Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
The Florida
Alligator

Vol 55, No. 136 University of Florida/ Gainesville Thursdays July 18,1963

Alligator Names Reitz
|As Man of the Year

Dr. J. Wayne Reitz is the Florida
tator 1962-63 Man of the Year.
e fifth president of the Uni Unirsity
rsity Unirsity of Florida was elected to
is annual honor by the staff of
te Florida Alligator, based on
ominations sought from the
iculty, staff and student body,
eltz was chosen as the person
erv i n g the cause of higher
iucation to the greatest extent
uring the past year.
The son of Julius and Minnie
lae Reitz, Dr. Reitz was born
i Olathe, Kansas on New Years
;ve, 1908. He attended Colorado
and M where he received his
lachelor of Sciences in 1930. He
>n a Master of Sciences from
he University of Illinois in 1935
ifid a Ph. D. in agricultural

Council Endorses
Racial Committee

By JOEL SACHS
Editorial Assistant
Legislative Council Tuesday
night adopted a resolution
endorsing the work of the Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville bi-racial committee and
commending the student body for
their mature and continuing
concern for equal rights.
The Council amended a
resolution presented by the Student
Group for Equal Rights with a
resolution prepared by several
members of the Council.
j Controversy started with the
inclusion in the original resolu resolution
tion resolution of an endorsement of the
work of the Student Group for
Equal Rights.
Mike Klingman, Legislative
Council member, stated that the
G,ainesville City Commission, the
Alachua County Commission, the
Ministerial Association and the
tjfF administration confined their
ftxiorsements to the bi-racial
Committee and that this would
he the proper course of action
s>r the Council to take.
I Pincus Gross, representative
Irom the Student group for Equal
Alights, said that his group was
satisfied with amended resolution.
The basic reason for the sub submitting
mitting submitting of the resolution was to
Jjhave SG take a stand on the issue.
[ A controversy erupted when
publications salaries for the fall
And winter trimesters were intro introiluced
iluced introiluced for adoption by the
icouncil.
An attempt was made to cut
|the salaries as proposed by the
Publications Finance Board, which
|is composed of members of the
Board of Student Publications and
SG.
After much discussion and with
the endorsement of the original
salaries by Paul Hendrick, SG
President, John Purcell, SG
Treasurer, Jim Crabtree, Sec Secretary
retary Secretary of Finance, and David
Lawrence Jr, editor-elect of the
Alligator, the Council approved
the salaries as recommended.
The Gator Band was given SISOO
to help defray costs of the trip
to the Georgia Tech football game.
The band will appear during the
halftime of the nationally televised
game.

economics from the University
of Wisconsin in 1941.
In 1934 he came to the UF as
an Assistant Professor of Agri Agricultural
cultural Agricultural Economics, was promoted
to full professor during the time
of his ten-year service, and left
the University in 1944 to join the
Economic Council, United Growers
and Shippers Association in
Orlando.
In 1949 he returned to the Uni University
versity University of Florida as Provost for
Agriculture, andbecame President
of the University in April of 1955.
As president of the states oldest
and largest University, Dr. Reitz
played a major role in igniting
the flame of interest in higher
education that burned more
brightly this year than at any

Maurice Plumb, 4AS from
Clearwater, was appointed Sec Secretary
retary Secretary of Legislative Affairs.
Plumb fills a vacancy created
by the graduation of Dave Vogler.
Other business which came
before the Council was the
passing of the fee allocations and
budgets for the fall and winter
trimesters. This was their second
and final passage. The additions
to the Finance Law were also
passed on their second reading.

Bp
V
HI

JOHNNY NASH
Nash lo Croon
At UF Frolics
Singer Johnny Nash will present
a one and a half hour show as
the feature attraction of Saturday
nights Summer Frolics at the
University Inn.
Also included in the affair will
be dancing to the music of the
thirteen piece Buccaneer Band, a
buffet dinner and swimming in the
pool. Tbe theme of the evening is
The Night of the Lotus.
Emceeing the program will be
WDVH's Tommy Kenning&n. Free
transportation will be provided,
leaving the Hub at 7:30 and 9 p.m.
Price of tickets Is $1.75 per
couple and an additional $1.75 for
dinner.

time this century.
Beginning early last summer,
President Reitz took the public
platform many times to challenge
the state to provide its institutions
of higher learning with both the
financial means and the academic
and fiscal freedom to meet the
educational opportunities he saw
ahead.
His proposals attracted wide widespread
spread widespread attention and support.
He followed his proposals with
definite plans of action before
the Legislative Council Committee
on Higher Education and effective
work during the legislative
session.
Among his proposals which won
legislative and Board of Control
backing were the Board of Regents
plan whereby the current Board of
Control would have more members
more continuity and authority to
receive appropriations directly
from the legislature and super supervise
vise supervise .the expenditure of these
education funds.
Also the Division of Sponsored
Research was put into law with
the backing of Dr. Reitz. This
would establish an agency to more
efficiently receive and disburse
contracts and grant funds.
Other legislative changes which
followed President Reitz efforts
for unburdening University
administration were: authority for
University approval of teaching
and research salaries up to $15,000
without Cabinet approval; and
(See REITZ, Page 3)

Court Invalidates
Huguenin Election

New Orange Peel problems con continued
tinued continued to mount this week as an
Honor Court ruling declared that
the recent election of the
magazine's editor was invalid.
Three members of the Court's
Board of Masters and six Justices
ruled Sunday in favor of petitioner
Matthew Moore, 4AS, and stated
that the Student Publications'
Board had illegally named Stan
Huguenin, also 4AS, as New Orange
Peel editor.
Moore's petition, filed against
the Electoral Board, claimed that
Huguenin, a transfer student, had
not previously worked on the
publication, and thus did not meet
the qualifications for editor called
for in the magazine's charter.
The Honor Court opinion leaves
the feature humor publication
without an editor, and chances
seemed slim this week that one
will be named before September.
According to Bill Epperheimer,
executive secretary of the Student
Board of Publications, most of the
student and faculty members on the
Board have left for the summer and
will not return until the fall tri trimester.
mester. trimester.
The Board will meet as soon
as a quorum can be obtained,"
Epperheimer said yesterday, but
until that time, the New Peel

Elk. R
Rif : s .4 'JB
H.

UF PRESIDENT J. WAYNE REITZ

Honorable Mention
Awarded to Three

Dr. Joseph Well, Alligator Man
of the Year In 1956, has been
awarded honorable mention In this
years polling,
The retiring Dean of the College
of Engineering and Director of the
UF Engineering and Experiment
Station, Well Is known as Father
of Nuclear Activity In Florida
and is listed In Whos Who In
America, Whos Who In Engineer Engineering
ing Engineering and American Men of Science.
The State Legislature in its
recent session passed an unpre unprecedented
cedented unprecedented resolution In establishing
Oct. 25, 1963, as Dr. Joseph Well

seems to be In a state of suspension
since it cannot function without
an editor."
Award Salutes
Pediatrician
Dr. Richard T. Smith, professor
of pediatrics in the College of
Medicine, was chosen Monday for
one of the highest honors in the
field of medical research by the
American Academy of Pediatrics.
The award, the 1963 E. Mead
Johnson Research Award, was
announced by E. H. Christopher son
executive director of the academy
in Evanston.
It will be presented to Dr. Smith
at the annual meeting of the
academy Oct. 5-10 in Chicago.
Dr. Smith was honored for his
research work in the area of
immunity,, especially for his
demonstration that newborn babies
are able to build their own
immunity to disease at least from
birth and possibly even earlier.
Previous studies In the field
had indicated that infants carried
only those disease-fighting anti antibodies
bodies antibodies that were passed along by
their mothers.

Day In Florida, honoring h£s many
accomplishments.
In addition to heading UF en engineering
gineering engineering efforts, Well Is best
known for his work on the VT
or proximity fuse during World
War 11. He Is Floridas repre representative
sentative representative on the inter-state OH
Compact Commission. In 1961 Well
received the Distinguished Service
Award of the Florida State
Chamber of Commerce.
Well, 66, received his BS from
Johns Hopkins In 1918, MS from
University of Pittsburgh in 1925
and an honorary doctor of science
degree from Jacksonville Univer University
sity University In 1960. He Is currently doing
research in the field of bio-medical
engineering.
Farris Bryant
Fl Bryant has been cited for his
contribution to higher education b
the Florida Alligator.
The Alligator gave Bryant a
honorable ihention in the man c
the year award. The staff selecte
Bryant because of his fight for the
bond issue which he backed during
-the past legislature'. The bond
building program would provide
millions for construction of junior
colleges and state universities If
passed by the people In a vote this
fall.
Bryant has pledged to stump
the state in an effort to bring
about the passage of the Issue.
Newspapers
Two Florida newspapers were
also awarded Honorable Mention
In the competition, The St.
Petersburg Times and the Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville Sun.
Commended for their promotion
and coverage of the problems of
higher education were the two
papers; their Executive Editors,
Don Baldwin of the Times, and Ed.
Johnson of the Sun; and the Suns
educational writer, Cliff Cormelr.
We are especially pleased to
honor these papers, said Mary Maryanne
anne Maryanne .Awtrey, Alligator Editor,
since, as a newspaper dedicated
to the university and education,
we realise statewide coverage Is
vitally Important in focusing the
publics attention upon educational
matters.



