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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Johns Investigator Threatens Piclceters

Two UF students, one a picket
for equal rights, said student
pickets were approached Tuesday
and threatened with arrest and
suspension from the University by
R. J. Strickland, chief investigator
for the John's Committee.

The Florida
Alligator

V 01.55, N 0.137 University of Florida, Gainesville Thursday, July 25,1963

Hendrick Declares Support
For University Bond Issue

A full-scale student government
campaign to enable the state to
issue bonds for university needs
is underway, according to Student
Body president Paul Hendrick.
The state-wide effort seeks to
inform students, parents and
alumni of the vital Importance of
the November election in clearing
the way for new classrooms and
other facilities, noted Hendrick.
Hendrick said that a three-point
program started this week to
promote a yes vote in the coming
balloting on state constitutional
revisions.
A direct mail campaign to the
parents of UF students is one
important step toward Informing
the state of the needs of higher
education today, said Hendrick.
The student body president added
that an information and public
relations effort would supplement
direct mailings through the use of
student and facu 11yspeakers
throughout Florida.

UF Pushes Goodwill
With Letters, Book

The UF student body has taken
its first step toward a program of
international friendship and
exchange, according to Paul
Hendrick, student body president,
and Juan Quesada, secretary of
international affairs.
Student government sent
bi-lingual letters and a book
Fertile Lands of Friendship," to
19 major Latin American univer universities
sities universities this week, said Quesada.
The book, published by the Uni University
versity University Press, is the result of a
joint effort between the UF and
Costa Rica in the area of land
use. It will be translated for these
universities into Spanish by the
U. S. State Department.
In this student alliance for
progress, we are attempting to
first exchange ideas and infor information;
mation; information; later, we hope that
additional technical exchange will
be supplemented by traveling stu students
dents students and faculty members," said
Hendrick.
He continued, This is the first
step in the development of a pro program
gram program of personal good will between
our students and those of Latin
America. We hope that this experi experiment
ment experiment will be followed by efforts
of other American universities."
* We cannot be absolutely certain
of long-range success; however,
the enthusiasm this idea has
received from student leaders,
from UF's 500 member
international student community,
anH from many faculty members,
gives us hope that this program
will build a friendship with our
neighbors to the south,"
commented the student body presi president.
dent. president.

The two students Jim Harmeling,
4AS, and Stan Brodsky, spoke to
Strickland at the Humpty Dumpty
Restaurant, NW 13th Street. Har Harmeling
meling Harmeling had just been relieved from
picket duty when Strickland came
out of the restaurant and began to

The final step in student govern government's
ment's government's efforts will be a campus
wide get out the vote campaign.
Free transportation will be
supplied to the anticipated central
campus polling place.
The unanimous support of the
student government cabinet and a
recent meeting of the UF Alumni
Association have provided the
impetus for this action, said Hen Hendrick.
drick. Hendrick.
All students should be
concerned and do all possible to
secure passage of the forthcoming
bond issue, stated Hendrick. It
is vital, he continued, in
meeting the drastic shortage of
facilities which exists that this
bond issue be permitted.
The cooperation of the student
government groups at the Univer University
sity University of South Florida and Florida
State University are being solicited
in what Hendrick termed a race
in higher education to keep pace
with the mushrooming en enrollment.
rollment. enrollment.

It is expected that the College
of Agriculture, the School for
Inter-American Studies as well as
other UF agencies will participate
in this international undertaking
as it develops, said Quesasda.
Wet-Dry
Vote Slated
September 3 was set as the date
for a wet-dry referendum in
Alachua County Tuesday by the
County Commission, after more
than 25 per cent of the Countys
registered voters returned
petitions circulated by the Gaine Gainesville
sville Gainesville Motel Owners Association.
Henry Gray, commission
attorney, said some 1,000 more
petitions than the required mini minimem
mem minimem one-forth of the countys
25,000 registered voters were
returned.
The election was set on
September 3, because it must be
no closer than 60 days to a general
election. A school millage election
is set in the county in November.
Registration for the election
closes thirty days before the
referendum, Saturday, August 3.
To be eligible to register for the
election, one must be 21 years of
age, a resident of Florida for one
year, and a resident of Alachua
County for six months.
Voters in the referendum will
decide if liquor may be sold legally
in the county, and if sold, if it
will be restricted to package sales
or if it may also be sold by the
drink.

photograph the pickets.
Harmeling went to the rear of
the restaurant to get the license
number from Stricklands car.
According to Harmeling,
Strickland shouted, Hey you,
come here.

Hendrick noted that among the
facilities the UF would receive,
a large general classroom building
just west of Tigert Hall, would
be included.

A FINAL REHEARSAL
.. .of "The Cave Dwellers" is run through by four mem members
bers members of the cast. The play will be shown tonight at 7:30
and Friday and Saturday at 8:00.

Curtain's Up Again
Players For Florida

The curtain goes up at 7;30
tonight on the second performance
of the Florida Players production,
The Cave Dwellers," in Norman
Hall Auditorium.
Curtain time Friday and
Saturday is 8 p.m.
The two-act play by William
Saroyan features Steve Malin,
Gainesville, as Duke; Terry Lyon,
Jacksonville, as the King; Joanne
Schatz, Gainesville, as the Queen;
and Joan Hall, Tallahassee, as the
Girl.
Setting for the play is an
abandoned theater where Dtice,the

I didnt know what to do' so I,
just stood there, Harmeling said.
Then he (Strickland) pointed at
me and shouted again, *1
mean you.
Harmeling then walked over to
Strickland and introduced himself.
Strickland showed Harmeling a
card identifying him as the Chief
Investigator of the State of Florida
Legislative Investigating
Committee.
Harmeling said Strickland told
me he was investigating these
illegal activities, and since this is
an illegal organization, your
activities are illegal.
Harmeling explained to Strick Strickland
land Strickland that he was a member of
the Student Group for Equal Rights
which has obtained temporary
permission to operate from the
UF administration. Harmeling
asked Strickland if he had contacted
the UF administration and Strick Strickland
land Strickland replied that he had not.
Strickland pointed to mepicxet
line (organized by the local chapter
of the NAACP), and asked if I
thought it was right for the'
taxpayers money to be spent on
these activities, Harmeling said.
Strickland said, Here we send
you to this university and you start
causing this trouble.

King, the Queen and the Girl have
taken refuge from the outside
world.
The question raised in the play
is whether the characters should
continue to relive their pasts in
other theaters, or whether they
should Join the world.
Others in the cast include
Herbert Gilliland; Mary Ferguson,
Carol Hamilton, Gerald Slaughter,
Klip Smith and Pat Frank. Barbara
Conrad is understudy.
Director and set designer for
the production is Ronald Jerlt,
UF instructor of speech.

Harmeling said at that time
Brodsky, who was passing the
restaurant, entered the conversa conversation.
tion. conversation. At that time, Strickland was
pointing to the pickets, mostly
local Negroes, and siad is that
the type of fellows' you want to
associate with? Follow that fellow
around some night, dont tell him
you are following him, and then
decide if thats the type of 'life
you want to.live, continued
Strickland.
Brodsky said he and Strlcklhnd
talked for about 15 minutes. At
one point he (Strickland) said, Im
going to get a warrant for the
arrest of every one of you.
He gestured toward me and
the pickets, said Brodsky. I
pointed out to him that I believed
our picketing activities were legal
known to the mayor of Gainesville
the metnbers of the Gainesville
81-Racial Committee, and under
the survellance of the Gainesville
Police.
However, Strickland said they
were not legal, Brodsky said.
Strickland said he knew certain
people would try to defend us,
but that the investigation
committee would get us, said
Brodsky.
As the conversation continued I
felt Strickland was getting more
and more hostile so I said 1 didn't
think I could talk to him any longer.
He (Strickland) said he wouldnt
belittle himself talking to me,
said Brodsky.
At this point, he turned away
to leave and made a spitting ges gesture,
ture, gesture, said Brodsky.
Bernle Wisser, news editor of
the Student Groups pulblcation
Common Sense, contacted Strick Strickland
land Strickland Thursday night at the Manor
Motel.
I checked the license plate
number Harmeling gave me with
the Highway Patrol, Wisser said.
It was registered in the name of
R. J. Strickland. Before this I
thought someone might be passing
himself off as Strickland since he
seemed to be acting so
irresponsibly.
I went to the Manor Motel,
since I thought he might go to a
still-segregated motel. His car
was in the lot, wisser said. I
called his room from the motel
office, the man who answered the
phone said he was R. J. Strickland
Chief investigator for the Johns
Committee.
Strickland denied the arrest
threat. I told him a student re reported
ported reported to me that he (Strickland)
said he would have the student
suspended, Wisser said.
Strickland said to me, ls that
what they told you? I thought that
would get a rise out of them. That
is what I was trying to do, I was
trying to get them going.* ( Wisser
said.
Strickland told Wisser he was
investigating student picketing.
Well, Bernie, let me say at
this time I am trying to answer
they why, the wherefore and the
whos behind the student picket,
Wisser quoted Strickland as
saying.
I asked him if he found any
communists, said Wisser.
However, Strickland refused to
give a yes or no answer, saying,
according to Wisser, Well,
Bernle, as you know that would
be part of my investigation.

Lost Edition
This is the last edition of
the Florida Alligator tor the
Spring Trimester. Publication
will resume on September 9.
Today's edition, 44 pages, is
the largest Alligator ever pub published.
lished. published.



The Florida Alligator Thursday, July 25,1963

Page 2A

Presidents Lose Bid for Salary Control

The council of state university
presidents lost out to the State
Board of Control last week in a
bid for more control in approving
employe and faculty salaries.
Board members Charles
Foreman, Fort Lauderdale, and
Wayne McCall, Ocala, took the lead
in insisting the board retain pay
authority for all salaries above
SIO,OOO.

Leave Your Car For
Service
While Attending
Classes
KUYKENDALLS
PURE OIL
Service Station
22 N.W. 13th Street j
Cracked Eggs 3 doz $ 1.1 Os

i
PROFESSIONAL SERVICE PHARMACY
419 S.W. Bth Street
Gainesville, Florida
FR 2-5347
BRING US YOUR PRESCRIPTIONS AND PLACE THEM ON FILE FOR THE
SCHOOL YEAR, WITH US.. .WE DELIVER TO ALL PARTS OF THE £AMPUS
FREE.. .WE WILL MAIL YOUR PRESCRIPTION AND DRUG BILLS HOME
TO YOUR PARENTS, AT NO EXTRA CHARGE.. .WE ARE LOCATED
CLOSE TO THE CAMPUS AND NEAR THE COUNTY HOSPITAL.. .CHECKS
CASHED...DO BUSINESS WITH A FLORIDA GRADUATE.. .SERVICE IS
OUR MIDDLE NAME.. .LET US SERVE YOU...
. r / ||>.- ! -V- H
Hpr 'WnM
Hr m Hf Jj
Remember the FSU Rally?
Pictures like this one bring the noise and excitement of that night long ago
right back to us... This scene and hundreds more are captured for you by
The University of Florida Yearbook, THE SEMINOLE.
Os course we're talking about more than photographs and words.. .It takes a
keen awareness, a sort of inside look at the real spirit of Florida's campus
to produce a good yearbook; this is what the SEMINOLE is all about.
The SEMINOLE will reflect many worlds here at Florida. It will picture
many faces in telling its story.. .Chances are yours will be one of them.
Don't forget to order your copy during registration.

University presidents and board
executive director Broward Cul Culpepper
pepper Culpepper had sought to gain
permission for the presidents to
approve salaries up to the $15,000
figure.
UF President J. Wayne Reitz
agreed with FSU President Gordon
Blackwall, who called the move a
step backward from existing
policies, and ureed the board to

Application Fees Raised
$5 Effective After Sept.l

Student application fees for state
universities were raised from $5
to $lO by the State Board of Control
Friday.
The increase will be effective
for all student applications for

keep the authority only on salaries
above $12,500.
Culpepper had asked the board
allow him to give approval on
salarie s between SIO,OOO
and $12,500, and all those above that
maximum could be sent to the
board. Culpepper argued the
control would impose a delaying
action in salary approval which the
universities had been trying to
avoid.

enrollment made on or after
September, 1964. Broward
Culpepper, executive secretary of
the -board, said the fee was in increased
creased increased for two reasons.
Culpepper said processing and

McCall and Foreman said they
saw no real factor for
consideration, and said board
approval could be obtained within
a week by mail. t
McCall told the board, I feel
we should retain that position at
least until we get through the bond
issue. He said he felt the board
should show lay public that the
board is going to accept this
responsibility of scrutinizing the

handling of applications now costs
more than $5. He also said the
increase was designed to help
assure that applicants were acting
in good faith when submitting appli applications.
cations. applications.
Culpepper said many students
are shopping for schools when
they submit applications. Univer University
sity University presidents estimated between
one third and one-fourth of the
applications result in enrollments.
During the meeting Culpepper
also announced plans for a mass
lobbying effort to gain public
support of the multi-million dollar
higher educational capital outlay
bond plan.
Culpepper said Hendrix
Chandler, board of control press
aide and board corporate secre secretary,
tary, secretary, will be released from some
of his duties to compile and dis distribute
tribute distribute information for the bond
issue, which will be voted on as
a constitutional amendment this
fall.
I find there is some misunder misunderstanding
standing misunderstanding around the state, Cul Culpepper
pepper Culpepper said, referring to public
reaction to the bond issue. He
said it is vital to gain understanding
so voters will support the'bonds
debt plan for long-term financing
of buildings at junior colleges and
universities.

f Mt mm. WamJ \M
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Bp K r
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*>> B B gF/ fB
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... fhjttik Km ilyi^y
#|i ; r f "li§w fm Mm§
|ij \ Jfflftr / m £ i
*' 1 JJf* jJh|| A
* y ** S *ff i^f^tf^f 1 $ ",.;|i
H§g W jg|l||g %
''? i s ~' ** f|||g||
THREEPENNY OPERA
...will be presented In the P.K. Yonge Auditorium,
August 1-2. Eleanor Broome of Gainesville and Mar Marshall
shall Marshall Thomas of Hialeah run throuqh a routine of Mac
the Knife".
' Get you message thOugft
1 I IV M
I ,with AlliQAto aOvetismq

salaries/
The plan pres^h-'-1 by culpeppe r
would have allowed university
presidents to fix salaries up to
$12,500 a year from non-academic
personnel and $15,000 for teaching
and research personnel.
It gave Culpepper authority, if
the presidents desired it,
approve appointment of personnel
where salaries were more than
$12,500 for administrative per personnel
sonnel personnel and $15,000 for teaching
and research personnel.
The authority would not have
included policjT level personnel
of the universities such as the
vice president, deans, department
heads and directors of divisions
or schools.
Hospital
Plans Out

Final plans for the Veterans
Administration hospital to be built
here were made available to the
UF officials today.
The federal agency will ask for
construction bids on the 500-bed
hospital this fall, with completion
scheduled for mid-1965. it will
be built at an estimated cost of
sll million.
The hospital will be built on
Archer Road, opposite the j. Hillis
Miller Health Center. The senior
faculty of the College of Medicine
will make up the medical staff.
Eighth District Rep.D.R.(Billy)
Matthews, reached by telephone
in Washington, said he was happy
to see the project progress to
the point that plans are available.
I am proud that the residents
of this district have the first
visible results of the months and
years of planning that went into
this new medical institution, Rep.
Matthews said.



'Requiem Slated
By Music Groups

The UF Department of Music
will present the Requiem by
Gabriel Faure, French impress impressionistic
ionistic impressionistic composer, tonight at 8:15
in University Auditorium.
Combining their talents in the
presentation of Faures
Requiem will be the string
players of the University Sym Symphony
phony Symphony Orchestra, the Choral

3 ?* s
rt
m
.(UmiA

KEISTER

Latecomers Take Sabin

Alachua Countys three-month
Sabin Oral Sundays polio vaccine
campaign came to a close last
Sunday as 8,964 residents turned
out for a makeup feeding of the
Type II vaccine.
This brought to 46,306 total
number of persons who got the
final feeding of a few drops of
vaccine on a sugar cube. This

Y" \V TRADITIONAL CLOTHING CENTER
\ \ ,] BUY YOUR TRADITIONAL CAMPUS WARDROBE at the University of Florida's headquarters for
jKjc'/ collegiate merchandise, BELK-LINDSEY. Belk's has alI of your campus wardrobe needs, including
Iv the latest fashions from these famous names:
r/^ I For Girls: And for Men:
Bobbi Brooks H.I.S.
y Jonathan Logan Shapley
Jantzen Catalina
Shapley Van Husen '4l7'
r wiN S3OO IN PRIZESm |
/ SEE entry rules in September 9 Florida alligator (
/ f )A UF boy and girl will each win a $l5O back-to-campus \
/ ) wardrobe of traditional collegiate fashions at Belks. I
T 6 L CHARGE CENTRAL CHARGE LAYAWAY
3V
THE StORE WITH MORE IN THE GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER

Union, thqgUniversity Choir, and
the First Presbyterian Church
Choir.
Marilynn Uelsmann will be
soprano soloist and Marshall
Thomas, baritone soloist. Willis
Bodine, music instructor, will be
organist. The entire program will
be under the direction of Elwood
Keister, associate professor of
music.
The requiem is a solemn mass
sung in the Roman Catholic Church
in honor of the dead. When set to
music, the requiem is arranged
in the nine divisions of the mass.
According to Bodine, the
requiem is simple, pleasant, and
refined. The requiem is suitable
for both church and concert use,
Bodine said.
Also on the program tonight is
Howard Hansons The Cherubic
Hymn, to be sung by the Choral
Union. Accompanying the Choral
Union will be Bodine at the organ
and Gerald Forbes at the piano.
The University Choir will also
sing four folk songs by Johannes
Brahms. The folk songs are In
the Night, Im Going Away,'
The Dead Youth, and How
Lovely Is the Maytime.

was a dropoff of about 6,000 from
the average 52,000 who turned out
for the first two doses in May
and June.
Sundays makeup total topped
that of the June feeding, when
8,620 turned out, but the increase
failed to make up for the big
dropoff in the primary feeding date
for Type II July 14.

2 DOUBLE ROOMS with PRIVATE BATH
For 4 Quiet Male Students
In Large Private Home
ROOM AND MEALS $18.75 PER WEEK
ROOM ONLY S3O PER MONTH
MANY "EXTRA" ADVANTAGES
Write to 216 N.E. 3rd St., or Phone FR 6-8314 After 5:00 p.m.
There is only one Submarine Sandwich Shop in town
The biggest, freshest, most delicious sandwiches are at:
ALAN'S CUBANA
THE HOME OF THE FAMOUS 'THREE MEAT TREAT
ALAN S CUBANA
Its Gainesvilles ONLY Sandwich Specialty Shop
And they feature FREE DELIVERY day and night to your dorm, frat or sorority
house, or off-campus apartment.
.
6-1252


Thursdays July 25/1963 The Florida Alligator

Page 3A



Page 4A

The Florida Alligator Thursday,July 25,1963

alligator
editorials

undignified
STICK UP YOUR HANDS, students, the John's Committee is here
again, hell-bent on saving us from ourselves...and intent on preserving
( status-quo ethics.
R. J. Strickland, chief investigator for the Florida Legislative
Investigation Committee, blew into town Thursday on the usual blast
of do-goodism hot air. He proceeded, according to sworn affidavits,
to threaten students picketing local restaurants with suspension from
the UF and arrest for their illegal activities.
Later Strickland told a student reporter for the newsletter of the
Student Group for Equal Rights that he was just trying to get the
students going.
HOWEVER, COMING AND GOING, most of the members of the
Student Group for Equal Rights, seem to be level-headed and responsi responsible
ble responsible individuals. Strickland's statements may make them hopping-mad,
but his statements arent likely to provoke them into any action he can
honestly point to as illegal, immoral, unnatural, or communistic. .
depending on just what he is looking for at the UF this time.
For a man bY the Legislature with the responsibility of
safeguarding universities and university students, through seeking
out those endangering such schools and students, Strickland employs
some unusual investigative methods. Badgering and threatening, in
an effort at jest or in seriousness, is an Agatha Christie technique.
It has no place in serious investigation.
THE WHOLE IDEA OF THE Johns Committee is open to question.
Although it was continued by a wide vote in the last legislative session,
it is still a fact that the committee has never produced any legislation
that has passed into law.
APRIL, MAY ANI) PEANUT BUTTER, its no wonder. Investigative
techniques using drastic threats, which arent backed up (Strickland
admitted he had not been in touch with University administrators),
cant produce much evidence.
Strickland, who is in essence a one-man investigative squad for
the Committee, should stop watching spy movies, and investigate in a
dignified manner, if he must investigate at all.
traditional?
THE COLLEGE INNS ANSWER to picketing by the Student Group
For Equal Rights has diminished the C.l.s claims to a place in
4he ranks of Florida traditions.
The owners, by cleverly capitalizing on a technique for gaining
ntiention for the civil rights movement, slapped UF students in the
1 ' in ~ , in!?; i in.bad tasie.
SINCE ii >14, THE C.i. ~4*o perated on jtv. rsi Avetf
r ' 0. th*' ... u's ~ gra&u.ico of
C t, as ir '.t sessin
could be. conducted around a fire late into the night over a cup of
coffee and a slice of pie. Other alumni remember the C.1. as a
source of income to finance their college educations.
The C. I. has grown enormously in the almost half-century
it has been in business. The present building rose magnificently
from the ashes of the fire that destroyed the C. I, in March of
last year.
HOWEVER, THE ATTITUDES) of the owners are not nearly as
magnificent as the building. Nobody can deny it is their right to try
to promote and maintain their volume of business while demon demonstrations
strations demonstrations against their policies are going on. All businessmen seek
to make a profit and increase It year after year. But, is it commendable
for the owners of a business to glory in the limelight shed upon them
by the virtue of their being holdouts for a policy of discrimination
that is surely doomed by the march of time?
These attitudes and actions may be within the legal rights of the
owners, but is it morally and ethically right? Is this sort of hardshell
discrimination to become permanently connected with the image of
the C. I. that is held by UF alumni throughout the state?
SOUND BUSINESS POLICY dictates maintaining customer good-will.
The customer good-will that is generated by a picket special is not
likely to outweigh the customer good-will that will eventually be lost
by those patrons who prefer to eat and shop where management is not
blatently and rudely outspoken against classes of patrons.
T" 1 T7| * 1 11
EDITOR-IN-CHEIF. . Maryanne \wtrey
Managing Editor.. T George Moore
Business Manager Fountain
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of
e University of Florida and is published weekly. THE Florida
ALLIGATOR is entered as second class matter at the United States
om at Gainesville, Florida, oftices are located
and 10 in the Florida Union. -
il! le ?l?* De U niVerSity of Florida FR 63261, Ext. 2832, and request
either editorial or ousiness office. 4
Opinions voiced in personal columns on this page do not necessarily
reflect the opinions of the editors. Only editorials are the official
voice of the paper.

O / HA? ,SE^
, i

Grad Recalls UF of Yore

(EDITORS NOTE: The following
was written by Bernice Walston,
UF alum of the 19205, with the
unbelievable student number of
5689.)
As I move about the campus these
days, I wonder how many of the
other snow-topped alumni share
some of my nostalgic memories.
It was June 1927 when I arrived
bag and baggage for my first eight
weeks of summer school at the
University of Florida. Immediately
a veteran sophomore Alpha Gamma
Rho appointed himself my guide
and campustry teacher. He was
such a nice escort all summer,
and we are still friends.
It was perfectly permissable to
stroll about the campus after dark
(until nine oclock) but woe to the
couple who sat down on a bench.
Hr.vksinws fJ isMw] q,, -i a he
sclents,
n IOV Q
Ist -a ft- -,n .1 1 hiui
unct a : o- ,-c
1 NSah i cn;inu '' a hiuUD v.au

GARY PEACOCK

Quotes From Quincy Revisited

(EDITORS NOTE: From i 960
until his departure last summer,
former Alligator Humor Columnist
Gary Peacock kept tongue-in tongue-incheck
check tongue-incheck as he pointed his broken brokendown
down brokendown typewriter at campus
politicos, policies and traditions.
Once again, the aging enterpreneur
of The Peachtree Palace,
comments on campus events. This
time a tilted view on some
would-be entries in the
Homecoming Slogan Contest.)
Alas, a mention of the
Homecoming Slogan Contest on
Huntley-Brinkley and even Charley
Johns hears it! So do others.

Minority versus Minority Troubles Reader

EDITOR:
through the use of the majority
have the right to control another
minority grouj m
lty group -- student Group for
Equal Rights -- have the right
through picketing, to use the
majority so they can control the
private property of another minor minority
ity minority group the owners of the
Gold Coast and College Inn?
The only reason for interfering
with a person's liberty, according
to Mill, is for self-protection. Not
for self-betterment, not for getting

met Dean Skinner at four oclock
on Friday mornings, hiked to Glenn
Springs, went swimming, ate
breakfast, and walked back to cam campus
pus campus in time for a shower and a
seven oclock class.
The first day in Education 101
Dean Norman called my name
and thundered as loudly as he could
in his high pitched voice, What
makes a good teacher? In view
of the Dean's recent Educational
Philosophy, he will probably doubt
that he ever resorted to such
pedagogy.
A popular mid-morning snack
was a double egg malted at the
College Inn, and for only fifteen
cents too.
Parking was no problem. Who
had a car?
It was nice to walk down Tree
Drive, reach up and pick a leaf
and try to identify the tree by
its botanic-. 1 air... You can
leji back i. now io s
the tope of uir t~ces.
If you c -rmg the night,
you ,veic aimo ST to hear
Tv a.ici.iii J. .. ,;v-.

