGIC by Edna
Ferber (Doubleday $5.75): In which
Miss Ferber continues her auto autobiography
biography autobiography from 1939 to 1963. The
first part of her story was pub published
lished published in A Peculiar Treasure."
This account gives her
extremely articulate reactions to
her surroundings, friends, people
she met, places she visited, events
and her own literary output during
those crowded years. And since
the past two dozen years were
the fastest-paced in history, Miss
Ferber has much to comment on.
VISIONS OF GERARD, by Jack
Kerouac (Ferrar, Straus $3.95):
This tender, compassionate bio biography
graphy biography of a saintly young boy is
a unique departure for the author
of On The Road and The Dhrama
Bums.
Gerard Duluoz, a 9-year-old
schoolboy who sees visions of the
Virgin Mary and is gifted with an
inexhaustable sympathy for all
Gods creatures, is fatally
stricken with rheumatic fever. He
suffers without murmur the

Cadets Up In Tests

UF military cadets took high
honors in ROTC achievement tests
at Fort Benning, Ga. last month.
The cadets, just completing
summer training at Fort Benning
with students from 37 colleges
and universities, placed first in
rifle marksmanship, second in 90
minute final examinations, and
raised their standing over last
year in land navigation from 13th
to 6th place.
Cadet Jack S. Williams,
education senior from Jacksonville
placed second as outstanding cadet

sickness which wracks his failing
body. A thinly-disguised portrait
of Kerouacs own older brother,
he seems limost too good for this
world. The author remembers him
with awe and adoration.
The writing, frankly sentimental
is sometimes moving and poetic.
At other times it submerges into
soap-opera bathos and beatnik
mysticism -- hangovers from
Kerouacs earlier works. But of all
tragedies, the death of an innocent
child is perhaps the most difficult
to comprehend. Kerouac does his
best to try.
it it it
BEST SELLERS
i UPI)
(Compiled by Publishers Weekly)
Fiction
THE SHOES OF THE FISHERMAN
Morris West
ELIZABETH APPLETON
John O'Hara
THE GLASS-BLOWERS
Daphne du Maurier
CITY OF NIGHTJohn Rechy
GRANDMOTHER AND THE PRIESTS
Taylor Caldwell
CARAVANSJames Mic.iener
SEVEN DAYS IN MAYFletcher Knebel
and Charles W. Bailey II
RAISE HIGH THE ROOF BEAM.
CARPENTERS, AND SEYMOUR
J. D. Salinger
THE CONCUBINE Norah Lofts
THE COLLECTORJohn Fowles
WHEN THE LEGENDS DIE
Hal Borland
. V
Nonfiction
THE FIRE NEXT TlMEJames Baldwin
l OWE RUSSIA SI2OO Bob Hope
MY DARLING CLEMENTINE
Jack Fishman
THE WHOLE TRUTH, AND NOTHING
BUTKedda Hopper and
James Brough -
THE DAY THEY SHOOK THE PLUM
TREE Arthur H. Lewis
TRAVELS WITH CHARLEY
John Steinbeck
TERRIBLE SWIFT BWORD:
The Centennial History of the Civil
War Bruce Catton
HAPPINESS IS A WARM PUPPY
Charles M Schul*
THE ESSENTIAL LIPPMANN Walter
Lipjjmann. ed by Clinton Rossiter
and James Lare
O YE JIGS s; JULEPS!Virginia Cary
Hudson
THE GREAT HUNGER: Ireland, 1845-
1849Cecil Woodham Smith
THE FEMININE MYSTIQUE Betty
Friedan

at the camp. Selection was based
on leadership, academic prowess
in military science and overall
military excellence.
Retiring Col. Thomas A. Graham
professor of military science and
tactics of the universitys ROTC
unit, said the success of the UF
cadets in the Fort Benning con contests
tests contests could be attributed to their
well-rounded background and the
high standards they have selected
as their goals.

I HEELS put on in 5 minutes
I SOLES put on in 15 minutes (
I MODERtTsHOE I
REPAIR SHOP
fpcross from Ist notionol bonlj
I
fOLKSINCERS
\" V *'
.i. r ? S.N . (>
. /,*, .v- \ /"* i.. vyr on*
* s V U VAA
v, ... ~v\ d .A.
. -
folhlore
prodor*'run
*m*.T J n "-
m/wmZf fS ?
ri. Mt wi>.

