Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
UF Alumni
Win First
In Nation
UF Alumni Association today
received# a first place national
award from the American Alumni
Council for distinguished
achievement in the development
of alumni support.
The award, announced at the
annual meeting of the AAC, is a
first place prize among publicly
supported institutions for
improvement in alumni fund pro programs.
grams. programs. it carries with it a trophy
and SI,OOO in cash.
The achievement places the UF
among 17 other colleges and uni universities
versities universities in the nation cited for the
1963 Alumni Giving Incentive
Award by the American Alumni
Council. Financed by the U. S.
Steel Foundation, the awards
recognize sustained and improved
alumni support.
Honorable mention in the area
in which UF took top place went
to Michigan State University and
Womans College of Georgia.
Georgia Tech led in the sustained
performance category among
public universities, with honorable
mention going to the University of
Colorado, the University of
Michigan, Ohio 1 State University,
and Texas A & M.
This is the first time in UF
history that Alumni Association
support efforts have been
nationally recognized with such an
award, said UFs Director of
Alumni Affairs Bill A. Fleming,
who accepted the award here.
When we stop to consider that
the UF is one of 18 to be recognized
for its annual giving program from
among some 2,000 college and
universities making similar fund
raising efforts, the significance
of this distinction comes sharply
into focus/ he said.
It reflects a growing aware awareness
ness awareness by alumni and other
supporters of the UF that voluntary
financial support is necessary to
take care of so many needs such
as the Dollars for Scholars project
that legislative appropriations can
never provide.'*
He said this awareness is
confirmed by the 8,200 alumni who
contributed to last years fund,
giving the UF a percentage of
participation that was among the
highest of all publicly supported
institutions.

Plunge Takes Life
Os Student Caver

Louis A. Hippenmeier, a UF
student, was fatally injured in a
cave west of Gainesville on July
1.
The accident occured while
Hippenmeier and four others, Bud
Johnson, Jim Quigg, Mike Sheridan
and Frank Tiberi, were engaged
in a routine cave exploration trip.
Hippenmeier, a long-time member
of the Florida Speleological Society
and of the National Speleological
Society, was an experienced cave
explorer.
After spending a couple of hours
looking for new caves, the party
stopped at a cave known locally
as Dead Man's Drop." Four
people entered the cave while
Hippenmeier, who had seen the
cave on previous occasions,
remained on the surface as the
others descended theladder.
Hippenmeier situated himself in a
secure position at the top of the
sink where he could control the
safety line tied to each person
climbing down the ladder.
After spending about an hour in
the cave, the exploring party re returned
turned returned to a point directly under the
entrance and called to Hippenmeier
to lower the safety line so that he
could belay them out of the cave.
Hippenmeier had come down the
slope o t the sink and was sitting
on the logs over the entrance
awaiting their return. As he was
getting 19 and going for the safety
line, he apparently lost his footing

*owb n| |r
pjjPi f
H|r k- v ... SB '
v.vV.-v iN V' -.< "t*s- v SBPs

Il'S NOT A FLORIDA MAN
...that's put the wistful gaze in coed Joyce Bleidner's eyes but the chance of
winning a Caribbean cruise, a portable stereo set and other top prizes via the
University of Florida Homecoming Slogan contest.

The Florida
Alligator

V01.55,N0. 135 University of Florida,Gainesville Thursday, July 11,1963

Red Barber Gives UF
Personal Library Set

A kaleidoscope of the world of
sports, collected by one of the
nations most colorful sports
announcers for his personal
library, has been given tfoe UF.
It came from Walter Lanier
Red Barber, the radio
voice of the New York Yankees,
and longtime CBS sports adviser
who got his start in broadcasting
at radio station WRUF on the
campus.
He gave the UF such a wide
variety of material of interest to
sportsmen that the 550 books are

and fell into the cave.
Johnson immediately initiated
first aid treatment. Sheridan
climbed the ladder without a safety
line and went to notify the
authorities. Hippenmeler was
fastened into aStokes litter,
raised out of the cave, and rushed
to the University Medical Center,
where he died a short time later.
Rep. Talks
To MBA
State Representative Osee Fagan
addressed members of the John
Marshall Bar Association
following a luncheon at the Holiday
Inn, July 3,
Fagan, a member of the state
House of Representatives from
Gainesville, spoke on enactments
of the 1963 legislature which will
effect lawyers. About 50 UF
students, faculty and ad administrative
ministrative administrative officials, including
UF President J. Wayne Reitz,
were present.
After the address, Reitz praised
Fagan for his work in the House
in the interests of higher education.
If all the other members of the
house were one-fourth as
interested and one-fourth as
effective in higher education as
Osee Fagan is, most of our
problems here would be solved,
Reitz said.

being placed in two locations to
enable generations of sports buffs
to use them to best advantage.
It includes A Treatise on
American Football by Amos
Alonzo Stagg published in 1893.
In this book the Grand Old Man
of Football describes in detail
the supposedly modern T
formation.
Books on baseball comprise
seven shelves in the library.
Barber, who started his career as
an announcer for the Orange Grove
String Band, a popular country
music combo of the early '3os,
became best known for his baseball
coverage of the Brooklyn Dodgers.
Supplying the same type of ex expressions
pressions expressions he used to describe the
country music groups antics, such
as sitting in the cat-bird seat,
Barber parlayed his knack with
colorful words into a national
reputation.
Along the way he became a
knowledgable authority in the
broad field of sports and served
CBS as one of its top sports sportscasters.
casters. sportscasters.
The library, which he collected
over many years of describing
national sports events, runs the
gamut from relatively rare
volumes to a personal collection
of baseball score cards.
Among the more distinctive
books is number ten of only fifty
copies printed in a limited edition
of the Sporting Repository pub published
lished published in 1904. Other notable books
in the collection Include the
Hunter's Encyclopedia, Frank
Foresters Field Sports of the
U. S. published in two volumes
in 1849, and volume three of
Sporting Magazine published in
1794. v
The bound volume of actual score
cards are those used for all the
Brooklyn Dodger baseball games
from 1947-1950.
Most of the books (415) will be
placed in a glass-enclosed unit
in the College of Physical Edu Education
cation Education and Health Reading Room in
Florida Gymnasium. They will be
designated as the Red Barber
Collection.
The others (135) will remain in
the UFs Main Library for use by
researchers. Included in the latter
group are official rule books for

practically every game in the
sports fielfl. A study of these rules
defines the changes in various
sports over the years.
Dean of the College of Physical
Education and Health Dennis K.
Stanley said in commenting on the
library:
This is probably the finest
collection that any physical edu education
cation education unit in the United States
possesses. The UF is Indeed
fortunate to have a person as
famous in sports as Red Barber
give us the collection he spent a
lifetime amassing.
In addition to serving as texts
these books will provide an en enrichment
richment enrichment program which is
unsurpassed, Dean Stanley said.
We are particularly happy to
have the book by Stagg which is
considered almost priceless by
spjortsmen.
Dean Stanley has known Barber
since his days as a student.
I can recall that back in the
days when Coach Charlie Bachman
and myself were coaching the foot football
ball football team how Red* used to
constantly qOiz us on every angle
of football, he said.