From New York City came this
entry from the NAACP as they
plan a giant Growl-in during Hornet
coming; Set Us Free at HC
63.
Tipping his hat toward the ring,
Arizonas Barry Goldwater coun countered
tered countered with Lets Shut the Gate
at the South End of the Sunshine
State.
So did President Kennedy.
Invite one of My Baby Brothers
and you Wont Have to Worry
About Others.
Getting closer to home.
Governor Bryant submitted,
You 11 See Me at HC 63.

ahead in the world, not for
"? V P.. vr
lea f u iu *. o* entreat
mother to do as he wishes, but
n£ can only Conipti
if hp suffers from a lack of self selfprotection.
protection. selfprotection. The student Group tor
Equal Rights in this case is not
protection, unless they consider
having to eat at ttn
cafptor?, at the campus
careteria as such.
4. f
Jnt m !f f tat here ** my argu argument
ment argument deals solely with this one

Murphree preferred to practice
at that time.
Recreation was np problem,One
could always find a partner jt
the tf.M.C.A. for Table Tenuis,
Checkers, or Bridge.
With a responsible adult chap,
eron, Dean Skinner gave her
permission for evening swimming
parties at Lake Wahburg and
explorations of Warrens Cave,
This no one will believe,
Registration fee, including room
and board for the eight weeks
session, was $41.00.
As I watched workers puling
down the old Sigma Alpha Epsilon
House today, I remembered the
first time I passed by it. M)
boy friend asked, Did you hear
a loud noise?" I answered, No,
why?" He pointed to the statue
q t the lion and said, 'JM
was supposed to roar."^P^
into spasrr.s of ladder and t>
joveti ius r vn | fiv .ij '..'tie
Se\c>ai i :r.i l 4 *- l-eO
~.,n to roar,
and .* e G AIK
tha-' r 'Hs "*
joke private. i

Fred O. (Bud; Dickinson s
curious. Will They Want Me l
HC *63?^
In the senate, Im handy. A 5
Governor, Ill be Dandy, wr0 1
Senator Scott Kelly ofPolkCowj
Campus politicians
submitted numerous ideas, bu
most of their thoughts, good
prevents their publication e
Finally, Orientation Group
96 sloganed, When the OneG 1
Scorer Comes to judge ThisS of
Game, He'll Say Not U
or Lost, But How Well YouDrpPP 01
the Name.*

particular ins
If because of the P a
do not eat at the Gol ;J
College inn, the
the Student Group to* cl a
control the private P r P >|
someone else. It is que riv ,i
whether the eight of P
ownership is sacred;
laws already infringe upo
can only be said that eV
this right is lessened v-e m
closer to Socialism.
j.a.k* 1



THE CAVE DWELLERS: A FITTING CLIMAX
by
Gerald B. Forbes
Shakespeare said it first: All the worlds a stage. Four hundred
years later, William Saroyan took the metaphor and built a play about
It. The current offering of the Florida Players brings that play, Tb;
Cave Dwellers, to life in away that is both refreshing and moving.
If this werent the next-to-the-last week before finals, and most
students weren't engaged in a last-minute striving for academic
salvation, I would say that the present production must not be missed,
regardless of the price one might have to pay.
There are many things about Ronald Jerits conception of The Cave
Dwellers which are noteworthy, not the least of which is the physical
setting itself. Saroyan set his play in an abandoned theatre on the
lower East Side of New York City because, as he said, all buildings
are caves, and because the theatre is the cave at its best the last
arena in which all is always possible. Jerit, who not only directed
this play, but designed its setting, has happily given us much more than
the simple, stark, stage walls called for by the playwright. The first
thing which strikes the spectator on entering Norman Hall auditorium
is the false proscenium which has been covered with posters to suggest
old, theatrical billboards. Once he has taken his seat, moreover, the
sense of his being ifi the theatre is intensified all the more by the
setting which emerges from under the proscenium. To anyone who
had been connected with the Florida Players in the past few years, that
setting evoked pleasant memories and nostalgic associations of the
plays given in Norman Hall over a two or three-years span of time.
As such, it lent a note of true authenticity to the emotional atmosphere
of the play. One was ready to accept the locale as a logical haven for
dispossessed actors.
Scenic effects were used discreetly and, for the most part, to good
advantage. Scrims were employed in portraying dream sequences in
the lives of the principal characters. These sequences effectively
projected the fears, the loneliness, and the emptiness of their separate
existences; they also prepared the audience for the climax of the
first act, when the little circle of four feels its solidarity threatened
by the interruption of outsiders. The lighting of such sequences was
adequate, tasteful, and usually well-timed.
In a play like The Cave Dwellers, it would be wrong to single out
individual actors for critical plaudits. Such a procedure would simply
indicate that the viewer had completely missed the inherent beauty
and significance of this production. For, in one respect, this play
surpasses anything the Florida Players have done in recent years.
It provides a display of ensemble playing which is most convincing
and, at times, approaches the level of a professional performance.
The responsibility for sustaining this high level, of course, rests
most heavily on the shoulders of the four principal characters, the
Duke, the Girl, the King, and the Queen, respectively played by Steve
Malin, Joan Hall, Terry Lyon, and Joanne Schatz; but even the minor
characters rarely violate the sense of a mutual sharing which under undergirds
girds undergirds the play as a whole. Again, Jerit is to be congratulated on a
feat which all too few directors achieve.
Mary Stephenson, the costumer for the Florida Players, shows us
once more her ability to cope with any kind of theaterical situation.
Her costumes, always appropriate, suggested both the poverty and
emptiness as well as the warmth and past grandeur in the lives of
the characters.
In sum, The Cave Dwellers brings the current season of the Florida
to a fitting climax. Technically and histrionically, it repre repre,ssnts*3heatre
,ssnts*3heatre repre,ssnts*3heatre at its best. Performances are scheduled for Wednesday
and Thursday evenings at 7:30, and Friday and Saturday evenings at
8:00.

Light OKd By State

r
The corner'between Yulee Area
and Norman Hall has been approved
for a stop light by the State Road
Department, and a survey of that
area is currently being taken by
the Gainesville Police Department,
said Susan Siegal, secretary of
Womens Affairs.
UF Chapter
Taps 3 Lady
Journalists
Three new members have been
initiated into the UF chapter of
Theta Sigma Phi, national pro professional
fessional professional fraternity for women in
journalism.
Mayranne Awtrey and Jean
Marshall presided over the ini initiation,
tiation, initiation, held last Wednesday in the
Stadium.
Membership in Theta Sigma phi
is based on high professional and
scholastic standards. To qualify
for membership, the student must
be competent and active in some
phase of communications, and in intend
tend intend to make journalism her
profession;
Those initiated were Judy
Barnes, Ann Groebe and Evelyn
Podsiadlo.
Pat Hogan, senior in the School
of journalism and Communications
will represent the local chapter,
Beta Xi, at the national convention
in Cleveland in August.
Hie convention is held annually.
A workshop on women's pages in
newspapers will be held for the
first time in conjunction with the
convention this summer*

REVIEW

Student government has pro promoted
moted promoted the establishment of a traffic
light at the corner of S. W. 13th
Street and sth Avenue, according
to Miss Siegal.
This area is a dangerous
intersection, especially when class
changes occur, stated Miss
Siegal, in analyzing the problem.
The pedestrian underpass,
near Mallory Hall, has not been
successful as a route to Norman
Hall, Miss Siegal said.
The woman cabinet member
added, We hope that a traffic
light will be put up in the near
future. I believe that this will
provide a solution to a very dan dangerous
gerous dangerous situation.
SAE Lot
Re-Zoned
Gainesville city commission
Monday night, re-zoned the north
and southeast corners of Univer University
sity University Avenue 13th Street to
prevent construction of a filling
station on the SAE corner.
A building permit for the filling
station has already been granted,
but will be repealed in 30 days
when the new ordinance goes into
effect.
The commission approved retail
store zoning for both corners.
The filling station permit has
been contested for the past several
months because the lot is located
directly across from the entrance
to the University.
Some people felt a filling station
there would detract from the beauty
nf fho campus.

Speech Prof to Head
Clinics at Wisconsin

Dr. Ralph R. Leutenegger, mem member
ber member of the UF Speech Department
faculty for the past three years,
is leaving the UF to become Di Director
rector Director of the Speech and Hearing
Clinics of the University of
Wisconsin, Milwaukee.
He will assume his new position
in September.
Murphree
Personnel
Honored
Three members of the Murphree
Are'a Halls Council will receive
Certificates of Mer i t at the
Councils final meeting of the
spring trimester tonight.
Awards will be given to Thomas
G. Digby, Joseph Palatinus, and
David Engelman by the Councils
Summer Steering Committee.
These awards are given for
outstanding service to the Council
and to Murphree Area, said
Acting President Reed Parrish.
Each of these members has been
active during this entire academic
year -- without their efforts com completion
pletion completion of many Council projects
would have been difficult.
Digby has served as chairman
of the Constitutional Revisions
Committee; Palatinus has served
as chairman of both the Publicity
and Academic Affairs Committees
and Engelman has served as chair chairman
man chairman of the Special Projects Com Committee.
mittee. Committee.
This presentation is the first
in a series, of annual recognition
programs to be given by the
Council, Parrish added.
News Workshop
Slated Here
Some 200 student newspaper
reporters and editors from South Southeastern
eastern Southeastern colleges are expected here
for the annual College Editor
Workshop this fall, sponsored by
the Southern Universities Student
Government Association (SUSGA).
~..J
The purpose of the SUSGA work workshop,
shop, workshop, to be held at the UF October
10 and 11, is to communicate and
share ideas on editorial and
management policies of the
university press.
A complete schedule of activities
is planned for the workshop,
ranging from prominent speakers
in the field to a possible talent
show by the International Talent
Association. However, much of the
workshop will be concerned with
the production methods and
policies of the Florida Alligator.
Participating school may send
as many students as they wish.
Construction Men
Meet in Orlando
Construction contractors and UF
building construction and civil
engineering professors gathered
in Orlando Friday for a
construction management confer conference.
ence. conference.
The conference was intended to
extend the knowledge of practicing
general contractors in areas of
management related to the con construction
struction construction business.
It was sponsored by Central
Florida Chapter of the Associated
General Contractors, with the help
of the UFs Department of Building
Construction.
Attending the conference from
the University were H. H. Block,
bead of the building construction
department; King Royer of the
building construction faculty, and
Byron Spangler, associate pro professor
fessor professor of civil engineering.

Thursday, July 25,1963 The Florida Alligator

Dr. Leutenegger holds a PhJ).
from the University of lowa. He
taught at Michigan State Univer University
sity University before coming to Florida.
Here he has taught courses in
Phonetics and in speech pathology
in addition to participating in out outpatient
patient outpatient diagnostic Work for the
Speech and Hearing Clinic.
He is author of the textbook,
The Sounds of American
English, published this year by
Scott, Foresman and Co. He was
assistant editor-to Wendell Johnson
on the book, Stuttering in Chil Children
dren Children and Adults.
He is currently an abstractor
for the quarterly journal Deaf Deafness,
ness, Deafness, Speech and Hearing
Abstracts, and has been a
frequent contributor to
professional journals.
Off-Campus
Magazine
Plans Issue
The Old Orange Peel, off offcampus
campus offcampus humor magazine, plans a
mammoth issue in September,
iccording to Editor Jack Horan.
The magazine to be sold the first
week of classes, will consist of
60-70 pages of jokes, satire, girls
and cartoons.
September's Peel will follow a
three-section plan. The first
section will be a complete guide
to the Florida coed. The second
section will be a Freshman orien orientation
tation orientation guide, while the third will
be a guide to Alachua county and
Gainesville. t
Each section will contain many
related features, funny and
satirical in nature, Horan said.
The magazine will sell for 25
cents at several off-campus
locations.
Newman Club
y Winds Up Year
The Newman Club held its final
meeting of the year last Sunday.
Committee reports were given on
the car wash and the trip to
Rainbow Springs.
Under new business, the mem membership
bership membership voted to send a letter of
support to the Student Group for
Equal Rights.
For Orientation Week, a large
Welcome Party and Dance, to
include a band and other enter entertainment,
tainment, entertainment, is being planned.

Whats New In PAPERBACKS?
DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS FOR ENGINEERS
.. .Philip Franklin
KINETIC THEORY OF LIQUIDS
... J. Frenkel
TEN BOOKS ON ARCHITECTURE
.. .Vitruvius
FUNCTION OF THE COMPLEX VARIABLE
. .James Pierpont
SURVEY OF PHYSICAL THEORY
..-. Max Planck
THEORY OF HEAT RADIATION
.. .Max Planck
TABLES OF INDEFINITE INTEGRALS
.. .G. Petit Bois
WHO'S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF
.. .Edward Albee
FAIL SAFE ...Burdick & Wheeler
THE IMPRESSIONISTS
.. .Francois Mathey
THE BROWSE SHOP
Campus Shop & -Jaokstore

Salvation Army
Push On At UF
Students can help needy families
in Alachua County by putting un unwanted
wanted unwanted articles in collection boxes
instead of trash cans.
During the last two weeks of
school, large boxes will be placed
in Yulee, Mallory, Rawlings and
Murphree areas. The Salvation
Army will collect die used goods
and distribute them to marginal marginalincome
income marginalincome families in the county.
Dorothy Harvin, 3BA, originated
the idea and Is heading the pro program.
gram. program. She called the Salvation
Army which eagerly agreed to
help.
We need anything that can
possibly be usedeven cloth for
rags, Miss Harvin said.
Used clothes, shoes, broken
radios -- anything that students
will discard as they prepare to
leave can be donated.
Students off-campus and in
Tolbert area can bring discarded
goods to any of the participating
areas.

HULL
BRAKE
SERVICE AND SUPPLY
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Complete brake service
for all makesof American
and foreign cars
Experienced, trained
mechanics so serve you
> TIRES
TUBES
BATTERIES
WHEEL BALANCING
Guaranteed 10,000
miles or one year.
"> Member, Independent
Garage Owners of
America, Inc.

Page 5A



The Florida Alligator Thursday,July 25,1963

Page 6A

Rights Effort
To Continue

The Student Group for Equa*
Rights will continue its work in
trying to bring an end to discrim discrimination
ination discrimination in the Gainesville area
in the fall if the situation remains
the same as it is at, present,
according to president Jerry
Essick.
The group was founded the first
week in June for the purpose of
helping to achieve equal rights for
all citizens of Gainesville utilizing
every legal and non-violent
measure possible.
The group coordinates its work
with that of the local NAACP
chapter and the Youth Movement
of the NAACP. The organization
received sanction from the univer university
sity university administration to carry on its
activities from the very start.
Some of the projects of the
group Include issuing a weekly
Book Sale
Continues
The Student Book Sale, formerly
Student Book Exchange, will be
open during part of Orientation
Week and the first week of school,
according to Fred Lane, secretary
of student activities.
The student government
sponsored project will now be
l allowed to expand to a larger size
because it is moving to a new
location, said Lane.
The Student Book Sale is going
to be located on the first floor
of the Florida Union.
We expect that the greatest
number of books handled will be
in the C course area, primarily
because of the great influx of
in-coming freshmen and university
college transfers, said Lane, sale
chairman.
We encourage all students to
try to find the books they need
at the Student Book Sale first
because a student can save money
by dealing directly with other stu students
dents students without the middle-man,
said Lane.
The Student Book Sale will open
Thursday, Sept. 5, and close Wed.,
Sept. 11.
Those wishing to leave books
for sale in the fall should check
the Orange and Blue Bulletin for
time and place.
Tennis Lights
Expected Soon
Final approval is expected soon
from the Campus Development
Committee for lighting the Brow Broward
ard Broward Fielu tennis courts, according
to Maurice Plumb, student govern government
ment government cabinet commissioner of
housing.
The issue was referred to that
committee this weekly the UF
Executive Council, which is headed
by President Reitz, said Plumb.
Cost estimates have been
received from the Physical Plant
Division, and the money for the
project is available, stated Plumb.
We have received strong
backing from numerous student
groups as well as numerous mem members
bers members of the housing department
and university administration.
Plumb said.
. Plumb added, Lighting the
tennis courts will allow evening
activity and increased use of
existing facilities, if this
experiment succeeds, it is possible
that other similar areas might be
lighted.
Paul Hendrick, student body
president, said that student gov government
ernment government officers are currently
preparing a complete investigation
to place before the Campus Devel Development
opment Development Committee so that the
actual construction may begin.
This group is the lasthurdle
to a project which we feel will be
very useful and practical, con concluded
cluded concluded Hendrick.

newsletter entitiea common
Sense to inform the student body
of the activities of the group and
the actions taken by various city
merchants and UF organizations;
holding meetings to plan steps to
attain me goal; planning speakers
to address the student body or the
current problem of civil rights.
According to Dr. Marshall Jones
of the Psychology Department, ad advisor
visor advisor for the group, the group is
composed of a cross-section of
the student body, ranging from first
trimester freshmen to graduate
students. A substantial number
of faculty members have also
endorsed and actively supported
the group, Dr. Jones said.
The most recent and must con controversial
troversial controversial activity of the Student
Group for Equal Rights has been
picketing various businesses re refusing
fusing refusing to serve all students of
UF. According to Essick,
picketing will be continued in the
fall if the merchants still holdout.
Dr. Hal Lewis, head of the
Educational Foundations Depart Department,
ment, Department, accepted the position of
chairman of the Committee of
Faculty Sponsors for this group.
The Faculty Committee aids the
students in fund-raising chores and
lends its support to other activities
of the student group.
Activities planned for the fall
include a speakers bureau for
addressing various campus organ organizat
izat organizat io n s and holding question
-answer periods, bringing
nationally known speakers to
campus, and corresponding with
other universities throughout the
South to have similar
organizations.
Attache Talks
At NDEA Meet
Dr. Edouard Morot-Sir cultural
attache of the French Embassy,
spoke here Tuesday night before
a general assembly of the NDEA
Summer Language Institute now
in session on the campus.
The lecture dealt with contem contemporary
porary contemporary literary trends in France.
Guest lecturer Morot sir is
author of several books and
articles in the fields of philosophy
literature and education.
He was director of the Fulbright
Commission in Paris and
professor of philosophy at the
University of Lille until 1957 when
he took his present position.

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Ad Man Learns Hard Wav

Gary Burke, advertising
manager for student publications,
learned not to leave his keys in
his car the hard way. . by
watching a thief get in, start the
car and drive off.
Burke, a June graduate of the
UF, parked his car across the
street from Tony's Pizza on west
University Ave., about noon
Tuesday. I left the keys in the
car because I was only going to
be gone a few minutes.

ALL-SIDEWALK COMMUNITY 1
ALL WOODED LOTS I
GRAND OPENING)
1 pm Sunday, July 28th I
6 Exhibit Homes on Display
Homes Priced from 12,900 to 18,000 1
I-k ? I PRIZES GALORE
I 1 Free Swim Club Membership Free Balloons I
115-to St. I Free Pepsi I
I VA FHA Conventional Financing
T~~ I Presented By
I I J HUGH EDWARDS, INC.
NE 16th Ave & 15th Street 372-1551

As Burke stood in the restaurant
he saw a young man, described
as short and about 20, drive off
in his Volkswagon convertible.
u i was too stunned to do anything
for a minute, he said, then I got
on the phone and told the police
my car was heading east on Uni University
versity University Ave.
Burke located the car later that
afternoon when the clever car thief
called the campus police station
saying he was Burke and that the

car had been recovered m
cleverness gave him away ?
cause Burke had Vst go ne j*'
the station to report the earth,*!
and listened in on the call tv
caller said he was calling f ro
the administration building
Burke and a campus
rushed to the area.
Burke found his car in f rot
of Tigert but the thief got away.



Job Agencies
Not Always
Impersonal
LOS ANGELES (UPI) When
Helen Edwards was job hunting
she hated employment agencies
because she thought they were
ugly and impersonal. So she
started one of her own and proved
they could be just the opposite.
That was 25 years and many
thousands of jobs ago. In the
interim she has filled openings
ranging from corporation presi
dent to department store Santa
Claus. Bus she has never
forsaken her original conception
of how an agency should be run.
looks like a large foyer in a
plush apartment.
I have tried to make it have
the look of a salon, she said.
I want it to be like walking into
my living room.
The volume of business is so
great she employs several coun counselors
selors counselors who specialize in various
areas, but she still insists on
talking, at least briefly, to every
applicant who comes to the agency.
This may mean 50 talkathons a
day.
She says with a smile, Im
fast with words.
Her first concern is to put
applicants at ease.
*People are very nervous, very
upset when they are job hunting.
They are on the defensive.
Although she fills all sorts of
jobs, she prefers handling
applicants in creative fields such
as artists, writers, advertising
people and even poets.
One of the rooms in her office
suite is decorated with woodblocks
done by an artist she handled.
She could not place him so she
bought some of his work herself.
After 25 years in the business
of finding jobs for other people,
she is convinced the most im important
portant important single factor in
determining who gets a particular
job is the applicants appearance
manner of dress, manner of
speech.
Communications, the ability to
express oneself both orally and on
paper, is second, she continued.
Then comes talent, knowledge and
ability.
Its also very important for a
job applicant to be courteous not
merely to the interviewer but to
his secretary, the receptionist and
everyone else in the office, she
said.
More times than not the secre secretary
tary secretary has a great deal to say about
who is hired, she explained. And
too many men think it is beneath
them to be courteous to a
secretary.
She also advised against the hard
sell. Leave them wanting more,
she said.
Husbands
Are Scarce
In New York
NEW YORK (UPI) Husband Husbandhunters
hunters Husbandhunters will find that New York is
not a likely place to find a mate.
Women greatly outnumber men in
the metropolis.
Nina Farewell in her new book,
The Unfair Sex, advises single
women also to avoid Washington,
D.C., Dallas, Savannah, Ga., and
Richmond, Va.
Where to go? To Lawton, Okia.,
Wichita Falls, El Paso or Amarillo
Tex., Columbus, Ga., or Norfolk,
Va., where there are 117 men to
every 100 women.
Announcements
Graduation announcements for
August graduates are bow avail available
able available at the Campus Shop and
Bookstore. They are 15 cents each.

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TICKETS AIR AND SEA CRUISES HOTEL & RESORT RESERVATIONS
TRAVEL INSURANCE DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN AUTO RENTALS FOREIGN
CAR PURCHASES ESCORTED TOURS INDEPENDENT PLANNED TOURS TO
VOUR PREFERENCE.
Maaaiift
YOUR ASSURANCE OF QUALITY SERVICE IN THE TRAVEL PROFESSION.
A
* r
t!

:
* A

r O
m:

Thursday, July 25,1963 The Florida Alligator

Page 7A



The Florida Alligator Thursday,July 25,1963

Page 8A

UF Awarded slo4,BoGrant

The UF has been awarded a
$104,880 federal grant to test
criteria and procedures for de determining
termining determining acceptablity for low lowincome
income lowincome applicants for FHA
insured mortgage homes.
UFs Bureau of Economic and
Business Research was selected
by the Housing and Home Finance
Agency to examine credit
processing practices employed by
its Federal National Mortgage
Association and FHA, as well as
credit qualification problems and
mortgage payment experience in
connection with low-cost FHA FHAinsured
insured FHAinsured homes.

iPKEWIPTWSj^
l
got THAT V&J>
%(f A
VT-- l 1
L COSMETICSVITAMINSTOILETRIES*NOVELTIESGIFTS* STATIONERY _!
SCHOOL SUPPLIESMAGAZINES AND POCKETBOOKSHOUSEHOLD
ITEMS CANDIES CIGARETTES & TOBACCOS* ALL SUNDRIES*
PLENTY OF FREE PARKING CLOSE TO CAMPUS AND IT'S
CONVENIENT TO THE OTHER FAVORITE STORES AND ESTABLISH ESTABLISHMENTS
MENTS ESTABLISHMENTS IN THE VICINITY* JUST DOWN THE AVENUE. j
McCOLLUM DRUGS
Phone fr 6-5356 1124 W. University Free Delivery |

WELCOME STUDENTS, PARENTS
Sto beautiful Holiday Inn Motel, Restaurant
and General Gaines Steak House
SUPERS CUISINE
CATERING SERVICE both on and off premises
GROUP MEETING FACILITIES
in our Executive Room
PRIVATE DINING ROOM for large receptions
AMERICAN EXPRESS credit cards honored
TELEVISION In every room
SWIMMING POOL for our guests
COFFEE SHOP
* RESTAURANT PHONE FR 6-82 66 MOTEL PHONE FR 2-3311
SOUTH OF UNIVERSITY ON U.S. 441 VUS /
1900 S.W. 13th STREET WW
L

The research study will take
three years.
The Bureau will use a low-cost
subdivision in the Gainesville area
known as Lincoln estates, and
similar low-cost subdivisions in
several other states for the study.
The Washington announcement
from Housing and Home Finance
Agency Administrator Robert C.
Weaver, pointed out that the Bureau
of Economic and Business
Research has done a number of
related housing studies, such as
analysis of the cost of home pur purchases
chases purchases and sources of mortgage
funds.

Said Weaver: Both FHA and
FNMA are deeply interested in
the Florida project. We would
like to extend the advantages of
the most liberal financing to the
families most in need of it
those of low income."
But since these agencies can
only serve acceptable credit risks
. anrf since such a determination is
extremely difficult at the low lowincome
income lowincome level, we are hopeful that
the Florida demonstration will
point the way toward sound credit
criteria which will broaden oppor opportunities
tunities opportunities for low income families
to purchase homes."

'* Ba^a s s ~ j
NEW MORMON CENTER
.. .finished this summer, will provide a place for all
students of the Mormon faith to gather for fellowship.

High School Principal
Addresses PDK Group

Melbourne High School principal
Dr. B. Frank Brown will address
the annual Phi Delta Kappa
init ia t ion banquet tomorrow on
campus.
Dr. Browns stature as an
educator led to his being tapped
by the Kennedy Administration for
service on the panel for research
and educational development of the
President's Science Advisory
Committee, and has attracted
widespread attention to his space
age hign school in Melbourne.
A recipient of the 1962 Jaycee
award for outstanding young men
in the state, Dr. Brown is a member
of the curriculum committee of the
National Association of Secondary
School Principals. He received his
doctor of education degree from the
UF.

Phi Delta Kappa is a professional
education fraternity. In it i at ion
ceremonies at 3:45 p.m. will
precede the banquet at 6;30 in the
University Inn.
UF Junior Gets
Purina Award
Billy Ray Cannon, a junior at
the UF has been selected to receive
the Ralston Purina Scholarship
Award for 1963-64,
J. D. Sykes, company vice presi president.
dent. president.
The Purina Scholarship amounts
to SSOO and is awarded annually
to an outstanding junior in the land
grant colleges in each of the 50
states.



