Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
SAEs Take
Service Prize
Sigma Alpha Epsilon (SAE)
fraternity yesterday was awarded
the Klein H. Graham Service trophy
by the Greek Council of the UF
Religious Association.
The rotating trophy replaces
the Dan McCarty Trophy which
was stolen earlier this year from
the Lambda Chi Alpha house.
The McCarty Trophy was
awarded annually by the Interfra Interfraternity
ternity Interfraternity Council to the fraternity
or sorority which contributed the
most service to the state, city
and university.
The new trophy is named in
honor of Klein H. Graham, UF
business manager for 41 years.
Seminole Sets
Distribution
The winter trimester edition
of the Seminole, UF yearbook, will
be distributed starting Monday at
1 p.m. at the Information Booth
across from the Student Service
Center (Hub).
Graduating seniors leaving the
UF before Monday may have their
Seminole mailed to them free of
charge by leaving their name and
address in Florida Union, Room
14. Other students leaving before
Monday also may have their year yearbook
book yearbook mailed to them by coming
to room 14 and paying asl handling
fee.

The Florida
Alligator

V 01.55, No. 124 University of Florida/Gainesville Thursday, April 11,1963

Board of Control Pushes
For Space-Age Fund
. 1.. in a ii

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) The
State Board of Control yesterday
cemented its stand to press to the
hilt' requests to the legislature
for $164 million to launch Florida's
university system into the space
age.
The board, in effect, voted to
push just as hard for new col colleges
leges colleges and universities as for ex expansion
pansion expansion of existing institutions,
particularly in the field of re research
search research and graduate work.
The board said it would not
back down in any area, including
the $22 million proposed by a space

Vv
i I

THE FACES OF FOLK SINGERS on the UF campus express many
moods happiness* thought, dreamy-eyed. All four of these fingers

The Many Moods of Music ...

gator Sirl

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UF VERSION OF THE EASTER RABBIT
. . is today's Gator Girl. Roughly six inches tall with pink eyes and black and
white fur, she (or he) is nameless. The Easter Bunny may not be welcomed very
warmly this year as students will be in the midst of finals.

era education study and the $142
million in basic appropriations for
existing institutions.
Several board members disa disagreed
greed disagreed on whether the basic ap appropriation
propriation appropriation for established univer universities
sities universities should not take precedence
over new institutions, including a
college at Pensacola and a uni university
versity university in the Orlando-Canaveral-
Daytona area.
We took our stand long ago,"
said board member Frank Bucha Buchanan,
nan, Buchanan, Miami, and I think we
should push every bit of the bud budget,
get, budget, no matter what its for. Thats

the only way well get it."
Charles Forman, Fort Lauder Lauderdale
dale Lauderdale said It must be made
clear that, if cuts are made by
the legislature, they should not
necessarily come out of the $22
million in space era recommen recommendations.
dations. recommendations.
We cant just tell students in
Pensacola, for instance,were
sorry we cant give you a school
now."
The space era package includes
$2 million for the Pensacola col college
lege college and $500,000 to plan the Uni University
versity University in East Central Florida.

Burke Recommended
For Ad Sales Slot

Gary Burke, former business
manager of student publications,
has been recommended for adver advertising
tising advertising manager of student


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at
1 i, |
GAKY BURKE
. new ad manager?

, o
will appear on a UF-produced record, selling for $3 beginning
Monday at the Campus Shop and Book Store.

Dan O'Connell
Will Present
Keynote Talk
Dan OConnell, one of the UFs
five delegates to the Southern Uni Universities
versities Universities Student Government As Association
sociation Association (SUSGA) convention April,
25, will present its keynote
address.
Frank Harshaw, Mike Jackson,
Mac Melvin and Chip Block or
Steve Freedman will accompany
O'Connell to the three-day conven convention
tion convention at Louisiana State University.
SUSGA consists of 51 Southern
universities and serves as
a medium for exchange of ideas
by student government leaders.
SUSGA is one of the best public
relations devices available for stu student
dent student government, said OConnell,
a vice chairman of the associa association.
tion. association. It serves as a teacher
by making educational experiences
available to UF student leaders.
One of the things this years
delegates plan to present at the
convention is inviting the next
publications workshop to meet at
the UF, according to OConnell.
Presently SUSGA maintains an
entertainment buying cooperative
between member schools. Top
name artists are contracted by
SUSGA and available to member
schools at specified times during
the year.

publications.
The recommendation, which
must be approved by the UF per personnel
sonnel personnel department, was made
Monday by the Board of Student
Publications.
A resident of North Palm Beach,
Burke is currently an economics
major in the college of Arts and
Sciences. He is expected to
graduate in June.
Previously the position which
was held by William Epperheimer,
paid $6,500 per year. Epperheimer
was recently appointed acting actingexecutive
executive actingexecutive secretary of the Board
of Student Publications.
No salary has been set for Burke.
Burke transfered here from the
University of Kansas in the fall
of 1958. Since that time he has
been active in student publications
serving as business manager of
the Orange Peel, assistant bus business
iness business manager of the Florida
Alligator, business manager of
Scope and advertising manager
of the Alligator.