Mac Heaths Backlit
Threepenny Opera

Tiger Brown, Polly Peachum
and Mack the Knife, Immortal
characters of Kurt Weill's The
Threepenny Opera*, will take their
places on a UF stage for two
performances of the popular opera*
on August 1-2.
Sponsored by the Department of
Music, the opera presentation will
be the highlight of the summer
cultural season on campus.
The light musical comedy has
many catchy tunes, the most
famous of which, Mack the
Knife*, has achieved widespread
appeal in recent years, others are
Pirate Jenny*, The Army
Song*, Ballad of Democracy and
Jealousy Duet.
In the past the summers campus
opera has Included Oklahoma
and Carousel, by Richard Rod Rodgers
gers Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein, as

Alachuans
Register At
Fast Rate
By JOEL SACHS
Editorial Assistant
Voter registration in Alaqjiua
County has shown a marked in increase
crease increase during the last week. The
cause of the increase is attributed
to the circulation of the wet-dry
petition.
According to Mrs. Alma Bethea,
Alachua County supervisor of
registration," there has been an
increase from about six new
registrations per day to over 40
per day.
Mrs. Bethea said, I am con convinced
vinced convinced that the wet-dry issue has
accounted for the sudden rise in
voter registration.*
The majority of those who are
registering are people who have
not registered before. continued
Mrs. Bethea, It is probable that
a large majority are UP students.
If the present trencf continues
I suspect we will have over 1000
new registrations before the
petition is presented to the County
Commissions
The voter roles are closed thirty
days prior to any election. If the
petition is successful, the last
date of registration will depend
on the date of the election as set
by the County Commission.
Many persons have asked the
supervisors office if these is
property holding qualification to be
eligible to vote. The only quali qualifications
fications qualifications necessary are that you
be 21 years old, a resident of the
state for one year, a resident of
the county for six months and that
you retain all your civil rights.
The signers of the petition will
be checked against the voter
registration by the County Com Commission
mission Commission after the petition is
presented. Only those people who
are registered voters may sign
the petition.
Final Phase
Os SOS Drive
The final phase of the Sabin
Oral Sundays will be conducted
Sunday, July 14. This is the third
dose in the series that will offer
protection for all three types of
polio virus.
Locations for the vaccine
distribution are the same as the
two previous days. Stations near
campus are at Norman Hall and
the Gym.
It is expected that over 50,000
will turn out for this final phase.
About 55,000 received doses on
the first Sunday and 52,010 on the
second Sunday.
Everyone is urged to participate
for their own protection and for|
the elimination of polio in this
area.

well as other outstanding musical
works.
This years presentation is belr
directed by Guy B. Webb of the
faculty of music. Principal
members of the cast are: Marshall
Thomas, Hialeah, as Mack the
Knife; Sandra Smith, Gainesville
as Polly Peachum; Marlene
Potter, Boynton Beach, as Lucy
Brown; and Stephan Sklute, St.
Petersburg as Tiger Brown.
A chorus and an eight-piece
orchestra will accompany the cast
throughout the performance.
Admission to the presentation
in the p. k. Tongs Auditorium
is free, but by ticket only. Tickets
may be obtained by sending a self selfaddressed
addressed selfaddressed envelope to the Depart Department
ment Department of Music, University of
Florida, Gainesville.
The curtain rises at 8:15 p.m.
for both performances.



Page 2

The Florida Alligator Thursday, July 11,1963

Keating Cites
Castro Threat

Sen. Kenneth B. Keating,
Republican of New York Monday
night warned that negotiation with
the Castro regime or any Cuban
regime held in power by Soviet
troops and weapons would be "a
most serious mistake.
The Senator addressed the UF
as a participant in the Summer
Lecture Series. He said that if
Provost Named
For Evaluation
Dr. Samuel P. Martin, Provost
for Health Sciences at the J. Hillis
Miller Health Center, has been
invited by Surgeon General Luther
L. Terry of the Public Health Ser Service,
vice, Service, U. S. Department of Health,
Education, and welfare, to parti participate
cipate participate in the Second National
Conference for evaluating the
Federal program of traineeship
aid to professional nurses. Some
50 authorities on nursing, medicine
health, and education will attend
the conference in Washington,
D. C., July 17-19, 1963.

Leave Your Car For
Service
While Attending
Classes
KUYKENDALLS
PURE OIL
Service Station
22 N.W. 13th Street
Cracked Eggs 3 doz $ I.IC

4. l* 1 VO K WA.,( H Qf *vf; 4, |UC
Why is our nose so stubby?
The VW doesnt need a long front hood be because
cause because the engine's in back of the car.
This gives you a couple of advantages over
the long-nosed jobs.
Obviously, it makes for a shorter car.
So you can move in and out of traffic. And in
and out of tight little parking spots.
Your chances of denting a fender in the process
are proctically nil, too. Because the VW's short
hood lets you look right down your nose at the
road.
The point is this: Everything on the VW is there
for a reason. Including our changes. t
Unless you've nosed around VWs for years,
you may not be aware of things like our fully
synchromesh transmission.
Or our quieter, more powerful engine.
Or our 3,012 other inside improvements.
On the face of if, the VW looks the same
underneath, it's changed.
Which is one reason the VW depreciates $o
little and stays in style year after year.
Nose and all. -
MILLER BROWN
MOTORS
1030 East University Avenue

we recognize the Castro regime in
Cuba, if we negotiate with the
communists there then we may
as well say goodbye to our hopes
and pledges for the rest of this
hemisphere.
Whatever we might gain in
the short run from a settlement
from Castro, he said, will be
just about as useful as what we
gained in Laos. Communists never
have and never will abide by treaty
agreements to cease subversion
and respect the wishes of the
majority of the people.
Keating quoted Castros analysis
of the U. S. policy over the last
two years where Castro argued
that the U.S. has failed continuely
whereas Castro has won in the
fight over Cuba.
Those who suggest negotiations
with the Castro regime today are
in effect accepting Fidel Castros
argument. They are admitting that
a communist dictator in a small
and neighboring country is better
able to carry out his will than the
United States of America.
He continued, if we persist in
seeking agreement with Castro on
his terms, we will be advertising
to the entire world the impotence
of our policy.
The impact of that realization
in Latin America and around the
world does not sink in im mediately.
It does not have the sudden mo momentous
mentous momentous impact that missies
pointed at the heartland of this
continent do.
But over the years, over the
long run, that is the message that
takes hold in the countries where
people and politicians are con concerned
cerned concerned to be on the winning side.

wm ife.
d wl mm
gal; W4K,' i M
M RMfk !S9mmbf I
...is Miss Dalzell Ginn, 2UC, from Gainesville. She is majoring in Occupational
Therapy and is a member of the Order of Athena.

Pierce of St. Pete Times
Speaks to UF Rights Group

Warren H. Pierce, chief
editorial writer for the St. Peters Petersburg
burg Petersburg Times, is speaking on The
Revolution About Us at the weekly
meeting of the Student Group For
Equal Rights tonight at 8 in the
Florida Uion Auditorium.
Jerry Essick, 2UC, chairman

Murphree Area Votes
To Knock Rent Hikes

The Murphree Area Halls
Council sent a resolution to the
UF Division of Housing criticizing
the recent increases in all
dormitory room rates for male
students.
Composed of representatives
from ea h section in the Murphree
Area, the Council is the official
organization that represents stu students
dents students living in the dormitories
of the Mu "phree Area.
The resolution stated: Be it
known, therefore, that this body,
acting ... (in its official) capacity
. ~ and assembled in body this
twenty-seventh day of June, nine nineteen
teen nineteen hundred and sixty-three,
completely objects to, and
condemns, the extreme increase
in dormitory room rent
commencing with the Fall
Trimester.
We sent the resolution, said
Council Secretary Bill Wall, be because
cause because of the policy set forth in
the Council Constitution. Among
other purposes, the Council is

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EGGPLANT ife
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HAYDEN MANGOS 25c@
CALIFORNIA BKiNG POTATOES..."... 3 f or 10c
ITALIAN SALAD ONIONS 13,; 9
FANELLI & EDWARDS
MARKET
2410 Newberry Road Within Walking Distance
Across from Beta Woods Os Corry Village

of the student group, said it will
be an open forum and questions
from the audience are encouraged.
Other activities of the group will
be setting up of a picket line in
front of the College Inn tomorrow
starting at 11 a.m. This picket
line will only be in. effect during

expected to (1) provide a means
of conference ajid communication
between the residents, University
Housing, and the University of
Florida administration, and (2)
improve living conditions and seek
solutions to other problems of
the residents.
We felt that most of the resi residents
dents residents in this Area disapproved of
the sudden increase, Wall said,
especially after many had already
paid what they thought was their
room rent for the Fall.
The purpose of the resolution,
tie added, was to communicate
this information to the proper
authorities.
Sets Initiation
Phi Delta Kappa, honorary
education fraternity, will hold its
Annual Initiation Banquet on Friday
July 26, at 6;30 p.m. in the
University Inns banquet room.

the hours when most students eat
lunch or dinner. The picket line
will be integrated and have faculty
members as spokesmen for the
picket line.
Tuesday night, the faculty of the
Law School and the Dean endorsed
A Statement on Law and Race
Relations" which has been en endorsed
dorsed endorsed by most of the Law Colleges
in the South. The statement a
stand that places limits on the state
governments. It brings out that
National Law is the supreme law
and that the National Supreme
Court interprets this law and not
the state supreme courts.