TASTE THE DIFFERENCE!
4
LONG'S CAFETERIA
313 WEST UNIVERSITY AVENUE DOWNTOWN, BETWEEN THE TWO THEATRES
SERVING HOURS
Lunch: 11:30 am 2:00 pm Dinner 5:00 8:00 pm
Ample Free Parking in our 100-Car Lot, for your Auto, Scooter or Bike.
H
r- ---
}\ ;
We Have Been Successful Because
1. We take a personal interest in each of our customers.
2. We will cash your check for FREE Only show your student ID.
3. Palmer and Sue Long will feed you on the "cuff" if you are broke. (We have fed many like this in the past.)
4. We are college graduates and former Presidents of our Fraternity's Chapter.
5. We are small (220 seating), home-owned, and family operated, with UF students to serve you. Come in and get to know us. We
are never too busy to listen to your problems and offer some advice.
6. Join the thousands who send greetings each year to us, their Gqinesville parents from all over the world.
COMPLETE DINNER QT<
SERVED AS LISTED 4:45 to 8:05 P.M. Jw W
MONDAY Choice of Golden Brown Fried Chicken, or Baked Ham
TUESDAY- Choice of Chopped Sirloin Steak, or Beef Stew
WEDNESDAY Choice of Roast Turkey and Dressing or Country Styled Steak
THURSDAY Choice of Barbecue Short Ribs of Beef, or Sliced Roast Beef
FRIDAY Choice of French Fried Deep Sea Scallops, or Rib Steak
SATURDAY Choice of Chopped Fiesta Steak, Brown Gravy, or Fried Chicken
SUNDAY NOON Roast Turkey and Dressing
SUNDAY NIGHT Choice of Our Famous Country Styled Smothered Steak, or Sliced Roast Beef
-INCLUDES-
Choice of Any Dessert (We Feature Non-Fattening)
Choice of Rice, Potatoes, or any one Vegetable
Choice of any 15$ or 20$ Salad
Roll and Butter
Coffee or Tea (All You Want)
EAT A GOOD BALANCED DIET AND WATCH YOUR WAISTLINE ALSO
SOMETHING NEW HAS BEEN ADDED
STUDENT MEAL TICKETS
)0 MEALS FOR $lO PLUS : ONE FREE MEAL WITH EACH TICKET
Treat Yourself or your date to our free bonus special.
TELEPHONE OR SEE US ABOUT OUR $2.00 BANQUET; FOR GROUPS OF 10 TO 200
More than 12 million meals have been served under the direction of Palmer Long. t Remember, in Gainesville we are
considered the student's friend. You owe it to yourself to try our food, our services, and our assistance.
LONG S CAFETERIA

(Palmer and Sue Long, sole owners and operators. Our building belongs to the Methodist Board of Student Education.
Thus our rent payments go to provide scholarships to college students throughout the state of Florida.)

Thursday. July 25.1963 The Florida Alligator

Page 9A



Page 10A

*
mMc j*Jb*-. 1 $ A**% *y. J|^yjM v; ,'-' v 4 H^BWB^^^^^Bf^^^^^KnlMiiHwTTlMlngyiii :l ITT 1 Wf mF nm"Bv#- V' '-
GEORGIA SEAGLE REOPENS
.. .after two trimesters of being closed and SIOO,OOO later.
LANES
AMERICAN SERVICE STATION
Atlas Products, Tires, Tubes, Batteries, Gas,
Oil, Accessories, Lubrication, Washing and
Polishing
Kauto service | r. ~ '-
"Wait! I remember where "My battery is dead?
the qas cap is!" What have you been
feeding it?"
Road Service 7:30 am 9:00 pm I
Phone FR 6-752 9 Across from Buchhoiz Jr. High 730 W. Univ. Ave.

WELCOME, NEW STUDENTS
/ \ r .....
V ... V
ii H&B
YOUR FRIENDLY BANK FOR ALL YOUR BANKING NEEDS"
Gainesville hospitality is personified in the service you get at Florida National. Our service is not just
friendly; it is fast, efficient and complete as well -a happy combination of genuine courtesy and highly
businesslike professionalism. You are invited to come in and check for yourself the many modern conven conveniences
iences conveniences of the Florida National Bank, where every banking need can be met. It's located in the heart of
our downtown shopping district, smack in the-middle of University Avenue's most frequented block Free
Parking, Drive-In and Walk-Up Tellers are just a few of the many courtesies extended to all Florida Nat National
ional National Bank visitors. The Florida National Bank is a favorite with all Gainesville citizens both the local
population and the university community because we like you, and like to show it.
WALK-UP TELLER AUTO LOANS
DRIVE-IN WINDOWS HOME IMPROVEMENT LOANS J| J jiMMi m
CHECKING ACCOUNTS SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES
SAVING ACCOUNTS MANY OTHER SERVICES UMNULAkwUKjMlJjdEllfl^
MEMBER: FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION FLORIDA NATIONAL GROUP OF BANKS 120 WEST UNIVERSITY AVENUE

The Florida Alligator Thursday, July 25,1963

Col. Smith Leaves
For Orlando Base

Col. Vernon S. Catfish Smith,
professor of air science of UF's
Air Force ROTC has been officially
transferee! from the 150th AFROTC
Detachment.
This marks the end of four
years' service at the UF by Col.
Smith, who has been transfered
to the 1360th USAF Hospital, Or Orlando
lando Orlando Air Force Base, because of
a recent heart attack andapending
operation.
Col. Smith came to the UF
from the Air Reserve Record Cen Center
ter Center at Denver, Colo, in August,
1959, replacing Col. Ralph Rhudy,
who retired at that time.
During his 33 year Air Force
career, Col. Smith worked in Air
Force assignments varying from
Director of Mil. Pers. for the
Third Bomber Command during
WWII to Assistant Dep. Chief of
Staff in the Alaskan Theater of
Operations. For his distinguished
service in the Air Force, he re received
ceived received the Legion of Merit and
the Air Force Commendation
Medal.
Before entering his Air Force
career, Col. Smith was an out outstanding
standing outstanding sports figure. He won
varsity letters in baseball, bas basketball,
ketball, basketball, and football at the Uni University
versity University of Georgia. He became
well-known as Catfish Smith
in 1931 when he lead the Bull Bulldogs
dogs Bulldogs to a 15 to 0 Victory over
Yale, collecting all the points in

Speech and Hearing
Workers Gather Here

Over 100 speech pathologists,
audiologists and personnel con concerned
cerned concerned with exceptional children
fro n throughout the state con convened
vened convened here Tuesday for a three
day meeting.
The conference, representing
the Tenth Annual Speech and
Hearing Clinic and the College

the game. That same year he was
chosen as All-Aerican end by
Colliers magazine.
While in Gainesville, Col. smiii
was quite active in local civic
organizations; he was a member
of the Board of Directors for the
Boys Club, first vice president
of the Gainesville Kiwanis club
a member of the Gainesville
Council of International Friend Friendship
ship Friendship his doors were kept open
to the foreign students here on
campus and he was a member
of the Chamber of Commerce
retirement committee.
i
m
COL. SMITH

of Education.
Keynote speakers are Dr.
Corrine Kass, research assistant
professor at the Institute of Re Research
search Research on Exceptional children
at the University of Illinois and
Dr. John ONeill, director of the
Speech and Hearing Clinic there.



r t\ vaMAVVVWA\ \\A
mi!iillm!ll&£^ss3l^£SSs**S&BEKn^Jl!^^jt^^f>
COMING DOWN
.. .is the SAE house on the corner of 13th Street and
University Avenue.
* % r *, -ffil # ~4**tt v<
££* 2jF %. 1a- y**\& &
IrjHH *<£§gfg& & v >
> J|& JL*sfjjPSMgj
' GOING UP
.. .is the new DPhiE sorority on Sorority Row.
H.S. Musicians Here
Members of band and chorus Continuing University studies and
groups from state high schools the UF Department of Music are
are attending the Gatorland Band sponsoring the clinic,
and Choral Clinic at the UF this
week. Students attending the clinic have
The students are learning stage been recommended by their princi princitechniques,
techniques, princitechniques, music theory, and pals and band or chorus directors
musical-comedy production. and have at least two years
The general extension division experience playing a band instru instruo7
o7 instruo7 the Florida institute for ment.
GATORLAND
dancing]
"Where Friends Meet
420 N.W. 13th Street

Sixty-Six Florida Students j
Working For Health Board

Sixty-six student: are working
.at their chosen p.ofessions in
various parts of Florida this
summer under auspices of the State
Board of Health. They are engaged
in a wide variety of public health
jobs from studying mosquitoes
to the problems of premature bab babies.
ies. babies.
Dr. Robert v. Schultz,
coordinator of training, said the
program has proved highly
effective and tremendously impor important
tant important to the students because it
gives them much practical
knowledge they would otherwise
be unable to obtain.
A prime purpose of the pro program
gram program is to interest qualified
students in choosing careers in
some phase of the many public
health activities in Florida.
Many of the students are working
in laboratories in Jacksonville,
Tampa, West Palm Beach, Or Orlando,
lando, Orlando, Tallahassee and Pensacola.
These laboratories examine many
thousands of specimens a day
tissue for rabies, blood for polio
or encephalitis, food which may
have caused food poisoning.
Others are working in the Duval
County child Guidance and Speech
Correction Clinic; Mental Health
Unit of the Alachua County Health
Department; Premature Baby
Demonstration Center and County
health department in Miami; en environmental
vironmental environmental health section in
Winter Haven; and health depart-
Dean Presides
Dean Perry A. Foote of the
College of Pharmacy, president of
the American Association of
Colleges of Pharmacy, presided
at the annual convention July 21-
23 at the University of North
Carolina in Chapel Hill and
attended the ensuing Pharmacy
Teachers Seminar. About 250
teachers and administrators from
throughout the country were ex expected
pected expected to attend.

University Students
SPECIAL PRICES ON APPROVED & REQUIRED GYM CLOTHES
MEN (It//
GYM SHORTS lW Ck \
T SHIRTS \ Y T
shoes ) 7
SOCKS NjV / c V
SWEAT SUITS / /. I \
SWEAT SHIRTS, GATOR STENCILLED / 1 { r| QD/Nj \
SWEAT SHIRTS, PLAIN / . *4/ r^ w ''Wj
#J ( /? |
WOMEN- (f
JAMAICAS j/7 \ il /
BERMUDAS _(l f~JJ )
SHOES /
SOCKS *'JJ r
SWEAT SHIRTS, GATOR STENCILLED 1 \ v
SWEAT SHIRTS, PLAIN -1 Vv^
Fred Perry TENNIS SHORTS for Men TENNIS RACKET RE-STRINGING
Fred Perry TENNIS SKIRTS for Ladies 24 HOUR SERVICE
We Invite You to Visit North Central Florida's Most Complete Sporting Goods Store
JIMMIE HUGHES SPORTING GOODS
*
One Block from Campus IJI3 W. Univ. Ave.

Thursday, July 25,1963 The Florida Alligator

ments in Pinellas, Sarasota, Leon
Palm Beach, Hillsborough,
Broward, Escambia, Polk and
Gadsden counties.
The students come from college
or junior college and, Dr. Schultz
observed, * apply themselves seri seriously
ously seriously and work hard.
The scholarship program was

*
-tHi? iz hr
t>dDv? ca*/ u
My Daddy is driving, and f there is my Mommy and
Me. We are on our way to eat at Mac's House. My
Daddy says the car costs lots of money. Mommy says
Daddy needed the car so he could drive to work. I
think he bought it so he could drive us all to Mac's
House to eat. We are all smiling because we all
know what is ahead. We have eaten at Mac's House
before.
MACS HOUSE
520 S.W. 2nd Avenue FR 2-6514

started in 1958. Since then Ihe
number of students taking advan advantage
tage advantage of the program has gradually
increased each year. Students are
selected on a basis of merit, need
and availability of scholarships.
They are paid in varying cate categories
gories categories according to experience
and years they have been in school.

Page 11A



The Florida Alligator Thursday, July 25,1963

Page 12A

New Frosh
To Forum
A new approach is being taken
this year to the Freshman Forum
a fall weekend aimed at introducing
new -freshman officials to the
background of the university,
faculty and administration
Chairman A. J. Ivie, SEG
announced this week.
The forum will be held two or
three weeks after the beginning
of school in the fall. Student
government leaders, Florida Blue
Key and Mortar Board members,
administration, counseling and
faculty members will speak and
lead discussions with freshmen
elected to offices on the fresh freshman
man freshman council and dormitory hall
councils.
According to Ivie, the delegates
to the forum will represent a cross
section of the freshman class.
The purpose of the weekend
forum is to stimulate interest in
UF among the top high school
graduates and new freshmen. The
forum will emphasize the oppor opportunities
tunities opportunities for work in student gov government
ernment government and also will place
emphasis on the academic phase
of university live, Ivie said.
We hope the forum will serve
as an incentive to all freshman
to become active in SG. We hope
that through this program the
interest of the leaders of the new
class will be spread to the rest
of the freshman class/* Ivie said.

Students Love Our Selections
Jv %
Kjb Canvas Chairs $lO to $12.50
Paper or Plastic Lanterns
j Lightolier Desk Lamps
l $9.90 to $12.50
Coffee Mugs $.50 to SI.OO
WE CARRY EVERYTHING FOR YOUR
DECORATING AND FURNISHING
DESIRES...
Cjaddurn interiors
3RD AVENUE AT IST STREET. N.W.

I rendition at Florida among other things means DONIGAN'S, as evidenced by the fact that some Florida
grads will actually make the trip back to Gainesville just to enhance their wardrobes with the DONIGAN'S label. That'sa
good thing to remember when you select your Fall wardrobe -a job that can be a problem, unless, of course, you decide
home of quality appael foR colleqe men anO women one Block fom campus
LADIES: VILLAGER LADYBUG ETIENNE AIGNER HARBURT AUSTIN HILL JOHN MEYER
. <*

INSIDE
STUDENT
GOVERNMENT

UF Politics Open Doors to Freshmen

By TOVA LEVINE
Editorial Assistant
Student Government at UF is
based on the idea that students
should have a part in determin determining
ing determining the plans and policies of their
university, according to student
body president Paul Hendrick.
New students who are irterested
in working with student government
have many opportunities to do so,
Hendrick said. For experience in
student government, a student may
begin by working as an under undersecretary
secretary undersecretary for one of the cabinet
members, participating in the
Student Government Service
Organization, or by running for
an office in the Freshman Council

or dorm council or for dorm
area legislative council represen representative.
tative. representative.
There are always opportunities
for students to work in SG. New
freshmen and other interested
students are encouraged to take
part, Hendrick said.
UF Student Government is a
t h r e e- branched organization,
made up of executive, legislative
and judicial branches. The organi organization
zation organization on the whole receives
approximately 10 per cent of the
student activities fees. The money
goes for special programs, office
help, and other projects.
The Executive branch of SG is
composed of a president, vice
president, 12 cabinet members, and
five commissioners appointed as
extra members on the cabinet.
The president serves as the
representative of student opinion,
works with the faculty and admin administration,
istration, administration, appoints cabinet
members, serves as the university
representative at meetings and
through letters.
The cabinet performs broad
services to the student body. The
members of the cabinet are
responsible for all projects
concerning the academic commun community,
ity, community, student activities, laws of the
Student Body, student bus service
and insurance, and campus organi organizations.
zations. organizations.
Cabinet members also serve as
liaisons between Student Govern Government
ment Government and international students
activity, between SG and residents
and governing bodies of married
student living areas, between SG
and student jobs.
Cabinet members serve as
advisors concerning military ser service,
vice, service, co-ed problems; they work
with the University Religious
Association and work on
publicizing SG events and
functions.
The Legislative Branch of
Student Government consists of a
council of 70 members. The vice
president of the student body pre presides

sides presides over the meetings.
The members of the council are
elected from each college in the
spring elections, and from dorms
and off-campus housing in the
fall. Approximately 30 posts will
be open in the fall.
The Legislative Council passes
laws for the student body, charters
organizations and publications,
passes resolutions expressing
student sentiments, and ratifies
cabinet appointments. The Council
is set up on the committee system
with various memhers sitting on
the rules, housing, budget and
finance, social, and publication
committees.
The third branch of Student
Government is the Honor Court,
the judicial branch. This branch
seeks to uphold the Honor Code
of the university through trying
violations and punishing offenders.
The chancellor elected in the
spring is the presiding officer at

SG Posts Information
In Newsletter Sheet

The first issue of Inside Student
Government" a student gov
ernment newsletter, was dis distributed
tributed distributed on campus during the
second week of July.
These will become a regular
feature of campus communications
in the fall, according to Paul
Hendrick, student body president.
The chief concern of my
administration is the degree of
awareness that students have as
to the student government ser services
vices services available to them. said
Hendrick.
During the campaign this
spring, I found that many students
were surprised that student
government is a big business,
apportioning nearly one half

court trials. A clerk, also elected
in spring, records the proceedings
of the honor court. As of fall
1961, a six man student jury, chosen
a t random, judge the students
brought before the court.
There are two annual election
periods at UF, one in the spring
and the other in the fall. The fall
election is scheduled for Oct. 3.
The election system resembles
national political elections, in that
two parties run candidates, with an
occasional third party also nomin nominating
ating nominating candidates.
Fraternities, sororities, and
independent organizations play a
big part in the election campaign.
Poop signs, stumping, manipu manipulation
lation manipulation by organizations, persuasive
speeches and printed materials,
and many activities (such as
debates, dorm question-answer
periods, etc.) dominate the pre preelection
election preelection days.

million dollars a year. Students,
I hope, will realize through read reading
ing reading the newsletter that student
government has a definite impact
on the policies of the university,
stated Hendrick, commenting on
the purpose of the one-page fact
sheets.
The biggest problem of pre previQus
viQus previQus administrations, Hendrick
added, is the isolation f student
government fro n the actual student;
community. Little information
about the student bodys wishes
entered student activities.
Hendrick concluded, Effective
communication is vital to success successful
ful successful projects. The newsletter, 1
believe will aid us in this
capacity.



Host Program Opens Ranks
For Student Sponsorships

By TOVA LEVINE
Editorial Assistant
The International Host Program
sponsored by the Florida Blue Key
(FBK) is aimed at filling a link
between the incoming foreign stu student
dent student and the new social customs
and activities he will be faced
with here.
Applications are now being taken
from students who wish to work
on this program. Students may pick
up the blanks in Room 314 Florida
Union.
The purpose of the program is
to help new students from other
countries adjust to the mores of
the community, to help introduce
these students toother American
students, and to help the students

Cabinet Members Meet to Review
Gamut of SG Summer Activities

Student government's last
cabinet meeting of the spring tri trimester
mester trimester was devoted to an analysis
of the year's platform and a
review of some of the smaller
functions of the cabinet which had
not been aired at early meetings.
Meeting in the student body
presidents office, Florida Union
room 310, last Thursday, July
18, the twelve member group
reviewed this summers activities.
Vernon Swartsel, secretary of
academic affairs, reported that
C course help sessions would again
be held during the fall and winter
trimesters, and that a search for
the proper professors to lead these
sessions was underway.
Student governments request
for longer library hours, particu particularly
larly particularly during final exam periods,
was noted by Swartsel. An answer
to this request had not yet been
received from the administration
of the university libraries.

Presidents Retreat Set for Fall

The Presidents Retreat, annual
fall meeting of student and admin administration
istration administration leaders, will take place
Sept. 20-22, at Park of the Palms
retreat in Keystone Heights,
according to Student Body Vice
President Frank Harshaw.
The three days of discussion
allows student government officers
to discuss and attempt to find
solutions for numerous campus
problems with the university
administration, said Harshaw, who
is in-charge of the event.
Harshaw listed the purposes of
the meeting as informational,
problem-solving, and good will

'* # ~
to take advantage of the fashion wisdom available for the asking at DONIGAN'S. It's a fact. Florida men and women
traditionally place their confidence in DONIGAN'S, because traditionally, the DONIGAN'S sales staff
is expert in the field of fashion know-how, all year long. You can't find un-pOsh clothing anywhere in here.
s l.\\ .wv.w. cem.R.U ctuage im west univepsity avenue fp 6-2338
MEN: GANT CORBIN TROUSERS REIS TIES BASS WEEJUNS UNETT CLOTHING LONDON FOG

get settled in their living quarters
and accustomed to the Florida
campus activities and academic
life.
To achieve these aims ;
American students act as hosts to
the new international students. The
students who sign up to be hosts
may choose to sponsor a student
from a particular country, of a
certain age level, sex, and
academic major.
The program, headed by Don
Denson, FBK chairman, and co coordinated
ordinated coordinated by Buddy Jacobs, will
also serve as a liaison between
the hosts and the foreign student
center on campus.
According to Denson, this pro program
gram program is in a unique position to

Secretary of Labor Bob Setzer
commented that efforts were in
progress to obtain openings for UF
students in New York City as part
of the Florida Worlds Fair
Authority from April 22 to Oct.
18,1964.
Setzer added that a clearing
service for potential baby sitters
has been established and will be
continued in the fall.
A publicity manual for all or organizations,
ganizations, organizations, cataloging all infor information
mation information in this area, will be ready
in the fall, said Chris Tompkins,
summer commissioner of school
affairs. I think that this will be
a big help to student governments
many associated organizations,
said Tompkins.
Juan Quesada, secretary of
international affairs, traced the
development of the International
Center in Building AE. He said
that additional facilities will com comthe
the comthe air-conditioned meeting place

between the two groups.
Following the opening session
at which the delegates will be
addressed by University President
/ J. \Viyne Reitz and Paul Hendrick
student body president, a series
of group discussions will be held.
The probable topics for consid consideration
eration consideration were listed by Harshaw
as follows: increased facilities in
university housing units; improve improvement
ment improvement of campus communications,
including additional television sets
and improving the Orange and Blue
Bulletin; development of the new
area at Lake Wauburg. Other topics
are: the relationship of the campus
with the civic community a

be of high value and service to
each international student arriving
at the UF and to those students
who serve as sponsors.
The Host Program this year is
setting up a series of activities
for both foreign students and their
sponsors to participate in, such as
field trips, lectures, socials, and
meetings with local government,
Gayle Bauer, 3AS, past sponsor
of a foreign student, said that
acting as a host helps in estab establishing
lishing establishing overall friendship and
understanding between American
and foreign students. Both the
foreign student and sponsor learn
from each other -about each
others countries, customs, and
people, Miss Bauer added.

in the fall.
Dennis Flanagan, liaison with
the numerous campus religious
groups, reported that Religion and
Life Week plans are already well
underway. He noted that all in incoming
coming incoming students would receive a
brochure from the University
Religious Association telling about
the various religious centers.
Secretary of Finance Jim Crab Crabtr
tr Crabtr e e reported that a thorough
investigation of the UF traffic
and parking problem is nearly
complete. He noted that a possible
change in method of enforcement
of tickets might take place in the
fall.
Higher standards for off-campus
housing is being supported by
student government Commissioner
of Housing, Maurice Plumb. Plumb
noted that the recent session of
the Legislature had enabled the
Gainesville City Commission to
take action in this area.

discussion of the discount
program, the student book sale as
well as social and cultural needs;
the mental health climate at the
UF, as related to academic pres pressures
sures pressures and recreational facilities.
Harshaw stated, Student and
administrative leaders need very
definitely to explore this problem
of mental health for an example
one many dont recognize.
This years Presidents
Retreat poses many problem
areas to work with the adminis administration
tration administration on. It is a good way to
approach these problems which
confront,us, added Harshaw.