The Florida Alligator Thursday, July 18,1963

Page 2

Homecoming Slogan
Winners Announced

Future Meets Past in Gators
Big Blast has been selected by
the Florida State Cabinet as the
winning slogan in the UF Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming Contest.
The selection was announced
Tuesday morning by Gov. Farris
Bryant.
The winning words, submitted
by Mrs. Alice C. Dunnill, a third

Peace Corps Picks
Grinter for Africa

Diamond mines and the African
wilderness await Lawrence
Buck Grinter, a UF June grad graduate,
uate, graduate, as he makes plans to leave
for Sierra Leone, Africa, to join
the Peace Corps Sept. 1.
Grinter plans to teach math
and general science to Africans
in the new independent nation.
After training at Cornell, Grinter
will fly to Africa to start his two
year job as junior ambassador.
President Kennedy feels that
it is more Important to send people
in at a low level and build up
the country, Grinter said, ex explaining
plaining explaining the philosophy of the Peace
Corps.
Ive always wanted to teach,
and Im glad Im going to a country
where I can do a specific task,
he said.

Leave Your Car For
Service
While Attending
Classes
KUYKENDALLS
PURE OIL
Service Station
22 N.W. 13th Street
fCracked Eggs 3 doz $ I.IQ
/ Through |
l indecision)
> opportunity is j
s often lost (
PUBUUUS SYRUSjJ
h a
If your indecision has to do with
choosing a career, you might
try looking into the opportuni opportunities
ties opportunities offered in life insurance
sales, leading to sales manage management.
ment. management.
We're looking for young men
with initiative and imagination
who want to grow with their
careers. And we're ready to
begin your training now, while
you're still in college.
Stop by our office for a talk or
write for the free booklet,
, "Career Opportunities".
David R. Mac Cord
2910 N.W. 13th St.
Phone 376-1160
PROVIDENT MUTUAL
Life insurance Comjfeny
of Philadelphia

year pharmacy student from St.
Petersburg, were selected from
more than 1,000 entries.
Second winner was Cliff Boals
of Gainesville and Alumni Cheers
Ring Back the Years.
Third and fourth place winners
in the contest, sponsored by
Florida Blue Key, were: Mrs.
Kendra M. Gilkes, a graduate

Grinter ex pi a ined the Peace
Corps is open to all interested
Americans, married or single,
with or without a college degree.
When school is not in session
in Sierra Leone, Grinter will work
on community development
projects.
After a person is chosen for the
Corps, he enters a crash
education program to learn
health, politics, foreign policy, the
task he intends to perform in the
country, how to drive a jeep,
economics, education and anything
else that will help him in his
country.
Peace Corps volunteers are
placed all over the world, from
the Philippines to South America,
As rica and India. Many corps men
work on health and agricultural
education.
Grinter feels that the Peace
Corps will be especially valuable
to him, for he plans to enter the
Foreign service after his two-year
duty, he said.
Architecture Talk
Modern Architecture at a
Glance is the topic of a lecture
to be given tonight by Dr. Edward
M. Fearney professor of archi architecture.
tecture. architecture. The lecture will be in
Room 324 Florida Union, 8:30.
Dr. Fearney will discuss the
viewpoints expressed within
architectural circles over pre prefabricated
fabricated prefabricated construction. He will
illustrate his points with color
slides.
7963
Graduation announcements are
on sale for August graduates in
the Student Service Center. Pro Proceeds
ceeds Proceeds of the sales go to Dollars
for Scholars. The announcements
cost 15£ per card.

i DO YOUR
LAUNDRY WHILE
YOU SHOP
AT WINN-DIXIE BG.C. MURPHY
\J Air Conditioned Study Lounge
>/20 lb. Washer or 10 lb. Washer
| V Dryers Hold 50 lbs of Clothes
| >/ Also Dry Cleaning 9 lbs. for $1.50
(Same as Every 10th Load Free)
\J Lots of Parking Space
Koin Kleen
Coin Operated Dry Cleaning fir Laundry
704 W. Univ. Are., across from Buchhois Jr. High

student in the College of Edu Education
cation Education from Orlando, and John
Askins, third-year journalism
student from Bradenton.
The package of prizes going to
Mrs. Dunnill include a seven-day
cruise to the West Indies, a
portable stereo set from a
Gainesville merchant, a Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming Weekend for two at a
Gainesville motel, and two tickets
to the Homecoming game against
Louisiana State Oct. 26.
Second-place winner Boals won
a three-day stay in the Bahamas,
football tickets and a SSO Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville shopping trip.
Mrs. Gilkesthird prize included
$l5O in gift certificates for her
entry Alumni Are King At the
Homecoming Fling.
Askins received a S9O Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville shopping trip as fourth place
award for UF Replays The Good
Old Days.

Chef Visiting Here Prepares
Delicacies for Banqueters

By JUDY BARNES
City Editor
Delicious food and gay
conversation were the keynotes
of the smorgasbord buffet pre presented
sented presented by UF Food Service last
week.
The affair honored the gourmet
cookery of Chef L. E. Giles from
the University of Utah. The chef
was at UF conducting a short
course for Gator chefs and cooks.
President J. Wayne Reitz and
chairmen' of all the departments
were among those at the affair.
Deans and heads of student
organizations completed the
assembly of important campus
figures.
The smorgasbord manner of
serving food is steeped in Scan Scandinavian
dinavian Scandinavian tradition. Food Service
preserved the true Scandinavian
ritual by starting the food array
with herring and by dedicating
the meal to the Vikings.
UF diners also lived up to the
Scandinavian tradition by returning
again and again to the vast array
of foods.
UF chefs remarked that Giles
had taught them to cook dishes
they had never heard of before.
They expect that Food Service food

i. f
v It Pf| , dUjm
FOOD SERVICE DISPLAYS TALENT
... as part of UF's short course on food preparation

will taste better because of the
new spices they have learned to
use.
New dishes inspired by Chef
Giles will probably be on the UF
menu in the future also.
The banquet started with hors
doeuvres, such as jumbo shrimp
stuffed prunes, herring, sardines
and melon balls. Entrees consisted
of beef stroganoff, lobster thermi thermidor,
dor, thermidor, turkey, ham and salmon.

Dangers of Eclipse
Cited by Professor

A UF astronomy professor
warned today that eye damage
may result from looking at the sun
during its Saturday eclipse.
To look at the sun with field
glasses or a telescope is to invite
immediate damage to the eye,
Prof. Guy C. Omer said.
Sun glasses are also insufficient
the professor warned. The eclipse
may be viewed safely through
welding glasses. Safest view of all
will be on TV screens, other
authorities suggested.
The moon will intercept the suns
light before dawn in Japan. By
late morning the shadow will have
reached Alaska, and will continue
through Southern Quebec and
central Maine before disappearing
into the Atlantic over Bay Harbor
in late afternoon.
The shadow passes eastward at
a speed of 2,100 mph, but the
earth is also moving Eastward,
so the speed is slowed down.

Whats New In PAPERBACKS?
MAN & DOLPHIN ...John C. Lilly
I'M A STRANGER HERE MYSELF
...Sinclair Lewis
A NATION OF SHEEP
...William Lederer
LACK LIKE ME ...John Howard Griffin
OCTOR ZHIVAGO ...Boris Pasternak
FROM PLATO TO NIETZSCHE
.. .E.L. Allen
CONCISE HISTORY OF MODERN PAINTING
ti ir ...Herben Read
luc ?. PEN MIND - j. Robert Oppenheimer
THE SNAKE HAS ALL THE LINES
.. .Jean Kerr
COINS COMPLETE LISTING
THE BROWSE SHOP
--- Campus Shop & Bookstore

Seventeen salads and relishes
were offered to guests. They
included the chefs specialty,
Three P Salad, consisting of
picKles, peanuts and peas. Other
delicacies included fresh
pineapple, jello molds, cole slaw,
potato salad, herring salad and
waldorf salad.
\ w
Dessert consisted of individual
French pastries and coffee.

This decrease in speed is most
noticable at the equator, where
the moon shadow crosses the
ground at only 1,060 mph.
In Gainesville, according to
Omer, nothing will be detectable
to the eye unless one looks at
the moon itself. Then half of the
bright disc of the sun will appear
to have been bitten out.
Hosts Wanted
The Florida Blue Key Inter International
national International program needs several
students immediately to serve
on this project for the fall*
The Host program concerns
giving aid and friendship to new
foreign students on campus.
Pick up applications in Room
314 Florida Union.