Probabilities direct
the conduct of
the wise man man
Consequently, his financial
planning includes a sound
foundation of life insurance.
The wise man knows, too, the
benefits of starting a life insur insurance
ance insurance program early. For in instance,
stance, instance, there's our Guaranteed
Purchase Option, added to the
policy bought now, which
guarantees the right to buy
more life insurance at future
specified dates without fur further
ther further evidence of insurability!
It could be advantageous to
find out more about some of
the newest features and poli policies
cies policies designed with you in
mind. Stop by our campus
office or telephone.,
David R. Mac Cord
Box 13744, Univ. Station
Phone 376-1 160
PROVIDENT
jvtUTUALMMM LjFEJ



Telstar Beeps
For Good Will

NEW YORK (UPI) An experi experiment
ment experiment described as designed to
test global television as an instru instrument
ment instrument fqr bette r understanding
among peoples will be conducted
July 10 when the Columbia
Broadcasting System will make use
of the communications satellite
Telstar to conduct the first "Town
Meeting of the World."
The plan, brainchild of CBS
President Dr. Frank Stanton, calls
for a live broadcast in the after afternoon
noon afternoon during Telstars longest
usable pass and a repeat at 7:30
-8:30 p.m. EDT. Four leading
statesmen of the Western Alliance
will exchange unofficial views on
important issues during the
broadcast. They will be former
President Dwight D. Eisenhower
from Denver, Antnony Eden from
London, Jean Monnet from Paris
or Brussels and Heinrich von
Brentano from Frankfurt or
Cologne.
Eisenhower and Eden will be
speaking in the presence of
audiences of interested citizens
who will be able to follow the
entire broadcast on monitor tele television
vision television sets. During part of the
time, individuals in both audiences
will be able to address questions
to either of the other two partici participants.
pants. participants. All the principal
participants will speak English,
which will be translated for
European listeners.
The cooperation of members of
the European Broadcasting Union
will make it possible for viewers

Poor Standards, Policing
Up Chpnce of Funds Misuse
>

"Loose federal standards and
inadequate federal enforcement
machinery" enhances the likeli likelihood
hood likelihood of misuse of federal highway
funds in Florida, states a recent
UF study of federal-state relation relationships
ships relationships in interstate highway
administration.
Just released by the UFs
Public Administration Clearing
Service and made by Joseph A.
Uveges, Jr., the study is the first
to be published within Florida that
pulls together the findings from
both Congressional and state leg legislative
islative legislative investigations into
Florida administration of the new
Interstate road program.
Uveges, holder of a National
Defense Education Fellowship in
the Urban Problems program of
the UF Political Science Depart Department,
ment, Department, made the study as part of
his doctoral research work.
Uveges study reports that the
Federal Bureau of Roads had the
statutory authority and the
opportunity to discover and end
the malpractices occurring in
various states but did not do so.
"The states do only as good a
job of administration in a grant grantin-aid
in-aid grantin-aid program as they are
compelled to do by the Federal
government," he says.
The study focused on the extent
to which the Federal government
imposes standards on the states
in the administration of the
Interstate road program and found
that essentially standards are

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Sanltone service. > >
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1724 W. Univ. Ave. Drive In 1717 NW Ist Ave.

in some 20 nations in Europe
and North America to witness the
broadcast. It was to delegates to
the American meeting of the Union
in New York last fall that Stanton
first announced his plan for the
broadcast.
"The oldest and purest demo democratic
cratic democratic forum in America
directly descended from the
Athenian agora, is the town
meeting," Stanton said. "CBS is
now studying,the technical con conditions
ditions conditions under which Telstar can
be used, as it approaches its
first anniversary, for a Town
Meeting of the World. . It will
be frankly experimental. We need
to study all the capabilities, lim limitations,
itations, limitations, possibilities of the
communications satellite system.
We need to construct a philosophy
of international television and the
programming appropriate and use useful
ful useful to it."

State Building Construction
For Year Stands at '62 Level

Floridas building construction
activity during April stood on an
almost identical level with that of
April, 1962 according to a report
issued monthly by the UFs Bureau
of Economic and Business
Research.
The Florida Construction

minimal and have not changed since
the Federally-aided highway pro program
gram program was first established in 1916.
UF Recital
On Agenda
Selections from Bach, Handel,
Schumann and Heiden will be
presented at "A Senior Recital"
sponsored by the UF Department
of Music.
The recital will feature three
seniors in the music education
curriculum in the College of
Architecture and Fine Arts and will
be held at the Health Center
Auditorium, Sunday, July 14 at,
3 p.m.
The program will include mezzo
soprano Marlene K. Potter and
performances by Gail E. Griffin
on the piano and William P. Heney
on the alto-saxophone.
Piano accompanists will be
Instructor Samuel B. Teeters and
Peter Dewitt Jr.
Dewitt is the 1962-63 winner of
the Frances Millikan Reitz Award.
'Catch 22
Dr. UF literature
professor, wil review Joseph
Hellers novel Catch 22 July 11
at 8;30 p.m., room 324 of Florida
Union.
Catch 22, a satirical work,' cen centers
ters centers around the lives of servicemen
in the Mediterranean area during
World War n.

1 U

GETTING SOAKED
.. .seems to be the order of the day during these last
few days.

Review reported the April figure of
$112,335,000 brought the total for
new construction authorized for
the first four months of 1963 to
$427,537,000 compared to a look lookalike
alike lookalike $427,321,000 authorized in the
comparable period of 1962.
Os this amount, $386,599,000
went to private construction, shown
to be slightly below the 1962
figures. The remainder went to
public construction which is up
almost 4 per cent over the first
four months of last year.
Within the public construction
category the report, notes edu educational
cational educational buildings were up 5.5
per cent while authorizations for
other public buildings were up 1.3
per cent.
Although a little over 5 per cent
decline in housing units was noted

Super Sub, Super Sub
Try an
Alans Super Sub
ALANS CUBANA
6-1252 F.F.D.
Whats New In PAPERBACKS?
NATION OF SHEEP .. .William Lederer
POOR NO MORE ...Robert Ruark
ELEME NTS OF STYLE ... Strunk & White
THE BOOK OF THE ST. ...Georg Graddick
THE PAINTER'S EYE ...Maurice Grosser
ON MODERN PHYSICS ...Born, Schrodinger, Auger
CHRIST AND FREUD ...Arthur Guirdham ..
TECHNICAL, REFERENCE, HARDCOVER
PLASMA PHYSICS ...Drummond
STANDARD HANDBOOK FOR SECRETARIES
.. .Hutchinson
HANDBOOK OF CHEMISTRY & PHYSICS
.. .Hodgmen,Weast, Silby
THE BROWSE SHOP
Campus Shop & bookstore

Thursday, July 11/1963 The Florida Alligator

during the first four months of 1963,
the April total was higher than the
April total last year.
The greatest percentage gain in
housing authorization across the
state was registered in the Gaines Gainesville-
ville-- Gainesville- Ocala St. Augustine
district. The 66.1 per cent gain
was largely attributed to three
large apartment houses going up
in the Gainesville area.
The LakelandEast Central
Florida district was up 35.8 per
cent, West Palm Beach Ft.
Lauderdale was up 8.1 per cent
and the Miami Metropolitan
Area showed a 3.5 per cent gain.
The renfiaining eight districts
showed percentage declines, the
greatest of which was borne by
the Jacksonville Metropolitan
Area, down almost 40 per cent.