Monday, Sept. 9; 1963 The Florida Alligator

GATOR CLASSIFIED

Auto&r

1962 BMW 19,000 miles. Very
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-st-c). (C.-l--st-c).
55 PONTIAC CONVERTIBLE.
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top. Radio & heater. $350.00. 306-
B N.W. 16th Street. (G-l-lt-c).
<
59 PLYMOUTH FURY 4 door,
automatic, radio and heater. Good
condition. $750. FR 6-8772 after
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(G-l-st-c).

Situations Wanted

NEED DRUMMER? Experienced.
Excellent set of drums. Call 372-
1249 after 5:00 p.m. Ask for John.
(F-l-st-c).
WILL CARE FOR Three children
in my home. Teaching, nursery
school experience. Large enclosed
yard. Children over 1 year
preferred. FR 6-8116. (F-l-lt-c).

ALL EYES ARE
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WHEN YOU ADVERTISE
IN THE ALLIGATOR
Call 6-3261, Ext. 2832
#t. Petersburg
dimes
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FLORIDA'S BEST NEWSPAPER
Can now be delivered
to you by 6 am seven
days a week. Wq have
guaranteed delivery
service anyplace on or
off campus, including
all dormitories. Save
25$ per week under
news stand price by
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you every day. Only
55$ per week. Our
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ation circulation department num number
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WANTED Companion for 2 yr.
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Help Wanted

MORNING PAPER ROUTE with
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Phone 372-4532 anytime.
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Page 15



The Florida Alligator Monday, Sept. 9,1963

Page 16

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MASS CONFUSION IS THE RULE
*9 typical scene from last week's orientation exercises is this, as hundreds of
students rush madly from appointment to appointment.

Law Students Honored

Seven UF law students have been named to the
editorial board of the Florida Law Review.
A quarterly journal published on the campus, the
review is a compilation of reports on the latest
developments in the field of law and is prepared by
students in the University's College of Law.
A B-minus or higher academic average is required
before faculty approval of candidates for the editorial

Annual Publications
f *
Conference Here

The fourth annual Southern
Universities Student Government
Association (SUSGA) Publications
conference will be held here
Thursday and Friday, Oct. 10, 11.
More than 150 students from 52
southern universities are expected
to participate in activities ranging
from panel discussions to a ban-"
quet. Other activities will include
lectures and campus tours.
Purpose of the conference is to
give other schools an idea how
the UF puts out its publications.
The participants will spend much
of their time observing methods
and techniques for possible use
at their schools.

- Expect More
Get More
K.C. Strip Steak
MEDIUM LARGE X-LARGE
1.35 1.65 2.00
London Broil Steak
SERVED WITH
FRENCH FRIES CHOPPED SALAD
HOT ROLLS & BUTTER
- .n.. V
SI.OO
LARRY'S WONDERHOUSE
14 S.W. First St. (Behind Sears)
7 am 8 pm

This is the first year the
conference has been held here.
Harrell Testifies
Dean George T. Harrell of the
College of Medicine went to
Washington, D. C., recently to
testify at Senate committee
hearings on a bill to provide federal
assistance for education in the
health professions.
Dr. Harrell assisted the com committee
mittee committee in determining the need for
U. S. Government support for
construction of new or expanded
colleges of medicine, denistry,
pharmacy, nursing and other health
professions, as well as for teaching
hospitals.

board.
Editor-in-chief is Mike Jamieson, third year law
student from Coral Gables. The six executive editors
all third year students, are: Reed A. Bryan of
Fort Lauderdale, Ed Ginsburg of Miami, Sylvia
Hardaway of Tampa, Steve Helgemo of Daytona
Beach, Steve Dakan of winter Park and Bill Meeks
of Fort Lauderdale.