Page 2

The Florida Alligator Thursday, Aprini,l963

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COUNSELING FOREIGN STUDENT
. Rene Cabrera is foreign student advisor W. W. Young.

L
USUAL/ CANDIES

THE BELL TELEPHONE COMPANIES
SALUTE: DON GEORGE

Don George fB.S.E.E., 1957) is responsible for putting
together a S2O million annual construction budget. Don is
Senior Engineer for Plant Expansion in Southwestern
Bells Oklahoma City office.
On his first assignment, Don was an Assistant Equip Equipment
ment Equipment Engineer. Then came a promotion to Senior Engineer
and the challenge of supervising eight people, including

BELL TELEPHONE COMPANIES
TELEPHONE
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PATRONIZE GATOR
ADVERTISERS
KUYKENDALLS
PURE OIL
Service Station
22 N.W. 13th Street
Cracked Eggs 3 doz $1

PARKETTE
OPEN 24 HOURS
BREAKFAST SPECIAL 29(
LARGE RIB EYE STEAK SI.OO
LARGE T-BONE STEAK -$1.19
QUARTER FRIED CHICKEN $ .50
226 W. University Ave.

both non-management and management personnel. These
earlier steps provided Don with opportunities and proved
he could handle the difficult job hes on now.
Don George and other young engineers like him in
Bell Telephone Companies throughout the country help
bring the finest communications service in the world to the
homes and business of a growing America.

Last in a Series

Good Neighbor
Policy Needed

By TOVA LEVINE
Staff Writer
The relationship between foreign
and American students is perhaps
the most important thing for both
sides concerned.
Educators contend a good friend friendship
ship friendship policy among the youth of the
foreign countries and of the United
States will help promote better
foreign relations among the
countries themselves.
UF foreign students, although
most all of them, immediately say
that the American students have
been extremely friendly towards
them, recognize certain subtle
restraints and barriers between
them. These barriers are usually

broken when the students get to
know each other better.
The graduate students have much
fewer problems in this vein --
in problems relating to adjustment
and student relationship than do
undergraduates.
Most of the foreign students and
the American students feel that an
effort is necessary on the part of
both parties involved, to fill that
something that is lacking, that
difference that must be understood.
Many foreign students tend to
stick together with their own,
because were all in the same
boat, we have the same
problems, and come from the same
cultures.
According to Amelia Mejia, luc
from Columbia, I was friends
with the foreign students mainly
at first. The girls in the dorm
were very nice, but we didnt
become close friends.
They had different subjects to
talk about. Now I know these girls
better and have become good
friends. There has tobe something
both ways both must give up
something to become friends de despite
spite despite basic differences.
Some of the students have varied
opinions on the problem.
The American student tends to
keep to himself. He is friendly
when you get to know him, when
both go out of the way he is
friendly, says Sabodh Garg, 7EG
from India.
The foreign student gets a good
picture of the. Americans the
warmth, the friends they make
here, and the willingness of the
people to help us, Viviem Diaz
2UC from Cuba, cites.
One major criticism UF foreign
students note about American stu students
dents students is lack of interest in foreign
affairs.
There is a lack of interest in
problems faced by foreign
countries. Some students seem to
feel that they have no great desire
to make real human contact with
students from other parts of the
world. The American students are
friendly, but only a small
percentage are more than friendly
below the surface, Jacques
Franco, 7AG from Peru comments.
According to Franco, the
greatest barriers are still customs
and language. There must be an
effort halfway the foreign
students must make an effort to
adapt, while the American students
must be willing to meet this
desire.
Another student classifies three
types of students at the UF: those
who are narrow-minded towards
foreign students; those who are in
fields that concern foreign
countries and are sincerely in interested
terested interested in foreign students and
the majority those who dont
care where a person is from as
long as hes a nice guy.
UF foreign students have several
suggestions to make to improve
the foreign student program on
campus:
1) To expand the Florida Blue
Key sponsor host program to
include more students (both foreign
and American) and to improve on
this program in certain inefficient
areas.
2) To encourage the American
students to join one of the foreign
student organizations to meet the
students personally;
3) To encourage the foreign
students to get into more campus
student activities for a closer
association with the American
students;
4) To have more American Americanforeign
foreign Americanforeign student mixers such
as parties and discussions.
Thus, UF foreign students feel
that if a general attitude of good
will prevails whereby the
American student will put himself
in the foreigners place and sin sincerely
cerely sincerely try to establish closer
contact, friendship, and under understanding
standing understanding and if the foreign students
will respond to this a much better
relationship will follow.