Northrips Go
Up to Alaska

From summer in Florida to
snow in Alaska is quite a switch,
but it doesnt bother Gigi and
Charlie Northrip a bit.
Charlie graduated in June with
a masters from the UF School
of Journalism, and is taking a
position on the University of
Alaska faculty in Fairbanks.
He is going toumanage Alaskas
only FM educational radio station.
The Northrips are going to live
right on the campus in faculty
housing. According to Gigi, Fair Fairbanks
banks Fairbanks is a very modern city and
has all the conveniences of
home.
The snow gets so deep you have
to tunnel to classes in the winter,
however, Charlie said.
And you call up the grocery
store and they deliver the food.
It is very difficult to travel
Alaskan roads in the snowy
season.
Unconcerned about the prospect
oLMbegrees -below-zero weather,
Gigi said, Ive always wanted
to go up there.
The Northrips are going to travel
all the way by car, a Rambler.
They plan to let down the seats
and sleep in it. For their house household
hold household belongings, they have a
utility trailer which they will
hook up to the car.
The trip will take about 20 days
Reitz
(Continued from Page 1)
change in laws requiring return
of excess incidental funds to the
state general revenue fund.
Much of the energy of President
Reitz throughout the year was
devoted to efforts in support of the
operating budget of the University.
He proposed and championed at
every level, large increases in the
University budget to provide for
growth and improved quality.
Though Reitz himself termed
legislative action in this respect
as a mixture of satisfaction
and mild disappointment budget
figures reflect substantial gains
in many respects.
One major objective which Reitz
won Board of Control and Legis Legislative
lative Legislative approval for were funds to
provide substantial increases in
previously lagging non-academic
salaries.
President Reitz was a frequent
and eloquent spokesman and
diligent worker for passage of the
university bond issue which he
called an opportunity for Florida
to redeem the past and insure
the future.

j Von / let a Fullback |
I I
IMF watch/ I
You'll lad it uiuolly cmli lo* for pro procfsloo
cfsloo procfsloo lorvico then for ordinary otl|
. If aot hr tho ootoo*, rortotnly in tfco
long ran. Wo goorontoo oil work .
unconditionally!
ffvfe&ibop
211 W. University Ave.

according to Charlie. They are
taking snow chains just incase,
because Alaskan roads get snowy
in late August.
Although the average Alaskan
summer temperature in Alaska
is only 58 degrees, some summer
days get as hot as those in Gaines Gainesville.
ville. Gainesville.
'American Dream
Edward Albees play The
American Dream will be
presented by Readers Theater
tomorrow and Saturday at 7:30
p.m. in 239 Tigert.
The presentation may be
attended by invitation only. Seats
may be reserved by calling ext.
2671.

Orange Peel Ruling
This opinion by the Honor Court was made in solemn conclave
on July 14, 1963, pursuant to a petition by twenty-three members
of the student body of the University of Florida.
The present controversy involves the appointment of the Editor
of the NEW ORANGE PEEL by the Publications Electoral Board.
While we recognize diat the issues as framed require an inter interpretation
pretation interpretation of the Student Body Constitution, we do not find it necessary
to do so to resolve this controversy.
The authority of the Publications Electoral Board to make the
appointments of staff positions to the NEW ORANGE PEEL flows
from the Charter of the Board of Student Publications. The Board
of Student Publications derives its authority from the Board of
Control and directly from the President of the University. (Article
II; Section 1 of the Charter of the Board of Publications). The Board
of Student Publications has delegated its responsibility in the selection
of all staff positions of publications chartered by the Legislative
Council of Student Government to the Publications Electoral Board.
(Article VI, Section 4, Charter of the Board of Student Publications).
This delegation of authority provides that all staff positions of
publications chartered by the Legislative, Council shall be selected
by the Publications Electoral Board as specified in the individual
charters. In referring to the Charter of the NEW ORANGE PEEL,
Article IV states that candidates for all staff positions must have
one full trimesters experience on the NEW ORANGE PEEL. It is
specifically stated that the Publications Electoral Board may waive
this requirement only if no qualified candidate applies.
It is the opinion of the Justices of the Honor Court that the
limitations provided within the Charter of the NEW ORANGE PEEL
is a limitation upon the power of the publications Electoral Board
to make appointments to staff positions within this publication. We
consider this language mandatory and not directory.
We note that the requirements contained within Article VI of the
Student Body Constitution are the same as those in Article IV of
the Charter of the NEW ORANGE PEEL. We do not decide, however,
whether the Student Body Constitution provides a limitation upon
the power of the Publications Electoral Board. Their power was
limited in this case by the express provision of the Charter of the
NEW ORANGE PEEL.
It is hereby directed that the appointment of Stan Huguenin as
editor-in-chief of the NEW ORANGE PEEL by the Publications
Electoral Board on June 14, 1963 was invalid. Further, it is directed
that the publications Electoral Board must comply with the mandate
of Article IV of the Charter of the NEW ORANGE PEEL. We further
direct that the Publications Electoral Board convene at the earliest
possible time for the purpose of filling the editor-in-chiefs position
now vacant on the NEW ORANGE PEEL. Respectfully submitted,
Honor Court Justices,
Spring Trimester, 1963
specials!
J PEPPERONI SNACKS
yj HAM
J COMPLETE LINE OF CHEESES
7 ROAST BEEF
y PARTY SALAMI SNACKS
y PARTY SAUSAGE SNACKS
y BRAUNSCHWEIGER
/ PORK SHOULDERS(COOKED AND CANNED)
AND MANY MORE DELICIOUS
SNACKS AND SANDWICH CUTS
FANELLI & EDWARDS
MARKET
:
,2410 Newberry Road Within Walking Distance
Across from Beta Woods Os Corry Village

I P
m

NORTH TO ALASKA
... head UF graduates Mr. and Mrs. Charles Northrip

Thursday. July 18,1963 The Florida Alligator

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Open until 8 p.m., with 2 locations to serve you
N. Main St. at 23rd Blvd., 372-6353
615 N. Main St., 372-4373
"In the Auto Game Barkley's the Name"
plus state tax, license and transportation
jx
7 yiz 12 tEAChE#,
fiviNg hv\ A?PL9
Miss Phipps is always teaching us kids things. So
one day I taught her something. I told her about
Mac's House. She was so glad that she said Thank
You Mary Jane and rewarded me with an apple.
I still have the apple. If I eat it it will ruin my
appetite, and I'm eating at Mac's House tonight.
MACS HOUSE
520 S.W. 2nd Avenue FR 2-6514

Special Edition
Next week the Alligator will
publish its list edition of the
Spring Trimester. The edition
will be a special mallout
edition, to be sent to all
students entering the UF this
fall. It will Include a special
insert section designed to give
entering students a glimpse of
University life at Florida.

The freshest, most )
delicious sandwiches V
in town come from... I
Alans 1
Cubana
6-1252
) F.F.D.