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Page 3



Page 4

The Florida Alligator Thursday, July 11,1963

alligator
editojr>isals

wet or dry
GAINESVILLE IS HUMMING to the tune of Wet or Dry and voter
registration has risen to an unusual height for this time of year.
The Alachua County Supervisor of Voter Registration reports that
large numbers of young people have registered as voters during
the past week. Although it cannot be said with certainty that the
large numbers of young people are University of Florida students,
certainly more students than usual are registering to vote in this
election.
Opposition to the movement to wet the county has lost no time
in forming. Four churches have come out against returning the
petitions mailed to the countys 25,000 voters last week by the Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville Motel Association. University President J. Wayne Reitz came
out against the election Sunday saying, the arguments advanced by
the Gainesville Motel Owners Association in favor of holding the
election are unsupported by facts.
UNIVERSITY STUDENTS will be one of the first groups to recognize
that Alachua County is far from dry. The nearness of wet
counties and the abundance of transportation at the University of
Florida enables most students, barring insufficient funds, to drink
as much, or almost as much as they want to. And, many students,
not wanting to make the booze run content themselves with 3.2
beer.
Many of those in favor of wetting the county say students, and
others, simply go out of the county for liquor when they want it,
and keeping Alachua dry does little to keep people from drinking.
They add that the very danger of drunken driving between here
and the county line is almost enough justification to let liquor in.
The last part of the argument is weak. . drunken drivers can be
killed anywhere. . and a drunken pedestrian can die just as quickly
on University Avenue as he can on Highway 441.
THE FIRST PART of the argument is a little more valid. When
people want to drink they will* When people dont want to drink they
won't.
The Motel Association says a wet county will attract more
business to the area. Opponents of the petition say it wont.
Proponents of drinking say liquor isnt immoral and doesnt lead
to wholesale sin, opponents of the plan says it is and does.
WET OR DRY is a moral question. Wet or dry is an ethical
question. Wet or dry demands careful consideration.
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA students are naturally interested in
this question. Many of those eligible to vote on this question will
want to register, if they have not, and cast their ballot.
And vote is what people should do. Voting is the agreed upon method
in this country of settling questions. Those truly interested in the
problem, wet-side or dry-side, should let their opinions be known by
returning the petition, or by voting, if it comes to that.
know your stand
IN 1956 WHEN AUTHERINE LUCY, a Negro, enrolled at the
University of Alabama, student David Kirk wrote novelist William
Faulkner and asked hiip what Southern students could do to meet
desegregation and its problem.
Faulkner replied from his home in Oxford, Miss. Last month
Faulkners reply was published for the first time by the Crimson
and White, the University of Alabama newspaper. It also appeared
in the National observer.
Exerpts are reprinted here.
Dear Mr. Kirk;
... I have found that the greatest help in meeting any problem with
decency and self-respect and whatever courage is demanded, is to
know where you yourself stand, that is, to have in words what you
believe and are acting from.
Segregation is going, whether we like it or not. We no longer have
any choice between segregation or unsegregation. The only choice
we have is, how, by what means. That is, shall segregation be
abolished by force, from outside our country, despite everything we
can do; or shall it be abolished by choice by us in the South who will
have to bear the burden of it, before it is forced upon us.
... I CAN THINK OF NOTHING which would do more to hold
Intact integrity and decency and sanity in this matter, than a sort
of interstate university organization for simple decency and ration rationality
ality rationality among Southern college men and women. A confederation of
older men like me would not carry half this weight.
I can Imagine nothing which would carry more weight than a sane,
sober uaion of student representatives from all the Southern schools,
standing for the simple things which democracy means and which
we have got to show the world that we do mean if we are to survive,
the simple principles of due process of the majority will and desire
based on decency and fairness to all as ratified by law.
THIS MAY BE DIFFICULT at first. It is a sad commentary on
human nature that it is much easier, simpler, much more fun and
excitement to be against something you can see, like a black skin,
than to be for something you can only believe in as a principle, like
justice and fairness and (in the long view) the continuation of individual
freedom and liberty.
And remember this too, when you have to meet these individual
problems; You will be dealing with cowards. Most segregationists
are afraid of something, possibly Negroes; I dont know. But they
seem to function only as mobs, and mobs are always afraid of some something,
thing, something, of something they doubt their ability to cope with singly and in
daylight. .
The Florida Alligator
EDITOR-IN-CHE IF. ? Maryanne Awtrey
Managing Editor George Moore
Business Manager jay Fountain
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of
the University of Florida and is published weekly. THE FLORIDA
ALLIGATOR is entered as second class matter at the United States
Post Office at Gainesville, Florida. Offices are located in Room 8
and 10 In the Florida Union.
Telephone University of Florida, FR 6-3261, Ext. 2832, and request
either editorial or business office.
Opinions voiced in personal columns on this page do not necessarily
reflect the opinions of the editors. Only editorials are the official
voice of the paper.

the DRIES

DON ADDIS

Original Peel Not a Spirit

Dear Mr. Dixon:
In your hysterical defense of
your Old Orange Peel you use the
same sideways reasoning youve
used in justifying your use of the
name Orange Peel. You simply
repeat the argument you made in
your parable of The oracle and
skirt the real issue by attacking
me as an egotist. That was your
suggestion, not* mine.
The difference I wrote of between
the original Peel and yours as
you must know but choose to
ignore is one of purpose.
The original was not designed
as a commercial venture. Only
in 1958 did it begin charging for
each issue. It was self-supporting
in its PURPOSE of serving the
students who owned it. Only
incidentally did it earn a profit
(which went back into publications)
in its latter days. Yes, I got a
salary, but as you point out, I
was not the magazine.
Clandestine Publishing Company
I hope youll admit, operates pri primarily
marily primarily 'bn a profit motive, your
claims oi serving as high priests
to a mystic spirit of undergraduate
satire notwithstanding. Your letter
didnt mention the other
publications youve planned under

LETTER

Negro Is Being Deceived

EDITOR:
The situation seems grave. I
do not know whether it is only
the appearance, or whether it is a
deep penetrating view.
The Negro is being deceived,
and is being deceived by
his friends. Leaders rouse him to
think and to act as if freedom is
the golden key which unlocks the
treasure chest of life; a key which
most non-colored seem to possess.
The unfortunate truth is that if
every Negro turned white, ten
years from now his masses would
still crowd the slum districts.
In order to rise today it takes
education; education takes help

Bygone Gators

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR FIFTY YEARS AGO

THE EUROPEAN WAR will be a
pleasant peaceful picnic compared
with the great struggle between
Auburn and Florida in Jacksonville
on Saturday, Oct. 10th. SLSO round
trip on A.C.L. two trains. Special
7:30 a.m. Regular 7;55 a.m.
Tickets good to return up to Sunday
night. (Oct. 8, 1914).
SIGMA ALPHA ENTERTAINS
The Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity
entertained the ATO and PiK
fraternities and the Stray Greeks,
last Wednesday night at their home
809 West University Avenue.
Refreshments were served consis consisting
ting consisting of soft drinks, punch and
sandwiches while Fess
performed at the piano thruout the
evening.
The following evening, Sigma
Alpha Epsilon was at home from
7:30 to 10:30 to friends and the
faculty. Coffee, sandwiches and
Dunch were served. Music was

this company, of which Old Peel
is only a part. (Your idea of
unloading the thing on students
when youre graduated is
something new.) Nor did you
-mention th at your editor Jack
Horan, is not a student. And if
your magazine is, as you say,
for the student body, why were
you peddling 10,000 of the things
at Daytona? Thats moving the good
old spirit a little further than
down the street a block or two.
I have some more questions for
you.
If I refused to contribute to your
book because I like to think Peel
died when I resigned, how come
Im contributing to theNewOrange
Peel?
Did I really refuse to help you
on your Old Peel, or did I see
several reprints of my cartoons
in your first issue?
Did I really stoop to criticize
commercial gain, or did I say:
Being in business to make money
does not make a magazine evil, but
making money on somebody elses
name makes it, at best, ethically
debatable?
Does your spirit of Peel really
live on, even without me, or did
I count three of my more elderly
drawings in your latest issue?
And how in the world did I