Just Strummin Along Is
Journalisms Don Grooms

Journalism Prof. Don Grooms
talks of folk music as if it were
as natural as walking. And well
he might.
, In my part of the country,"
Grooms said, a child first learns
to play the guitar or the five-string
banjo. Then he learns to walk."
My part of the country" for
Grooms is western North
Carolinas Great Smoky
Mountain, where he was born and
where he first learned folk music
as a seemingly natural event in
his mountaineer childhood.
The star performer of recent
Journalism Award Night banquet,
Grooms said folk music had al always
ways always played a part in his family's
life.
"But I never knew it was even
called folk musicuntilafewyears
ago when it became fashionable,"
Grooms said. "This sort of music
has been handed down from genera generation
tion generation to generation in the mountains,
and I simply learned what all other
hill people knew.
Grooms was born about 30 miles
from Waynesville, N.C., in the
heart of the Great Smokies.
Neither he nor any other member
of his family had any formal music
training, he said but everyone in
the family played the guitar as a
part of their everyday living.
"Folk music recently has
become fashionable," Grooms

THE BEST BUY IN
TOWN ON MADRAS
SPECIAL
/
IS THE
W GENUINE BLEEDING MADRAS
The more you wash it, the richer
it . that's how Madras con connoisseurs
noisseurs connoisseurs know it's the genuine
from India. No two plaids are
alike because each short piece of
cloth is hand-dyed in native cot cottages
tages cottages . and each is handsomer
than the next. Add traditional
- button-down detailing (Hared col collar
lar collar curve, hack pleat, hack button,
hanger loop, tapered tailoring)
p and vou h.oc u.ia\ s most authen authentically
tically authentically smalt M-ortshirts.
V v Mens Shop,

said, "because people want some something
thing something solid to hold.
"Some explain this revival of
Interest in folk music by saying

M ._ 2*lo
?

GUITAR PLAYING
. . journal ism professor
Donald Grooms.
some people dont like what they
find in modern living and want
to return to the more substantive
ways of the past.
I think this is a correct view,
for folk music does have a solid,

substantial beat. The words of
a folk song mean something."
Grooms pointed to the limited
choice confronting music listeners
today as a further explanation of
the folk revival.
"Other than the traditional
classic music, there is actually
little for people to hear," he said.
"Country music, or hillbilly, has
no substance and is little more
than popular music sung in country
style. Rock-and-roll is also lack lacking
ing lacking in substance and closely related
to the so-called country music.
"Then we have the bland, popular
types that are little more than
background music."
But folk music, he explained,
with its meaningful words and
played in a mournful, minor key,
demands attention.
"You cant use folk music for
background at dinner time,"
Grooms said. "You have to listen
to it to get anything from it."
Grooms joined the UF
journalism faculty after receiving
his masters degree from the Uni University
versity University of California at
Los Angeles.
He did undergraduate work at
Florida Southern College and at
Southern Methodist University.
He has worked for advertising
agencies, press associations,
radio stations, magazines and
newspapers.
His wife Carole, a Texan, was
introduced to folk music by
Grooms.
She didnt like it at first,"
he said, but in visits to the
mountains she had much first firsthand
hand firsthand contact with folk music and
has come to appreciate it."
And two-year-old son, Geoffrey,
Grooms explains, also plays the
guitar and sings.
His first toy was a small
guitar," he said.
In addition to his teaching and
folk singing, Grooms listed another
major activity.
He is currently working on a
novel which he expects to be pub published
lished published soon. rs
Its sort of a split-level folk
tale," Grooms said.