Page 3



Page 4

The Florida Alligator Thursday, July 18,1963

calli^atox*
editor>icLls

our president
HE E NOT'A WHEELER and dealer" as some University presidents
often are. Dr. J. Wayne Reitz could best be termed a man who has
accepted the role of leadership In Florida education and is effectively
leading with a quiet dynamism.
He has also been described as a kindly, Christian gentleman with
the constitution of a horse and the dedication of a saint.
Perhaps the behind the scenes work of Dr. Reitz before the University
of Florida became racially integrated best illustrates his method of
accomplishment.
BEFORE THE UNIVERSITY was ordered integrated in 1958 on a
graduate level, Dr. Reitz asked student leaders what their position
would be if integration should be ordered by the courts. On each
occasion, he received their unanimous assurance that such an
eventuality would be met with decorum and dignity and in a manner
that would uphold the honor and the good name of the University of
Florida. He also met with community leaders, and sought out their
reaction and gained similar cooperation.
Floridians can be proud that their state political leaders did not
seek to make capital out of radial problems, but they can be equally
proud of the university president who effectively helped ward off
any incidents similar to those witnessed recently in other southern
state universities.
IN AN ADDRESS AT the 1982 Summer Commencement, Dr. Reitz
outlined forthrightly the need for relieving Florida's institutions
of higher education from a burden of fiscal statutes and procedures
which in his words had become "so oppressive as to be almost
unbearable". He followed these words in February with a plan of
action proposed to the Legislative Council Committee on Higher
Education for a constitutional Board of Control which would have
more members, more continuity and authority to receive appro appropriations
priations appropriations directly from the legislature and supervise the expenditure
of these educational funds.
The proposal attracted widespread Interest and support and much
of the philosophy outlined by Reitz was Incorporated in the Board
of Regents statute adopted this Spring by the Legislature.
Numerous other items of legislation aimed at providing greater
fiscal freedom and flexibility were proposed under the leadership
of President Reitz. A University of Florida proposal for establishment
of an agency to more efficiently receive and disburse contract and
grant funds became law after Reitz won its approval by the Board
of Control.
Representative Ralph Turlington recently said of Dr. Reitz:
"HE WORKED TIRELESSLY and effectively during the session.
He is known personally by many legislators and is highly regarded
and respected for the way he always dealt fairly and factually In his
quest for university needs.
"He did not take a provincial view of education needs but sought
measures that would benefit higher education throughout the state.
He was an effective leader for higher education forces throughout
the session."
IT E FITTING ALSO that we give overdue credit to the Presidents
lady, who shares her husband's dedication to the University of Florida.
In a large university such as ours, the social demands upon the
President and his wife are literally endless. Whetherit be a supper
for Florida Blue Key, a freshman reception, a faculty welcome, or
entertainment of senators and vice-presidents, Mrs. Reitz is a
gracious and thoughtful hostess, completely devoted to the welfare
of the University family.
WE DID NOTSEEK testimonials to Dr. Reitzs ability as a University
leader, but on the occasion of hearing of our selection one faculty
member said of our Man of the Year, "in his dedication to the cause
of higher education, Dr. Reitz has held above everything Intellectual
and moral integrity. There are few persons in the position of running
a complex organization, dealing with politicians, crackpots and
intellectuals, who can approach him in maintaining complete Integrity."
This above all is what makes us proud to have our president, our
Man-of-the-Year.
thank you
It is seldom you see one newspaper give another an award.
But today we are proud to give recognition t 0 two newspapers
who have served what we at the University feel close to home.
The St. Petersburg Times and the Gainesville Sun have illuminated
the needs of the university system in Florida. The St. Petersburg
Times throughout the year has been a force in support of Gov. Farris
Bryants bond program for university and junior college construction;
they have taken a strong position for academic freedom and have
continually stressed the needs for strengthening higher education
throughout the state.
The new Gainesville Sun as a newcomer to the community has
been quick to realize the needs of the University and has tightly
woven a stand to fulfill these needs into their editorial policy.
The Florida Alligator
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Maryanne Awtrey
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of
the University of Florida and is published weekly. THE FLORIDA
ALLIGATOR is entered as second class matter at the United States
Post Office at Gainesville, Florida. Offices are located in Room 8
and 10 in the Florida Uniozi.
Telephone University of Florida, FR 6-3261, Ext. 2832, and request
either editorial or business office.
Opinions voiced in personal columns on this page do not necessarily
reflect the opinions of the editors. Only editorials are the official
voles of tbs pipor*

tfk "DfNTYov
S HAVE THE
.

Last Week A Horrible Gator

EDITOR:
I have just finished reading
todays copy of the Alligator and
the only word I can describe it
with is horrible.
For the past few years I have
been watching the Alligator go
down in prestige and quality. I
think that now it has reached the
bottom rung of the ladder and can
go no further.
If you stop and think of the
following comments, I am sure you
will see why I think the paper has
sunk to such low places.
1. Front page news: The lead
story about Red Barber was quoted
almost completely from the
Gainesville Sun. The story on the
Barber books appeared in the Sun
either Tuesday or Wednesday in
the fashion that it is in, in the
Alligator.
The UF Alumni Assn was
awarded Yhe award earlier this
week, not "today" as the paper
says. The student reading the paper
would be led to believe that the
news Is brand-new and it just
happened on July 11. This Is not
the case.

Freedom Why Qualified?

CLIVE TAYLOR
LIBERAL VIEWPOINT
Recently, octogenarian Mr. Reed
promised to will the University of
California one million dollars If
It promised to exclude Communist
speakers from the campus. How However
ever However after discussing the issue
with some students he made a new
will of Five million to the Uni University
versity University with no anti-communist
clauses attatched. He admitted that
he had underestimated the average
students intelligence.
Last year a communist speaker
was officially barred from the
University of Florida. Also Legis Legislative
lative Legislative Council narrowly defeated a
motion to oppose the
administrations stand. Unlike Mr.
Reed of California the Legislative
Council of the Student Government
did not feel sure enough about the
level of our students intelligence
to allow an Invitation to ANY
speaker, no matter what his stand.
If this country claims to
represent freedom then let that
freedom be neither qualified or
Ucentuous. Some question might be
raised If the request was for a
rally or a parade but the
freedom for a speaker to present
his views to state university stu students
dents students is certainly not Ucentuous.
However the freedom of that
university which bars such a
speaker is qualified.
It Is qualified in this way. Views
must not be presented which offend
too many students' sensibilities.
Students can (must) read Lenin,
Marx, and Freud, (and other

The picture of Joyce Bleldner
was also used In the Gainesville
Sun and the cutline Is almost the
same one used In the Sun.
2. Page Three: The main story
on this page is the Telestar story,
which Is two days old. The story
goes on to tell that a program
would be broadcast by CBS on July
10. This Is only yesterday as far
as today is concerned, I just cant
watch a program the day after It
was on the air.
The story on"Bu 11 ding Con Construction
struction Construction Stands at '62 Level" has
as much Interest to the average
UF student as a story about two
Micanopy boys shooting marbles
would.
The headline on the story about
federal highway funds will mislead
anyone who reads it. . I havent
figured out yet what the meaning
of the head is.
3. page Four: The editorial has
yet to say anything to me. You
began with some very good thoughts
and said some very good things,
but, you got lostf in the train of
thought and didn't completely
follow through what you started.
You are to be congratulated for

THE ALLIGATOR IS pleased to welcome Clive Taylors
column back this issue. Since his last column was greeted by
cries of "Communist/ this one will certainly be, considering
the subject.
THE ALLIGATOR WISHES to remind its readers that the
opinions appearing in columns on this page reflect the opinions
of the authors. Only editorials are the official voice of the Florida
Alligator.

writers with more or less alien
ideas), but they should be protected
from the spectacle of someone
who actually believes in these
views in the act of expounding them.
This would be too much of a threat
to the students Ideals and values.
But would It be? Surely at a
time when the average student
has had about 15 years of
Inculcation of American ideals he
Is able to defend them against
those which are different, if he
can not defend his Ideals then the
fault must surely lie in the ideals
themselves, and not, (as Mr. Reed
discovered), in the students
intelligence.

EDITOR:
<4
I would like to nominate Larry Edwin Sapp for Alligator Man of
the Year. He is 22 years old, a student in pre-med, determinedly
striving for a medical degree in the far-distant future.
Larry does not have time to participate in school activities, such
as student government, because he is too busy setting a wonderful
example for the young men of Gainesville, who just don't have the
time or money to endeavor to better their education and make
themselves better men and citirens.
L'ury holds one full-time job and two part-time jobs in addition
to school. Despite all this he continues to be an exceptional husband
to me and father to our three-month old daughter.
This is why I nominate Larry E. Sapp for Alligator Man of the year.
Thank you,
Donna G. Sapp
TO YOU, MR. AND MRS. SAPP, and to all the other married
students who push your capabilities to the limit and beyond, the
Alligator extends congratulations. You are now, and always will
be, the Alligator Men and Women of the Year.

A Florida Man

the letter that appears from Mr.
Kent as this Is one of the few
times the Alligator has let both
sides of the issue be heard.
4. Page Five: The story on
the snake was published some somewhere
where somewhere else also before It got in
the Alligator. What good is -old
news?
5. Page Seven; The article on
Fireball Roberts Is a little old.
Dont you think so? Most students
who are Interested In the race
know who won it as It was In all
the papers the day following the
race.
I realize it Is hard to put out a
newspaper, but I dont believe It
Is necessary to have news
uninteresting or old stuff In a
paper to put it out. When you get
a staff who is Interested In just
advancing themselves, I guess
that it does hamper you.
ROBERT SIMMS
(EDITORS NOTE: As far .as
copying the Sun, both the Sun and
the Alligator obtained the news
releases in question from the UF
Bureau of Informatlon and
Services. Cheer up, Mr. Simms,
there is only one more Issue of
the Alligator after this one.)

Presuming that our Ideals are
In fact sound then we need not be
protected from subversives by
well meaning administrators. This
is plea for licence (i.e.
calling "Fire" In an unlit theatre),
but It Is an argument for a really
unqualified freedom of speech to
protect those rights set down in
the Constitution which are
supposed to guarantee that very
freedom.
Let invitations to speakers be,
in the words of Dr. Fleming,
president of the University of
Oregon, "not subject to review
by any committee or administra administrative
tive administrative office of the university."