MBSPjjp^
CAMPUS WARDROBEOLOGY ..
A SYNOPTIC VIEW, SETTING FORTH TRADITIONAL REQUIREMENTS DEEMED
NECESSARY IN THE SELECTION OF FINE DRESS AND SPORT SHIRTS THIS
" SEASON.
I. STYLE*
/MOSTLY BUTTON-DOWNS, BUT SEVERAL TABS FOR
DnLoo bHltfib /VARIETY AND MORE FORMAL SITUATIONS.
f NATURALLY BUTTON-DOWNS IN COAT MODELS, AL ALSPORTSHIRTS
SPORTSHIRTS ALSPORTSHIRTS THOUGH A FEW PULLOVER MODELS MAY BE INCLUDED
(FOR DISTINCTION.
*ALL MODELS MUST INCLUDE TAPERED BODY, BOX PLEAT AND SELF
LOCKER LOOP IN BACK, OFFSET BUTTON BARREL CUFFS.
11. COLORS AND PATTERNS
/STRIPES TAKE A BOLD APPROACH AND ARE UNANI UNANIMOUSLY
MOUSLY UNANIMOUSLY A LEADERRED, BLUE, ALSO IN DARKS,
ON A WHITE GROUND, REPRESENT A MUST; A BASIC
WARDROBE OF ALL WHITE AND BLUES SHOULD BE
DRESS SHIRTS< MAINTAINED; ADDITIONAL COLORS IN STRIPE CO COORDINATES
ORDINATES COORDINATES AND SOLIDS ARE VERY PLEASING, AL ALTHOUGH
THOUGH ALTHOUGH PROPER DISCRETION MUST BE EXERCISED
WITH CONSIDERATION TO SUIT AND SPORTCOAT
' (COLORINGS.
r INDIA MADRAS IS BOLDER AND EXTREMELY POPULAR
FOLLOWED UP WITH SOLID OXFORDS RETAINING
THIS SAME DEEP TONE COLORING . BURGUNDY
NAVY, BOTTLE GREEN AND CAMEL. COMPETING FOR
SPORTSHIRTS NEXT PLACE ARE BLAZER STRIPES, RED STRIPES
- AND TARTANS FOLLOWED THROUGH WITH SIMILAR
COLORINGS. MANY OTHER PATTERNS, COLORS AND
FABRICS MAY BE ADDED DEPENDING ON INDIVIDUAL
l TASTE.
_OUR DEDICATION TO THE CAUSE OF FASHION HAS NO LIMIT. SELECT WITH
CONFIDENCE FROM A COLLECTION ABIDING ... HANDSOME ENRO ADVANCE
* GUARD IN TRADITIONAL STYLING.
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World of BICYCLES...
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NEW & USED MOTORCYCLES
ALL PARTS & ACCESSORIES FOR BIKES & CYCLES
KEYS FITTED
STUDENTS! If you would like to place a new or
used bicycle on reserve and avoid the rush / write:
STREIT'S BICYCLE SHOP
615 W. University Ave.
Gainesvilie, Florida



Never Trust Toadstools

That strange little white plant
that may have appeared on the
iawn this morning may be a
delicious mushroom, the type
favored by Julius Ceasar or
Alexander the Great--or it may
be a deadly toadstool.
Unless youre trained in the use
of a microscope, however, and
know which botanic al char characteristics

Former Male Hall
Houses 200 Coeds

By TOM SCHIERECK
Os The Gator Staff
Graham Hall, formerly an all
male housing area, is housing 200
UF women this year.
The change is due to an increase
of womep students and the closing
of Grove Hall. Grove previously
housed 165 women.
Thomas Carpenter, assistant
director of housing, said a similar
switch was made several years
ago when Weaver was used
for Womens housihg/
It is not uncommon for uni universities
versities universities to have men and women
in the same dorms today, he
said. At Graham, men and women
share the same lobby and
recreation room, but live in
separate buildings.
There has been a steady in increase
crease increase of woman applicants to
the university. Nine years ago, the
ratio was eight to one, he said.
Today it is 2.2 to one. This
increase has caused a lag in
womens housing facilities.
Changing Graham Hall from a
mens to a womens dorm was the
only practical solution.
The demand for mens dorms
dies off quickly because most men
decided to live off campus by their
junior or senior year, Carpenter
said.
He said he believes this is an
ideal arrangement. Men and
women will show more care and
consideration toward facilities in
the presence of the other sex. They
will have greater chances to meet
new friends and develop better
socially, he said.
Players
- 1 Tryout
Floridas drama enthusiasts, the
Fldrida Players, will hold tryouts
for an adventure inexpressionistic
drama, The Visit, Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thursday at 4 and
7 p.m. in room 239, Tigert Hall.
Director L. L. Zimmerman calls
The Visit one of the most
ambitious plays used as a season
opener in many years.
The play makes adr as tic
comment about mans callousness
in a very unusualy way and prom-
to entertain and startle
aroiences, he said.
The story begins in a bankrupt
European town greedily awaiting
the arrival of one of the worlds
richest women. They are horrified
when she arrives and says she
will help the town prosper only if
the townspeople will kill a former
lover in the name of Justice.
The play takes a surprising turn
as the town decides which is worth
more--moriey or a mans life.
The Visit is scheduled for
October 16, 17, 18, and 19, the
weekend before Homecoming.
It sets the stage for five other
major productions by the Florida
Players this year, including a
comedy, Charleys Aunt;
House of Bernarda Alba by
Lorca, and Summer and Smoke
by Tennessee Williams. >
Zimmerman plans to use more
than 30 actors in his play and hopes
interested u F students will tryout.