and all the champions of the Negro
promise is freedom. The pitiful
thing is that as the wretchedness
of the Negros life becomes worse,
the more he is consumed by
ideas of freedom. The Negro is
like the man who is sinking in
quicksand, realizes that when he
reaches bottom he Will be dead
and so prays that the bottom is
very deep.
The Negro realizes without
freedom his position is static,
but fails to grasp that even with
all the freedom in the world,
innumerable inherent conditions
are holding him back. There is
no direct relationship between
freedom and living standards but

furnished by a four piece orches orchestra.
tra. orchestra. (Feb. 25, 1915)
MORE RAPS AT THE CURRENT
CUSSER -- Again the Current
Cusser bobs up with practically
the same line he had two weeks
ago. Threats, repetition of ques questions
tions questions answered last, and a sort of
ultimatum to the faculty with
respect to control of the Athletic
Association.
He asks -- once more how
much control the faculty exercises
in the Athletic Association. Well
here's what they do, they only
pay about four-fifths of the coaches
salary, borrow all money, have to
sign checks before they are
honored, stand goodforall
financial obligations, and in return
for this, they have the final
authority to say what teams
play; and what men we play. Isnt
that fair? (Dec. 5, 1916)

become a known commercial
artist as a direct result of the
Orange Peel? I was a working
cartoonist long before I came to
the UF. (On the original copy of
your letter I see you added the
word known as an afterthought.
Im not sure I could be called
that, either.) if I'm more
successful now, its also because
I majored in art here.
The fact that I sold my sex
symbols to Playboy has no relation
at all to their previous appearance
in Peel. In fact, that could have
killed the deal, since Playboy,
unlike your magazine, prefers to
print previously unpublished
material. I placed several cartoons
in Peel that I could as easily
have submitted to national
magazines for bigger pay, so I
was no profiteer during my term
as editor.
And I'm not particularly proud of
being last editor of the real Peel,
for no matter hpw much I might
have contributed to its success,
I contributed just as much to its
death. (Incidentally, Jack Horan
edited the final issue.)
I wasnt the original Peel;
was Jack Horan; nor was it son.
spirit. It- was a magazine which
no longer exists.

every time the Negro takes a look
at himself he blames his condition
on a present lack of freedom. .
and demands more.
As an example, in most cities
the school you attend is based on
the sector of the city which you
live in. The Negro in many cases
is demanding exemption from the
rule. Clearly something must be
done for the Negro; But must it
be in the form of freedoms which
will make chaos out of society?
To understand the Negros po position
sition position take a hypothetical town.
In this town the Negro is given
all rights and no one has any
animosity towards him. He goes
into a formerly all-white store
and is not served because he has
no money. He goes to an employ employment
ment employment agency and asks for a job
but there are none because he only
went half-way through high school.
Os what value is a library to a
Negro who cant read? Os what
value is it for the Negro and white
to meet on common ground when,
while the white is well dressed,
the clothes are rotting off the
Negros back? What good is
freedom to a cripple? The Negro
has been wrongly held back for
the last 100 years, but no matter
how wrong, it doesn't change his
present position.
It took a hundred years to lower
the Negro to the bottom of the
hole he is in and all the freedom
in the world only makes the hole
larger, what the Negro needs to
do is pull up his sleeves and pull
himself out.
He needs friends who talk not
of freedom but of algebra and
hygiene. The stew of life calls for
only a pinch of freedom, but quarts
of sweat. It is ironical that while
the Negro has so much work to
accomplish on himself, he Is being
lead on 'sit-insto demand some something
thing something he cannot do anything with.
J. A. KENT, 2UC



Serpent in the Garden
Poses Summer Threat

The serpent in the garden is a
threat more real to Americans
than perhaps anyone realizes. He
may he a coral snake or a
moccasin or rattler, but the
chances are that hell cause more
trouble in the back yard this
summer than he has ever caused
in the backwoods.
If this year is like most others,
many people will be bitten by
snakes in the coming months, with
children the most frequent victims.
They will probably be bitten while
running barefoot not far from their
homes.
probably no subject has
associated with it more folklore
and less hard fact than snakebite.
Nearly everyone can tell you when
snakes will bite and when they wont
where they are found and where
they arent, what to do and what
not to do if bitten.
Some of the folklore was once
based on actual experience, but
the tradition has become far
removed from the fact.
One big step toward filling this
information vacuum was the pub publication
lication publication this month of the Florida
Medical Association Journal,
devoted almost entirely to snake snakebite.
bite. snakebite.
A major contributor to this
seriesthe first time that the
journal has devoted an issue to a
single medical problemwas Dr.
Joseph F. Gennaro, Jr., assistant
professor of anatomy at the UF
College of Medicine.
Dr. Gennaro is in the midst of
an intensive study about the nature
of snakebites, both the mechanism
of their production and the effects
on the victims. He brings into focus
some of the best available infor information
mation information on the subject of snakebite
adding to it his own experience
in the laboratory and replacing
folklore with facts.
There are two kinds of snake
we have to worry about in North
America, so far as the poisonous
bite is concerned, he points out.
One is the pit viper family, which
includes the rattlesnakes and
moccasins and is a comparatively
recent development in the animal
kingdom.
The other dangerous snake
family is the elapidae, which, in
the United States, is represented
by the coral snake. It comes from
a much older family tree. The main
distinction between the two kinds
of snake is this: While the coral
snake has a much more poisonous
venom than the rattlesnake, he has
a very inefficient means of
delivering it to his victim.
The less potent rattlesnake
venom, on the other hand, is
injected under the skin through a
very effective tooth and poison
gland system that resembles a
good hypodermic needle.
Although information on snake snakebite
bite snakebite in general is poor in this
country, rattlesnakes are well wellcovered
covered wellcovered in comparison with coral
snakes which are often dismissed
as a negligible problem.
Its true that the small coral
snake with its tiny mouth and teeth
isnt able to bite a human being
effectively very often, but the fact
remains that when he does get the
venom under the skin, it may well
be fatal, he added.
It is very little consolation to
the fellow who has been bitten by
a coral snake to know that it
doesnt happen very often.
Protection against snakebite
takes many forms, but the most
effective one is to remember not
to walk through woods and fields
with bare feet or ankles.
It is very interesting to notice
the statistics on the seasonal
incidence of snakebite, Dr.
Gennaro said. More people are
tramping through unfamiliar back backwoods
woods backwoods areas during the fall and
winter hunting seasons. But the
greatest number of snakebite
victims are reported in the
summer months, among
youngsters who are playing within
sight of their suburban homes.
Very little is understood about
how the snake venom actually does

I i B
vt fl ;
I a JM Hr
-

SUMMER MONTHS MOST DANGEROUS

...was discovered in a study undertaken by the Med
Center. The coral snake shown above, although it
has a hard time biting a person, is almost always fatal.

damage to the human system. It
is known that coral snake venom,
like that of the cobra and other
Asian varieties, attacks the
nervous system causingparalysis.
The rattlesnakes venom
apparently destroys tissue
and attacks the heart and blood
vessels.
But, so far, scientists have not
been able to isolate the particular
substance in the venom which does
the damage. They have been able
to show that the snake does not
always bite with the same intensity
but may regulate his bite according
to the size of the victim or the
degree to which he is aroused.
The coral snake, on the other
hand, releases the venom into his
mouth, then must get it into the
victim by gnawing with two tiny
teeth, no larger than needle points.
Because the coral snake bite
often seems like a harmless
scratch, the victim doesn't take it
seriously, Dr. Gennaro said.
Many times, a youngster will
pick up the snake and play with it
for hours without being bitten.
Then the snake will clamp onto a
soft part of the finger long enough
to break the skin.
Scientists disagree on the
effectiveness of various
treatments after a person is bitten.
But nearly all authorities agree
on the necessity of entirely
immobilizing the victim as an
effective way of minimizing the
effects of the venom, Dr.
Gennaro said.
Not only does this slow down
the circulation of the venom to
other parts of the body, but it
actually seems to reduce the
damage at the site of the bite.
The use of suction cups and
sucking out the poison by mouth,
after making a cut at the point
of the bite, appears to be effective
in removing a significant amount
of venom, studies showed. Dr.
Gennaro pointed out that it is
wise to wait two or three minutes
to see whether any swelling occurs.
If it does, it is time enough to
make an incision and try to with withdraw
draw withdraw the venom.
Experiments show that the value
of suction is within the first 15
to 20 minutes after it is applied.
0
Research Prof
Goes to Europe
Dr. Edward R,Garrett, graduate
research professor in the College
of pharmacy will go to Europe
at the end of this week to present
the results of his research on drug
distribution and stability before
several professional groups.
Among the meetings he will
attend is the International
Congress for Chemotherapy in
Stuttgart.