BEHIND THE EIGHTBALL

f Gator Grads
Sports Wrap-up
By CHARLES GOODYEAR
Sports Editor
For those graduating this August, there have been many exciting
moments to reflect upon. You may have entered in 59 or '6O, so
certainly you remember the Ga. Tech game of '6O. Who could forgot
the excitement wrought by the professional-like drive down the field
and then gambling on a two-point conversion.
A nip and tuck battle in the Gator Bowl against Baylor left everyone
drained from the suspense. What a season;
Naturally, you cant win them all and this was proven the next
season. We took a few tumbles in football, but won the conference in
swimming again and baseball and were even number one in the nation
for a while*
This past year, the Gators did not equal their wlnnlngest season
of '6O, but they did take their sorry 6-4 record to the Gator Bowl
again. To the consternation of sportswrlters all over the nation, they
proceeded to wipe up the best team in the East.
Swimming took their eighth straight SEC crown and first undefeated
season on years. Basketball had a series of bad breaks, but things
do look brighter for next season. The baseball team, despite having a
fine team, dropped the pennant and lost a chance to go to the NCAA
playoffs because of it. Golf and tennis did creditably with Bill Tym
taking the singles title in the conference and the golf team finishing
second. Track was fifth and cross country sixth in the conference
so that overall, Florida finished better than any of the schools in
the SEC.
What happened in the 59-'6O season? Coach Bob Woodruff was
in his last year at the time. We beat Virginia 55 to 10 and lost four
SEC games out of five. 'Nuff said.
Some of you will say that you are glad to leave and hope never to
return, but I feel that I will see many of you trying to get back in
the student side this fall and certainly will run into you on the alumni
side as the years go by.

Brown Sings Praise
Os Unsung Heroes

At the end of this month, there
will be a deluge of football maga magazines
zines magazines predicting the top ten in
the nation and the pre-season All-
Americans. I'm sure the majority
of these predictions will be ture.
We here at the UF have two
players that will undoubtedly
appear on some pre-season teams.
Im quite sure you realize who
these are, Frank Lasky and Larry
Dupree. I can truthfully say both
are All American quality ball
players.
Here is my list of darn good
Florida GATORS that havent re received
ceived received the credit they deserved.
The first is Fred Pearson from
Ocala, Florida. For the last two
years Fred has been without a
doubt the steadiest lineman weve
had. During the season of 1961,
Fred played first team as a sopho sophomore,
more, sophomore, and did yeomans job. Last
year Fred played on the Go Gators,
the offensive team. He led each
week in successful execution of
his assignments. There were the
tough in-line blocks which sprung
backs like Dupree loose on long
runs. Ask any player on the Florida
team, whose hole he would run
through for those few vital yards.
I bet he would say Fred Pearsons.
Another ball player that is out outstanding
standing outstanding without receiving due
credit, is Jimmy Morgan of Lake
City, jimmy transferred from
North Eastern Oklahoma Jr.
College with Frank Lasky. The
very first day of practice, Jimmy
let it be known to the coaching
staff that he wanted to play ball
here at Florida. He lead the Side Sidewinders
winders Sidewinders as defensive signal caller
and a rugged line backer. I can
remember many times when
Jimmy made a tackle completely
across the field Just by sheer
determination and hustle. He's the
type of ball player you want next
to you in the line when its fourth fourthand-one
and-one fourthand-one on your one yard line.
Jerome Jones is another unsung
hero. In 1961 he played first string
for two games before a broken leg
put him out. Jerome was in a cast
for four months. Jerome came
back in the 1962 season and played
with the Go Gators, leading many
power plays off tackle, with a little
hop in his leg. I'll take my hat
off to him any day for coming back
as he did.

Inside Report

By RUSS BROWN
Sports Writer

Jim O'Donnell is first string
fullback. Hes not large as full fullbacks
backs fullbacks go, but with his excellent
speed, has done an outstanding
job offensively and defensively.
His ability is respected by the
fact that when the first team is
on the field and Larry Dupree
is in the game, Larry plays half halfback
back halfback instead of his natural position
of fullback. And as we all know,
Dupree is a pretty fair country
runner.
These are just 6ome of the
unsung, i could mention others who
certainly deserve recognition, but
lack of space denies them their
due this time.
I would Just like to get the
message through that not all of
the deserving ball players get their
due credit. A sports writer has to
write in his opinion what is
glamorous and exciting. These four
players that I have mentioned may
not always shine in the open, but
you can be sure that they are doing
their jobs.

I WASTED I
I ALERT STUDENT SALESMEN FOR THE B
I STUDENT PUBLICATIONS |
U ADVERTISING STAFF* B
ft CALL UNIVERSITY EXTENSION 2832 OR DROP IN ROOM 2, H
L REWARD I

BASEBALL

Ciub standings through Tuesday
American League
Pet. Gfc
New York .621
Boston .557 5 1/2
Chicago .556 5 1/2
Minnesota .544 61/2
Baltimore .538 7
Cleveland .511 91/2
Los Angeles .462 14
Kansas City .432 16 1/2
Detroit .424 17
Washington .390 231/2
National Leagne
Los Angeles .618
Chicago .551 6
San Francisco .538 7
St. Louis .538 7
Cincinnati .522 8 1/2
Milwaukee .522 8 1/2
Pittsburgh .517 9
Philadelphia .489 Hl/2
Houston .383 21 1/2
New York .330 26
Former Gator Star
Gets New Post
Haywood Sullivan, former UF
all around athlete, has been
assigned to Portland, Oregon as a
first step in grooming him for the
position of manager in the Kansas
City Athletics farm system.
Sullivan, 32, will be a player playercoach
coach playercoach as well as assistant to
Portland Manager Dan Carnevele,
the club announced.
ISOMETRICS
For the sixth in a series of
isometric exercises, we employ
the use of the rope left over from
the last one.
This exercise is for development
of the abdomen muscles. Once you
have stronger muscles in the lower
abdomen, you will find it easier
to control your breath, push things
with your upper body and your
stomach will be flatter as well.
Place the rope around the legs
of a heavy piece of furniture,
such as a large desk or heavy
bed. Place the other end of the
looped rope around your chest
after you have reclined on the
floor. Now, try to sit up while
keeping your legs on the floor.
You may find it useful to place
your feet under some other heavy
object in order to keep them on
the floor.
Try placing the rope Indifferent
places so that you can vary the
angle of your body as if you were
actually sitting up with a weight in
your hands behind your head.
An advantage of this method over
actually using weights is that you
can increase your lifting power
without increasing youp was it size.
The use of heavier and heavier
weights will, in time, Increase your
physical size.

Thursday, Juiy 18,1963 The Florida Alligator

Early Winn Wins Late

Early Winn finally gained his
300th major league pitching victory
Saturday after a series of frus frustrating
trating frustrating attempts as the Cleveland
Indians defeated the Kansas City
Athletics 7-4 in the second game
of their doubleheader. The As
won the opener 6-5.

Bill Donigan Is
' s $
Cleaning Housel
4
CLEARANCE SALE
MENS
BELTS .99
SPORT SHIRTS Large selection 3.00 each or 4 shirts
for 11.00. Others including seer seersucker,
sucker, seersucker, 1/3 Off.
v
BERMUDAS 1/2 Price
DACRON & WOOL SUITS 1/2 Price
LADIES
BATHING SUITS 1/2 Price
DRESSES & SUITS 1/2 Price
BERMUDAS & LONG PANTS 1/2 Priee
BELTS .99
SKIRTS 5.00 or 2 skirti for 8.00
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BLOUSES Now 3.00 each
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nOMI/1 AKIC
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Winn lasted only five Innings,
the minimum distance a starter
has to go to be credited with a
victory, in becoming the 14th
pitcher In maJor*league history to
win 300. The 43 year old right righthander
hander righthander left after the fifth with the
Indians leading 5-4.