acteristics characteristics to look for, youd better
forego your culinary inspirations
in favor of good old fashion caution
and leave it there, according to
UF botanist Erdman West.
There are thousands of species
of mushrooms in Florida, west
said, and most of these are either
poisonous or untested.
Toadstool is actually, a folk folkname
name folkname for poisonous mushrooms,

No plans have been made beyond
this year, he said.
All in all, i am rather opti optimistic,
mistic, optimistic, Carpenter said.
problems should arise, if we are
properly staffed, and we are.
Sharon Hennessey, a resident
of the Graham area said, There
are both advantages and disad disadvantages
vantages disadvantages to the mixed housing
set up. it enables girls to meet
boys on an informal basis. This
enables girls to see their true
personality, not the front likely
to be seen on a date.
You get a chance to meet many
boys, she said. Maybe not always
as dates, but at least as friends.
It seems more like home.
It is a considerable improve improvement
ment improvement over just having men in a
housing area, said Broady
Richardson, a male section adviser
of the area. The boys are some somewhat
what somewhat neater in their appearance
Now they are less likely to cut up
in the lobbies and recreation
room.
In one week, we already have
had a dance and a mixer. We had
nothing like this last year. Here
you can casually sit down and talk
to a girl. There is so little chance
for this on campus.
We have to keep r our blinds
down all the time, which makes
our rooms even hotter, said Dee
Anthon,. But I really like it here.
Bill Black, lUC, also likes the
chance to talk and joke with girls.
Its much better to be with girls
than just to be talking about them
with a group of guys.
Another resident Susan
Westnedge, said the arrangement
gives women a chance to make the
first move and not seem forward.
However you look at it, its
better for boys and girls, she
said.
Driving Folk
To Practice
On New Range
Future driver education
teachers and P. K. Yonge High
School students will practice actual
driving this year on a remodeled
driving range west of the UF track
field.
The range was re-marked during
the summer to permit angle and
parallel parking and to indicate
change of driving lane, according
to William A. Nutzell, assistant
professor in Physical Education.
The re-marking of the range
will permit manuevers to be done
off-streets, Nutzel said.
One instructor will supervise
several cars practicing on the 175
by 550-foot range. Cars for the
classes will be provided by the
College of Physical Education and
Health.
The range program has been
instituted as a part of driver
education teacher preparation to
meet the needs for teachers in
this field as a result of a state
law passed requiring driver's
education programs in high
schools.

said the Agricultural Experiment
Station botanist.
A toadstool may be so closely
related to an edible variety that
distinguishing it under a micro microscope
scope microscope is exceedingly difficult.
Poisonous mushrooms may act
in different ways. A person who
eats one may become sick in a
few minates or he may feel fine
for as long as two days.
The horrible thing about the
delayed reaction, West said, is
that the system absorbs so much
of the poison that there is no
effective antidote.
Some poisons attack the nervous
system, while others cause com complications
plications complications in the digestive tract.
One type causes hallucinations of
brilliantly-colored lights, West
said.
Actually, mushrooms dont
mushroom *at all, according to
West, and growth that appears to
take place overnight may involve
months of development in the
ground.
The process usually starts with
vast networks of tiny webs which
come together in knots and
develop small mushrooms at the
intersecting points.

, / -t
Tonys Is Under New Management...
He Has a New Improved Pizza for You, Too!
5
y Pizza Menu
K&Cjy g YV m / Small Mad Large
m Tomato & Cheese .90 1.40 1.75
uQI / Onions .95 1.50 1.95
f / Green Peppers .95 1.50 1.95
Pepperoni 1.00 1.60 2.00
Sausage 1.10 1.65 2.05
Beef 1.10 1.65 2.05
0* mm a* j Q Bacon 1.10 1.65 2.05
372~0!>4 0 Salami 1.10 1.65 2.05
- y Olives 1.4-5 1.65 2.05
Anchovies 1.15 1.65 2.05
Mushrooms 1.25 1.70 2.30
Combinations of 2 1.35 1.85 2.60
Combinations of 3 1.45 2.00 2.80
-t TONYS SPECIAL 1.55 "2.35 3.10
I
OPEN FROM II A.M. TO 12 P.M. 7 DAYS A WEEK
. L
1 308 West University Avenue
..GAINESVILLE 372-8548
TONY'S PIZZA
i fi
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Come In & Try The All New Pizza At Tony's