Thursdoy, July 25,1963 The Florido Alligator

Professors Want Well-Read Freshmen
i
It was Professor David Larks sharp reply to our question that
started all this copy for an advertisement. Sir, we said, what
are the required books you will use in you freshman honors course?
And, mistakenly, we added, You see, Sir, freshmen want to read
ahead of time so that they can come better prepared. Well, out
poured the prose in certain but definite terms. (One of the attractions
of University of Florida Professors is that a good number speak in
prose). Zounds, he said, I don't want any students of mine to
have read the texts beforehand. Letm read the things they should have
read before coming to college. Glvem CRIME ANDPUNEHMENI
ANNA KARENINA, OF HUMAN BONDAGE f And a hundred others.
Then, (heavily accented) they will be ready for my course.
Well, considerably daunted by this barrage, which by the way,
please note, answered not the question we put to the professor but
another question entirely ( you will experience at least four years of
this same kind of thing). We timidly and with great forthrightness,
said Sir, would you care to tell us your selection of books you think
all entering college freshmen should have read?
Certainly, he said with some reluctance, you can list them but
dont quote me (another familiar-to-be phrase in academe).
So here without editorial comment, unless we can think of some,
is Professor Larks books. In addition to the above, the authors to
which we are not mentioning because if you dont know them you might
as well quit here and read somebody elses ad, he listed: Edith
Wharton ETHAN FROME; W. H. Hudson GREEN MANSIONS; Gide
THE COUNTERFEITERS; Gautier MLLE DU MAUPAIN Huxley
POINT COUNTER POINT; Voltaire CANDIDE; Shaw BACK TO METH METHUSELAH;
USELAH; METHUSELAH; Rostand CYRANO DE BERGERAC; Edna Millay SONNETS;
Cervantes DON QUIXOTE; Charles Kinglsey HYPATIA; Charles
Wood HEAVNLY DISCOURSE; Oscar Wilde IMPORTANCE OF BEING
EARNEST; Bellamy LOOKING BACKWARD; Ellen Glasgow BARREN
GROUND; Richard Hughes A HIGH WIND IN JAMAICA; James Ste Stephens
phens Stephens CROCK OF GOLD; Steinbeck GRAPES OF WRATH; Aristophanes
LYSETRATA; Upton Sinclair THE JUNGLE; Bulfinch MYTHOLOGY;
Fielding TOM JONES; Stendhal RED AND THE BLACK; Marquand
LATE GEORGE APLEY; lots of Ogden Nash; and of course, all the
PLAYS OF GILBERT & SULLIVAN.
Emboldened by this venture, we set out and found a cross-section
of the University faculty, and this included professors of English,
History, Chemistry, and Engineering. We lumped all their offerings
into one list, and here is what came out;
Ruth Benedict PATTERNS OF CULTURE: Suetonius LIVES OF THE
TWELVE CAESARS; Cellini AUTOBIOGRAPHY; Thomas Wolfe LOOK
HOMEWARD, ANGEL; Bertrand Russell MYSTICEM AND LOGIC;
Henry James PORTRAIT OF A LADY; Gordon Childe WHAT
HAPPENED IN HETORY; Hamsun GROWTH OF THE SOIL; John
Hersey HIROSHIMA; Thomas Mann BUDDENBROOKS; Willa Cather
DEATH COMES FOR THE ARCHBEHOP; Dorothy Parker POEMS;
Carson McCullers REFLECTIONS IN A GOLDEN EYE; Maugham
THE RAZORS EDGE; Hemingway FOR WHOM THE BELL TOLLS;
Alfred North Whitehead ADVENTURES OF IDEAS; and, of course,
THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES; The DECLARATION
OF INDEPENDENCE; and LINCOLNS GETTYSBURG ADDRESS.
We protested the last three on the grounds these had already been
read by now, but answered we were sure that it wasnt only reading
needed, but thorough understanding. So there!
We were led to understand, too, by our interviewees, that under understanding
standing understanding meant that students already would have read (and understood)
people like Faulkner, Salanger, Freud, Dickens, Bronte, Jane Austen,
Swift, Hardy, Fitzgerald, Camus, Chaucer, Conrad, Stephen Crane,
Dante, Defoe, George Eliot, Flaubert, Frost,Shakespeare, Hawthorne,
Hexley, Orwell, Ibsen, Sinclair Lewis, Kipling, Montaigne, Scott,
Shelley, Stevenson, Lewis Carroll, and all the ones that should have
been read in the elementary grades, plus all the pre-school, plus
all that should have been read to you as an infant.
So sure thing, entering freshmen have a little reading to do before
September 9th. Maybe we can be of some help. We are Just a little
old bookstore trying to help. We have only about 150,000 books on
hand. but we keep trying to get the one you will need. We have no
claim to any particular fame. Except the students who find something
here they didnt know existed. Like inspiration for instance. Once
during a freshmen week we overheard one frosh to another, while
scanning the bookshelves; Gee, he said, you know this is the first
time I have ever been in a real bookstore. Thats fame. We hope
you like books, too. The FLORIDA BO ok STORE
1614 West University Avenue

Page 13A



Page 14A

The Florida Alligator Thursday,July 25,1963

- READ THE ADS
For goods & services you
will need at the U of F.
f=j
LI
Know
Opportunity-i
Pittacus
.. \ }k-
Thats a big order from Pitta Pittacus!
cus! Pittacus! But your opportunity in
a career may be less obscure
than you realize.
If you have initiative and im imagination,
agination, imagination, you should investi investigate
gate investigate the opportunities in life
insurance sales and sales
management.
Take the time now to phone,
or stop by and talk with the
head of our college unit about
the advantages of being in the
life insurance business.
David R. Mac Cord
2910 N.W. 13th St.
Phone 376-1160
PFIOyiDENT
MUTUALSfei LIFE
'

dfardur yf Warty
Now open...
Now open, Gainesville's newest world cf foods, Carmanella's, 706
West University, Colonial Plaza. Let Carl and Nell De Prospero
be your hosts in the Garden of Eating. Feel free to browse in the
Gourmet Shop.
TAKt OUT ORDERS A large assortment of salads, cold cuts
and cheeses.. .all cut to order and packaged to go.
DINING ROOM open 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. GOURMET SHOP &
DELICATESSEN open 9 a.m. until 8:30 p.m.

Kids Get
College
Training
REDLANDS, Calif. (UPI) ~
Some elementary school children
already have college experience.
The University of Redlands last
February initiated the program
for 27 children who have been doing
superior work in their studies
The youngsters, from Terrace
Hills Elementary School,
attended sessions in art, science,
creative writing and drama one
afternoon a week in addition to their
regular school work.
Regular faculty members at the
University devoted their time to
the program, teaching the children
and visiting area schools to explain
the objectives of the project to
elementary school teachers.
The teachers, were given lesson
plans and ideas on how they chould
instruct their regular classes in
the same areas.
Roy Hill, superintendent of the
San Bernardino County Schools,
said the program turned out to be
a most interesting way in which
to meet the needs of gifted young youngsters.
sters. youngsters.
University officials, elated over
the enthusiasm of the youngsters
and the overall success of the whole
program, indicated that it wiU
probably be continued in the fall.
They said that the same major
areas will be covered with the
possibility of additional subjects
being added.
Many of the universitys
teachers have expressed interest
in donating their time if the pro program
gram program is enlarged.

X-1 \ I
JBL V

LIKE SARDINES IN A CAN
.. .was the crowd that listened to Johnny Nash Saturday night at Summer Frolics.

Students Can Be Classified
Into Three Types, Prof Says

ANN ARBOR, Mich. (UPI)
A man who served for 23 years
as president of the University of
Michigan says students usually
can be classified into three types.
They are the noisy ones, the
playboys (and girls), and the dedi dedicated
cated dedicated ones, says Dr. Alexander G.
Ruthven, president emeritus, who
was in office 1929-1951. He
describes them i n his autobio autobiographical
graphical autobiographical Naturalist in Two
Worlds (University of Michigan
Press).
The noisy ones, said Dr. Ruthven
are determined to be heard from
the time they enter college. Posing
as authorities on almost everything
at home and abroad, they ir. st
they should run the Univer lt> .
They usually claim to be 1 berals
and boast of disrespect for

authority. Common status symbols
are . soiled shoes/ jeans,
shorts, untidy hair, and occasion occasionally
ally occasionally mangy beards. These students
should disturb no one. One can
usually assume that their activities
represent growing pains. My
disappointment with them as I
have seen them later as alumni
is that very few become liberal
leaders and many become dis distressingly
tressingly distressingly ultraconservative.
The educator said the play playboys
boys playboys (and girls) had in my
experience been a small group.
| 1 ;V |||L
JOHNNY NASH

I said, haven 9 1 you heard
about Kleanra-Matic?
KLEAN-A-MATIC
featuring the
SANITONE DRY CLEANING PROCESS I
*y M

Specialize in shirts, dry cleaning & fluff dry
4 hour service upon request
Phone FR-6-5321
1724 W. Univ. Ave. 1717 N.W. Ist Ave. (Drive InJ

He said that complaints are often
heard about the waste of money
and time of instruction in tryihg
to educate those whose ambition
is to get nothing more than a
gentlemans grade or to get
married.
The critics fail to take into
consideration the number of
these students who find themselves
after they have entered college
and go on to success as alumni
and citizens, Dr,. Ruthven wrote.
The dedicated ones, he con continued,
tinued, continued, more than asp*/others
make life worth living for their
teachers because they come to
college with their eyes firmly
fixed on at least a genei goal.
. . Once called gr Is by
the playboys and conside 1 poor
college citizens by the noi ones,
these men and women have in
later years gained the more re respectable
spectable respectable title of eggheads.
Neither of these terms is
appropriate.
Professor
Gets Award
Professor F. E. Richart, of the
UF Department of. Civil
Engineering has been named the
winner of the Arthur M. Wellington
Prize for 1963 by the American
Society of Civil Engineers, it was
announced at Society headquarters
in New York.
The prize was in recog nos
Prof. Richarts technic? I
* Foundation Vibrations dell
was published in c the
Societys official publica



SitivetonanZ &
"Serving Sons and Daughters of Florida for 29 Years"
nf f THE COLLEGE |
lit / Vi'- f J A
?Xk*Bs *W r collection The overwhelming iB 8
i mO' fc/iotce o/ college men on campusTT. 8
L natural shoulder suit with vest, or ('wn/h I
w+out vest), your choice. % The sport coat 8 BB
r*choice... an interesting blending of tonesU
mgj| 1 ..v.v.%v.'.v.\v. .v. .v.v,v. > .'. i .y,v. .v, , ..w.''.v.'.'.-A,v-.v-.'.'.'.v.v.'.v.5,v.'. 1 .v.N*. 1
I|WWPBr I owr coa/s a very special status on 8
B 64 w* c ampus.m Shirt preference, .. toe hu/tow-B [ c
m VI 8* doton o*/orJ, traditionally styled by 1
fi i Manhattan. Upper classmanship in Uni
IV Vn VAW.S%V.V.W.'.W.VkW.\S\WAV.V.V.NWW.SNSWV.S.\.W.V.V.V.V.\SW.V,',V. ,^B
Pj. I't'crstiy sportswear.% You'll be well shodw
*' Jy| r*' 1 .WrtSVAV.V.'^V.SV.V.W.S-.V.V.VAW.VAV.NSVS'.SW.W.'.SV.W.NNNWW.V.W^W.ViW.V.SVA'.WSVrtV.W.V.'.NVNy^V^B
_ V i-fcy ['Bostonian Classic in fashion and 8 >
w* stitch best describes our sweaters. 8 Jiilik
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Jackets... rugged for the outdoor life orm
pcaw/ws, ;/ion //to c/tt/Z went/ blows.m For
O/to CO-Ed... An exciting and interesting JHf
i§\ of coordinates, blouses, sweat-u X
f*grs, s/tw pants, skirts, kilts, bags, 8 IPk
ISB W* jewelry, and many other interesting I JK
p items styled for campus wear... and 8
Silverman's extends a cordial welcome to the freshman, 88
\\ upperclassmen, old friends, faculty, and new residents B|§
/ \\ of Gainesville. Our store and all it holds is completely
j / \\ at your service.
V\ In every college town the students have a special store they
Wk like to call their own. A place that makes them feel right
at home whether buying orbrowsing. We at Silverman's B
would like to think that our store is such a place. 8r
By! Traditional apparel for the college man and woman has been
Ip|j a byword at Silverman's tor many years. Our extensive SBjL
selections of nationally known clothings and furnishings are SBjj^
designed to take care of all your needs.
8 Our student charge plan ( a Silverman's first on campus j^^H^Bjfl^
.

Thursday, July 25,1963 The Florida Alligator

Page 15A



The Florida Alligotor Thursday, July 25,1963

Page 16A

Gator Band, Fightin Gators
To Be Featured on TV in Fall

The UF Gator Band and the
Fightin Gators will be featured
on nationwide television, CBS
network, this fall when the Gators
meet the Georgia Tech Yellow
jackets in Atlanta.
The Saturday Sept. 14, game will
be the first major college football
game of the season.
The Gator Band will take the
field for a seven-minute halftime
show. The presentation will be a
short history of music based on
the sound of the three sections of
the band. The show, entitled,
Bang, Beep and Blow, is written
by UF Band Director Richard W.
Bowles.
Bowles stated he wanted the band
sound for this show to be different,
Scores OK,
Guard Says
College entrance examination
scores may now be used on appli applications
cations applications for appointments to the UJS.
doast Guard Academy.
The Coast Guard has announced
that as of this fall, high school
graduates may use college en enhance
hance enhance exams in lieu of the test
previously administered by the
doast Guard.
Copies of entrance exam results
should be forwarded to Coast Guard
Cadet, Miami 32, Fla. Results
of the exam may entitle applicants
:o an appointment to the Coast
Guard Academy in New London,
Conn. They also must qualify
physically.
Students successfully
completing studies at the academy
receive aB. S. degree and a
commission as Ensign in the Coast
Guard.
Applications for an appointment
md college entrance exam results
must be sent to the Miami office
jefore Dec. 7, 1963.

WELCOME, NEW STUDENTS!
"No, I dont play football. IBIH|
This stands for First National!" jfijL
f O-7
-tiA
Every Florida Man or Woman just like every otker / \ \ /y\ \
Gainesville citizen has good reason to be proud I U I Mj|
of banking with The First National Bank of Gaines- I t y I \ 'J' j'Jb /
ville. It marks you as a wise person, with the sense \'l // / [J L
to deal with an old, established firm whose good A I 11 I Jjj j A-
reputation is part of Gainesville's history. /II f ,II I l /
Look for the First National Bank in the heart of tfJJ) |
town, where our big clock has become a valued j
landmark to all who pass by. o' V
ESTABLISHED 1888
|,NATtONALI AMPLE FRFF
75 YEARS CONTINUOUS | J.bXmk| ,,,,,,. PARtaisir
SERV | CE jaMM OF GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA PARKING
GnsU member of federal DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION
faSKE i MEMBER OF FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM
^!-

something not heard at every
football game.
In support of the historical back background
ground background of the brass instruments,
the band will march a full rank
of conch horns, instruments made
from the shell of the Queen Conch
a gastropod common in the off offshore
shore offshore waters of Florida.
Featured in the Bang section
of the show will be the Gators
giant bass drum, The Biggest
Boom in Dixie. Although the giant
drum is not the largest in the
nation, it is said to be the only
big drum that will boom properly
and is played regularly as a
musical instrument.
Supporting the Beep section,
woodwinds, will be a rank of

Companies Halt
Cigarette Ads

Major cigarette companies last
month decided to discontinue ad advertising
vertising advertising in college newspapers
and magazines a move that will
cost The Alligator an estimated
SSOOO to S6OOO next year, according
to Gary Burke, advertising
manager.
The amount represents about
one-third of The Alligators na national
tional national advertising revenue. The
new policy has already been put
into effect.
According to George V. Allen,
president of the Tobacco institute
the major manufacturers have de decided
cided decided to stop advertising as well
as distributing sample packets on
campus. Institute members make
nearly 100 per cent of the
cigarettes produced in the United
States.
Certain cigarette companies will
be selling ads for UF football

Musettes, the Instrument patterned
after the ancient shawms of Persia.
Musettes are the forerunner of
todays oboe and are quite loud,
in spite of their small size.
Drum major of the band is
Gordon Shelfer, physics major
from Jacksonville. Shelfer is one
of the tallest drum major's in
the nation. In full field regalia
he is more than eight feet tall,
from gleaming boots to towering
plume.
The Corps of Gatorettes, the
bands twirling corps, trained by
choreographer Tanya Tallman,
will also be featured.
The band will also play for the
alumni brunch at the Dr inkier-
Plaza hotel before the game.

programs, Percy M.Beard, assis assistant
tant assistant director of athletics said
yesterday.
According to ohr National
advertising representative, we will
be receiving ads from the Brown
and Williamson (Viceroy) and R. J.
Reynolds (Winston and Salem)
companies, Beard said.
UF football programs take in
about $2,000 per year in national
cigarette ads.
The tobacco company move
against advertising in college
publications may be an attempt
to divert attention from an expected
statement by the American Medical
Association (AMA) on health
effects resulting from smoking.
However, the AMA has not yet
released a statement to this
effect.

( jATOR CLASSIFIEDS Roob A
Union*. Ext. 2832. /
WELCOME STUDENTS
TO GAINESVILLE'S ONLY SPECIALTY
RECORD SHOP
HERE YOU'LL FIND JUST THE RIGHT RECORDS
FOR EVERYONE IN OUR WIDE AND VARIED
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TO ALL OF YOU ... FROM ALL OF US! 0
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POWELLS COIN-OPERATED LAUNDRY TOYLAND
MORRISONS BARBER SHOP GRIDLEY MUSIC
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PARK LANE CAFETERIA GRANTS NEISNERS
BELK-LINDSEY DIANA SHOP BAKERS SHOES
CELLONS 66 SERVICE WOODROWS MENS SHOP
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Thursday, July 25,1963 The Florida Alligator

Page 17A



Page 18A

The Florida Alligator Thursday, July 25,1963

flLjw b
C' ,- v |u '' /rjl JW JjTTt PW9 m "*' I
' Mil nL m flljffi\ /m. .- W M
P **" |P> j* *" *

A LAST GOODBYE WAVE
... as thirty people take advantage of the Flordia Union Group Plan flight to Europe
this summer. Only students, faculty, staff, and their immediate families were
eligable to make the trip to Europe.

Welcome Week Plans
Set For Newcomers

Socials, a barbeque picnic, and
?et-acquainted parties are all a
part of the annual Welcome Week
Program for incoming freshmen
and transfer students.

Girls will be greeted by a com committee
mittee committee of big sisters and student
iormitory officers who have
volunteered to return early to
alan the week's activities,
including party decorations and
refreshments.
The division of housing will
entertain the hostesses Friday
night, Aug. 30, at a barbeque
picnic in Broward Hall recreation
room.
The summer planning committee
has arranged a work shop for
the hostesses in Jennings Hall
Saturday morning, when the girls

IWHAT-A jjjjgpjh ~=d
- *'
OUR JOINT MAY BE FALLING DOWN,
BUT OUR BURGERS ARE STILL THE BEST IN TOWN
WHAT-A-BURGER
f 34C 24C
I (Junior)
407 N.W. 13th Street

will make additional plans for
Welcome week and the entire
year.
Monday evening at 9:30 a housing
forum will be held for each hall
intended to provide freshmen a
chance to meet hall officers and
staff members and to become
acquainted with the hall program
government and WSA regulations.
Following the Dean of Womens
forum and the Panhellenic forum
Welcome Week will end Thursday
with hall parties in the dorms
after curfew.
Some halls have additional pro programs
grams programs scheduled. Broward has
scheduled a campus folk singing
group one night. Socials with the
boys's dorms are also planned
during the week.

WOMENS SPECIALTY SHOP
y yWL come in and make
\ our home your home.

U F
STAFF and FACULTY MEMBERS
BORROW and SAVE at
A/-^4A
1 **** ff iCe
SerJ* reAc *"*c H \S$
* l£r, r C'* i P v
- \- \9l-* 7

PARKERS
.. .has the most complete assortment ot school and
office machines and supplies in North Central Flo Florida.
rida. Florida. For any of your needs see or call Parker s,
FR 2-2555. Parker's sells and trades all types of
portable typewriters, especially Underwood, Oliv-
etti ancf Smith Corona. These include electric and
non-electric standards and portables. We repair all
makes. Rental and leasing plans are available.
Need a brief bag, art supplies or various engineer engineering
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t
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Lj



/Many Married
Students Here

Although the married college
student used to be quite an unusual
thing, here at UF gold bands on
left ring fingers are as common
as class rings. The administration
keeps no official records of the
number of married Gators, but
it is well into the thousands.
A great percentage of men are
married by the time they reach
their senior year, while many UF
coeds are married, also.
Married students can live off
and on campus. On campus they
can live-in Florida Veterans
housing, the Flavets, or in more
modern apartment villages named
Corry and Schucht. Flavets
are temporary structures built
after World War 11, renting for
' less than S3O per month.
Corry and Schucht are modern,
red-brick villages which rent for
approximately $55 per month. All
campus apartments are furnished
with basic needs.
Recreation for married students
follows along the same lines as
that of other students. Married
Gators attend the same entertain entertainment
ment entertainment and cultural events as other
students. Campus entertainment
is ideal for the married student
because it is usually easy on the
budget.
Wives form many special or organizations
ganizations organizations for social life, usually
connected with their husbands
fields. Law Dames, En Engineering
gineering Engineering Dames, and many other

|H 9
I-I I l
.. 'p ~mi

ARCHITECTURE EXHIBIT
...can be seen in the North Wing Gallery of the Flor Florida
ida Florida Union. The "Chapel at Roncamp" by Le Courbusier
is the main subject.

Le Corbusier Pics
On Display Here

An exhibition of seven
photographic panels showing 31
black and white photographs of the
chapel Notre Dame du Haut in
Ronchamp, France, designed by
Le Corbusier will be on view at
North Wing Gallery, Florida Union
until August 15.
The traveling exhibition of the
Fine Arts Committee was planned
by the American Institute of
Architects and presents a study
in depth of the chapel.
Le Corbusier, one of the worlds
most distinguished architects, won
the ALA Gold Medal in 1961. The
photographs included in the ex exhibition
hibition exhibition were taken byEzraStoller
outstanding architectural photo photographer,
grapher, photographer, who was awarded the 1961
AIA Architectural photography
Medal.
Circulated nationally by the
Smithsonian institution Traveling
Exhibition Service, this exhibition
focuses on the startling yet deeply
religious aspects of this revolu revolutionary
tionary revolutionary religious edifice.
Le Corbusier, whose real name
is Charles Edouard jeauuciet,
was born in La Cbaux-de-Foods,
Switzerland, in 1887 and now
resides in Paris. His first book,
Towards a New Architecture,
published in 1923, established him

such groups have frequent
meetings. Groups of wives are
also formed in the married
villages. These groups usually dis discuss
cuss discuss child care and household
problems.
Children have plenty of company
in the married villages. Flavet
111, a section of the Flavet villages
has about 500 children alone.
Budget keeping does not offer a
tremfndous problem to the
married student because Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville caters to the student in many
ways. Large supermarkets keep
food bills down, while discount
houses in the area help budget
household items and clothing.
Rent is one of the biggest pro problems
blems problems of the married student if
he does not live in the married
villages. Off-campus housing is
abundant, but many apartments
are nearly out of the grasp of
the married student financially.
Trailer living is popular among
married students because of its
low cost and easy upkeep. Trailers
are completely furnished, easy to
cool and heat, and are more private
than apartments. Gainesville has
many trailer parks, primarily
devoted to students.
Studying is often easier for the
married student because he has,
fewer emotional problems,
according to professors.
Professors also say that married
students consistently make higher
grades.

as a leading prophet of modern
architecture.
This chapel, completed in 1955,
culminates the stylistic develop development
ment development foreshadowed in his apart apartment
ment apartment blocks in Marseilles, begun
in 1948, and in his designs for
Chandigarh, the capital of Punjab,
India, begun in 1951.
Here, pholychrome sculpture,
executed in -einforced concrete,
has become architecture. Le
Corbusier has rejected his
previous style of abstract purism,
geometric design in 2-dimension,
and rational, functional art for this
lively, baroque form with its bold
but economical use of color. The
chapel is a human expression,
showing an individualism lacking
in his earlier works.
Despite the massive, rough walls
the sweeping, bowed roof, and the
silo-like towers, the church gen generates
erates generates an ethereal rathe, than a
monumental quality because of the
way in which the curving, brown
roof seems to float on the white
walls which, being concave anc
free flowing, seem weightless.
The diffused light introduces
a mystical atmosphere. Mr. G.
E. Kidder Smith wrote about the
chapel, It is the greatest building
of our time.

PATRONIZE GATOR ADVERTISERS
BAPTIST STUDENT UNION
PRE-SCHOOL RETREAT
SEPTEMBER 6,7 & 8
MAKE RESERVATIONS AT THE BAPTIST STUDENT CENTER
1604 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE.
r -., . t
i*
are
fAND NAMES STRONG!
1 ALL THESE FAMOUS BRAND NAMES & DOZENS MORE ARE I
I BOTANY 500...DICKIES...M0NET JEWELRY...SUPERBA... 1
f JANTZEN...BALI BRAS...DON LOPER...FABERGE...CASUAL
J MAKER...STYLE-MART...HOILYWOOD VASSARETTE...HANES...
W BURLINGTON...BONNIE BELL...PATTY PETITE-VAN HEUSEN... I
I ARTEMIS...VANITY FAIR...KUPPENHEIMER...FIELDCREST...
I HEALTH-TEX...ARROW...CHARLES OF THE RITZ...GOSSARD...
I McGREGOR BELLE-SHARMEER. WARNER'S...
We believe in brand names because 1
who labels his merchandise is proud \ A
I of what he makes You can be sure i I
ajjfimS&l I that a product bearing a nationally 2 \
ISEBXM 1 advertised label represents the l\l
1 utmost m benefits to you \
We are proud of the fine brand names j \ \
Bfc we feature and gladly endorse | \ \
them with our own name. |
I This gives you a double guarantee
I of quf lity, fashion, comfort and value.
WILSON'S -ON THE SQUARE IN h j

Thursday, July 25,1963 The Florida Alligator

Page 19A



The Florida Alligator Thursday, July 25,1963

Page 20A

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

For Sale

FOR SALE: 1960 Simca Deluxe,
one owner, absolutely like new.
32 mpg. $550. 372-6459 (A-137-
It-c).
'57 BUICK Convertible, white paint
and red interior, PS, PB, WSW.
Going home. Must sell. SSOO.
FR 2-9855, Miss Lugo.
(G-135-3t-p).

HENDERSONS MILL STORE
Tommy Bolt Building, Crystal River, Florida, US 19
Irregulars of Fine Qualities
TONS OF TOWELS and MILES OF FABRICS
Selection Quality Price
-
ionite Only 2 Thrillers
[rUlllllilllZ KING KONG vs. GODZILLA
J MYSTERY SUBMARINE
STARTS FRIDAY 9 ExciHng B,G HiH!
Jianu rmi/Al See 2as late as 9:30
Open 6:30; Show at dusk
HALF WCH^AN!
\ Wr iTWH
see -^- SEE...
HERCULES HERCULES HERCULES
Fighting Half- Cunnin 9 and Fighting In The
Human Supermen Strength Against C ave of Blood
- Giant Condor
#2
The MASTERS OF TERROR Together!
Vincent Boris Peter
PRICE KARLOFF LORRE
Edgar Allen Poe's ln Pathecolor
JHHE RAVEN"
Bonus 3rd PR IM I TIV E PA SSI ONS
Featureat UNLEASHED ON AN
JSmH ]h ?S ISLAND OF FURY
Jn Vftt&N ISLAND
fjDj_lnColoivFridav&SaturdayOnly^^_
STARTS NEXT WEDNESDAY 2 FIRST RUN
ACTION PACKED THRILLERS
Guy Williams
CAPTAIN SINBAD
Robert Taylor
CATTLE KING
Both in Color

NEW HOMES. . Gainesvilles
biggest and m6st respected builder
offers homes in N. E. and N. W.
sections. Campus representative
Claude (Cash) Hamrick, 216 R
Flavet IH. HUGH EDWARDS, INC.
372-1551. (A-134-ts-c).
TELEFUNKEN 4-track Stereo
taperecorder with two Stereo
microphones. .2 yrs. old. S9O.
Contact Student Publications
Central Business office, ext. 2832.
(A-137-lt-c).