Page 5



Page 6

The Florida Alligator Thursday, July 18,1963

College of Arts & Sciences
Bachelor of Science
APOSTOLATOS, GEORGE N., Patras, Greece; Phi Mu, Alpha Chi
Sigma; International Student Organization; BIA; HAC, Pres; judo
Club; Dorm Area Academic Chairman; Soccer Club.
COWLES, DANIEL COOPER, Mathematics.
DURAK, LEWIS M.; Goegraphy, with honors.
GERBER, JOHN H., Biology.
GLENN, TOM HARVEY; Chemistry.
GREEDORF, HOWARD F.; Psychology.
GRINTER, LAWRENCE EDWARD, Gainesville; mathematics;debate
team; Sky Diving Club; transferred from Cornell Univ.; Phi Kappa
Psi.
HAMPTON, JOHN W. 111, Live Oak; Physics; Sigma Phi Epsilon;
Advanced Army ROTC; Homecoming.
HERSKOWITZ, ALLAN, Miami: chemistry; Pi Lambda phi; Pi
Mu; Alpha Epsilon Delta.
HUBERTZ, JOHN MICHAEL, Physics.
MEADOWS, EDWIN H., JR., Chemistry.
MORGAN, CHERRIE, Winter Haven; Chi Omega, treasurer, Women
Students Assc., Jr. Rep., Judiciary Committee.
PURCELL, LEE HARPER, CHEMISTRY.
WALLACE, STEPHEN SCOTT, Biology, with honors.
Bachelor of Arts
ALDAY, SARA LYNN, Gainesville, History; Chi Omega, social
chairman, rush chairman, vice-president; Sigma Alpha Epsilon;
Little Sisters of Minerva, Sweetheart of Sigma Alpha Epsilon.
AUSTIN, JOAN WENDY, French.
BENNION, JUDITY ANN, Boca Raton; Foreign Languages; Alpha
Lambda Delta; Deans List; Alpha Chi Omega, pledge president,
2nd vice president; Broward Hall Council, program chairman; Woman
Students Assc., Florida Union Committee.
BOHUTINSKY, ANDREW, Political Science.
BOTTOMLY, JUDY KLING, Political Science.
BRIDGES, WINSTON T., Political Science.
BUAN, MARCIA, Political Science with honors.
BURKE, GARY MICHAEL, Economics.
CHASEY, AUGUST A., Psychology.
CLARK, VIRGINIA A., History.
COHEN, RICHARD JAFFEE, Political Science.
COLEHOUR, VERNAL ALIDA, Anthropology.
COOPER, JAMES L., Political Science.
COSSABOOM, EDWIN D., Political Science.
COUSENS, DANIEL FREDERICK, History.
CROSON, FRANKLIN BROWN, English.
CUNNINGHAM, KATHLEEN MEETH, English.
DENSON, DONALD NEAL, Political Science.
DEUTSCH, STEPHEN RUDOLF, Psychology.
deWOLFE, DOUGLAS KENNETH, Miami; sociology; Chi Phi, sec.;
foreign student sponsor; orientation, section advisor, Alpha Kappa
Delta.
DIAMOND, ELAINE, Sociology.
DRYDEN, ANN FLORENCE, Political Science.
DUNWODY, CAROLYN DALE, English with high honors.
ESLICK, JUDITY ANN, English.
FROMHART, MICHAEL V., Psychology with honors.
GERALD, FRANCIS LYNN, Political Science.
GOLDSMITH, THOMAS A., Political Science.
GREEN, JOSEPH T., JR., History.
GRIDLEY, WILLIAM CARTER, Political Science.
GRIFFITHS, JOANNE F., Mathematics.
HALLAJ, DIXIANE J. F., Mathematics with honors.
HEIMAN, MARY A. G., English.
JAMISON, SUSANNE, English
JOHNSON, BONCEIL FAYE, Clewiston; English with honors.
KOGELSCHATZ, JOAN LEE, Sociology.
KURTZ, RICHARD LEE, Psychology.
LAMBERT, JOSEPH C., History.
LARSSON, DONALD E Psychology.
LEBAN, JEANNETTE ALINE, Psychology.
MacARTHUR, CARROLL ANTHONY, History.
MARLOW, WILLARD EUGENE, History, with honors.
McFADYEN, DAVID D., Political Science.
MORGAN, PATRICIA BELL, English.
OTTS, VIRGINIA LEE, Political Science.
OSBORNE, ELIZABETH MARY, English.
PETERSON, JOHN SAAR, History.
PRICE, MARY KATHLEEN, Ft. Lauderdale, Pi Sigma Alpha;
Sigma Tau Sigma; Lyceum Council Associate.
RAPE, KENNETH, Gainesville; psychology; Phi Eta Sigma; Psi
Chi; Freshman Council; Baptist Student Union, state publicity chairman.
REUTER, INGEGARD S.M., French.
RIVERS, EADDY, P., English.
ROSALER, JOSEPH, Miami; Alpha Epsilon Delta; Phi Beta Kappa;
Graham Area Council. ",
ROSSMAN, STEPHEN F., political science.
ROUSH, BARBARA A., psychology.
RUDOLPH, RONALD, English.
SCUDDER, ANN H., Gainesville, psychology; phi Mu.
SELLS, CAROL ANN, Gainesville; psychology.
SACHS, JOEL: West Palm Beach; political science; Secretary of
Interior, Legislative Council; Gator Growl committee; Tolbert Area
Council, vice pres; IFC, Alpha Epsilon Pi, vice president; Phi Eta
Sigma; Florida Alligator, editorial asst.
SHELLEY, JAMES RONALD, English.
SLAUGHTER, WILLIAM GERALD, Perry; economics; Pi Sigma
Epsilon.
STOAN, STEPHEN K., History with honors.
VOGLER, DAVID JAMES, Political Science.
WEBER, HELEN LOUEE, Anthropology.
WATSON, ELLEN GRAY, History.
WRIGHT, GERALD RICHARD, Sociology with honors.
WILLIAMS, JONATHAN DAVID, Pompano Beach, political science;
Distinguished Military Graduate; Cadet Commander, AFROTC; 1962
Pre-Growl; Legislative Council; Orientation; Florida Union Scholar Scholarship
ship Scholarship Award.

june, august graduates

- -'i
Jr \
Jr

QUEEN
...of International Week
was Miss Sofia Moreno.
Selection of the Queen
climaxed a week of pro programs
grams programs on international af affairs.
fairs. affairs.

m
J I
TMk K J
I j

PLAYMAKERS
.. .gave tired students a
brief respite from the
books, and a few nights
of entertainment during
the no-fraternity party
summer. They presented
"Dinny and the Witches"
and "The Cave Dwellers".

College of Agriculture
Bachelor of Science
CHAIRS, THOMAS P., 11l
FUENTEVILLE, HE US PIN R.
GORTZ, HAN H.
HASKINS, BERNARD R.
HENDRY, DOZIER BENJAMIN, Shady Grove; Tolbert Area Council;
Collegiate 4-H Club; Collegiate Future Farmers of America; secretary
Alpha Tau Alpha, treasurer.
HERNANDEZ, WILLY MILES, Sand Pedro Sula, Honduras; Latin
American club; Agronomy and Soil Club; Soccer Team.
HUDGENS, WILLIAM R.
JOHNSON, STEPHEN R., Clewiston; Sigma Phi Epsilon.
KASHI-RAD, AHANAD
TON, LE DA, Saigon, Vietnam; Alpha Zeta, Citrus Club.
MCELROY, WILLIAM C.
MANVEL, WILLSQ, Villanueva, Cortes, Honduras; Soccer Club,
Capt.; 1.5.0.; Latin American Club.
RE VILLA, AURELIO, Arequipa, Peru; Dairy Science Club; Agronomy
Club; Latin American Club.
Bachelor of Science in Forestry
GREEN, JAMES
WHELLER, GARLAND L.
Master of Agriculture
HAJJAPI, SAIYED M.
HURST, JACK VERNON, Branford; Phi Sigma; Newell Entomological
Society, reporter.
College of Architecture
Department of Building Construction
CLARK, SHIELDS E. Ill: Student Contractors and Builder's
Association.
RAYER, DANIAL K.
Master of Fine Arts
SCHWARZ, SHIRLY S.
BLOCH, MILTON H.
Bachelor of Fine Arts
AULWURN, HENRY.
School of Journalism & Communications
Advertising
ALLEN, JAMES H. JR., Miami Springs t
COATES, BRENDA SUZANNE
GREEN, STEPHEN G., St. Petersburg; Florida Alligator, Business
Staff; Alpha Delta Sigma, Deans List.
HARPER, JAMES R.
KEENER, JOE E.
McNEESE, DONALD R.
MONTANA, FRANCISCO
PARKS, MICHAEL A.
RICE, GARY H.
ROWLAND, FOY E.
TRAUB, DAVID M.
WAGMAN, RICHARD J.
WOODS, CHUCK
Broadcasting
NUTHALL, CHRISTOPHER J.
RAINERI, FRANK G.
Journalism
ANDREWS, GAYLE
AWTREY, MARYANNE, Gainesville; Florida Alligator, Editor
Managing Editor; Summer Business Mgr; Theta Sigma Phi, treasurer;*
Orientation; Homecoming Publicity; Women Students Association-
International Students Organization; Women Off-Campus Council!
CHERRY,JOHN
DOWLING, WILLIAM Q. HI
MIDDLETON, HORLOW C.
PAULSON, WILLIAM E.
RITCH, FRANKLIN
STONESIFER, HOWARD
WILSON, DONALD M.
Master of Arts in Journalism and Communications
FLANNERY, GERALD V.
NORTHRIP, CHARLES M.
College of Business Administration
Bachelor of Science
Beta Alpha American club! 4113 Bela Gamma Sigma;
HARLLEE, Kappa Tau.
Baptist Student Union. ** d Air Force ROTC Drill Team;
of Flavef!J S Treasurer N Fiitet^M SOnV ille; Alpha Kappa Psi; Mayor
ROOSA RirHA Pn l o 11 Mayor s Council.
£, Alpha Chi Zeta, Gamma Sigma Epsilon.
Master of Business Administration
ONSETS. Blue Key; Sigma
Alpha; Scabbard and BlaS lpha Kappa pi Sigma
Colonel, Army ROTC, PreS * Sec * Cadet
Fame, ifc, vice pres., tribunal jwtice;