Monday, Sept. 9,1963 The Florida Alligator

tv*-
m St M Ik IT
ml
I a m Btpp*- § -Jp-
MUSHROOM OR "TOADSTOOL"?
McDAVID'S BARBER SHOP
f
* "Just Across the Avenue
* SEVEN BARBERS
Shoe Repair Shop in Rear 4
1718 W. University Ave. 4-

Page 17



The Florida Alligator Monday/ Sept. 9,1963

Page 18

UF Will Share
TV Grid Loot

The UF is not going to make
a fortune on the nationally tele televised

rami'
HAIRSTYLIST
"Where loveliness
is mode lovelier"
QUALITY OPERATORS
TO SERVE YOU:
Mr. Robert
Gladys Falls
Eileen Rutherford
Sarah Hope
Next to Long's Cafeteria
FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT
CALL
319 W. Univ. Ave.
ample parking in rear

!§!£>
Catering to the students of the university since 1905
Serving Quality Foods for low prices -
Sundries store for the students 1 convenience
Complete take-out service and catering for large and
small parties
v
We feature daily specials on our cafeteria line
COLLEGE
INN
1728 WEST UNIVERSITY AVENUE

vised televised opening game with Georgia
Tech but the publicity will be
good for the school,.the state and
the Southeastern Conference
(SEC), according to Percy Beard,
assistant of athletics and
athletic business manager.
Tech and the UF were offered
$135,000 by the Columbia Broad Broadcasting
casting Broadcasting System (CBS) to televise
next Saturdays game throughout
the nation but the two schools wiF.
not get s67,so£Lapiece.
According to Southeastern
Conference rules, the money is
divided into 15 shares of $9,000
each. The Gators and Yellow
Jackets get two shares each
($18,000) and the ten remaining
SEC schools get one share. The
conference also gets one share.
CBS made the offer in the early
spring after much of Floridas
pre-season publicity had been
released. This necessitated more
publicity about the change in date
from Sept. 21 to Sept. 14. The
change also affects the kickoff time
which has been moved from 2 to
1 p.m. to accommodate the CBS
schedule.
Fortunately tickets had not been
printed when the decision was made
to move the game up one week.
Printing new tickets would cost
the UF about S7OO.
As for hotel and plane reser reservations
vations reservations everything was just moved
up one week.
Major concern of the Gator
Coaches was the effect of the loss
of one week of practice to the team.
Georgia Tech also has the same
problem.

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END OF THE LINE
.. .for Gator yarsity halfback Jack Harper is at hand as he picks up five yards in the
first quarter of Saturday's intra-squad scrimmage.: Making the tackle is freshman
George Grandy (on ground).

Gators Have Week
N - *J- /.;
-~ ' '- .-SatZ.ll. '. '
To Heal Football Injuries

The Florida Gators are entering
their final week of practice before
Saturdays season opener with
Georgia Tech on national television
and everybody including head
Coach Ray Graves is walking
around with their fingers crossed.
The injury picture of the team
Graves No. 1 concern right now

Confidence Is Key
To Shannon Story

One year ago last spring there
was one believer in young sopho sophomore
more sophomore Tom Shannon as the
immediate answer to the UFs
problem at quarterback.
This fan go upset when Shannon
started the season as a defensive
back. He really wasnt satisfied
until the Miamian opened the Duke
game at quarterback and pitched a
pair of touchdown passes.
This gentleman with the
Now all pens
use same
ink cartridge
Fits Sheaf fer Parker
Esterbrook Wearever
Venus Eversharp
Cartridge Fountain Pen
/
Buy the one that fits the pen you own
and the pen you may get or borrow.
Washable Blue, Washable Black,
Peacock Blue, Jet Black. Cardinal
Red, Blue Black and Green.
Get All-Pen Cartridges
Available at your favorite
. supply 8 for 49<