Suction should not be applied over
a long period of time a maxi maximum
mum maximum of 30 minutes to one hour
is sufficient.
A minority of persons will have
adverse reactions to the serum,
and it should never be administered
as first-aid, but only by a physician
who is prepared to cope with the
allergic reaction if it should
occur, Dr. Gennaro said.
We want to discover all we can
about snake bites, but we would
rather not find it by seeing children
bitten this summer.

.. .Os our young men's natural shoulder clothing and furnishing. Each item
is selected from our regular stock of quality young men's clothing.. .none
are special purchase! We do not have-all sizes in some items, but most
likely you'll find exactly what you want at important savingsl
Suits Sport Coats
Were 39.95 89.95 Were 29.95 59.95
NO Ve gu ? a ?;!h rts 7soo Now 22.50 47*50
Long & Extra Long
Trousers Sport & Knit Shirts
Were 12.95 25.00 Were 5.00 10.95
Now 9.95 18.95 Now 3.65 7.95
k
Walking Shorts Swim Suits
Were 5.95 12.95 Were 5.95 10.95
Now 4.45 9.95 Now 4.45 7.95
- ONE GROUP OF SUITS & SPORT COATS NOW 1/2 PRICE
dUUUB
6 South Main Street

Thursday, July 11,1963 The Florida Alligator

Tape Texts Assist
Blind in Studies

ST. PAUL, Minn. (UPI) More
than 50 blind college and trade
school students are using iape
textbooks fro m a Minnesota
library.
The tape library, under devel development
opment development for four years, is
sponsored by the Minnesota State
Services For The Blind and the
Hamm Foundation, a St. Paul
philanthropic organization.
The projects first university
graduate was Andrea Goudle,
Minneapolis. Her textbooks
during most of her University of
Minnesota career were hundreds
of reels of magnetic recording
tape.
The program was undertaken
four years ago when several
blind students who had been using
recorders suggested that textbooks
be read into tape. They thought
this would be easier,, to handle
than disc and live
readers werent around when
wanted.
So volunteer readers began
putting textbooks into tape.
When Miss Goudle wanted to
study biology or history, for
instance, she would borrow a tape
textbook from the library and play
it on her recorder.
She took notes from the text textbooks
books textbooks On her braille writer as
she went along. When she wanted
to take notes, she stopped the
recorder and transcribed the

OOPS! WE GOOFED
In last week's ad for STOCK'S Men's Shop we
mistakenly listed sport coats as starting at $2.50.
Don't you believe it. That price should have
read $22.50. Under "Suits", the price $89.00
should have read $89.95.
i i i

passage in braille. If she wanted
to repeat a passage, she reversed
the recorder to the beginning of
the section and replayed it.
To help students locate passages
the page number of the text' has
been read onto the tape at the
beginning and middle of each page.
The textbooks have been pre prepared
pared prepared by 95 volunteers, selected
carefully. Voices must be clear
and agreeable. Monotone will put a
student to sleep.
UFs Lake
Equipped
New recreational equipment has
been ordered for Camp Wauburg,
according to Howard Margolis,
SEG, secretary of married student
affairs.
A water slide for students, as
well as five sets of swings and
four see-saws for children, will
be set up before the end of the
summer, said Margolis.
The project was made possible
through the combined efforts of
student government and the
Mayors Council. More items will
probably be added, said Margolis.
Margolis commented, M The
playground equipment will be suit suitably
ably suitably located so that mothers near
the waterfront can keep an eye on
their children.

Page 5



The Florida Alligator Thursday, July 11,1963

Page 6

I gator CLASSIFIEDS
TO PLACE YOUR MESSAGE ON THIS PAGE CALL UNIVERSITY EXTENSION 2832 OR STOP IN ROOM 12, FLORIDA UNION BUILDING

For Sale

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Call FR 6-2380. (A-135-3t-c).
FOR SALE G.E. Steam Iron;
Sunbeam Hair Dryer; Portable
mixer, Portable Royal, Arvin
heater, Zenith Combination, gold
cutlery, small chest, Professional
books, 1957 World Book Encyclo-

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Flavet 111. HUGH EDWARDS, INC.
372-1551. (A-134-ts-c).

For Rent

AVAILABLE August 15th Reserve
ahead Two small efficiency

apartments clean, convenient and
comfortable. Across from campus
at 321 S. W. 13th St. One with
kitchen one without. Lease for
nine months or by the year. Ideal
for mature quiet men. Two men
for one apartment, possibly three
for the other. (B-135-lt-c).
TWO 3 and 4 BEDROOM furnished
Apts, available in September. For
further information call Mr.
Kaplan. 372 0481. (B-132-st-c).

Wanted

WANTED: 1950 through 54 Fords
and Chevrolets. Al Herdons
Service Station, 916 SE 4th Street.
(C-134-4t-c).
CASH ON DELIVERY: Will buy
phonograph records. Will consider
all forms and all* speeds. Primary
interest long playing records.
FR 6-7016. (C-132-ts-c).

Autos

6l VW Sedan, heater, white whitewalls,
walls, whitewalls, light green Best offer.
See at Jennings Hall, Room 1120
afternoons after 1 p.m.
(G-135-lt-p).
FOR SALE Oldsmobile in
excellent condition to make room.
Will sell for S3OO cash. 321 SW
13th St. (G-135-lt-c).

Florida Union Films
Friday & Saturday, July 12 & 13
FIVE
PENNIES
Showing at 7& 9 p.m. Admission so<£
Medical Center Auditorium
A STORY ABOUT FLORIDA
FILMED IN FLORIDA
NOW SHOWING AT THE FLORIDA THEATRE
the dolphin
MEIROCOLOB ws: r

57 BUICK Convertible, white paint
and red interior, PS, PB, WSW.
Going home. Must sell. SSOO.
FR 2-9855, Miss Lugo.
(G-135-3t-p).
1953 PLYMOUTH. Motor in good
condition. Reliable transportation.
Only $75. Call; FR 2-6679 or
207 R Flavet 111. (G-135-lt-c).
GOING .TO EUROPE? THE
CONTINENT? Let us arrange for
delivery of your new Triumph or
Fiat anywhere. We take your old
car in trade here and arrange for
delivery of your new car there.
Use it to tour the continent and
return it to the States with you.
Call Ken Bowman, FR 2-4373.
Barkley Motors, Inc. Lincoln
Mercury Meteor Comet
Triumph Fiat. (G-125-12t-c).

Help Wanted

NOW INTERVIEWING coeds from
Palatka, Ocala, Leesburg and
Tavares. Full time August sales
worlf. May be worked part time
during fall. Commission basis.
Mr. Briggs, FR 2 2190.
(E-135-3t-p).
WANTED Male for night work
beginning in September. Call
University extension 2832 for
details between 8:30 and 5 p.m.
(E-134-ts-c).

NEED MONEY? Earn good money
while in college. Call or write
Jim Cooper & Associates, Room
20 6, Security Building,
Gainesville, Florida. FR 6-9783.
(E -133-st-c).

Services

RUBYS ALTERATIONS, 1238 SW
3rd Avenue across street from
Administration Building.
(M-129-ts-c).
TYPING DONE ON IBM electric
typewriter. Will type on short
notice. Reasonable rates. Phone
Mrs. Martinez FR 6-3261, Ext.
257 5 weekdays or FR 6-.1859
weekends or nights. (M-127-ts-c).