1952 TROTWOOI> TRAILER Bx 31
One bedroom. Priced reasonably
for quick sale. Available August
15th. Call Micanopy 2801 or Uni University
versity University extension 2869.
(A-137-lt-p).
WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC stove
21 four burner oven broiler,
fully insulated, used 1 year only.
Was $l3O, now SBO. Call 372-1961.
(A-137-lt-c).
GOOD, CLEAN 7 cu. ft. Refrig Refrigerator.
erator. Refrigerator. $30.00 Call Paul Gibbs
FR 6-8366 after 8:00 p.m. (A (A---137-lt-p).
--137-lt-p). (A---137-lt-p).
SELLATHON! GRADUATING
EVERYTHING MUST GO! S3OO
original, AM-FM Multiplex Stereo
Phono Console -32 Watts, 12
Woofers, Every Component is
excellent. You must hear to believe
at SIBB. Includes 6 mo. warranty
and records. 52 Rambler, good
transportation S7O, New toaster
$6, Bookshelves $3, 9 x 4 oval
white rug $2.50, Parakett, cage,
food and accessories $2.50; and
others. P. B. Malter, 314 D Flavet
I. (A-137-lt-c).
SMITH CORONA Electric Type Typewriter,
writer, Typewriter, automatic carriage return.
Its a compact, not a portable.
Clean and adjusted, has new ribbon.
$l4O net. Robert Kuhn FR 6-
1291. (A-137-lt-c).

For Rent |

TWO 3 and 4 BEDROOM furnished
Apts, available ifi September. For
further informationcallMr.
Kaplan. 372-0481 (B-132-st-c).
ATTRACTIVE ROOM in quiet
modern home. Ideal for U. of F.
student. Private entrance, kitchen
privileges. 3715 N.W. 7th Place.
Phone 372-7883 (B-137-lt-c).

pioidA union films committeel
Friday & Saturday, July 26 & 27
ANGRY HILLS
Friday & Saturday, August 2 & 3
WE RE NO ANGELS
Showing at 7& 9 p.m. Admission 30<£
Medical Center Auditorium
ijouvegotta
lotto [win to do(
/"/ miwimiifs
SOtWKC
w dick ann- Maura bobey jessE .ed
* mm dyks MaGrer siaPieroN-rm- pwson-suLuvan

SMALL HOUSE for rent on farm
8 miles west of Gainesville. Cash
or rent could be worked out, Ralph
Downing Rt, 4, Box 355 C, Gaines Gainesville,
ville, Gainesville, Florida (B-137-lt-c).
HOUSING MEN Rate unchanged
2 blocks from main library. 2
room furnished units near all
University requirements. Ground
floor, private entrances, Univer University
sity University approved. Office- 127
15th Terrace. Phone 6-4694.
(B-137-lt-c).

Autos

1960 FORD FAIRLANE, 2 DR.,
Radio, heater, 4 new tires. $975
or best offer. Call FR 2-7966
after 6 p.m. (G-137-lt-p).
'6O FALCON 4-DR., Standard
Transmission, 28,000 mi. Good
condition. S7BO. Call FR 2-9391
D. Knittle, 86 Buckman Hall (G (G---137-lt-p).
--137-lt-p). (G---137-lt-p).
GOING TO EUROPE? THE
CONTINENT? Let us arrange for
delivery of your new Triumph or
Fiat anywhere. We take your old
car in trade here and arrange for
delivery of your new car there.
Use it to tour the continent and
return it to the States with you.
Call Ken Bowman, FR 2-4373.
Barkley Motors, Inc. Lincoln
Mercury Meteor Comet
Triumph Fiat. (G-125-12t-c).
CASH ON DELIVERY: Will buy
phonograph records, will consider
all forms and all speeds. Primary
interest long playing records.
FR 6-7016. (G-132-ts-c).

Wanted

TYPIST NEEDED to type lab
reports. Desire someone living on
or near campus who can type on
short notice. Phone Mr. Henry
porter. FR 6-613 after 7;OQ p.m.
(C-136-2t-p).
WANTED: 1950 through '54 Fords
and chevrolets. A1 Herdon's
Service Station, 916 SE 4th Street.
(C-134-4t-c).

Help Wanted^|

NOW INTERVIEWING coeds from
palatka, Ocala, Leesburg and
Tavares. Full time August sales
work. May be worked part time
during fall. Commission, basis.
Mr. Briggs, FR 2- 2190.
(E-135-3t-p).
NEED MONEY? Earn good money
while in college. Call or write
Jim Cooper & Associates
Room 206, Security Building,
Gainesville, Florida. FR 6-9783.
(E-133-st-c).

Services

RUBYS ALTERATIONS, 1238 SW
3rd Avenue across street from
Administration Building.
(M-129-ts-c).
TYPING DONE ON IBM electric
typewriter. Will type on sliort
notice. Reasonable rates. Phone
Mrs. Martinez FR 6-3261, Ext.
25 7 5 weekdays or FR 6-1859
weekends or nights, (M-127-ts-c).

i i m
For Sale

ATTENTION FACULTY AND
STAFF. Three bedroom, 2 bath
air-conditioned home in convenient
Northeast for sale#-Close to
churches, shopping center, within
walking distance of Metcalfe and
Bishop Junior High. Many extras,
including built-in GE kitchen, dis disposal.
posal. disposal. Large corner lot. Only
$14,850, with S7OO down, $97.50
per month. 5 1/4% GI mortgage.
1505 N. E*. 19th Lane, FR 6-8528.
(1-137-lt-c).

PLACE YOUR AD
4. STAND BACK!
4>
i
GATOR CLASS!I lEDb
GET RESUL 5
Coin Operated
Laundry
(coin drycleaning optional)
'We havea location avail available
able available in southwest'section
of Gainesville that will
really pay off. Next too
Jackson Minute Market
in best possible area. On
city sewer line and all
other utilities. We furnish
and install for you the
finest laundry and dry drycleaning
cleaning drycleaning equipment a available.
vailable. available. You need S6OOO
and good credit standing.
Write Atlantic Hoffman
Equipment Corporation,
P.0.80x 5652,Jackson 5652,Jacksonville
ville 5652,Jacksonville 7,F1a.,0r call Dave
Davis, FR 2-0455.



For many years, I have listened
to Florida's fans criticize the
football team and I must admit
some of the comments were just.
This time, however, I am going to
reverse the process and criticize
the Florida fan; not the alumni,
but the student.
I classify the student body into
three sections; non-fraternity,
fraternity and female.
First; the majority, the non nonfrat
frat nonfrat men. These are usually too
busy to support the team. What
would life be on this campus with without
out without intercollegiate athletics? It
has been my experience that this
group is not only the severest
critic but seems to have it out
for the football team. I dont know
the reason for this attitude,
jealousy perhaps.
Second: the fraternity group. I
am a member of a fraternity so
this includes some of my own
brothers. The group I dislike the
most is the so-called elite group
that thinks a fraternity man is a
walking God. He is the individual
that comes to a game drunk. He
drinks through the game and is
usually passed out by the third
quarter. Why doesnt he stay at
home? What do we have a group
of young men in the stands for,
to cheer the team or to throw
insults at the other fraternities?
A game is merely a social
gathering to this group. People,
you can stay home!
Third: the fashion model type
coed. Most coeds are avid fans
and I take my hat off to them,
but the group I have in mind
comes to the game just so they
can outdress their rivals. They
are too busy looking beautiful to

What Ever Happened to Lee Evans?

#w# Grants Own Brands ... /or home and family!
STATIONERY
NOTIONS
TOYS HOUSEWARES HOSIERY XJ
W^MwJ/mfl&i^^^^m
CANDY MATFRIAI l INDFRWFAR c#prif#ppp^
'I ..*"> ;;
GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER NORTH MAIN STREET
" ll > 1 1

Inside Report

Brown Castigates
Florida Students

By RUSS BROWN
Sports Writer

notice the game. In fact, they are
even too dainty to applaud when
the band is performing. Ladies,
stay home. You need your beauty
rest for the parties later that
night.
I must admit I have been severe.
There are so many people who
support the Gators that it actually
tnakes playing football here a
pleasure instead of a chore. A
great majority of us play because
this is the only way we can re receive
ceive receive an education, but still we
play mainly because we love the
game, the excitement and the
competition. Football is a tough
game physically as well as men mentally.
tally. mentally. We spend many hours pre preparing
paring preparing ourselves for a game and
acceptance from the student body
is greatly desired. We would like
to feel that we are playing for
the university, instead of just for
our coaches, wives, close friends
and a true Gator, President Reitz.
I wish everyone of you could
witness a football game at L.S.U.
At six Oclock, their stadium is
almost packed. People are there
almost an hour and a half before
the game starts. When an opponent
steps out on the field, they start
chanting Tiger Meat and by
game time you believe you are
tiger meat. The fans take that
psychological edge off a team and
it helps.
Florida has the greatest chance
in its long history of football to
become a great football power.
The players are here, the coaches
are ready and we have the schedule
to get national recognition early.
What we need is some ole college
Gung-ho-give'em HELL GATORS!

r d tf tfK.
K. tfK. Mg
* "lH
$ i R jgM
(pis ?
RUSS BROWN
.. .our only end with
varsity experience;

2/WenF/ghf,
One KOd
Two men engaged in a fist fight
Monday night while a third man
looked on with little concern.
Observers of the fight stated
that a large crowd had gathered
for the occasion, which had
apparently been staged by some
outsiders.
An unconfirmed report stated
that the two men involved were
in cahoots with the promoters and
had, in fact, been paid a large
sum of money each for partici participating.
pating. participating. One wild rumor has it that
a closed circuit television hookup
to movie theaters across the nation
had charged goodly sums to people
who actually subjected themselves
to the spectacle.
An unconfirmed report states
that one of the principles Is
Sonny Liston, an ex-convict and
that the other is Floyd Patterson,
a former athlete.
The fight lasted 2 minutes
and 10 seconds. Liston is allowed
to continue his claim of being
the heavyweight champion of the
world.

-. Y
Thursday, July 25,1963 The Florida Alligator

The Intramural bowling was con concluded
cluded concluded last Friday with Physics I
out rolling Corry 1 1,787 to 1,576.
Will Block was the most
outstanding keggler, bowling 237
and 236 for a 473, which was iO3
points higher than Don Ders com combined
bined combined score.
In the semi-finals, Corry I edged
the Playboys. Each had been the
winner of their respective
brackets.
The table tennis tournament was
held Saturday with Bob Cohen
beating Nguyen Anh in a three of
five series.
The softball bracket winners
are: I Forgy's Clowns; n Phi
Delta Theta; in Flavet ID; IV.
Holidays. A single elimination
tournament was played this week
with* the final game slated for 6
p.m. tomorrow on field number
three.
Nine steams have entered the
single elimination volleyball

RAME*
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tournament which ends tonight at
8:00 in the Florida Gym.
There will be no tennis this
trimester due to the lack of tMM.
Physics I BOWLING SCORES
George Matzkanln 169 174 333
Bill Dunnill 156 167 323
Don Der 140 148 288
Will Block 237 236 473
872 916 1,787
Corry I
Mike Lipson 179 190 369
C. Edelstein 114 158 272
J. Uveges 120 177 297
L. Tupler 179 186 365
B. Gurivtz 150 123 273
742 834 1,576
Tedi May Leave
Georgia Tech will pull out of
the SEC in January and place more
emphasis on intersecional football,
according to the Atlanta Journal.
Athletic Director Bobby Dodd
declined to comment on the report.
He did say that about a 50 50
ratio of sectional to intersectional
football games will be scheduled.

Page 21A



Page 22A

The Florida Alligator Thursday,July 25,1963

BEHIND THE EIGHTBALL

f Confession
And Challenge
By CHARLES GOODYEAR
Sports Editor

Confession timet I have consistently turned out sub-par sports
pages. I have learned more about it week after week, but I managed
to make different types of errors. That the pages were often better
than some small town newspapers is as it should be; we are larger
than many towns. I started off attacking professional sportswriters
on the grounds that they appear to know little of sports and only a little
more of journalism. I end up confessing that I know nothing of
journalism and only a bit more about sports.
I was proud to haye introduced the opinions of Russ Brown to the
reader. I hope that he will be able to continue with his inside Report
during the fall as the Gators face their weekly opponents.
Challenge
There have always been students here who could be an asset to
any of our intercollegiate teams, but who never even try to come out.
Some state that they wanted to do so, but did not know how to go about
it. Others say they don't have time. Others lack the confidence required
to make it. (See the article in the supplement about who to see about
going out for a team).
There are many men on campus who could outrun me with little
effort, but they never will by just nodding in agreement. I would like
to extend an open challenge to all male students to come out for sports
this year.
If you come out for cross country, Ill try to beat you, and if I
dont fine. That will mean that the team will be just that much improved.
I would like to be on an SEC championship team. I know that the men
necessary for getting the job done are here and I want them to come
out and do n. Nori-integrated Recruiting
I dont think it right to run an article viewing one side of an issue
without giving equal weight to other considerations. For this reason,
I point out that Marty Stones viewpoint does not clash with mine
exactly, but they do not coincide.
For recruiting purposes, primarily football and basketball, athletes
are selected on basis of their athletic ability, to be sure, but not
solely. Their backgrounds are checked to determine the type of student
the boy is. It is important that he stay here for more than his freshman
year, so matters of grades, planned course of study, vocational
ambition, extra-curricular, etc., are looked into. No athlete, who
might be incompatable with his fellow students, team members or
other contacts, is knowingly recruited.
This explains to a great degree why we have not actively recruited
Negro athletes thus far. We try to get Florida boys first and then go
outside the state. The fact is simply that it has not been worth going
after boys who would only flunk out. In time, as their high school
preparation is improved, Negroes will be recruited on an equal basis.
Congratulations
A word of congratulations is due the intramural department and
those who participated in its fine program this summer. With summers
heat, it is always easier to do nothing than to get involved in a sports
program, in the bowling finals last week, all but two men improved
on their second game. Had Will Block improved as much as some
he would have been close to perfect; but who wants to argue with
consistent high levels of performance?
Stone Bids For Integrated Sports
By MARTY STONE
Alligator Correspondent

The Kentucky Wildcats have
become the ice-breaker in the
Southeastern Conference by being
the first school to recruit both
white and colored athletes. For
Wildcat officials, it was a hard
decision. Many problems arose
beside those created by Southern
race relations.
Now that tne UK has broken the
ice, it appears that other teams
will follow. The big question here
is what road will the UF take?
My personal opinion is that the

CROSBYS
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SERVICE
MINOR TUNE-UPS BRAKES MUFFLERS
' FREE PICK-UP & DELIVERY
COMPLETE GULF SERVICE
7 am to 12 pm
Phone FR 2-9324 931 W. Univ. Ave.
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Gators will also follow, maybe
not immediately, but soon.
Florida took a big step %t the
beginning of this academic year
when they opened their doors to
Negro students. It was an act
that UF students can be proud
of, for there was no violence
and no troops. Ibelieve that Florida
officials will realize that by
opening their athletic doors as
well as their academic doors, the
UF will again benefit.

Athletic Frat
Invites All
To Join
Sigma Delta Psi is the Phi Beta
Kappa of the athletic world, just
as PBK requires more than in intellectual
tellectual intellectual excellence, SDP
requires all around fitness and
athletic prowess.
None of the requirements for
membership are difficult for a
person who regularly performs
them, but the fun really begins
with events you have never even
tried. This is somewhat like taking
courses outside of your major.
The requirements are: 1. 100
yard dash in 11.6 seconds; 2. 120
yard low hurdles in 16 seconds;
3. high jump approximately 5 feet,
according to a height-weight
schedule; 4. broad jump 17 feet;
5. 16 pound shot put 30 feet or
according to a schedule; 6. 20
foot rope climb in 12 seconds; 7.
baseball throw 250 feet or javelin
throw 130 feet; 8. football punt
of 40 yards; 9. 100 yard swim
in 1:45; 10. mile run in six min minutes;
utes; minutes; 11. handstand for 10 seconds
or three games bowled with
average of 160; 12. front hand handspring,
spring, handspring, landing on feet; 13. fence
vault, chin high.
In addition, good posture and
grades sufficient for athletic
eligibility are required. If you are
a member of an intramural cham championship
pionship championship of if you have earned a
varsity letter, you may substitute
it for one of these except for
swimming.
There is no time limit for com completing
pleting completing these tests. In fact, you
could even gain membership after
graduating. Contact the Intramural
Department or Coach Alan Moore
for further details.

\ CHANDLERS^
\ HAMBURGERS
- >
p '*2r. K
U.S. GOVT. INSPECTED BEEF USED EXCLUSIVELY
HAMBURGER .15 COCA COLA .10
CHEESEBURGER .19 ROOT BEER .10
FRENCH FRIES .12 ORANGE .10
MILK .12 COFFEE .10
MILKSHAKES Chocolate Strawberry Vanilla .20
720 N.W. 13th Street

I

ALL EYES ARE when you advertise
IN THE ALLIGATOR
CaM 6 3 9 6]( Ext 28 32
Streits
World of BICYCLES...
u'li nl' 1J
NEW & USED MOTORCYCLES
ALL PARTS & ACCESSORIES FOR BIKES & CYCLES
KEYS FITTED
STUDENTS! If you would like to place a new or
used bicycle on reserve and avoid the rush, write:
STREIT'S BICYCLE SHOP
615 W. University Ave.
Gainesville, Fl^fida
Wri



Football, Swim Star
Signed by Gators

Luther White, outstanding all allaround
around allaround athlete at Chiefland, will
become the 36th member of the
1963 Baby Gator football team.
White, 5-10 and 168 pounds,
played halfback and quarterback
this past season for Chiefland and
was also a standout basketball
player.
We are happy to have Luther
joining the Gators, said Coach
Ray Graves. We think he has
exceptional potential and will be
a big asset to the UF.
White, along with the rest of
the Baby Gator squad, will open
the 1963 season Sept. 23 in Auburn
against the Tiger freshmen.
They will meet Miami and FSU
on the road and play the Georgia
Bullpups in Gainesville.
All-StarGames
Set Here
The North-South High School
All-Star basketball and football
games will be played here Saturday
August 3. The basketball game
will be in the afternoon? while the
football game will be on Florida
Field at night.
Some of the best high school
giaduates in the state will be
brought together for this annual
event. Most of the boys have been
signed by various colleges, but
occasionally, an unsigned boy will
receive a bid after the game. Coach
Jimmy Dunn,Gator backfield coach
was too small to play college ball
until he led the 1955 South All-
Stars to victory and* won the hearts
of the fans. He was first string
quarterback for three years here.
Students will have to pay one
dollar as these events are put on
by the High School Activities Asso Association
ciation Association which rents the use of the
gym and field.

WELCOME STUDENTS AND PARENTS
ll
jl\ Gainesville, Fla. Restaurant
t Phone FRanklin 2-6333 \Jbh/
Mniugrsittt 3tut~'~ lip'
EVERYTHING COMFORT DESIRES America inest
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/ I \ Dining at its Finest
1 oror ty G rou P Luncheons
, \ I |ill| mSm Carriage Room Open for Breakfast,
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fflotfcl \V| J| IwM i Lunch K f 4tW Gator Roost Open for Conventions,
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RESTAURANT & COFFEE SHOP FREE RESERVATIONS WITH ASSOCIATED QUALITY COURT MEMBERS .. HEALTH CLUB
RADIO & TV IN EVERY ROOM BABY SITTING SERVICE TROPICAL GARDENS
SWIMMING POOL 24 o* SWITCHBOARD MAJOR CREDIT CARDS HONORED
WALL TO WAIL CARPETING LOBBY WITH OPEN FIREPLACE FREE KENNELS

Australian freestyle champion
Charles Staples has signed a
swimming scholarship with the
UF, Gator coach Bill Harlan
announced.
Staples, a native of Sydney,
Australia, holds both the
Australian and New South Wales
110 yard freestyle records (long
course) with a time of 55.1. His
55 yard freestyle time over the
long course is 23.8, also a national
mark.
There is no question Staples
is the best swimming prospect
ever signed by the UF, said
Harlan. His times, over the long
course, are comparable, perhaps
better, than the times which won
the NCAA this past year.
Staples, 6-2 and 185 pounds,
swims the 55, 110, and 220 yard
freestyles and the 110 yard butter butterfly.
fly. butterfly. He attended Waverly Prep in
Sydney and will be a radio-tele radio-television
vision radio-television major at Florida.
One of the reasons this boy
chose Florida was his very favor favorable
able favorable impression of our Journalism
School and its major in broad broadcasting.
casting. broadcasting. He is extremely dedicated
o this course of study.

ISOMETRICS
(EDITORS NOTE: I want to
thank Coach Walter Welsch for
his suggestion of doing a series
on isometrics. He recently gave
me a copy of some exercises
devised for Naval office workers
which are quite helpful for keeping
fit. They suggest that you do as
much walking as possible.)
This weeks exercises will wind
it up for the summer so you get
a bonus. The first is a hand
press. Place your hands together
in front of you and push then in
opposite directions. You will find
that this will strengthen your arms
and shoulders.

*
* SX t
IK
Ur i

FRANK LASKY
... has been picked
as a pre-season All-
American.

The second exercise is a neck
press. Hold your hands behind your
head as if stretching and pull them
forward while pushing back with'
your head.
The third exercise is a leg
squeezer. Sit down, hook one foot
over the other and try to pull
your feet apart.
Remember in all of the
isometric exercises, use about
half strength at first and gradually
exert full force. Strain for six to
twelve seconds per day only.
Overuse will tear down your mus muscles
cles muscles and weaken you. Think of
applying body tension at any given
time and you will find that the
opportunity to keep fit is all about
you if you will only avail yourself
of it for a few minutes a day.

Thursday, July 25,1963 The Florida Alligator

Want Real Southern Hospitality,
Newcomer?
Come and Bowl at...
REBEL LANES
RESTAURANT
Student Rates 811 W. University

Page 23A



The Florida Alligator Thursday/ July 25, 1963

Page 24A

> vfiv'-A : :-:v>.v v ,...
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*** H#H
WSWKWSwHw/WW **
WE LIKE TO MAKE FRIENDS ...
And count the University faculty, staff and as you embark on new and exciting experi experistudents
students experistudents among our most cherished ones. In ences. We invite you to come in and get
the days and weeks ahead, youll be meeting acquainted at the full-service University
many new people and making many new City Bank, interested in your welfare during
friends, too.We welcome all students,faculty the months and years ahead. We stand
and staff toGainesville and wish you success ready to serve you.
CENTRAL CHARGE
YOUR NEAREST BANK TO THE CAMPUS complete banking service
CHECKING ACCOUNTS
SAVINGS ACCOUNTS WITH
INSTANT INTEREST
I THRIFTY CHECKING ACCOUNTS
FRIENDu v SERVlCE SERVlCEfijrchj
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fH. m always welcome
SANK 1116 w. University Ave.
GAINESVILLE, FLA. MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION



ALLIGATOR FALL PREVIEW

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.. .are a fitting climax to all of the activities that take place during Homecoming
Weekend.

HC '63, A UF Tradition
That Thrills Thousands

By LYNNE WOGAN
Staff Writer
Plans for Homecoming 1963 at
UF are already underway with
the slogan contest. From the
entries Governor Farris Bryant
will select the unifying theme for
the events of the entire weekend
of October 26.
Sorority and fraternity members
will plan house decorations around
Men s Dorms
Arent Just
Bedrooms
Weekend movies, dances, li library
brary library facilities, weight rooms and
dorm TV-viewing are among the
many activities initiated and spon sponsored
sored sponsored by hall governments in the
mens living areas at the UF.
A step into the big-time social
life was made by the Graham area
council last year with the sponsor sponsorship
ship sponsorship of a Bunny Club one week weekend.
end. weekend. UF coeds from the girls
dorms entertained and acted as
hostesses for the dance held in the
area recreation room.
The basic governing bodies of
each dormitory are the hall coun councils.
cils. councils. Members are elected as rep representatives
resentatives representatives of their respective
sections. Usually council officers
are elected from among these rep representatives.
resentatives. representatives.
Activities of the Councils are
financed by the collection of an
Activity Fee from the residents.
Funds are used for purchase of
equipment such as irons and ping pingpong
pong pingpong tables and balls, rental of
current movies, and staff to show
the movies.
Hall Councils have also worked
with university officials to bring
weight-lifting rooms, sports
equipment check-out facilities, and
branch libraries to the dormitory
residents.
Several of the dormitory groups
publish newsletters.
Students interested in hall
government should contact their
section advisers for details.

VoL 55, No. 137 The Florida Alligator Thursday,July 25,1963 Section B

GATOR GROWL SKITS

this theme, which will emphasize
the alumni reunion this year.
The weekend begins with the
colorful homecoming parade
Friday. Last year more than 20
marching bands from all over the
state provided the rhythm. Student
groups annually enter elaborately
decorated floats and compete for
the prizes awarded the most
original and the best.
A highlight of the weekend is
Gator Growl, for 30 years the
largest all student shows in the
world. Each sorority and fra fraternity
ternity fraternity is invited to participate
in a Pre-Growl tryout. The top 5
skits are selected by judges and
are presented Friday night at
Growl along with individual student
talent. Current events, national
and campus, usually provide
material for the skits.
50,000 people view Growl which
is climaxed by an extravagant
and sparkling display of fireworks.
This year Growl will be directed
by Tommy Kennington, a local
student disc jockey.
The Homecoming Queen Contest

UF freshmen should realize
they arent entering their
thirteenth year of high school.
Lester Hale, Dean of Student
Affairs said, Entering freshmen
will no longer have their assign assignments
ments assignments given to them piece by
piece. Theyve got to be their
own motivator.
The best high school students
from the state come up here, he
said. To make the grade,
students must learn to budget their
time voluntarily.
Hale said, Both freshmen and
transfer students should recognize
the UF as an environment for
learning.* Both should be excited
about getting interested because
they want to, not because they
have to.
All students should come to the
UF expecting to get enjoyment
out of the learning process, he
said.