College of Education
Bachelor of Arts in Education
ASKREN, ROBERT D., Daytona Beach; Delta Upsilon; University
Religious Association; Greek Council, pres.; Lyceum Council;English
Club, pres.; Canterbury Club, pres; Religion-in-Life Week; Section
Advisor.
BENBOW, SPENCER ALLEN, Gainesville; Elementary.
BOHANNON, JACK RICHARD, St. Petersburg; Social Studies.
BOYD, DONNA MABRY, Lake Placid; Elementary.
BUSCH, JAMES EDWARD, St. Petersburg; Elementary.
BUSCH, SUZANNA LOVETT, Gainesville; Elementary,
CAMPBELL, RICHARD WAYNE, Bradenton; Student Florida Edu Education
cation Education Association, president; Gator Marching Band, Symphonic Band;
Gator Ski Club; Tolbert Area Council; Newman Club; Kappa Kappa Psi!
COLLIER, KORA KAY, Palatka; Eh., SCH, Jm.
CONNELL, SANDRA BROWN, Lyons, Ga.; Social Studies
CONSER, CAROL CONROY, Miami; Eh, Sch, Jm.
COSTELLO, JANET R. F., Orlando; Elementary
CRAMER, DIANE LESLIE, Miami Beach; Eh, Sch, Jm.
EHR, JUDITH ANN, Treasure Island; Elementary.
EVERTS, MARDEE MICHELE, W. Palm Beach; Elementary.
FERGUSON, MARY AGNES, Starke; Elementary.
GARTY, DEIDRE GENEVIEVE, Miami; Eh, Sch.
GECHTMAN, SANDY, Opa Loca; S.FJE.A., Broward Hall Council,
vice pres.; Broward Intermurals; political coordinator.
HAYWARD, ROMMY RAY, Ft. Myers, Social Studies.
HICKS, Claude Errol, Lake Worth; Social Studies.
JOHNSON, CLARISSA FRAZE, St. Petersburg; Elementary.
KAMENS, LINDA SUSAN, Flushing, N. Y.; Elementary.
KELLEY, CAROL ERICKSON, Elementary.
LAZZARA, JOYCE DOROTHY, Tampa; Elementary.
LEONHARDT, GERMAINE PAULA, Daytona Beach; Elementary.
LEWIS, ISABELLE 8., Lake Worth; Elementary.
LEWIS, SARAH JANE, Lake Worth; Elementary.
LIBBY, MARY ELIZABETH, Palm Beach; Social Studies.
LOY, PATSY SUE, Amherst, Mass.; Art K-12.
McGINTY, EILEEN JOYCE, Leesburg; Eh, Sch, Jm.
McGILLICUDDY, GRACE LA, Miami; Spanish German.
MANCHESTER, MARY RUTH, Gainesville; Deans List; Dis Distinguished
tinguished Distinguished Academic Achievement Award, Alpha Lambda Delta, Kappa
Delta Pi, Orientation.
MARANTZ, IRES F St. Petersburg; N.E.A.; F.E.A.; N.C.T.E.;
Apprentice Players; Florida players.
POLAN, CONNE, Charleston, W. Va.; Delta Phi Epsilon, Hillel;
Broward Hall Council; Student Florida Education Assc.
REAVES, GAYLE CLARK, Fayetteville, N. C., French.
RILEY, KATHRYN CLARK, Wayne, Penn.; Social Studies.
SCHACKOW, GERALD DAVID, Sarasota; Legislative Council; Intra Intramural
mural Intramural Coordinator, Flavet in; Three Press, Ad. Manager; Deans
List.
STONE, ARLEEN JOYCE, Lockhart; Elementary.
TAMPLIN, CAROLYN, Sharpsville, Pa., Elementary.
TYLER, BARBARA LYNN, Largo; Elementary.
UMAN, MILDRED H., W. Palm Beach, Elementary.
VAN ATTA, GAIL ANN, Miami, Elementary.
WEANER, LEONORA MICHELE, Miami Beach; Elementary.
WYTIAS, SANDI LEE, Miami Shores; Eh, Sch, Jm.
Bachelor of Science in Education
ARONSON, MARC, Miami; Sigma Pi Sigma; M.A.A.; Deans List;
Alpha Phi Omega.
BICE, JUDY CATHERINE, Haines City; Mathematics.
GRANGER, ALAN WILLIAM, St. Petersburg; Mathematics.
REEL, JAN MARIE, Vero Beach; Bookk. & Basic Bus. Subjects.
SHEETS, ROBERT WILLIAM, Ocala; Mathematics
SMITH, MARY LOU, Ocala; Business Educ.
WRIGHT, JOHN MONROE JR., Miami; Phi Kappa Tau.
MASTER OF EDUCATION DEGREE
BEAL, RUBYE McGLYNN, Foundations of Education.
BLANCO, DENVER, Secondary Education.
BURN, CHARLES AUGUSTAVE, Personnel Services
CARLSON, JOHN FRANKLIN, Secondary Education
CARR, SARA ANN C., Secondary Education.
CARTER, CATHERINE CALHOUN, Personnel Services.
CLIBURN, RAYMOND L., Personnel Services
COMPTON, NILES EDWIN, Personnel Services.
DANIEL, WILLIAM SAMUEL, Personnel Services.
EDENFIELD, CAROL ELENE, Personnel Services.
ENNIS, MARSHA CANFIELD BENDER, Personnel Services.
GALLANT, BARBARA GANS, Secondary Education.
GOLDSTEIN, HAROLD J., Personnel Services,
HALL, JANE SUGGS, Foundations of Education.
HANSEN, PAUL CHRISTIAN, Personnel Services
HENDRICK, KAREN KUCHEL, Personnel Services.
HICKS, JAMES ALLEN, Personnel Services.
JANSEN, GEORGE RICHARD, Personnel Services.
KING, CHARLES R., Educational Administration.
KITCHINGS, DONALD ANTHONY, Personnel Services.
LAND, BETTY CORINE, Secondary Education.
LASSETER, LOB BREWTON, Personnel Services.
LEHRER, CHARLES JOSEPH, Personnel Services.
McNABB, MARY BELLE, Personnel Services.
MICHELS, THOMAS JULIAN, Personnel Services.
MOSES, CLIFFORD DEE, Personnel Services.
PARE, OLIVER JOHNSON, Personnel Services.
PRESTON, BARBARA D., Elementary Education.
SLDCER, GLENN A., Personnel Services.
STAUFFER, MILDRED ELSIE, Secondary Education.
SZABO, DENNIS MICHAEL, Secondary Education.
TEELE, MARY JUDY, Elementary Education.
WALKER, LOUE WEST BLANKS, Personnel Services.
WIGGINS, RALPH EDWARD JR., Educational Administration.
WILDES, GILMAN JACKSON, Educational Administration.
SPECIALST IN EDUCATION
EDRE, EDWIN NICHOL, Personnel Services.
' /

r- I
' I wF / k 11| I
Hi tm
yywow**.;-.
B t B
I / A
.m / m

BASEBALL
.. .brought the UF once
again into the national
light as Tom Moore was
All-American for the
second year.

IK
>

NEW BUILDINGS
.. .were-typical of the sum summer
mer summer as the engineering de department
partment department added a building to
house their nuclear reactor,
the college of Architecture
held ground-breaking cere ceremonies
monies ceremonies for their permanent
buildings on campus, and
work was started on the new
Florida Union.