--has been the big story since
practice began two weeks ago.
Frank Lasky, the 270-pound anchor
of the Gator front line, has been
sidelined §ince before drills began
with a leg he slashed in, an ac accident.
cident. accident.
Fullback and potential All-
America Larry Dupree has a hurt

unshakeable faith was none other
than young sophomore Shannon
himself. And Florida head coach
Ray Graves quickly admits
Shannon wasnt wrong.
Such is not the case as the Gators
get ready for 1963. Shannon, now
a junior, opens at quarterback.
When the second unit enters the
game, offensively, the quarterback
will be Shannon. And so on down
the units of offensive substitution.
As far as we are concerned,
Tommys the boy who will make
our offense go, Graves said.
Hes not a picture quarterback,
but hes got poise, confidence and
reacts as well to pressure as
anybody Ive seen.
Last year Shannon set a new
school record with 56 completions
in 100 attempts. He was the most
outstanding player in the 17-7 Gator
Bowl victory over Penn State,
calling a near-perfect game and
throwing two scoring passes.
f§§?
filter k
TOM SHANNON

knee and for a while had the virus.
Starting center Roger Pettee, who
along with fullback Jim ODonnell
holds down the monster slot
in the Gator defense, has been
nursing battle wounds.
TOM SHANNON, Floridas only
quarterback with any game experi experience
ence experience re-injured himself in
Saturday's scrimmage.
And its those ailments that
keep Graves and his staff crossing
their fingers hoping nothing more
will befall them.
But of all those innuries, only
Laskys is serious enough to keep
him from starting in the game.
And even he is given a good chance
to play some.
All of our first-stringers with
injuries, Pettee, Shannon, Russ and
Barry Brown (ends) and Dupree
will definitely play against Tech,
the head Gator has said repeatedly.
Lasky put in a surprise appear appearance
ance appearance for a few plays in the
scrimmage Saturday and
afterwards Graves changed his
tune and said even the big boy
would see action in Atlanta.
FRANK WAS A pleasant sur surprise
prise surprise to say the least, the cigar cigarsmoking
smoking cigarsmoking mentor said. Were now
counting on him for some play in
the game Saturday. Were hoping
he can go at least minutes.
That could mean a lot to the
Gators.
Daily afternoon workouts
resume today but from now on they
will be top-secret affairs, closed
even to the working press.
The Gators are scheduled to
work hard through Wednesday, hold
a light drill Thursday and then fly
via chartered airplane to Atlanta
sometime Friday.
While injuries have made the
Gator followers something less
than overjoyed, reports from At Atlanta
lanta Atlanta say Tech coach Bobby Dodd
is having his troubles too. Several
key players are sidelined for the
game or at least hobbled.
THE GAME WAS MOVED up a
week so it could be put on nation nationwide
wide nationwide television and Graves has
said several times that the short
practice schedule has hampered
his plans.
But I know Coach Dodd has
been saying the same thing. We
sure could use another weeks
work, the Gator coach said.
Graves has tried to maintain
his three-team system the Gators
used last season but the new sub substitution
stitution substitution rule has modified their
play some,. "



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Stokes Out,
But Replaced

Florida basketball hopes for this
year sailed up and down like a
roller coaster this past week with
the good news just about off-setting
the bad.
Two-year starting forward
Taylor Stokes, who would have
started his fourth year as a Gator
was, refused re-admission to the
UF because, of grade trouble this
past week by the petitions
committee.
But a perfect replacement for
the 6-4 veteran entered the picture
from out of the blue in the form
of forward Paul Morton,
starred along with Stokes on the
freshman team three seasons ago.
Morton, a 6-4,218-pounder,
returns to the UF after a two-year
hitch in the Army. He averaged
tetter than 18 points a game as a
Baby Gator despite playing part
Chess Champ
Challenges
Charles C. (Kit)Crittendon,U.S.
Chess Federation Master, will
challenge any student in a simul simultaneous
taneous simultaneous chess exhibition Friday in
the Oak Room of the Florida Union.
The cost to enter against the
master will be 25 cents. All chess
players are invited.
There will also be an opportunity
to join the UF Chess Club. The
club will hold a six-round, Swiss
System chess tournament during
the fall trimester artd it will be
open to all players. Two divisions
open and amateur, will be based
on playing ability.
/
Games will be played Friday
nights on weekends without home
football games. Registration for
l he tournament will be next
Saturday and Sept. 20 at 7 p.m.
ln the oak Room.
One is scheduled for Sept.
Entry fee is $2 and a trophy.
A book is the first prize for the
. dinner.