SAVE
ON GATOR
CLASSIFIEDS
CONSECUTIVE
INSERTIONS:
One Day
20 words SI.OO
25 words 1.15
30 words 1.30
35 words 1.45
40 words 1.60
3 Consecutive Days
20 words $2.40
25 words 2.50
30 words 2.60
35 words 2.70
40 words 2.80
5 Consecutive Days
20 words $3.00
25 words 3.10
30 words 3.20
35 words 3.30
40 words 3.40
Held Over 2nd Big Week!
SPECIAL ENGAGEMENT!
I E I
I INTERNATIONALLY I
I ACCLAIMED HIT I
I JUST AS IT WAS I
I SHOWN IN THE I
jl MAJOR CAPITALS V:
JOF THE WORLDIfi
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ZANLICK'S IIIC
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WITH 42 niV
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Bosod on Iko Book |
'Â¥ jT Z ** COAHEUUS AY AN |
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3 Performances Daily
1:00-4:30-8:00 p.m.
PASSES



behind the eightball*

t'l Had A
Good Coach

By CHARLES GOODYEAR
Sports Editor
It was with a great deal of pleasure that I was able Lo report
elsewhere that Coach Percy Beard has been elected to the Helms
Foundation Hall of Fame for his achievements on the track and as a
coach.
I was talking to Coach Sterling Dupree, the head football recruiter,
about the fact that back in the 30s he had run the 100 and 220 yard
dashes in times that would still win most college meets. He just
pointed to Coach Beard and said, I had a good coach.
I dont feel that I can pay a higher tribute to the man than to affirm
the statement.
Brian Sternberg
Last week, Marty Stone gave his views on the pole vaulting situation.
I am not in sympathy with that viewpoint, but Brian Sternberg, a
sophomore at the University of Washington is. He has only broken
the worlds record three times this season and holds the currently
pending mark of 16-8. He has said on a number of occasions that
Cornelius Warmerdan is the best ever because he cleared heights
that others using the bamboo pole still have not approached.
Sternberg is, as many writers pointed out, a gymnast. This past
week, he was critically injured in a trampoline accident and may be
permanently paralyzed as a result. He has always been very modest,
in the press/and praised his fellow vaulters, such as John Pennell.
It is a shame that this accident had to happen, but John Thomas, our
foremost high jumper, was injured in a freak elevator accident as a
sophomore and thought never to be able to walk properly again.
I hope that Sternberg similarly recovers, as the world of sports
can always use such a talented, humble person.

Fireball Wins
Fireball Roberts won the Fire Firecracker
cracker Firecracker 400 mile stock car race
at the Daytona International
Speedway on the Fourth.
Fred Lorenzen and Marvin
Panch followed very closely in a
disputed finish over second and
third.
HOW THEY FINISHED
1. Fireball Roberts, Ford
2. Fred Lorenzen, Ford
3. Marvin Panch, Ford
4. Darel Dieringer, Mercury
5. Ned Jarret, Ford
6. David Pearson, Dodge
Rollins Crew
Suffers Loss
The Rollins College crew from
Winter Park lost in the semifinal
Os the Thames Cup for secondary
eight-oared teams. This was part
of the famed Henley Royal Regatta
in which Cornell, the US cham champions,
pions, champions, had been favored in the
heavier class.
The Rollins team had gone tc
England because of a donation by
an anonymous person, presumec
to be the father of one of the tearr
members, in order to gair
experience in big competition.
They were as surprised as anyone
that they got as far as they did.
WHATS
NEW
IN THE JULY
ATLANTIC?
Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr.: History,
as written in recent times, has become
a science rather than an art. The His Historian
torian Historian as Artist" is a plea for the re return
turn return to the tradition of history as art.
A Little More Time for Violence":
David Lowe replies to a unique
proposal (May Atlantic) that South
Africa be given time to solve its own
problems.
Exercise and Heart Disease": Sam Samp
p Samp A. Levine. M.D. disagrees with Dr.
aul Dudley White's view that physical
exercise is useful in preventing heart
disease.
U.SO
Artist at Work: Marc Chagall: A
special Supplement by Carlton
axe on Chagall's inspiring /W.
stained glass art.
Every month the
Atlantic provides a
D'attorm for many of Xi.
the world s most ar articuiate
ticuiate articuiate and creative
m en and women. The
result is always enter
tairnng and mfor ria riat've
t've riat've often brilliant.oc brilliant.occasionally
casionally brilliant.occasionally orofound
Wore and more, the
Atlantic is finding its
wav m to the hands of % XON
discerning readers. X SALE
Get your*copy today. NOW

McKinley Wins,
Miss Moffit Loses
Chuck McKinely brought
the Wimbledon mens singles
crown back to the US after an
eight-year absence with a 9-7,
6-1, 6-4 victory in the finals over
Fred Stolle of Australia.
McKinley was offered $50,000
for the first year if he would turn
pro. He refused the offer of Tony
Trabert who was the last US citizen
to win the title.
McKinly wants to finish his
mathematics course at Trinity
University, San Antonia, Tex. He
will complete it in January.
McKinley next represents the US
with the Davis Cup team.
Billie Jean Moffit of Long Beach
Calif., lost in the womens singles
finals on Monday. She was the last
hope for an American sweep.

CLEARANCE SALE
IVY SLACKS, DACRON & COTTON
by Townhouse & Glaser
9.98..
7.98.. 5.50
NATIONALLY ADVERTISED SPORT COATS
24.95 Now 20.95
19.95 Now 15.95
17.95 Now 13.95
15.95 Now 11.95
MADRAS, STRIPES AND SOLIDS
Sport Shirts
5.95 Now 4.95
4.95 Now 3.95
3.95 Now 2.95
BATHING SUITS
1/ Arr BELTS
74 Orr WALK SHORTS
T-SHIRTS
SOCKS
tnrra! men-sshop
* -*_

BASEBALL]

CLUB STANDINGS
Through Tuesday
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Pet. GB
New York *617
Chicago *553 5
Boston *543 6
Minnesota *542 6
Baltimore *540 6
Cleveland *524 7 1/2
Los Angeles 4 r ? 1 12
Kansas City *439 14 1/2
Detroit *427 15 1/2
Washington *349 22 1/2
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Los Angeles .602
San Francisco .565 3
Chicago .549 4 j/2
St. Louis .548 4 1/2
Cincinnati .529 g
Milwaukee .518 7
Pittsburgh .494 9
Philadelphia .476 iq 1/2
Houston .379 19
New York .345 21 1/2
ISOMETRICS
For the fifth in a series of
isometric exercises, we try the
bench press.
In trying the bench press with
weights, particularly by yourself,
you can run into trouble and could
kill yourself if the weights fell.
With isometrics, there is nothing
to fall, hence it is very safe.
You can use a rope, tied into
one continuous piece or stand with
your back to one side of a door doorframe
frame doorframe and hold a pipe against
the other or just place your hands
on it.
With the rope, place it around
your back so that your arms can
not be straightened fully in front
of you. In either case, try to
straighten your arms. Th's will
greatly strengthen your arms and
shoulders and will expand your
chest somewhat if you employ
deep breathing as an aid.
Try to vary the length of rope
in order to get different angles in
your arms. This is one reason why
a rope is better than a doorframe.
If you procure a piece of rope,
you can use it for many other
exercises which will be mentioned
later as well as ones which you
think-up yourself.