Not The 13th Grade Hale

in Silver Springs, September 21
and 22, will select 3 princesses,
who will tour the state promoting
homecoming. The queen will be
chosen from the 3 finalists and
will be announced during the week weekend.
end. weekend.
State leaders, Blue Key
members and their guests will
gather Friday night for the annual
Blue Key Banquet. Distinguished
speakers in the past have been
Senator Kennedy 59, Senator
Stewart Symington of Missouri6o,
Vice President Lynden Johnson 6l,
and Senator Kerr of Oklahoma 62.
The old grads come back to an
alumni reunion in the Plaza of
Americas and get together
according to their college and the
vear they graduated.
The weekend will be under the
direction of General director,
Charley Wells, and will be cli climaxed
maxed climaxed by the Florida LSU game
Saturday afternoon.

In clarifying enjoyment of the
learning process, Hide said,We
are all animals. The human animal
controls all by virtue of his
superior intellect.
H
DEAN HALE i

Presidents Welcome

You come to the university at a decisive point in its growth.- to
a student body which in a few years will pass the 20,000 mark. The
Student Body joins with the university community in welcomirigtyou
as a fellow student. By choosing the University of Florida you set
high academic goals. Wise use of the universitys resources; a
capable and conscientious faculty, a million volume library, and
counselling services will help you attain your goals.
If you come with an appetite for inquiry, asking questions, and
excited by learning, you will find college life rewarding. Mdreover
you can develop your whole self with stronger values and deeper
commitment to our free society. Your classes and outside discussions
will raise questions in your mind help you to understand why you
believe and think as you do and why. You will also examine other
systems and conflicting ideas to broaden your view of the world.
Only by thus developing your ability to triink critically can you better
solve your own problems and approach the larger problems of our
society.
No campus, however, is all work and no play. You will find here
more facilities for recreation and social life than any student body
before you. Dozens of valuable student activities are open to you
through your student government. Your student activity fees (included
as part of the registration fee) mean you can attend football games,
swim, dance, view entertainment programs, and read The Alligator
at noextracost. You pome here with the highest academic qualifications
of any Freshman Class in campus history. I wish you every success
in your academic pursuits and in developing your understanding to the
fullest as a Florida student.
- Paul Hendrick, Student Body President
I
Bt S m
B Hi tSP
mm
m
I
/ I li
/ \ if
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.. .has a deep and enduring interest in the stu students
dents students of the University of Florida. > He frequently
takes time from his hectic schedule as President
of the state's largest university to meet and talk
with students. ~

This superior Intellect has
varied degrees within Its ranks.
The natural posture of all animals
is up and moving around.
The academic posture is not.
However the students ability to
find enjoyment in his studies
makes this academic posture
more tolerable. The better a
student can accommodate the
academic posture, the better are
his chances in the rank of human
animals.
Hale pointed out that many
parents are not aware ol the
problems that will confront their
children at UF.
Above all, the parents should
not be alarmed at their childs
bewilderment. It can arise from
the simplest things such as trying
to find where a class meets or
seeking information. To offset this
bewilderment, the students need
[See High SCHOOL, P 9.38)

This special section of
The Florida Alligator is
published annually and
mailed to all incoming
students as a glimpse at
University of Florida life.

f
INSIDE THIS SECTION
Sports 14,15
Religious Centers... .10
Dormitories .6{,
Coed Fashion 2
<*
Florida Union .4



The Florida Alligator Thursdoy / July 25,1963

Page 2B

FOR WOMEN

r Casual Keynotes Coed Fashions

By JUDY BARNES
City Editor
The chic freshman coed to-be
will no doubt be wondering about
a very important thing as she
packs for collegewill she be in
style? Just what is UF style?

j
Studio of Chan and lolling <8
Coeds
College is only a part of your V
education. The art of becoming \ f y jff
your most attractive self can \ rr'
only be taught by a specialist.
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FOR YOU Vi \
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Success Modeling
Write for free brochure or phone for a free personal
analysis. 216 S.E. First Street 372-5868

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...AND A SPECIAL INVITATION TO A|lL NEW FRESHMEN (AND
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UF coeds do not dress much
differently than well-dressed high
school- girls. The only thing that
would really cause a difference
is the college girls more casual
approach to the way she dresses.
Time is short when studies are

the most important thing.
The main notes of style at UF
in the warmer months seem to
revolve around skirts and culottes.
These two articles "are almost
essential for a stylish coed.
Skirts are worn short, at about
mid-knee length. Culottes are often
worn shorter, but any skirt that
is so short as to be unbecoming
is considered in bad taste.
Wrap-around skirts and A-line
skirts are the most popular. These
skirts are usually made of heavier
material (often home-made),
madras being especially popular
in the wrap around.
Blouses usually follow the
collarleSs or round-collared
style. Both roll-up and sleeveless
are worn. There is more leeway
in blouse choice, however, as
almost any nice blouse will do with
a stylish skirt.
Dresses follow two main lines:
the shift and the Villager-shirt Villager-shirtwaist.
waist. Villager-shirtwaist. Shirtwaists are made of
lightweight flowered and paisley
or are made of madras.
The shift is worn by stylish
coeds at UF and is considered in
good taste if it is not too short.
Many shifts are made of denim
or linen and have ties at the
shoulder.
For dressup, coeds dress
simply, but elegantly. A silk sheath
for example, is much more in
style for big fraternity parties and
dances than a frilly formal. Net
formals are definitely jttut.
Bermuda shorts are worn to
class in the summer, but they are
not allowed in the classroom in
the fall and winter trimesters.
Slim jims, popular for informal
parties, are never worn to class.
Hair styles usually follow the
teased look. Three basic forms
of hair styles are found: short shortshort,
short, shortshort, medium-long hair worn
down in soft curls, and long hair
worn up.
Many coeds, however, prefer a

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CASUAL AND COMFORTABLE
...is the byword for coed clothing on the UF
campus. Dark cottons and madras are among
the-favored classroom wear in the fall.
less teased and more natural look Coed makeup is slight, on the
In any of the three basic forms, average, the main emphasis being
Time is again a factor here. on eyes.



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NEW ARCHITECTURE BUILDING BEING BUILT
.. .as shown in artist's conception, wiM cost $1.5 million and will bring together the
different parts of the College of Architecture and Fine Arts that have been scattered
throughout the campus.

Buildings Going Up,
5 Ready By 1967

By GEORGE ELMORE
Staff Writer
Students entering the UF this
fall will find a beehive of building
activity on the campus with five
projects underway that should be
completed before the class of 1967
graduates.
Included in this construction are
nuclear laboratories, an
architecture and fine arts complex,
a new student union, a married
housing unit, and possibly a new
arts and sciences classroom
building.
IBM's Enroll
For Exams
At Florida
Mechanization hasnt bypassed
the UF four flunkensteins
International Business Machine
computers are currently enrolled
at the UF . taking exams.
The mechanical monsters
soak up questions and answers
while electronically grading stu students
dents students exam papers. The machines
can grade over 700 objective
comprehensive course examin examinations
ations examinations in an hour.
The first IBM machine arrived
at the UF in 1939, and since then,
14 more have come and gone.
J. V. McQuitty, university ex examiner,
aminer, examiner, said the four machines
are rented for SSO a month and
will be replaced by IBM every ten
years.
Despite the quips that the
machines are taking over made
by upperclassmen, the IBM ma machines
chines machines dont have the final word
on exam grades. There is a double
check system in operation so that
each test is graded by two separate
machines. Errors can occur,
McQuitty said, when students do
not mark their answer sheets
clearly or when the person re recording
cording recording grades from the machines
makes a mistake.
Machine-grading is used almost
exclusively in the *C or com comprehensive
prehensive comprehensive courses offered by
University College. All students
musl nsss these C'>u"e?> or theu
equivalents, oeioie enteiing Uppex
Division.

The nuclear laboratories are
being built around an already
existing reactor. That building will
house classrooms and laboratories
for almost every science that is
concerned with the effects of
radiation.
Next in priority is the new
architecture and fine arts complex
The architecture school is now
housed in temporary buildings
erected right after WWII.
Also under construction are 208
apartments for married couples.
These apartments will be
primarily for graduate students
in the medical school, and will be
located near the medical building.
In the center of the group of
apartments will be located
facilities for laundry and meetings.
Possibly the most interesting
construction is the new Florida
Union. It will be located east of
the mens dorms and south of the
science center. The projected cost
of the new Union is about $5
million, and it should be completed
by 1965.

High School Over

only ask. There are literally
thousands who can supply the
information.
Many parents expect too much
from their children, Hale said.
The only thing that should be
expected of a student i$ that he
do his best. If a student works
up to his intellectual ability and
emotional stability, he is doing all
that can be expected.
Hale said that many parents
become alarmed with the pro problems
blems problems their children have to
cope with. Dont be alarmed if
your sot or daughter becomes
lonesome/ Hale cautioned.
One of the biggest mis misconceptions
conceptions misconceptions that people have is that
the UF students are just a number,
Hale said, Nothing could be
further from the truth. True, all
students have numbers.
These numbers are used to
keep student records on IBM
machines, but by use of these
machines, the administration has
more time to give the personal
attention that students need.
To get this personal dteitUon,
students seeking help or
information.

(Continued from Page IB)

On the ground floor there will be
bowling, 16 lanes, ping-pong and
billiards'. On the first floor there
will be a Cafeteria*
The next floor will contain a
general purpose auditorium with
seating for 1200 people. In the
west wing there will be a small
theater with seating for 300 people.
The main theme for these rooms
is flexability. They can be
partitioned off to meet just about
every need.
Offices for student activities,
Studeht Government, Florida Blue
Key, and Publications will be lo located
cated located on the third floor.
The remaining floors will be
primarily for guests.
The building will be entirely
air-conditioned, and up-to-date in
every respect.
A classroom building for the
College of Arts and Sciences is
planned near Tigert Hall, the
administration building. Money for
the construction has been
appropriated, but not released by
the State Legislature.

They have to open their own
Pandoras Box, or they will
never know what's in it. The UF
has plenty of personal attention
if the students will only ask for
it.
Don't fall prey to the eman emancipation
cipation emancipation complex, Hale warned.
Often the student wakes up
too late to the fact that he is
not at the UF to run loose and
unbridled. The student
experiencing the first taste of
maturity on his own must learn
to replace the harness of home with
self control, he said.
Cavers Club
Active Here
Caving enthusiasts will find their
niche in the Florida Speleological
Society. Besides caving for
pleasure, the Club maintains a
team of cavers ready to do
rescue work.
There are some 100 caves in
Alachua County and the Club is
mapping one of the larger one.*?
take trips to caves in Alabama and
Georgia.

Thursday, July 25,1963 The Florida Alligator

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(Ba.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday.) 4
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MARKET
S 2410 Newberry Rood Within Walking Distance 7

Page 3B



Page 4B

The Florida Alligator Thursday, July 25,1963

Florida Union: A Home for Activities

By Tova Levine
' Editorial Assistant
The Florida Union is com community
munity community center of the UF -for its
students, faculty, alumni, and
guests. The Union is an organisa organisation
tion organisation and a program as well as a
building.
The first event sponsored by the
Union in the fall will be the Orien Orientation
tation Orientation Open House, Activities on
Parade". All campus organiza organizations
tions organizations and Union committees have
been invited to plan a display and
demonstration for this night. All
parts of the Florida Union will be

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CHRISTMAS SALE ITEMS
...being unpacked by members of the Florida Union
Board.

PENNEY'S WELCOMES
YOU TO OUR TOWN
Jpii SEE OUR LADY TOWNCRAFT SHIRTS,
SKIRTS, MEN'S SPORT SHIRTS, SLACKS,
canvas shoes, dorm wear and sports y, f
mmiwmmm wear ur home furnishings depart- Ik.
ml/lfm!ffjmmUflg ment has a complete line of if
sheets, spreads, drapery, / |a.'
Mmiii} P,LLOWS TOWELS AND OTHER f jfejvflk
1 sfflllliwr D RM NEEDS ijf/ jP\
~7
/
, USE YOUR PENNEY CHARGE CARD HERE TOO!
Penney's It Downtown W. University Ave. w ... *.
Wolkmg Distance from the U. of F.

open to incoming fresnmen and new
students, including Student
Government offices, publication
offices, and Florida Blue Key Of Office.
fice. Office.
The second event sponsored by
the Florida Union in the fall will
be the Freshman Talent Show. Ac According
cording According to Karen Hendrick,
Assistant Program Director, all
freshmen with talent of any sort
dancing, singing, instrumental, or
comedy are encouraged to try
out. Those who wish to participate
should plan to bring with them the
necessarv accessories for the sWif

or act.
A football preview of the Gators
and the teams they will play will
be held Sept. 12. A pep rally, foot football
ball football slides, and a talk by Coach
Ray Graves are being planned by
the Union Board.
The Florida Union encompasses
many of the activities of the UF
and offers functions and events
throughout the year to appeal to
many different interests.
According to FrankGlinn, Pres President
ident President of the Union Board for Student
Activities, there are openings in
committee work for those students
who wish to participate, and oppor opportunities
tunities opportunities for advancement on the
Board.
The Florida Union offers the
new student one of the best chances
to have a part in and to serve the
UF," Glinn said.
The Forums Committee keeps
the campus up to date on contem contemporary
porary contemporary affairs through book re reviews
views reviews and discussions. Pat Frank,
author of best-seller Alas,
Babylon" will speak on campus in
the fall, as well as Dr. Henry
Kissinger of the Harvard School of
International Relations.
The Fine Arts Committee in pre presenting
senting presenting displays, art works, and
music matinees helps to promote
the cultural interest on campus.
The committee will also feature a
big Hootenany (folk song) festival
in the fall. A record of UF campus
singers entitled Hootenany" was
made after the big sing" last
year. The record is still on sale
at the Campus Shop for $3.
The Films Committee brings
many recent film attractions to
campus on Friday and Saturday
nights, with favorites shown on
Sunday and Monday evenings. The
main feafbre of this falls program
is bringing La Dolce Vita" to
campus Sept. 20-21.
The Dance Committee holds
regular Friday night dances Club
Rendezvous", an informal evening
of dancing, entertainment, and re refreshments.
freshments. refreshments. Plan are also under underway
way underway for forming a Cotillion Club-

lor marnea students, and for hold holding
ing holding a semi-formal dance in late
fall.
The Recreation Committee of the
Union sponsors travel trips to
Nassau and Europe, bridge
lessons, and Camp Wauburg Play
Days in the spring and summer
trimesters.
Other committees take care of
special projects of the Florida
Union, International suppers and
activities, secretarial work,
host/hostess service, public rela relations,
tions, relations, and the sprin g festival,
Gator Gras.

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DANCING AT THE CLUB RENDEZVOUS
.. .is just one of the many activities that the Florida
Union sponsors.

Applications for committee po positions
sitions positions will be available in the fall
and all students are encouraged to
sign up, Glinn said.
Within the building itself are the
billiard room, craft shop, and
photographic darkroom, music lis listening
tening listening rooms, browsing library
guest rooms, barber shop, game
rooms, and meeting rooms.
Plans are underway for the new
Florida Union building. Ground
breaking will take place in eacly
fall, and the completion of the new
Union is estimated for Sept. 1965
according to Mrs. Hendrick.



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UF Libraries Are
Well Stocked

The UF library has grown from
a 6,000 book collection to a million
volume collection in 62 years.
Since 1901, when the library
began in Lake City as part of the
Florida Agricultural College, until
this year, when the library added
its millionth volume (one of seven
folio editions of the Great
Bible, ) the library has grown
by leaps and bounds.
In 1913 the library was
established in Peabody Hall. The
first unit of the present library
was built in 1926. The second
unit provided the first formal stack
area and was completed in 1933
when the library contained 103,000
volumes.
By 195.5 the library contained
638,000 volumes; new Medical
Library and Agricultural
Libraries were under construction
and space had been provided for
Engineering and Chemistry Li Libraries
braries Libraries in their representative
buildings.
An addition has been made to
the Law Library and a reading
room established in the College
of Health and Physical Education.
Asians, Africans
Coming To US
STANFORD, Calif. (UPI) An
ever-growing number of foreign
students enrolling in UJS. colleges
and universities in the coming
years will be from newer nations
in the developing areas of the
world, according to the National
Assn, of Foreign Student Advisors.
The NAFSA estimated that
100,000 foreign students will be
seeking higher education in this
country by 1970, with greater
numbers of students coming from
the emerging nations of Asia,
Africa, Latin America and the
Middle East.
Forestry Club
To Meet Early
The Forestry Club will be
holding a get-acquainted meeting
early in the year. This club
schedules socials, contests, guest
speakers and a field trip to the
Austin Cary Memorial Forest near
Gainesville.

By 1960 the School of Journalism
and Communications had a library
in the stadium and space was
provided for the Library of
Education. A library will also be
included in the new Architecture
and Fine Arts complex.
Besides the million books, the
library has a record collection
which may be -checked out for
use in the library or at home.
The library has eight reading
rooms, as well as office and class classroom
room classroom space in the main building.
The P.K. Yonge Library of Florida
History is also housed in the main
building.
Texas Dean
Nixes College
And Marriage
AUSTIN, Tex. (UPI) A Uni University
versity University of Texas dean says the
idea that marriage makes for
better students is a myth.
We find marriage seldom
makes a good student out of a
poor one, Dean of Students Glenn
Barnett says.
Barnett warned that mixing
marriage and college can mean
troubles for both husband and wife.
If the wife was a competent
student and dropped out for
marriage, Barnett says, she
frequently feels an underlying
resentment if her student
husband doesnt excel.
In many cases, he adds, his
grades go down as the time and
concentration needed for his work
are nibbled away by the demands
of family life.
Barnett also says that a student studentfather
father studentfather can grow extremely
sensitive about his own position
while his wife plays the role of
breadwinner.
When a girl tells me she is
quitting to get married, Barnett
says, I tvy to impress upon her
the Importance of continuing her
own education some time, whether
soon or many years from now.
The boy she maries is going
to continue to grow and probably
become a leader in his profession
and his community. Her growth
will have to keep pace with his,
if the marriage is to succeed,
Barnett says.

MAN THE COMPS
WEST POINT, N.Y. (UPI) A
new requirement has been added
to the long list of musts for
cadets at the UJS. Military Aca Academy.
demy. Academy. All plebes (freshmen) now
are expected to learn and under understand
stand understand the use of a digital computer.
Authorities said once the cadet
has mastered the computers use,
he may utilize it through his four
years of study in solving problems
in many different fields, from psy psychology
chology psychology to mathematics.
NO SWEAT
NEW YORK (UPI) One tax
problem President Kennedy should
never have to worry about is trying
to dig up enough money to pay his
house taxes every year.
The 18 acres of downtown
Washington on which the White
House is located are valued at only
SI,OOO, according to Tax Foun Foundation,
dation, Foundation, Inc.

LARRYS PRESENTS f" f
cJ. a &M6
FOOD....Its the Best in Gainesville
HANDY....OnIy % Block from Campus
CONVENIENT....Open 24 Hours a Day
PRICES....Fit Any Student Budget
LARRY'S FEATURES FRIENDLY, FAST SERVICE. NO WONDER SO MANY flj
FLORIDA STUDENTS HAVE MADE LARRY'S THEIR FAVORITE SPOT, DAY
OR NIGHT.
NEW STUDENTS
LET US SERVE YOU THE BEST WELCOME IN GAINESVILLE I |JI
r :
LARRY'S
1225 WEST UNIVERSITY AVENUE '*

Thursday, July 25,1963 The Fiorida Alligator

NEWSPAPER ADVERTISING STILL
CANT BE BEAT
McDAVIDS BARBER SHOP
"Just Across the Avenue
* SEVEN BARBERS
k Shoe Repair Shop in Rear
k 1718 W. University Ave.

Page 5B



The Florida Alligator Thursday, July 25,1963

Page 6B

Jrj
\rM X
' iSSL;'* N
iIWPn -;*k
; I? I
; ; tllHllJ^iVSi^^B:
1

UNIQUE USE
. /.of a bedside tpble brings the outdoors into the room
inMaHory, a girls 1 dormitory.

Dorm Decorating
Is A Challenge

By EVELYN PODSIADLO
Staff Writer
Coeds arriving on the UF campus
for the first time this fall will
have ample opportunity to develop
ttvetr skills as interior decorators
while making their dormitory
rooms feel like home."
While girls are busy decorating
their rooms with bedspreads,
draperies, posters, and stuffed
animals, most boys are satisfied
with a bedspread and a picture
of the latest girl friend, or the
Playmate of the month.
Most coeds prefer to wait until
they arrive on campus to purchase
bedspreads and curtains for their
rooms. However, for those who
plan to bring such furnishings with
them, tucked in among the teddy
bears and throw pillows, heres
what your room is like.

A typical double room in the
girls dorms, (Broward, Rawlings,
Jennings or the Yulee Area) is
furnished with two twin Hollywood
beds, two desks, two straight
chairs, an easy chair, a double
dresser with mirror, and a waste wastepaper
paper wastepaper basket.
The newer dorms have built-in
shelves on the wall and built-in
towel racks in the closet.
The rooms in Broward are two twotone,
tone, twotone, with beige and red, beige
and blue, or beige and green. The
rooms in Rawlings, Jennings and
Yulee Area are either beige or
blue. The floors are linoleum tile
and some girls bring or buy throw
rugs.
When choosing bedspreads, most
girls select tailored spreads
rather than ruffled spreads. The
girls find the tailored spreads
more practical and easier to care
for than the ruffled spreads. The
majority of coeds prefer solids,
plaids, and stripes rather than
floral designs.
Tailored draperies are
preferred to frilly curtains by
most coeds. Many girls buy two
drapary panels and put one on
each side of the window. Some
girls have draperies that match
their spreads. It should be noted
thai drapery fixtures are not
furnished, and must be purchased
by the coed.

DORMITORY DECORATION ...

For the walls, there are prints,
travel posters, and bulletin boards.
Prints and travel posters caq be
bought at the print sale sponsored
by the Florida Union each tri trimester,
mester, trimester, or at the Gainesville book
stores. Bulletin boards are very
handy for preserving the many
little things accumulated in a
college career freshmen
beanies, orientation week name
cards, football game tickets,
photographs, programs.
Throw pillows, stuffed animals
and scatter rugs are added
attractions found in many rooms.
Although it is fun for freshmen
girls to plan their room
decorations, it is sensible for
them to wait and choose their
decorations with their
roommates after they have seen
their rooms.

I -- v ... .. i T
I
DO YOUR LAUNDRY
WHILE YOU SHOP
AT WINN-DIXIE SG.C. MURPHY Tl TT W
/ AIR CONDITIONED STUDY LOUNGE j
V ALSO DRY CLEANING 9 LBS. FOR $1.50
\J 20 LB. WASHER OR 10 LB. WASHER ( Same as Ever y 10th Load Free)
y/ DRYERS HOLD 50 LBS. OF CLOTHES LOTS OF PA RKING SPACE
Koin Kleen
Coin Operated Dry Cleaning fir Laundry
704 W. Unhr. Ave., across from Buchhols Jr. High

M .->^>.l^ ~
3W ; s
tJrli A? "': "' **> ?&&
iiy&JMPyMjl WMimgi II i
m& > i 2 |&S m ;.
< Bl Pr;.\
&SB :
IpMaHl HI M
IP IS

.. .is the keynote for this room in Tolbert Hall, a boys dormitory.
Bl fl
*****iMfc, i al H w 1 jHMHmmmhml BBK
. ** -M W f Wi /
Jk K9 I m
r wm[ j 4 iop--'
Ktk ft HhbHhmm

A MESSY ROOM
.. .isn't conducive to study, or to good marks on room inspection. Although this photo
was taken in a boys' dormitory, girls are prone to forget neatness, too.

SIMPLICITY



/^nvpu&SW
and bookstore
THE OFFICIAL UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA BOOKSTORE
ADJOINING THE HUB
BRANCH STORES MEDICAL CENTER, BROWARD, TRI SHOP & JENNINGS
SELF SERVICE %/|L
OFFICIAL UNIVERSITY TEXTBOOKS & SUPPLIES
NEW & USED TEXTBOOKS T /
THOUSANDS OF PAPERBACKS >
THE BEST OF EVERYTHING AT THE LOWEST PRICES J
/ J /V \
y Check Our List For Your Needs
TEXTBOOKS NEW AND USED ]o\
ARCHITECTURAL EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES W \\%
ART SUPPLIES MAGAZINES AND SMALL BOOKS
CRAFT SUPPLIES CANDY CIGARETTES, PIPES, TOBACCO
STUDY LAMPS FLORIDA RECORD ALBUMS
GYM OUTFITS HALL MARK GREETING CARDS
SWEATSHIRTS COLLEGE JEWELRY AND CLASS RINGS
COLLEGE PETS WRITING EQUIPMENT BY SCHAEFFER, PARKER, ESTERBROOK,
NORMA, SCRIPTO AND PAPERMATE
COLLEGE SEAL # PENNANTS AND DECALS
MASCOT STATIONERY COMPLETE LINE OF GENERAL SUPPLIES
FILM AND DEVELOPING SERVICE DRUGS AND SUNDRIES
1 TEXTBOOK PRICE POLICY I
# USED BOOKS SOLD AT 30% DISCOUNT FROM NEW BOOK PRICE
% WE PAY 50% OF NEW BOOK PRICE FOR USED BOOKS IN GOOD CONDITION IF AUTHORIZED
TO BE USED AGAIN AT END OF TERM
WE OFFER TOP MARKET PRICE FOR ANY OF /CUR TEXTBOOKS THA I HAVE BEEN DISCONTINUED
GET YOUR BOOKS AND SUPPLIES ON CAMPUS AND SAVE

Thursdays July 25,1963 The Florida Alligator

Page 7B



The Florida Alligator Thursday, July 25,1963

Page 8B

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N. Main at 23rd 81vd.,372-6353, Used Car Lot.
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Complete Service on All Makes of Cars
"In the auto game Barkley's the name"
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newest,
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The mood of tropical moonlight... the style of
youth and action... new, new TROPIC STAR* has cap captured
tured captured the love of young America. Come, see it on your
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slls, matching brides circlet $25. Easy terms, of course.
flings marked to show dote*!.
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ENJOYING A RELAXING GAME OF CARDS
.. .is but one of the many pleasures found in fraternity houses and fraternity life. Each
freshman will have a chance to learn more about the fraternities during the annual frat
rush week.