DUPREE . the All-America

of the season with his arm in a
cast.
Head cage coach Norman Sloan
said, We certainly hate to lose
a boy like Taylor. He was really
valuable to the team. But on the
other hand, were awfully glad to
have Paul back. He couldnt have
come back at a better time.
Stokes, one of the top rebounders
on the team, attended the Univer University
sity University of South Florida in Tampa
this summer in an attempt to
qualify for re-admission here, but
the petitions committee turned him
down last week.

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DRYERS HOLD 50 LBS. OF CLOTHES
Koin Kleen
Coin Opsrefed Dry Cleaning fir Laundry Located in Colonial Plaza
704 W. Umv. Ave., aero** from luchlial* Jr. High
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Ole Miss, 'Bama
SEC Teams To Beat

Mississippis Rebels and the
Crimson Tide of Alabama appear appearto
to appearto be the two teams that will be
fighting it out for Southeastern
Conference (SEC) football laurels
this autumn with Florida's Gatori
rated by most as a darkhorse
possibility.
Ole Miss, always a power under
Coach Johnny Vaught r has its usual
depth but lacks its usual super-star
this season. A lack-luster schedule
for the Rebels might offset
Alabamas quarterback sensation,
Joe Namath, theSECs No. 1 passer
last year, and fullback Mike
FraCfchia. Fracchia, who missed
\L' |
1
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DUPREE
.. .the student
Cindermen
Meet Today
The cross-country team will
hold its first meeting of the fall
trimester today at 4 p.m. in the
projection room in the stadium.
All freshmen interested in com competing
peting competing on the team as well as all
returning team members and
transfer students may attend. The
freshman team positions are wide
open and the varsity spots will be
filled on the basis of time trials
during the season.

Monday, Sept. 9,1963 The Florida Alligator

the past season with an injured
knee*, was one of the top runners
in the South two years ago.
And then there is Florida. No
one seems to be sure about Coach
Ray Graves charges this fall. They
have a massive line, the biggest
in the loop, but theyre light on
the ends and have some inexper inexperienced
ienced inexperienced back behind star fullback
Larry Dupree.
If the breaks fall right, the
Gators could possibly challenge
the leaders for a piece of the
championship pie.
It is customary for Georgia
Tech and Louisiana State to be
mentioned along with the other
teams going after the conference
title but word is this year that
they arent up to it, especially

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the Tigers.
Tech lost it% entire starting
forward wall via graduation but
since Mr. Do-it-All Billy
Lothridge returns at quarterback
and 6-4 end Billy Martin is back
at end, the Yellow Jackets can
not be ruled out. Lotheridge passes
runs, kicks field goals and is
Techs team leader in no uncer uncertain
tain uncertain terms.
LSU's touted three-team system
that has worked at that school so
successfully for years will be
considerably hampered by the new
substitution rule that goes into
effect this year mid they are also
lacking a bit in over-all attack.
Halfback Danny Lelanc. will try
to take over All-America Billy
Stovals shoes but odds are they
will be a triffle tpo large.

Page 19



The Florida Alligator Monday, Sept. 9,1963

Page 20

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Missing: One Aussie Tanker

By ERNIE LITZ
Sports "Writer/
Where Oh where Is Our Aussie
Swim Star? is the current theme
song at the UF Pool.
Swim Coach Bill Harlans prize
freshman, Charles Staples, from
Sydney, Australia is the mystery
man of the hour. Staples, due two
weeks ago, is neither to be seen
or heard of.
Harlan, after consulting athletic
director Ray Graves, telephoned
Sydney last week in search of the
Aussie splasher. Word there was
that he was working his way across
the Pacific on a freighter and upon
arriving on the West Coast, would
visit friends* at the University
of Oregon campus.
With freshmen orientation over
and late registration beginning
today and ending Wednesday, time
is running short. Harlan admits,
Hope is diminishing. .itwill
be a pleasant surprise if he does
show at jail.
THE QUESTION ARISES as to
whether Staples is just visiting
or registering at Oregon. Under
NCAA regulations he would be
eligible to swim at Oregon since
that school is not a signatory
NCAA letter of intent regula regulations.
tions. regulations.
Staples signed a letter of intent
for the UF but it legally effects
only the Southeastern, Southwest,
Atlantic Coast, Big Eight, Big
Ten and the Missouri Valley
Conferences and Penn State
University, the Universities of
Syracuse, Pittsburgh and West
Virginia.
If Staples were to enter one of
these schools after signing UFs
letter, he would be ineligible for
two years, but at Oregon he would
be eligible.
However, sources close to the
swim team hint other action will
follow if he enrolls at Oregon.
Remember, as the source
pointed out, We sponsored him
through the State Department to get
him into the country. Some rather
Jim
La Brec*
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obvious alternatives are left open
to us, although it would be a very
extreme move.
Staples was one of three new
swim recruitments lost. Terry
Humphries from Long Beach
junior College is another. Hum Humphries
phries Humphries received a full scholarship