Thursdoy, July 18,1963 The Florida Alligator

DOCTOR OF EDUCATION
CLARK, DONALD LEWIS, Personnel Services.
LAKE, MARY LOUISE, Curriculum & Instruction.
MATHEWS, BLAIR HAROLD, Foundations of Education.
College of Medicine
ADCOCK, KENNETH D. SOWDER, WILSON T.
ANDERSON, JAMES D. TEPPERBERG. JEROME
BLACK R BRUCE T A THOBURN, ROBERT, JR.
I TP TIDWELL, REX W.
BOTTOMS, BETTY L. Z^cLTdAVID^
BROWN, DAVID C. ZICKAFOOSE, DAVID E.
CIMINO, DAVID A.
COLLINS, ALG LA 8., JR.
COUCH, GORDON T.
DONALSON, JOSEPH T., JR.
GARRETT, LARRY P.
GAYLE R, 808 W.
HARPER, JOSEPH M., JR.
HOOD, JOHN R., JR.
HOWINGTON, FRANCIS L.
KNIZLEY, HOMER, JR.
KOTTMEIER, CHARLES A.
LEFTON, THEODORE E.
LOPEZ, RAUL I.
MASS, MAX E.
MCCORMICK, EVERETT N.
MILLER, ROBERT H.
MURPHY, ALVIN E., JR.
PANZER, JAMES D.
PATTEN, ROY S., JR.
PAWLIGER, DAVID F.
PHILPOT, THOMAS J.
POTTER, JAMES M.
POTTER, NELL W.
PRATI, RONALD C.
PURVIS, QUINNON R.
REED, JAMES C.
RIOPEL, DONALD A.
College of Pharmacy
Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy
CLARK, IRVING T., JR. Chattahoochee; Kappa Sigma, treasurer;
Kappa psi; Mortar and Pestle; Honor Court justice.
EELLS, WILLIAM J.
RICHMOND, KENNETH N., Pensacola; Mortar and Pestle; Rho
Pi Phi, secretary, chancellor.
College of Engineering
Bachelor of Electrical Engineering
ADAMS, JOHN PAUL, Pahokee; A. L E. E. E.
ANDREWS, FRANCIS R., Pensacola; Tau Beta Pi.
DAVES, PETER, St. Petersburg; Kappa Sigma.
KEARNS, BRIAN M., St. Petersburg; Tau Beta Pi, Sigma Tau,
I. E. E. E.
ROBERTSON, GORDON MITCHELL.
ROMINE, MAURICE G., Clearwater; I.E.E.E.
SAENZ, ROBERT G., Miami Springs; Sigma Tau, I. E. E. E.
VALONE, ROBERT MICHAEL.
Bachelor of Industrial Engineering
BACHTEL, JOHN R., Lake Worth.
DOUGHERTY, EDMUND T. JR., Gainesville; A.1.1.E. secretary;
B.EJS; 8.E.C.; Industrial Exhibits Fair Committee.
DOUGLASS, JOHN W., Lake Park; Chi Phi, president, vice presi president,
dent, president, rush chairman; Arnold Air Society; Distinguished Military
Cadet; President's Council; Blood Drive Chairman.
EIRELAND, MARION D Tampa; Delta Tau Delta; Benton Engin Engineering
eering Engineering Society, president; A.1.1.E. president; Hall of Fame, 1963.
MANTEL, THOMAS L., Jacksonville; A.1.1.E., vice president;
8.E.5.; 8.E.C.; Lambda Chi Alpha, alumni sec; Dean's List.
MILLER, MAXWELL MICHEAL.
PERIS, JEFFREY ALAN, Miami; Pi Lambda Phi, secretary,
historian, senior member at large; Sigma Tau; Orientation.
SCHROEDER, GEORGE C Cocoa Beach; A.1.1.E.
Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering
ESTES, MURL 11.
FORWARD, DAVID ROY, Indian River City; AJS.M.E., Sigma Alpha
Epsilon; B.ES.
HAYES, ROGER JOSEPH.
HENLEY, J. CARL.
College of Physical Education & Health
Bachelor of Science in Recreation
MARQUARD, BARBARA RUTH.
Bachelor of Science in Physical Education
DAVE, RONaLD DEAN.
DUNCAN, FINLEY JAMES.
HERRING, WILL JAM CARL.
MacBETH, JON LOWELL.
PELL, GARY BRYAN, Lake Worth; SAHPER; AAHPER.
SMITH, FRED MITCHELL.
Master of Physical Education and Health
BURDGES, MICHAEL DAVID.
ERWIN, ROBERT JOE.
FEHER, WILLIAM LEE.
KENDALL, WILLIAM RICHARD.

Page 7



The Florida Alligator Thursday, July 18/1963

Page 8

gator CLASSIFIEDS

TO PLACE YOUR MESSAGE ON THIS PAGE CALL UNIVERSITY EXTENSION 2832 OR STOP IN ROOM 12, FLORIDA UNION BUILDING

For Sale

FOR SALE: Apartment sl2e gas
cooking stove in good condition.
Apply 321 SW 13th St. (A-136-lt-c).
GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPS,
A.K.C. registered. Bred for
Temperment, Quality, and Show.
Call FR 6-2380. (A-135-3t-c).

LAST TIMES TONITE S4OO farlAail
Open 6:30, show at dusk | vQIIUQU
LIZ and RICHARD
TOGETHER ON THE SAME PROGRAM!
Al 7 The BRAMBLE BUSH
A,,: ELEPHANT WALK
A "Desire Under the Elms
i
STARTS FRIDAY* 2 Sr?
EXCLUSIVE FIRST AREA SHOWING!
MIGHTIEST MONSTERS OF THE AGES IN
THE BATTLE OF THE AGES!
King Capture I
' nd Escape!
H Godzillas on I
J Tokyowith His Atomic 1
kivJMl a^ Jm King Kong's Ferocious
* tren th Leveis tvef?
BECK jJ ML] MMfc | BombersJrom the Sky!
COLOR o^^^^^^
2nd First Run Hit * '"M4JQ
>en | "tonuisx wootsui nmi nt nuoi^SM
s ~ l

NEW HOMES. . Gainesvilles
biggest and most respected builder
otters homes in N. E. and N. W.
sections. Campus representative
Claude (Cash) Hamrick, 216 R
Flavet IIL HUGH EDWARDS, INC.
372-1551. (A-134*-tf-c).

For Rent

FOR FALL Available August
15th. Clean Convenient efficiency

apt. suitable for 1 or 2 people
across from campus For school
year or calendar year apply
321 SW 13th St. (B-136-lt-c).
TWO 3 and 4 BEDROOM furnished
Apts; available in September. For
further information call Mr.
Kaplan. 372-0481. (B-132-st-c).

Wanted

TYPIST NEEDED to type lab
reports. Desire someone living on
or near campus who can type on
short notice. Phone Mr. Henry
Porter. FR 6-3613 after 7:00 p.m.
(C-136-2t-p).
WANTED: 1950 through 54 Fords

This was the summer
0 x Clayboy would never
0 ;% v forget. This was the
*l * v summer of Claris and
1 l
fe§£
|pV HEHRY FONDA MAUREEN (rHARAj
NOW
fIORiOA union films committee
Friday & Saturday, July 19 & 20
GRAPES
& MATH
Showing at 7& 9 p.m. Admission 30$
Medical Center Auditorium
T
SOME GAINESVILLE RESTAURANTS REFUSE TO I
SERVE THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA'S NEGRO I
STUDENTS.
DONT PAY FOR
SEGREGATION
DINE ONLY IN RESTAURANTS SERVING ALL I
GAINESVILLE CITIZENS AND ALL UNIVERSITY I
OF FLORIDA STUDENTS. |
(This ad paid for by the U.F. I
Student Group for Equal Rights) 3

and Chevrolets. Al Herdons
Service Station, 916 SE 4th Street.
(C-134-4t-c).
CASH ON DELIVERY: Will buy
phonograph records. Will consider
all forms and all speeds. Primary
interest long playing records.
FR 6-7016. (G-132-ts-C).

Autos

1961 V W Pastel Blue with radio
and white wall tires. One car
owner. Excellent condition. Day
call Ext. 2864. After 5:30 call
Micanopy 2171. (G-136-lt-p).
'57 BUICK Convertible, white paint
and red interior, PS, PB, WSW.

Going home. Must sell. SSOO.
FR 2-9855, Miss Lugo.
(G-135-3t-p).
GOING TO EUROPE? THE
CONTINENT? Let us arrange for
delivery of your new. Triumph or
Fiat anywhere. We take your old
car in trade here and arrange for
delivery of your new car there.
Use it to tour the continent and
return it to the States with you.
Call Ken Bowman, FR 2-4373.
Barkley Motors, Inc. Lincoln
Mercury Meteor Comet
Triumph Fiat. (G-125-12t-c).

For Sale

COLLEGE PROFESSORS: For
Sale, Beautiful all modern C. B.
Home. 3 Bedrooms, 1 1/2 bath,
Floors carpeted. Beauti pleat
Drapes included in sale, re A.
Nice surroundings. 45 minutes
from Campus off Road 301 to 16.
Homesteaded, no taxes. Write or
call for information. Phone 964-
3043, Starke, Florida (l-136-lt-c).

Help Wanted

NOW INTERVIEWING coeds from
Palatka, Ocala, Leesburg and
Tavares. Full time August sales
work* May be worked part time
during fall. Commission basis.
Mr. Briggs, FR 2 2190.
(E -135-3 t-p).
NEED MONEY? Earn good money
while in college. Call or write
Ji m Cooper & Associates,
Room 206, Security BuikHng,
Gainesville, Florida. FR 6-9783.
(E-133-st-c).

Lost & Found

LOST Small white female dog,
part Chihuahua in vicinity of
1544 N.W. 4th Ave. Please contact
Pat Hector at this address or call
FR 2-6794. Any information would
be appreciated. (L-136-lt-c).

Serv ces

RUBYS ALTERATIONS, 1238 SW
3rd Avenue across street from
Administration Building.
(M-129-ts-c).
TYPING DONE ON IBM electric
typewriter. Will type on short
notice. Reasonable rates, phone
Mrs. Martinez FR 6-3261, Ext.
25 7 5 weekdays or FR 6-1859
weekends or nights^M-127-tf-c).

1 the I
I INTERNATIONALLY I
I ACCLAIMED HIT I
I JUST AS IT WAS I
1 SHOWN IN THE I
il MAJOR CAPITALS I, 1
JOF THE WORLOIfj
i DARRYL F. TUC
i ZANUCKS InC
zmesr
WITH 42 il AW
gt Ijm j
3 Performances Daily
1:00-4:30-8:00 p.jn.
SORRY, NO PASSES