STARTED IN 1776

Fraternity System Grew
From Phi Beta Kappa

In Virginia in 1776, a group of
ambitious young men laid the
framework for a new American
tradition the first Greek letter
society in the United States.
The organization, Phi Beta
Kappa, was formed at William

Frosh Council
To Guide Class

Due to the rush of orientation
and the first week of classes, the
Freshman Class and Council
elections will be held after things
have settled down.
Each dorm will hold an election
of members of the Freshmen
Council during the first week of
school.
The council will hold its first
meeting under the previous years
council officers where they will
select two nominees for each of
the offices.
The officers of the Council will
be chosen from these nominees
in the general election in October.
The nominees do not have to be
from the Council but must be
members of the freshmen class and
have letters from their high school
principal and parents and must
have scored at least 350 on their
senior placement exams. There is
a two dollar qualification fee for
each nominee.
The purpose of the Freshman
Council is to represent and act
in the best interests of the
Freshmen Class of the University
of Florida, to serve as an advisory
and coordinating body between the
Class and the entire student body
and the Administration, and to
promote interest in student
activities among members of the
class.
In the past, the Council has
sponsored Freshmen Driving

and Mary College and started the
trend toward the organizational
life that is now one of the biggest
things at college all over the nation.
Although it was originally a
debating society, and it began such
fraternity customs as secret
handshakes and Greek or Latin

privileges on weekends; hosted the
FSU Florida Footbal 1 game;
raising money for the Dollars-fo Dollars-for
r Dollars-for Program; sale of Rat
Caps; work in student Orientation;
the Victory Bell; and other worth worthwhile
while worthwhile projects.
If you are interested in running
for an office in the Freshmen
Council or participating on the
Council, write: Dalton Yancy,
President of the Freshman Class,
P.O. Box 13037, UniversityStation*
Gainesville.

Campus Talk
hoirT f SLAND -a new world with a new vocabulary. To
AUiUtnr lT 611 OVer< ; ome some of language difficulties, the
campus jargon. C mPl tongue in_cheek glossary of current
a J C n?^ R f ES ,7 ? iX two semes ter courses which must be taken
Includes a s udents before they can enter upper division.
andlo?ir u l6l 101 !'- Institutions, Physical Sciences, English, Math
and Logic, Humanities and 3c.logy.
facuv^niprnhfr Referred to as -progress tests by
flunk the r r S> eS6 U e designed to give students a chance to
flunk the C Courses before the final examination
Guess UN^s ST air IBM maChine USed to grade Multiple-
UFs records! S Ud6nt numbers **** generally foul up the
Gov rnment activities of which are carried on in
POOP SHEETS baCk rooms 0f fraterni ty houses,
government elections. Camp!UgD htera ture put up during student
of darkness Ille eal destruction of poop sheets, done under cover

mottos, Phi Bet is now strictly
honorary, it admits its members
on the basis of high scholarship.
As Greek letter organizations
became increasingly popular,
strictly social fraternities were
formed, chi Phi fraternity is the
oldest of these, and Alpha Tau
Omega was the first to arrive
on the UF campus, in 1904.
Kappa Alpha and Pi Kappa Alpha
came to Florida in the same year,
and were followed by Sigma Alpha
Epsilon in 1915 and Theta Chi in
1916.
Besides the social and honorary
fraternities on campus, there are
charters of nationally recognized
professional fraternities. These
include Sigma Delta Chi,
journalism; Alpha Delta Sigma,
advertising; phi Chi Theta, finance
and Rho pi phi, pharmacy.
Pi Mu is the pre-medical pro professional
fessional professional society, and the College
of Law has three professional professionalsocial
social professionalsocial fraternities, phi Delta Phi,
Phi Alpha Delta, and Delta Theta
Phi.



THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
FOOD SERVICE
THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA FOOD SERVICE IS PROVIDED FOR THE CONVENIENCE OF THE STUDENTS,
FACULTY, STAFF, AND THEIR GUESTS. THE FOOD SERVICE PROGRAM IS UNDER THE DIRECTION OF A
PROFESSIONALLY TRAINED DIRECTOR AND STAFF WHO DESIRE TO SERVE YOU TOP QUALITY FOOD WITH
EXCELLENT SERVICE AT MODERATE PRICES.
ALL THESE PLACES TO SERVE YOU:
MAIN CAFETERIA FLORIDA ROOM cafeteria
CAMPUS CLUB snack bar RAWLINGS HALL CAFETERIA IIP I
CO-ED CLUB cafeteria SERVICE CENTER CAFETERIA
HUME HALL CAFETERIA MEDICAL CENTER SNACK BAR
JENNINGS CAFETERIA GRAHAM AREA SNACK BAR
M' P,US g&s/s
TOLBERT SNACK BAR fflSl&f-- -
"Gator Room
' Decor for Pleasant Dining. -
~~ Watch for Similar Innovations
Soon at Other Food Service
Dining Areas!
SNACK BARS IN ALL CAFETERIAS
BREAKFAST LUNCH DINNER
Catering Service and Special Services Include:
services at camp wauburg box lunches
barbecues picnics
BANQUETS TEAS
All Kinds of Food Prepared To Take Out:
FRIED chicken potato salad
PASTRIES COLESLAW
BAKED BEANS SANDWICHES
BIRTHDAY &, DECORATED CAKES
The Food Service Division is self-supporting. Any money left after expenses is used to improve facilities for the students. f
KEEP YOUR DOLLARS ON CAMPUS.

Thursday, July 25,1963 The Florida Alligator

Page 9B



The Florida Alligator Thursday, July 25,1963

Page 10B

New Blood Sought
For 3 Publications

By Tova Levine
Editorial Assistant
The three major publications on
the UF campus the Seminole,
yearbook; the New Orange Peel,
humor and feature magazine; and
the Alligator, student newspaper
are in the planning stage for the
coming year, with new ideas, new
features, and new policies.
The Seminole, according to plans
of editor Joe Coudon, 3 JM of
Jacksonville, will once again re revert
vert revert back to the one-book-a-year
plan, after an unsuccessful attempt
at a trimester annual. The year yearbook
book yearbook will be ready for distribution
in April and will cover the main
events of the summer, as well as
all fall and winter activities.
According to Coudon, the total
number of pages will be less than
the combined number of pages in
the preceding two trimester year yearbooks,
books, yearbooks, due to financial difficulties.
The book will be about 300 pages,
Coudon said.

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Sports will be a big feature of
the yearbook as in the past,
Coudon said. Also the fraternity
and sorority pages will include
both the pictures of the members
and the groups activities.
The New Orange Peel will be
issued twice each trimester, the
first issue coming out on Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming weekend, according to
editor Stan Huguenin, 4 AS from
Sarasota.
There are four sections to the
New Peel, established by charter:
humor, opinion, art and literary,
and features. No one section can
make up more than 40 per cent of
the magazine, Huguenin said.
According to Huguenin, the
magazine will present a new format
and new type of content much im improved
proved improved over the past two issues.
. The masthead will bear the
motto The Souths Foremost
College Magazine. We hope to
live up to this goal, by bringing
back the tradition and glory of the

original Peel, Huguenin added.
The Alligator will continue daily
publication in the fall, Monday
through Friday, according to David
Lawrence, Jr., editor. Lawrence,
4JM from Oneco, edited theGator
during the spring trimester and
previously served as managing
editor.
One of the main features of the
paper will be the emphasis on the
feature aspects of football games
in the Monday paper. Since the
Sunday papers around the state
usually cover the events of the
games thoroughly, we will attempt
to show why a certain play oc occurred,
curred, occurred, rather than simply what
occurred on the field, Lawrence
stated.
Some of the big news stories the
Alligator will cover in the fall,
according to Lawrence, include the
wet-dry election, student politics,
the infirmary, the bond issue, and
the integration-segregation prob problem.
lem. problem.

THE WELL KNOWN CENTURY TOWER
.. .better known as the "singing silo", gives students a
15 minute warning before each class and it gives the
girlsa 15-minute warning before curfew on school nights.

Centers Offer
Religious Life

By TOVA LEVINE
Editorial Assistant
The freshman's first contact
with college religious life is with
the organized religious centers
about campus.
Several religious groups have
foundation buildings a short
distance off campus. According
to URA officials, the religious
centers sponsor services, socials
1
-m-
I
Students Expect,
To Be at Sea'
CHICAGO (UPI) College stu students
dents students who want to study the world
first hand will sail from New York
in October aboard the motor ship
Seven Seas," a floating class classroom.
room. classroom.
The University of the Seven
Seas" cruises will take approxi approximately
mately approximately 750 embryonic eggheads on
two voyages of 110 and 120 days.
Stops will be made at 22 ports,
including Lisbon, Naples, Alexan Alexandria,
dria, Alexandria, Bombay, Hong Kong and
Honolulu.
The university" will have ap approximately
proximately approximately 40 professors and
instructors, including 15 women
faculty members.
Students will enroll in a number
of liberal arts and scientific
courses, including architecture
creative writing, business admin administration,
istration, administration, astronomy, geography,
geology, oceanography and history!

discussion groups, and brunches
for their members.
Denominations that have foun foundations
dations foundations located near campus are:
Baptist, Catholic, Episcopal,
Jewish, Lutheran, Methodist,
Presbyterian, and Mormon.
The Society of Friends, the
Unitarian Fellowship, and the
Christian Science Organization
hold their meetings in the Florida
Union. Christian and Co Congregational
ngregational Congregational students attend the
First Christian Church in down downtown
town downtown Gainesville.
Methodist, Episcopalian,
Lutheran, Catholic, and Jewish
centers provide worship services
and social and educational
programs.
The Baptist and Presbyterian
centers offer social and
educational programs only; stu students
dents students attend Sunday worship in
downtown Gainesville.
Centers seek to help the student
grow in understanding his faith
through discussion, recreation,
and worship experiences. They
provide a spiritual basis upon
which a successful college career
can be built.
A World Come of Age" will
be the theme for the 1963-64 Re Religion-in-Life
ligion-in-Life Religion-in-Life Week, scheduled for
the week of January 19-24. During
this period guest speakers come
to campus to discuss the questions
and challenges of religion and
modern life.
In the week-long series of
forums, speeches, and discussions
the college community pauses to
explore and evaluate the appli"
cation of religious belief to the
decisions of life.
The week is sponsored by the
University Religion Association
(URA). Other events sponsored by
the URA throughout the year in include
clude include the campus-wide Christmas
observance forums,'and programs
for the World University Service
(WUS).
The URA encourages and stim stimulates
ulates stimulates discussion of religious
issues within the educational and
intellectual context of the
university community, to further
inter-religious understanding, and
to gain cooperatipn between he
religious organizations at UF.
The URA is connected with the
Department of Religion. Regular
academic professors in the depart department
ment department direct and advise the
activities of the association.



-
tMM r ' :^M : rr \^ m ln|MaH

'^fjr
riJu^H

.. *-* '"""
B1
NEAT AND APPROPRIA I b
.. .dress can do much in helping the college man
adjust and get along in the university atmosphere.
Easy-to-care for and clean clothing mean a lot in
the helter-skelter rush of college life.

FOR MEN

Tips On Dressing
In College Style

NEW YORK(UPD-Bill Ullmann,
who writes for the authoritative
trade publication Mens Wear,
travels about college campuses and
is generally recognized as aback abackto-school
to-school abackto-school expert.
His first advice to high school
.
boys who expect to be college
men this fall is to get rid of
thir high school clothes on
grounds the only thing worse than
looking like a freshman is to look
like a high school senior.
High school boys stalking about
in pipe-stem chinos resemble
nothing so much as a flock of
herons, he says. And although
college men wear a lot of chinos
they are trim but far fuller in
cut than their kid brothers. They
also have belt loops and dont
expose more than an inch and a
half of crew socks.
So another bit of advice before
going off to college is to get rid
of award sweaters and fraternity
jackets and leave off the fancy
black boots.
Here are some basic require requirements
ments requirements for a college wardrobe:
Suits; Two at least. The
first should be in a dark shade
such as navy, gray or deep olive.
The other can be medium tone
gray, olive or brown. A smart
operator would make the second
one a herringbone that could
double as a sports jacket. Ivy
League cut only. Vests are in.
--Slacks; six to eight pairs.
These should include at least two
pairs of worsted flannels, one
dark gray, the other medium gray
or olive. The others should be
wash slacks such as chinos, pop poplins
lins poplins or cords, if its warm a couple
of pairs of Bermuda shorts in
India Madras. Wheat jeans are
big on some campuses.
Sweaters: Three or four.
Safe bets are Shetland crewnecks;
lambs wool V-necks and
cardigans. Work in a camel crew
while you are about it.
Shoes; Everyday shoes
should include a pair of authentic
Norwegian-type mocs, a pair of

tennis or deck shoes and perhaps
a pair of desert-type or Tyrolean.
Tuck in about eight pairs of crew
socks for campus wear and three
or four dress socks in calf, length
dark colors. Dressy shoes can be
taken care of with a pair of plain
toe brown cordovan bluchers with
double soles and all-around storm
welts.
Shirts: Six to twelve sport
shirts, fewer if you wear button
down oxfords for sports,
including some solid colored knits.
At least eight to twelve dress shirts
most of them oxford button downs
with a few tabs. Stripes are strong
as are white, blue and yellow ox oxfords.
fords. oxfords. Pinks have come back.
Ties; Most popular are rep
stripes both wider and brighter
than the ones worn in high school.
Take a half dozen and buy more
on campus.
Hats: Take along a poplin
rain hat but hold off on others
until you see whats being worn
locally.
Outerwear; A poplin golf
jacket, a warmly lined waist-length
gabardine or poplin (or ski jacket
or tow coat) and a heavyweight
3/4 length loden coat in a duffle
or reversible. A topcoat could be
a dark-toned cheviot semi semichesterfield
chesterfield semichesterfield or a camel hair in
either single-breasted or double
breasted.*Raincoat styles vary but
the classic raglan balmacan in
natural color poplin is universally
accepted.
Dual-purpose: The versatile
navy blue blazer can be worn with
a white shirt, smart tie, dark
slacks and polished shoes for a
dressy pitch. It also can be worn
with Bermudas, sport shirt and
deck shoes. To the basic blazer
add a Shetland or tweed sport
jacket. If you can afford it make
a camel hair jacket your third.
Miscellaneous: 12 sets of
underwear, a robe, a dozei
handkerchiefs, one or two
mufflers, a couple of pairs of
gloves, three or four belts and,
as a reminder from Ullman, A
willingness to study, study, study!

Rush Week Is Planned
For Entering Students

To join or not to join. . many
students who will enter the UF
this fall are already considering
the fraternity sorority question.
During the first few frantic
weeks of college sororities and
fraternities will be conducting
rush. Rush week is designed
to give new students a chance to
look over the houses and to give
the fraternity and sorority mem members
bers members a chance to look over
prospective pledges with a
minimum amount of interference
with studies.

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Here's one place thats )
** pnxious to make you feel ** I
at home. Come in and get ac- ]
quainted the next time you find I
yourself downtown. You're welcome f
to just browse^around. We think you'll J
want to get to know us better after you've
enjoyed the informal atmosphere of our shop,
and seen our complete line of nationally adver advertised,
tised, advertised, quality dresses, sports wear and lingerie,
all bearing brand names you know and respect. Ask the
girls who have been here a while -a visit to the Personality
Shop is not only wise; it's fun! And while you're visiting, why
not let us open your own student charge account for easier shopping?
(£jfAo XOf 0 otO Xo 10 o
!IThe Personality 31
Shop
aoooooooooooooonooooocxxxxwooooorg f
8 EAST UNIVERSITY AVENUE f j
OPEN A STUDENT CHARGE OPEN 'TIL 9 FRIDAY NIGrfT |

Thursday, July 25,1963 The Florida Alligator

t 2 >,
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7 4
During orientation the Inter Interfraternity
fraternity Interfraternity Council and the
Panhellenic Council will conduct

forums for new students. At this
time rush rules will be explained
by sorority and fraternity
members.
There are 26 fraternities and
13 sororities on the UF campus.
All fraternities and sororities
have houses, on or off campus.
Most of the "fraternities are now,
or soon will be, concentrated on
Fraternity Row, near the boy's
dormitories. Most of the sorority
houses are near the girl's
dormitories on Panhellenic Drive.

Page 11B



The Florida Alligator Thursday/ July 25,1963

Page 12B

HEY LADY!
Engineering Isnt
'For Men Only

CHICAGO (UPI) Americans
must change their attitude toward
women engineers if the United
States is to offset a shortage in
the field and keep pace with the
Soviet Union, a woman engineer
says.
In our society, girls who show
an interest in mechanics are
usually chided for being
unfeminine, said Dee M. Holladay
associate professor of engineering
at the Chicago Undergraduate
Division of the University of
Illinois.
In the United States, less than
one per cent of engineering grad graduates
uates graduates are women, compared to 39
per cent in the Soviet Union,
Mrs. Holladay said.
Most engineering Jobs do not
require a woman to don fatigues
and a safety helmet or to crawl
over rough terrain, she said.
Seventy-five per cent of en engineering
gineering engineering jobs in the country are
desk jobs in research, develop development
ment development and design. The other 25
per cent are field and shop jobs.

H W'\
8:00-12 00 HOURS
jH 7:00-11:00

HOME AWAY FROM HOME
.. .is the international center, where foreign and American students can get together
for meetings and fellowship. Pointing to the sign is Maxis Baccuhus, British Guiana.

Foreign Students at UF
Are Active and Welcome

By TOVA LEVINE
Editorial Assistant
Foreign students come to UF
from many parts of the world.
Approximately seventy different
countries are represented on
campus.
Applications have been received
from about 95-100 new students
for the fall trimester. According
to officials at the International
Student Center, about 450-475
foreign students enroll in the UF
per trimester.
Foreign students either pay their
own expenses or are sponsored by
some international organisation,
such as Institute for International
Education, American Friends of
the Middle East, Agency for In-*
ternational Development (agricul (agriculture),
ture), (agriculture), and Food and Agriculture
Organization of UJN.
The international students'
Center is located on campus in
Building AE. The International
Student Organization sponsors

She calls false the argument that
women engineers would not use
their educationbecause they marry
and have a family.
All professional women really
run into the same argument, she
said, but national statistics show
that a woman who has a family
can be employed 25 years of her
life. If she doesn't get married,
she can expect 40 working years.
Most female engineering
students come from the poorer
social classes and of foreign
parentage where there is no
idealized feminine picture being
held up to them every time the
girl moves, she said.
Girls who want to be engineers
should expect to be discouraged,
will be happy they overcame the
opposition if they persevere,
Mrs. Holladay said.
Mrs. Holladay was graduated
from the University of Illinois in
1930 with a degree in architectural
engineering. She has been on the
Universitys faculty here since
1946. Before that she taught radio
in the UJS. Army Air Corps and
worked on electronic equipment
for radar projects in industry.

many activities for both American
and foreign students throughout
the year.
Various groups such as India
club, Latin American club, German
club, Arab club, and Chinese club
sponsor parties, suppers
and holiday celebrations. Inter International
national International Week is the main project
promoted by the groups. The
international Speakers Bureau
provides speakers for various
civic and fraternal clubs in
Gainesville.
Hie Florida Blue Key has
organized a Host program for the
purpose of bringing the American
and foreign student together, and
helping the foreign student get
adjusted to campus life.
Col. Glenn A. Farris is advisor
to the foreign students. According
to Farris, there will be a get gettogether
together gettogether in the fall for the new
foreign students.
Im very anxious for new
American students to recognize

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Campus Clubs Appeal
To Every Taste, Hobby

By GEORGE ELMORE
Staff Writer
All work and no play so
the saying goes, and UF students
find the campus offers many
opportunities to mix study and
extracurricular activities.
Campus clubs cover a broad
range of interests, from drama
to caving. Many students find an

the possibilities of cultural ex exchange
change exchange and the broadening effect
of conversing and making friends
with various foreign students with
whom they come in contact in
the dorm and classroom," Farris
said.
According to Farris, even though
the American student may be a
freshman himself and new to
campus, he should feel no
hesitation in strikingupa
friendship with foreign students.
One of the aims of the
International Center is to foster
such communication between
foreign and American students in
the interest of education.
*'l feel this is a special privilege
of the American student which
should be exploited," Farris said.
Foreign students also should be
encouraged to attain their primary
goals of receivings sound
university education coupled with
an understanding of the American
way of life."

outlet for their spare time in
student government, student
publications, music or sports.
Although the entering student
would be wise to avoid joining
any organization before he sees
how demanding his academic
schedule is, when he does make
up his mind there are many
activities to choose from.
The Apprentice Players, and
the senior organization, Florida
Players, are, as their name
indicates, for drama enthusiasts.
Throughout the year they present
several major productions, which
have included Playboy of the
Western World, Dinny and the
Witches, The Cave Dwellers,
and many other plays.
The Players offer membership,
not only to actors, but to lighting
technicians, set designers, cos costume
tume costume makers, and all other
personnel involved in a success successful
ful successful production.
There will be a meeting during
the first week of class for students
interested in the Players. Notices
will be posted on campus.
Another group that will be or organizing
ganizing organizing during the first week of

ANYONE
Can Tell You | ivjf j
Where Mihe's Is
"Come In & Browse at MIKE'S...
It s a Tradition with Florida Students"
Most complete Selection of tobaccos (imported and
domestic) in North Florida.
Broad selection of paperbacks, magazines and hard hardcover
cover hardcover books.
Quality line of pipes: English, Italian, Grecian,
finest in imported briars & meerschaums.
Sport & dress headwear for all tastes
MIKE'S
BOOKS PIPES TOBACCO HATS
Corner SE Ist Street and 2nd Avenue
Open 8 am til 9:30 pm including Sunday

the trimester is the Debate Club.
Under the /direction of Pro
William B. Lashbrook, the debate
teams have posted an outstanding
record at tournaments around the
country.
This year they will travel to
tournaments at Harvard, in
Arizona, Kentucky and New York.
The Gator Amateur Radio Club,
like the Speleological Society, is
prepared to aid in an emergency.
They have a Ham station on the
sth floor of the Engineering build building.
ing. building.
Music fans, with a yen bo
participate, can join one of the
several Gator Bands, the
Orchestra, or the Glee Clubs.
These organizations present many
concerts on campus and throughout
the state and nation during the
year.
These are only a few of the
many clubs on Campus. The others
range from the International Stu Student
dent Student Organization to the Swxmfins
and Aqua-Gators. If you cant
locate the club of your choice, the
Dean of Mens office maintains
a file of all clubs and can supply
information on them.



JSIC WITH
AUSH ROOMS?
fternoons on Gainesville's WPUP. Make your requests at TONY*
Randy's manager, as you order your pizza N If Randy has the tune
's Record Show". Tops in recorded music, up-to-the-minute news
th & University Avenue, or WPUP, 1021 East University Avenue.
. Have your Pizza Wheel punched
at the counter
. When you have credit for 12
pizzas, you are entitled to a
FREE pizza, any size.
I .Tony's Pizza Prices 15t HAMBURGERS
PIZ ZA Small Med. Large _a tl d *. m
You ve Tried The Rest... Now
TOMATO & CHEESE 85 1.35 1.70 Try g eS |j You Owe This
PEPPERONI 1.00 1.55 1.95 Treat To Yourself!"
SAUSAGE 1.05 1.60 2.00
MUSHROOMS 1.20 1.65 2.20 #AIR CONDITIONED DINING ROOM
PEPPERONI & SAUSAGE 1.30 1.80 2.50
SAUSAGE AND MUSHROOMS ...1.30 1.80 2.50 PLENTY OF ATMOSPHERE & MUSIC
ANCHOVIES 1.15 1.60 2.C0
MUSHROOMS & PEPPERONI 1 3C 1.80 2.50 rvri iwppY I
TONY'S SPECIAL! THE WORKS). .. 1.50 2-.25 3.00 DELIVERY SERVICE I
teal Italian Pizza With a Southern Accent FAST COURTEOUS SERVICE
'i

CALL IN YOUR ORDER TO TONY'S!
AND THIRTEENTH STREET
1308 W. UNIVERSITY AVENUE
4
x

Thursday, July 25/1963 The Florida Alligotor

Page 13B



The Florida Alligator Thursday, July 25,1963

Page 14B

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FLORIDA'S SPORTS COMPLEX
...in the left foreground is Florida Gymnasium, with the swimming pool and
Women's Gym behind it. Beyond them are the old cinder track, Florida Field,
tennis and handball courts, a soccer field and volleyball courts. Across the
street is the football practice field, which also serves as an ROTC drill field,
parking lot for games, and practice golf driving range. Up and to the left are
the two baseball diamonds, more tennis and outdoor basketball courts and the
new Grasstex track. Beyond the clump of trees are the varsity tennis courts
and more intramural and gym class fields. The cross country course is around
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This is how Howard looks when we come home
j from eating at Mac's House. Howard knows we
, have brought back some food for him. Only some sometimes
times sometimes my Daddy eats Howard's food on the way
home in the car. Then Howard bites my Daddy.
1 Howard won't eat dog food any more. I don't
know who likes the food from Mac's House more,
Howard, my Daddy, or Me.
MAC'S HOUSE
h 520 S.W. 2nd Avenue FR 2-6514

GATORS INACTION
...against Hampton Sidney
College's baseball team.
The frosh baseball team
works out in the background.
Behind them, the Fighting
Gators are holding spring
football practice. Within
100 yards, but out of the
photo, the thinclads are
having track practice.
U mk J V
IE
...will be throwing a lot
of left-handed ones this fall.