Gators Secret
Has 5 More Days

By WALKER LUNDY
Sports Editor
Five days remain.
Five days until the answer is known. Do the Gators have it or do
they not?
About 3:30 Saturday afternoon, the answer to that question will
not only be known to the 50,000-plus individuals that squeeze into
Grant Field in Atlanta to see Florida bump noses with Georgia Techs
Engineers but the secret will also be out to some 40 million football
fans across the nation who will watch the thing on television.
The Gators are pre-season picks to finish sixth in the country by
a certain popular mens intellectual magazine (Playboy) who we
suspect might be a little better in the arts than in football fore forecasting.
casting. forecasting. We noticed one sportswriter in the state picked them to finish
5-5. Those appear to be the extremes.
WITH A HEALTHY Larry (Deputy Dawg) Dupree and a Frank (The
Tank) Lasky in the same condition all jfear, we personally can see
them 8-2 with a bowl bid. This prediction counts a victory over those
slide-rule boys Saturday and thats no easy feat considering Tech has
only dropped three opening games on their home turf since 1903.
.Five days remain. Five very short days, head football coach Ray
Graves reminds us.
What We Plan
This column will be atn introduction to what we are calling the
Alligator's New Sports pages. Several features are on tap for you
readers this- fall and its our* sincere hope they will make you start
reading the paper backwards, our pages first.
-INTRAMURAL EDITOR is George Mims. We will attempt to
print ALL intramural scores of all games in ALL leagues THE DAY
FOLLOWING THE GAME. Mims is currently working with Spurgeon
Cherry, intramural department head, to work out this phase. Cham Championship
pionship Championship games will be covered as often as possible and club news
will be printed. An intramural column will run in these pages every
Tuesday, beginning tomorrow.
THE GATOR FOOTBALL team will be covered from every
aspect we can think of, including a daily story on the previous after afternoons
noons afternoons practice session. Columns by Coach Graves will run periodically
with the first one scheduled for this Thursday.
THE GAMES themselves will be examined and analized instead
of just having straight coverage. You read another paper Sunday
morning to find out who won the Gator game and then read us Monday
morning to find out why. Well give you the locker room story and
the story on the sidelines. We'll tell you how Alabamas chief scout
through the Gators did against Tech., and so forth.
ALL THE COVERAGE of Southeastern Conference football that
our United Press International teletype gives us will also be included
in our pages plus what national grid news we have room for.
AND WE WILL have our writers stay on top of the other sports
to keep you informed on whats going on in the entire athletic program
here at the UF. Witness the basketball and swimming stories in
this mornings issue. As soon as our lost Australian swimmer is
found (See below), youll know it.
Thats what we plan to do this trimester. We think youll see a
difference and like it. If you do, let us know. And if you dont, wed
like to know that too. Were aiming to please. ,
Gator Baits
Football ends Russ and Barry Brown, no relation, are so used to
seeing no relation after their names in the sports page, they have
started calling one another Not and Related Additional
bleachers in Florida Field are just wishful thinking, Percy Beard,
assistant athletic director says, desfftte stories to the contrary.
The Florida Florida State football game is here on THANKS THANKSGIVING
GIVING THANKSGIVING WEEKEND.
Remember when we thought having finals over Easter was good
timing? Cliff Luyk, former Gator basketball great of two years
ago, played with the Madrid, Spain team for the world title against
a team from Russia in Moscow recently. The Reds won a best-of best-ofthree
three best-ofthree series in Moscow. Their big 7-foot center made Luyk-Luyk-
Luyk mad during one game, however, and the 6-7 Gator picked the
big man up completely off the floor and shook him. Wars have been
started over less but GO GATORS.

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From The Sidelines

offer from Florida and wrote his
intent to! enter here this fall. He
then received another offer from
Ohio State university.
Harlan said, r He just received
a better offer from Ohio State
and thats why he chose to go
there.