Thursday, July 11,1963 The Florida Alligator

Gators First Foe
Tough Ga. Tech

Lets take a look at our first
opponent, Georgia Tech. What are
their strong points and
weaknesses?
In the first place, the Yellow
Jackets are the complete reverse
of the Gators. Their strong points
are at end and in the backfield.
Georgia Tech has some of the
best ends in the conference, lead
by Billy Martin, 6-5 and weighing
235 lbs. Some of you will remember
that he caught the touchdown pass
that broke our backs last year.
As a pass receiver, in my esti estimgtion,
mgtion, estimgtion, he has the best hands in
the conference.
The second end on the Georgia
Tech squad is Ted Davis. He is
another small end at 6-2 and
weighing 225. Davis is the best
all around end of thd two, but
not very spectacular. I played
across the line from Davis last
year, and in my personal opinion
he was the best defending and
blocking end we played all year.
Georgia Techs backfield, says
Bobby Dodd, should be pretty good.
In my book, if Bobby Dodd says
he has a good backfield coming
up, hes got a great backfield
coming. The top back in Coach
Dodds arsenal is Billy
Lothridge, Mister Everything.
You know that touchdown pass Billy
Martin caught that broke our back,
well, it was thrown by Lothridge.
Both were team mates in high
school, and are very close. In a
passing situation, Lothridge will
throw to Martin 50% of the time.
The rest of the backfield is
talented, not real big, bqt fast.
Lothridge is. the key to Techs
hopes. If he comes through,
Georgia Tech will do well, and
vice -versa. Hes also an
All-American candidate.
Their interior line will be of
the unknown quality. I said unknown
not weak or a push-over.

iz MotTittif
A{ DifJn3 t'^3
This is how she looks sometimes when Daddy
comes home from work and she was too busy to
buy some dinner. Daddy always pats her head
and says Thats Okay Because I Will Take Us
All To Dinner At Macs House. Thats what
Mommy had in mind all along. I think Daddy
knew it too but he never gets mad because he
likes to go eat at Macs House as much as
anybody.
MACS HOUSE
520 S.W. 2nd Avenue FR 2-6514

Inside Report

By RUSS BROWN
Staff Writer

OVERALL
The kicking games should be
equal, along with the passing. I
feel we may be a little stronger
with our running, with our
superiority in the line. Defense
might be tilted in favor of Georgia
Tech. The more I think about the
game, the more I wish I could
watch the game on television. You
know, where I'll be, people will
keep getting in the way of the
action. Its hard watching the game
from a prone position.

YPon't /eta Lifeguard%
Good watches
Tho nor* oxpontlvo your watch, tho mor#
it Rood* tho at tool ion of oxporti. But or ordinary
dinary ordinary watch** nood antra ipaclat car#
boCawto hooping partner tiara it not |ult
built-in. ft i tho aotolt of antra car*.
omenS3Ett^^
237 W. Unhrororty Auoauo

Page 7



Page 8

The Florido Alligator Thursday, July 11,1963

Coach Beard Elected to Track Hall of Fame

Summer Softball Schedule
Thursday, July 11, 5:00
Field
#1 Wasps vs Chemistry
#2 Ramrods vs Civil Engrs.
#3 Barristers vs Bombers
#4 Foulballs vs PKP
Thursday, July 11, 6:00
Field
#1 Forgys vs Corry I
#2 Tol. IV vs PDT
#3 Corry II vs Fla. 11l
#4 Scoffers vs Holidays
Tuesday, July 16, 5:00
Field
#1 Barristers vs Fla. 11l
#2 Tol. IV vs Civil Engrs.
#3 Foulballs vs Holidays
#4 East HI vs PKP'
Anyone interested in table tennis
Pi ease contact the Intramural
office, Fla. Gym, room 229 or Ext.
2889 by July 17, 5:00 P.M. Dead Deadline
line Deadline for volleyball entries will be
5:00 Wednesday, July 17. Volley Volleyball
ball Volleyball will start Monday, July 22.

ppr.
MU' TRIUMPH SPITFIRE
Over 12 feet long, speed over 90 m.p.h.,
disc brakes, independent suspension,
roll-up windowsnow only $2199 *at
n BARKLEY MOTORS, NC
Open until 8 p.m., with 2 locations to serve you
N. Main St. at 23rd Blvd., 372-6353
615 N. Main St., 372-4373
In the Auto Game Barkley's the Name"
* plus state tax, license and transportation
r ".....

Randy Webster _ m j m
Music To Eat Your Pizza By
RANDY WEBSTER, the boss man at TONY'S PIZZA is on the air; from 3 to 5 afternoons on WPUP. Make your requests at TONY'S PIZZA
Come on in and give the name of your favorite tune to Jimmy Grimes, Randy's manager, as you order your pizza. If Randy has the tune he'll
play it especially for: (Your Name) on the air, IMMEDIATELY, on "Randy's Record Show"
Tonii's Pizza Prices R a ,,lia, na WBh 0 s ,l,,rn
9 "Youve Tried The Rest... Now
pizza S, J Try The Best! You Owe This
TOMATO & CHEESE. ........ .85 1.35 1.7 C Treat To Yourself!"
PEPPERONI 1.00 1.55 1.95
SAUSAGE 1.05 1.60 2.0 C AIR CONDITIONED DINING ROOM
MUSHROOMS 1.20 1.65 2.20
PEPPERONI & SAUSAGE 1.30 1.80 2.50 PLENTY OF ATMOSPHERE & MUSIC
SAUSAGE AND MUSHROOMS s 1.30 1.80 2.50
ANCHOVIES 1.15 1.60 2.C0 DELIVERY SERVICE!
MUSHROOMS & PEPPERONI ....1.3C 1.80 2.50
TONYS SPECIAL(THEWORKS). .. 1.50. 2.25 3.00 FAST, COURTEOUS SERVICE
CALL IN YOUR ORDER TO TONY'S! A
JUST DIAL 372 -.8548 AND IT WILL 111 |\l Y X f*\£_ / A CORNER OF UNIVERSITY
BE READY WHEN YOU ARRIVEI Wll 1 W 1 1 AND THIRTEE NTH STREET

MURALS

BOWLING STANDINGS
BRACKET I Won Lost
Tolbert 3 j
Playboys 2 2
PKP 2 3
PGD 1 4
Barristers o 5
Cuban Comets o
D
BRACKET II Won Lost
Physics I 4 0
PLP 3 1
SC&BA -2 2
Ramrods 1 3
Corry II 0 4
BRACKET 111 Won Lost
Corry I 4 o
BTP 3 -i
physics 2 2
AIAA 1 3
Teps 1 3
Sig Eps 0 4

Widely Respected
Coach and Athlete
Coach Percy Beard has been
elected to the Helms Foundation
Track Hall of Fame. This honor
has been bestowed on him for his
outstanding career in track, both
as a star and coach.
Only two other coaches in the
SEC are members, Wilbur Huttsill,
hi s own coach at Auburn who
retired this year and Red Drew
of Alabana. Drew was elected
along with Beard this. year.
Beard, a native Kentuckian, had
never participated in athletics be before
fore before entering college. He was the
only boy in his high school
graduating class of six. In fact,
the only organized sport he had
seen was baseball.
After he arrived at Auburn, he
became interested in track and
during his final two years, he lost
only two dual meet races. After
he graduated, he ran four outdoor
and five indoor seasons with the
New York Athletic Club and lost
only one indoor race during that
period.
At the national AAU meet in
1931, Beard set the world record
for the 120 yard high hurdles in
the time of 14.2 seconds. Five
years later, he repeated the
distance in the same time. He
was second in the 1932 Olympics.
While on a European tour with
the National AAU team, he se,t
the Worlds record for the 110-
meter high hurdles. In 1934, beard
held the world record for the 110
meter high hurdles, 120 yard high
hurdles, the 70 yard indoor, the
60 yard indoor and the 6t meter
indoor high hurdles.
In 1959, Coach Beard was
selected to be one of the coaches
of the Uiiited States team in the
Pan American Games, was
a member of the Olympic Track
and Field Committee to select
the U. S. Olympic Team, and was
reappointed for 1964.

K
m
M
- K
m
fe ? ;' ~ ;VV 9
1
.
2

COACH PERCY BEARD
.. .Assistant Athletic Director, Track Coach and Business
Manager, now member of the Track Hall of Fame.

During the years, he has
constantly innovated new track
equipment such as the concrete
shot and discus rings, the rub rubberized
berized rubberized -ashphalt track and
runways for jumping events, and
other refinements.
The All-Star game was
won 5-3 by the National
League. WilJie Mays was
the outstanding player.

Girls 220 Record
Shirley Wilson of the Compton,
Calif., Track Club set an American
girls record of 24.5 seconds for
the 220 yard dash last week.
Her mark, set in the semjfipals
of the National AAU Championship
meet for women, erased the 25
flat mark of Norma Harris set
in 1962. Miss Harris also bettered
her old time in winning her heat in
24.7.