Brown Reveals Gator Hopes

EDITORS NOTE: Russ Brown
has been a first string end for
the past two seasons and was
All-SEC Sophomore in 1960.
In writing this article, I will
attempt to show the other side
of the picture the view we
football players have.
TEAM STRENGTHS
We feel that the team strength
is in the interior line. From
tackle to tackle, this should be
the greatest Florida line in history.
Our first team line averages 235
pounds. The offensive line and
backs should be better in all
phases. Floridas passing attack
should be great with Tom Shannon
at first team quarterback and
talented sophomore Kay
Stephensen backing him up.
are blessed with an
abundance of young talented backs.
This group of backs is very eager
and confident that they can do the
job. This is half of the battle.
Our kicking game should be the
best in many years. Hagood Clarke
one of the nations top punters
last year, is back. This year, we
have the added security of Hal
Seymour who can kick a football

Gator Whos Who

This fall, you can expect to hear
the names of a few of Floridas
Fighting Gators shouted from the
stands; It might be nice to know
more about them.
Larry Dupree will play half halfback
back halfback and fullback as needed. He
is 5-11, weighs 195 and comes
from little Macclenny, Fla. He
led the SEC in rushing with 619
yards last year and became the
only Sophomore on the All-Con All-Conference
ference All-Conference team.
Frank Lasky at 6-2, 270 pounds
will be a senior tackle. He hails
from Coral Gables, Fla. and was
the number one draft pick of the
New York Giants last year. He
has extremely good speed for a
big boy and can outrun many SEC
backs. Both he and Dupree were

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INTRAMURAL RASKETBALL
.. .is taken seriously, even if the shoes are not uniform.

By RUSS BROWN
Staff Writer

eighty yards. If you dont believe
this, watch the Georgia Techgarfte
on national television September
14.
TEAM WEAKNESSES
Our main weakness is defense.
We have young ends and halfbacks.
Offense is easy to teach a back,
but defense is tough. A great
offensive back is usually one who
is naturally a great runner. To
have a good defensive backfield
takes work, experience and time.
So far,'we have not had much of
the latter. Spring practice is only
twenty days long, and with young
backs, this is just not long enough.
We, the team believe in
ourselves and our coaches. It would
help a great deal to have you, the
STUDENT BODY, believe in us. A
game may be played on the field,
but it is won in the stands, and
in the classroom. If you see some
big lug walking around the campus
why don't you say, Beat those
Yellow-Jackets, or Crunch
those halfa Indians. That little
statement might give the extra
burst of speed that breaks Dupree
or Shannon loose for the winning
touchdown.

picked by Playboy magazine as
a pre-season All-American.
Russ Brown, a senior from
Miami, weighs 210 and stdtfdS 6-2.
He led the team in pass reception
last year with 15 for 227 yards.
In the Gator Bowl game, he caught
four more. Graves feels that he
will catch even more this year
as the ball will be thrown more.
On the other end of a pass will
normally be left-handed Tom
Shannon. Tom is 6-1 and 175 and
comes from Miami also.
Hagood Clarke is 6-0 and 190
from Miami. Hagood, who will
play left halfback and punt, came
to Florida without a scholarship,
but through his determination, he
earned on and a starting berth as
well. __



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Ray Graves Gives
His Views of Gators

Coach Ray Graves has run up a
20-11-1 record In three years with
two Gator Bowl victories included.
His football teams have played
against the tough foes of the South Southeastern
eastern Southeastern Conference and the best of
independent schools.
In addition to football, the eight
intercollegiate sports, of which
Graves is overall director, have
rim up a record of almost 69
per cent.
Graves came to Florida as
Athletic Director and Head
Football Coach after 13 years as
an assistant coach at Georgia Tech,
where he had become assistant
head coach under bobby Dodd from
1957-60.
Graves graduated from the Uni University
versity University of Tennessee in 1943 after
playing and serving as captain of
the Volunteer team in his senior
year. He played professional
football with the Philadelphia
Eagles and captained this squad
his final season.
Graves was the 1960 SEC Coach
of the Year and was selected
| Floridas Man of the Year by
I the Orlando Sentinel.
I He feels that we, should be,
I from tackle to tackle, as strong
I as anybody we meet. We have
good depth here and some out-
I standing individuals such as
I tackles Frank Lasky and Dennis
I Murphy, center Roger Pettee and
I guards Gerald Odom and Jack
Katz.
We dont believe there will
be a better quarterback in the
league than Tom Shannon, nor a
better offensive back than Larry
Dupree. However, we have pro pro
pro blems in that every boy behind
Shannon is a sophomore and we
have only two halfbacks returning
Hagood Clarke and Jerry New New
New comer.
Our big worries are in this
situation at halfback and in a lack
of depth at end. Russ Brown is
the only end who has ever played
varsity football before, and I cant
remember ever being associated
with a team having less experience
Hat this vital spot.
H Our schedule is very tough
with Georgia Tech, Auburn and

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I JIM O'DONNELL
I .is a hard man to bring down.

Alabama on the road, and LSU
here. Out of conference games
with teams like Miami and FSU
are never easy.
New rules caused concern and
work in spring practice. We had
a developed three-team system
and, of course, this had to be
completely eliminated. We will
play a pair of two-way units next
year, with the third unit being
primarily an offensive one, with
ability to play some defense.
We appear to be in need of
more defensive development, as
that is where inexperience is
hurting most now. Offensively we
should be a better football team
than we were last year. We plan
to throw the ball more, gamble
a little more with an open, some sometimes
times sometimes reckless attitude such as
we had in the Gator Bowl game.
Our kicking game should be
adequate with Jimmy Hall and Bob
Lyle on placements and sophomore
Hal Seymour, coming along to help
Hagood Clarke with the punting.
Seymour is erratic but had tre tremendous
mendous tremendous potential.
Murals Offer
Activity for All
Thousands of students have
participated in intramurals
through the years and any number
of intercollegiate athletes have
been discovered while doing so.
As well as dorm league com competition,
petition, competition, all of the fraternities
and many other on and off-campus
organizations field teams. Any
affiliate of these organizations can
be on their team.
What is your sport or sports?
In regular league play, there is
basketball, bowling, golf, hafidball
horseshoes, shuffleboard, softball,
swimming, table tennis, tennis,
touch football, track, volleyball,
and water basketball.
Along with league play, the
Intramural Department offers club
sports such as fencing, water
skiing, and gymnastics and recre recreational
ational recreational activities such as square
dancing, hunting, and fishing.

Coaches Want All
Frosh To Try Out

Can Joe Frosh go out for and
make an intercollegiate team at
Florida without being on full
scholarship? Yes!
It is true that football and
basketball players are highly
sought and are offered all legal
benefits in order to induce them
here, but still any number of boys
who can definitely make the team
roam the campus and never try.
If you want to go out for football,
go to the Department of Inter Intercollegiate
collegiate Intercollegiate Athletics and see Coach
John Donaldson, head freshman
coach. You can g your physical
at the infirmary your equip equipment
ment equipment from Sarge annister, but

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I 'vSmSLJ M r ; a. ~ iL fr mgr jte
>*- Re
fIH SH
"Quick f/22 at i/500th!" j
ONE STOP SHOPPING AT ROCK BOTTOM PRICES
LORD BYRON S
COSMETICS SUNDRIES SCHOOL SUPPLIES GIFTS CARDS
Closest Cosmetic & Sundry Store to Campus
NEXT DOOR TO LARRY'S RESTAURANT
1223 W. Univ. Ave. FR 2-5345

Thursday. July 25,1963 The Florida Alligator

the desire to play has to come
from you.
Your other chance to earn.a
freshman athletic award this fall
is by going out for cross-country.
Contact Coach Percy Beard or
Coach Walter Welsch in order to
get your equipment from Sarge
Ayers. Freshmen only run about
2 miles in competition and several
more in practice.
For roundball, see Coach Jim
McCachren well before the season.
Several fellows went out last
season and by sticking to it, ended
up with some financial assistance
dispite the presence of several
All-Staters.

Swimming is a year-round spoi
here. Coach Bill Harlan took ove
last year and led the team t
their eighth straight SEC crowi
Coach Buster Bishop is the ne
golf coach as Conrad Rehling
in charge of the University Goi
Club where the team practices
and physical education classes ar
taught.

Nestors TV
Located
Behind Florida Bookstore
TV,RADIO,HI-FI SVC?
Tubes Checked Free! 11
1627 NW Ist Avenue
.FR 2-7326

Page 15B



The Florida Alligator Thursday, July 25,1963

Page 16B

j@ sUa\
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| DISCOUNT / j
WHY PAY MORE WHEN YOU CAN GET YOUR
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! RECORDS |
| ALL CURRENT 45's 77$ |
| MOST BETTER MONAURAL LP'S $2.77 |
! MOST BETTER STEREO LP'S $3.57
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| MENS i LADIES j
| Dak-type Slacks $4.87 l Roll Up Sleeve Blouses 0Q
] Dacron & Cotton L Sizes 32-38 |
| All Colors, in sizes 28-42 I
| 7 Better Wrap Skirts $4.87
Snap-tab Collar 7 Colors: Cranberry, Teel, Plaids.
Dress Shirts J
White & Stripes, in sizes 14-17iDo-Si-Do Blouses S2.SB
1 Head & Arm Band Included
1 Cranberry, Teel & Prints
{ sizes 32-38
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J MEN'S GENUINE I Genuine I
Bleeding Madras Jackets 1 CABRETTA
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Beautifully tailored jackets \ Beautifully lined, never before
that you will expect to pay A an all leather jacket at this low
much more for. Sizes 38-42 I price. Beige, White, Silk, sizes |
in short, regular and long. 28to 18
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Plaza, North 13th St. & 26th J

Wet-Dry Stirs Few

(EDITOR'S NOTE: The over overwhelming
whelming overwhelming opinion of all people
interviewed as to their views on
the petition now being circulated
concerning the future of this county
as a wet or dry one was that it
didnt really matter one way or
the other.)
BYRON CLAGHORN 4AS: I
dont think one group should de determine
termine determine another groups morals.
Dunking is personal.
BARRY STEARNS 4ED: Idont
think it will make much difference
to the students, but it might go
hard on the surrounding counties.
I think it will go wet. He also
mentioned that the Baptist stant
was a tradition along with our
double standard.
SYDNEY MATTHEWS, FLORIDA
UNION: I have no strong feeling
one way or the other. (If the
county goes wet). It might cut
down on the number of accidents
between here and the county line.
808 SETZER 3BA: IT will be
good if it comes to a vote; it
should be voted on.
CLAY SPENCER 3ED: It might
make a difference for a while,
but then it will settle down.
JOHN STRICKLAND 4LW: I
think that every individual should

Students Study
Picture Taking

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Photography is assuming a
growing importance in modern
communication, according to
Buddy Davis, UF Professor of
Journalism.
The photography course offered
by the School of Journalism and
Communications gives the student
an opportunity to learn to use
complicated cameras, develop film
and print pictures.
Yashica, 35mm and 4 b y 5
cameras are furnished for the
student's use for the entire course.
Each student must supply his own
photographic paper and film.
Equipment includes 8 enlargers,
5 darkrooms, tanks, reels and
chemicals for developing film and
printing the pictures.
In communications, pictures are
used increasingly to cover sports
events, spot news and advertising.
To report events in depth, the
photo essay or photo story serves
a significant purpose, he said.
The photo story must have a
beginning, middle and end, but
there is no order necessary in

Alligator Opinion Poll

A STUDENT PHOTOGRAPH

have the right to make up his own
mind. I have never known anybody
who wanted it not be able to obtain
it.
PROF. J. E. DOVELL, Pro Professor
fessor Professor of political science: The
election should be called if 25%
of the registered voters want it.
(The voting) should not be signi significant
ficant significant to the student body because
of the lack of registered voters.
PROF. SYDNEY JOURARD,
PSYCHOLOGY: I think the county
should go wet, and I doubt that it
will effect the drinking habits, of
anybody in Gainesville.
* PROF.' HUGH CUNNINGHAM,
JOURNALISM AND COM COMMUNICATIONS:
MUNICATIONS: COMMUNICATIONS: I am opposed
to the wet. The more available it
is, the bigger the problem.
MIKE MINTON 2UC: Being
a non-drinker, this will not affect
me much, but if others are to
drink, I would rather they but it
here than drive back drunk from
the county line.
CHARLIE GRANNIS 2UC: Im
21 now, but the boys under age
will feel the enforcement of rules
that are now quite lax. I would
like to see it go wet, but we will
probably get a County Beverage
Agent to make sure that the rules
are enforced.

the arrangement of a photo essay.
It conveys a mood love, hate, or
a situation, like poverty, accord according
ing according to Davis.
One of the basic component
for success in photography, Davn
said, is experimenting. Experi Experiment
ment Experiment with different films, different
lighting conditions, different
angles and distances from the
subject.
The basic downfall of amateur
photographers, Davis added, is
the failure to obtain unity in a
picture. A picture has unity only
if it has a single message, a
single center of interest, with all
the lines and tones contributing,
Davis compared the camera to
an eye, and explained how the eye'
unconsciously eliminates what it
doesn't want to see. But the camera
is mechanical and records exactly
what is in front of it.
In a photograph composition
must remain subordinate to mean meaning
ing meaning for communicating ideas and
events, Davis said.



Economic Leaflet

Prof Suggests Labor Court

A practical solution to todays
ftppling strikes may be a Court
jjpl.abor-Management Appeals, a
sH professor of industrial and
JHrsonnel relations suggests.
9B)r. John R. Bangs makes this
IjHitement in the forthcoming issue
fl Economic Leaflets, a report
IMblished monthly by the UFs
JMreau of Economic and Business
and due to be released
Kxt week.
SB With such a court, the practice
H| ad hoc compulsory arbitration,
Hrmed by the management
|Mecialist as the worst kind of
Blllective bargaining, would be
[Outlook Is
Promising For
I Aug. Grads
Job opportunities for August
graduates are very promising
according to UF Placement Office
Director M. E. Mayberry.
The outlook is especially good
Bin fields of accounting, engineering
food technology, physical sciences
Bsuch as math, physics anc
chemistry, and for teachers for
both colleges and public schools.
According to Mayberry, a high
demand area lies in sales
personnel, both technical and
non-technical.
Mayberry said that the type oi
I individual in demand is one who
has outstanding grades, is active
in campus activities, and has a
well rounded personality.
I He describes this person as
I the Phi Beta Kappa who is captain
of his football team.
Mayberry stresses that one of
these traits maybe more important
for some jobs than for another.
I For instance, activities and per per
per sonality may be the important
factors in sales fields, while
scholarship is the most important
I in research and technical work.
I The prospective August graduate
should have little problem finding
I a position if he is qualified for
his field.
I Cancer Is
I A Variable
Killer
The medical fight against cancer
as reduced the death rate for some
ypes of cancer, but according to a
eport released by the Florida
hvision of the AmericanC an ce r
death rates for other types
Biave increased.
Since 1950, u. S. death rates
rom cancer of the stomach and
ancer of the uterus have declined
hout one-third. However, death
Bates have risen 73 per cent among
*en and 18 per cent among women,
ccording to Dr. I. S. Ravdin,
ational president of the American
ancer Society.
H Pancreatic cancer and leukemia
adults have also increased and
>e reasons for the rise have not
Been determined.
9 However, Dr. Ravdin pointed out
* at last year alone, some 44,000
ancer patients who might have
*ed had they developed the disease
years ago, are living today.
This, said Dr. Ravdin, is
n encouraging hopeful side
H' cancer which strengthens the
that in the foreseeable future
ore lives can be saved andeven-
a cure will be found.

discontinued, he says.
The court as described by Dr.
Bangs would be made up of five
judges, appointed for life and well wellversed
versed wellversed in labor relations.
Since it would be on the appellate
level, its decisions would be
subject to review only by the U.S.
Supreme Court.
The court could hear testimony
subpoena records, study the econo economics
mics economics of a total industry, develop
principles and set precedents, he
explains.
Meanwhile the workers would
return to their job§, the precedents
would be studied and a body of
public knowledge be made avail available.
able. available. . and in this way a strong
set of laws and precedents could
be built.
There is ample evidence that
such a plan might work here in
America, writes Dr. Bangs.
It works in Australia. Not
perfectly, but it works.
And there is precedent here in
the way patent cases are handled
in the Court of Customs and Patent
Appeals, he note-

J ft
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SSBPBHV iiiii^
Wm A
THt MOST AurHamrAnvf M
THE AMERICAN COLLEGE DICTIONARY
When you buy the American College Diction Dictionary,
ary, Dictionary, you buy the very best basic reference tool
today for years to
he American (College
tionary has undergone 46 updatings
a rand m h use ok

Dr.*Bangs suggests that, in the
beginning, cases be limited to
national emergencies and defense
strikes; but gradually other tough
settlements might be referred to
it. The need for such an agency
is obvious, he says.
Both the National Labor
Relations Board and the Federal
Mediation and Conciliation Service
are politically oriented and change
with each Presidential election,
he says, With life-term judges
political pressures would be
avoided.
And more important, says Dr.
Bangs, is the need for developing
firm labor law.
Dr. Bangs doesnt promise the
plan would prevent strikes but
says it would bring to reasonable
solutions those crippling strikes
that have paralyzed sections of
our economy and halted that
growth.

Thursday, July 25,1963 The Florida Alligator

Tips for Safety

Want to make your car safer?
Here are a dozen suggestions that
will make your car a safer place
to live in while you're in the
drivers seat.
1. If you dont have an outside
mirror, get one before all else.
They are essential to safe-driving.
2. Get a flashlight and mount
it with magnetic clamps or, better
bolt-on clamps beneath or along alongside
side alongside the steering column, so it
is always available immediately
in case of an emergency.
3. If you frequently trailer a
boat, arrange to have heavy duty
brakes and shock absorbers. Nor Normal
mal Normal brakes, particularly on
smaller cars, will not long take
the tough wear of a car and a
trailer.
4. Use seat belts and seat
harnesses. There is no question

The Drivers Seat

that they save lives, even of people
who normally drive at moderate
speeds in urban areas.
5. If you live in a state that
does not issue safety license
plates l5 states will be in 1964
put a wide strip of reflective
tape on your bumper, in case of
mechanical failure on a heavily
traveled road at night.
6. If your car isn't equipped
with a spray unit" to clean your
windshield, buy one. They can be
the difference between seeing*the
road ahead and crashin; into some something
thing something in front of you.
7. Buy a slow-me-down-please
meter. This is an Imaginary unit
probably never seen even in the
Wizard of Oz books. It is a piece
of advice that every driver should
carry to make his car safer. In
brief, it is advice that will insist
that, when you are driving too
fast, hurrying to beat another car
to an intersection or even driving
thoughtlessly fast on an urban
street where there are a lot of
children, you will slow down and
get your car under control.

Page 17B



The Florida Alligator Thursday, July 25,1963

Page 18B

plough h uoi;t-
to be i .auuojut K
vi* 11 A*. is that tl 4ut ouqm B
< s > dwy wi Mi~u suo *'*!,Bio Business For
r' vlc nnn a
/'^S2irSs^\ \ lUyUUU You, Mr. Merchant
/ me would be i-qtJM saDijjo sui 1
/ X viewing apphcan-ioq 0} saSanoo \ I||
/ / applicative group of high sfijv 1 | l|
/ / applicants are drawn. I J ***g*!Z /. I I
If He also aavi*ecJ*4' saaauwt ,*, | I
if to seek the cour*qi no 9J9A3S I I
N versities and oth-sa-id lauoipppi I (I
'/ j A | tions that are v-:>ipa j d aqi 'P' ,V* /11
/ i /\ / in-state student *x at s>*a3a[i
-
yV
IF YOU CAN REACH HIMf
*
University of Florida students spend more than ONE MILLION DOLLARS A MONTH for goods
and services ranging from prepared meals (85% spend an average of $39.53 a month each) to
newspapers and magazines (71% spend an average of $1.65 a month each).
REACH HIM
(and his gal)
THROUGH THE MOST WIDELY CIRCULATED AND BEST READ
MEDIUM ON CAMPUS:
The Alligator
Hi
Phone 6-3261, Ext. 2832 Ask for Advertising

* U.F. Marketing Class Suryey, 1961. Complete chart of expenditures upon request.



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MHhu JF*'/ T^S^n.
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....a week before classes start so that incoming freshmen can find out what services
the UF offers and where these can be found. Group leaders are upperclassmen and can
usually answer most questions that the incoming freshman may have.

4,000 Expected in Fall

Approximately 4,000 entering
freshmen and university college
transfer students are expected to
participate in the fall orientation
program.
Freshmen will begin Orientation
Week activities Monday night

Keep Coffee Cans
For First Aid Kit

The familiar tin coffee can need
not be tossed away in the trash
when empty. According to the
American Red Cross it can double
as a container for a family first
aid kit, to be kept at home or in
the car.
The kit suggested by the red
cross includes safety pins, small

/
CHESNUTS 4 1 LIST
FOR BACK TO CAMPUS
LARGEST GREETING CARD SELECTION
Q EATON'S STATIONERY
UNUSUAL GIFTS
q COMPLETE ART DEPARTMENT
0 SCHOOL LAMPS, DESKS, WASTE BASKETS
0 PORTABLE TYPEWRITERS
0 SCHOOL SUPPLIES
PLUS, A COMPLETE SUPPLY OF BUSINESS AND OFFICE SUPPLIES TO MEET
ANY OF YOUR NEEDS.
106 W. Univ. Ave. Phone FR 2-8421

ORIENTATION GROUPS TOUR THE CAMPUS

Sept. 2, in the gymnaisum. Uni University
versity University college transfers will
group Tuesday morning, Sept. 3.
This will be the largest group
ever handled by the Orientation
staff, according to Fred Lane,
technical coordinator. Thero will

scissors, antiseptic, toothpick
swabs, band aids, triangular ban bandages,
dages, bandages, sterile gauze pads, adhesive
tape, burn ointment, and various
sized roller bandages.
Once packaged, the coffee can
first aid kit can be sealed with
tape to keep out dust and moisture.

be an increased number of staff
members to handle the 146 orien orientation
tation orientation groups, said Lane.
This years program will be a
refined version of those of previous
years. We believe that it will run
more smoothly than before. Lane
added.
Current plans call for most
orientees to complete orientation
by Friday afternoon, Sept. 6.
In addition to Lane, heading the
all-student staff are: Bill Stanford
student director; W. MacMelvln,
associate director; Mike Colodny,
assistant associate director;
Dennis Flanagan, group control
director; Maurice Plumb, office
manager; and Frank Glinn, traffic
control chairman.
Under the guidance of the Dean
of Mens office, the orientation
staff is advised by William G.
Cross, advisor to organizations
and director of orientation.

Thursday, July 25,1963 The Florida Alligator

JM Students Win
Trimester Awards

Three students were given
journalism merit awards for this
trimester from the School of
journalism and Communications.
School Tries
To link Ideas
MORAGA, Calif. (UPI) St.
Marys College, a four-year
liberal arts school located in a
verdant valley 25 miles east of
San Francisco, is trying to give
its students more than just
random courses in the
humanities.
The college, which has an
enrollment of about 800, has
recently introduced courses
designed to give students an idea
of the relationships among the arts
sciences and social sciences.
The school offers an integrated
curriculum to some students.
Such a curriculum is intended to
give students an idea of the links
between science and mathematics,
on the one hand, and history, lit literature
erature literature and philosophy on the
other.

I A HAM /£LI
I AMD A HARpV M g AL / I
I Super STEAK Spwiabl I
I T BONE Dinner q, c I
|2 Vegetables, Rolls & Butter |
I CLUB STEAK Dinner "I
12 Vegetables, Rolls & Butter 80 c I
I 3 Sizes Thick, Delicious, Frozeal
I CHOCOLATE SHAKES I
GOLDCOAST I
| RESTAURANT I
I 1720 West University Avenue |

Howard A. Stonesifer, of Clear Clearwater
water Clearwater received the award in the
News-Editorial sequence of the
school; Joe Dust; of Ocala, and
Christopher Nuthall. broadcasting.
The awards were given on the
basis of character, scholarship,
and proficiency. The winners were
given certificates.
Stonesifer, was a member of
Sigma Delta Chi, journalism
honorary, Alpha Tau Omega,
staffer on the Gainesville Daily
Sun and Florida Alligator.
He is currently working for the
Florida Division of General
Extension of Florida Institute for
Continuing university Studies. He
will be working for WFLA-TV in
Tampa after graduation. Stonesifer
is married and has two children.
Reitz Appoints
State Dentists
UF President j. Wayne Reitz
has named an advisory committee
of 14 practicing dentists in Florida
to help in the planning of a college
of dentistry at the UF.

Page 19B



Page 20B

The Florida Alligator Thursday, July 25,1963

A Welcome... and
An Invitation from ...

. L&.L Mens Shop
Stag n Drag,
"TRADITIONALLY YOURS"
13 W. University Ave.
ASK ABOUT OUR STUDENT CHARGE CHARGETHE
THE CHARGETHE PROPRIETOR of this emporium takes great pleasure
in welcoming all students new and old- to the
, .* ; . ...
I C I
Stag n Drag, sportswear shop of the L&L Men s Shop.
The informality of this shop will be a shopping
pleasure for the lady in love with casual fashions,
or the gentleman who likes to indulge in an
extra portion of tradition.
It's the desire of the proprietor to derive frequent
pleasure seeing how well-dressed his patrons look
C
in fashions from Stag 'n Drag You'll love it,
,
LfN vWj I and we'll be flattered to see you ... do come in
and browse.
t 11liH 11tYtFl /\li IV 1 M f fiCf
Featuring These Famous Name Brands! l^^
STAG Naturci Shoulder Suits by HASPEL, GRIFFON and SOUTHWICK# jHHT
Shirts by CREIGHTON, ENRO Slacks by HIGGINS,
JEFFERSON, YMM GOLD CUP SOCKS Toiletries
by CANOE and ENGLISH LEATHER :
RAINWEAR Sportcoats by STANLEY BLACKER
greenhall Bros, belts Free Parking on
DRAG HARBURT* PANTINO MR. PANTS* COUNTRY SHIRT# f\ rst Federal Lot /
GLEN OF MICHIGAN YANKEE PEDLAR SEATON " UL /
HALL JEUNE LEIGUE BY CHERBURG LADY HATHAWAY*
DAVEY BAGS# SWEATERS BY BRAEMAR, GLASGO