I
E tH
i,
m&k i 0 '7, Hp :r:|§
Does a man really take unfair advantage of women
when he uses Mennen Skin Bracer?
All depends on why he uses it. §KMM
Most men simply think Menthol-Iced Skin Bracer is the best mUiM
after-shave lotion around. Because it cools rather than burns.
Because it helps heal shaving nicks and scrapes. Because it
helps prevent blemishes. r^T
So who can blame them if Bracers crisp, long-lasting aroma ||w|skjnbroMM'|
just happens to affect women so remarkably? !#'"" eIM
Os course, some men may use Mennen Skip Bracer because jp jH
of this effect ,< ft Hr* M 4
How intelligent! LMj ftiacsZSSSaMft

Thursday, April 11,1963 The Florida Alligator

w 'r Millinery Shop,
2nd Flwr
FRIDAY & SATURDAY ONLY
HT x **4vtt f
20% OF|||
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Page 3



The Florida Alligator Thursday, April 11,1963

Page 4

Theyre r Working WivesPlus

A small group of wives spend
each night with children-not their
children, but children who for dif different
ferent different reasons are forced to stay
in the hospital for a lengthy time.
These wives are part of a UF
Dames project whereby each night
from 5-9 p.m. volunteers from
one of the 13 Dame groups sit
with children in the pediatric clinic
in the J. Hillis Miller Health
Center.
From 5 to 9 in the evening
is the loneliest time for children
in the hospital, according to me medlcal

Gmusnut
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Movie Information FR 5 WJI
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see 2 as late as 9:15
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COMKMinO WHOMCWC V
Suzanne PiESHEiiE'Cuitt wun
2nd hit at 7:15: John
Hersey's World War II
Novel
Oft STEVE McQUEEN
I l;.r n ROBERT WAGNER
HOVER
3rd hit at 11 p.m.
TROY DONAHUE CLAUDETTE COLBERT MR. MAIDEN

A HANDFUL OF HEROES IBPR
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WALT DISNEY technicolor |
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M:RISCM pic t ulS presents H mm. l I I I I II I I I
"WEST SIDE STORY''
NATALIE WOOD
RICHARD BEYMER RUSS TAMBLYN
RITA MORENO GEORGE CHAKIRIS lllir = ~X /
McnD X ROBERT WISE JEROME ROBBINS . . ERNEST LEHMAN
associate pwooucta saul chapun cmcwiocrp' b> JEROME ROBBINS Ml ilf i\l
music .v LEONARD BERNSTEIN o. . STEPHEN SONDHEIM Iwlf/7
BASE O UPON THE STAGE PEAT PNOOUCID BY ROBERT [ GRIFFITH N 0 HAROLD S PRINCE H / /
booa BY ARTHUR LAURENTS 1 MM Wf
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PNOOUCTION OESHiNEO BY BOP'S lIYCN I**o 'N P>> SiON '0 *>N oXOB* IP HI H Wm Wk/
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NOW SHOWING! 3 SHOW|NGS DAILY
No Reserved Seats! ( d *jv a
Sorry, No Passes! ~ 8:00

dlcal medlcal Dames advisor Mrs. Richard
T. Smith, who suggested the
project.
Many of the parents of the
children, who are in the pediatric
clinic because of illness live out of
town/* Mrs. Smith said. They
can only visit their children on
weekends so in the evenings these
children are especially lonely.
The volunteers from the Univer University
sity University Dames sit with the children,
play with them, entertain them
and in some cases even change
diapers, according to Mrs. Sihith.
Usually about 50 children are in
the clinic and no two of them

I HEELS put on in 5 minute
1 SPIES put on in 15 minutes.
I MODERN SHOE
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gocross from Ist notionol bank
tflijHfl}|lJ Tonite &
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hit# 1- "NEVER SAY
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Rock Hudson
hit #2
"Trouble was never so muck fun/
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have the same disease or injury.
Children in the clinic range from
infants to 14 years.
According to Mrs. L.
Daniels, immediate past president
of the University Dames, the
Dames try to have about 10 pro projects
jects projects a year. Projects range from
fashion shows to Easter and
Christmas activities for children
in the pediatric clinic.
Although the project at the pedia pediatric
tric pediatric clinic was suggested by the
Medical Dames and Mrs. Smith,
the project is carried out by all
the University Dames and each col college
lege college group contributes volunteers
for the project.
MSCI7O MSCI7O
- MSCI7O Reply
MSC 170 is the UFs answer to
the New York Philharmonic.
MSC 170 is the University
Symphony Orchestra. The 65
member orchestra provides one
credit hour to any participating
student.
About 50 per cent of the
orchestra is composed of
students, said Conductor Edward
Troupin, The rest is made up
of faculty members and Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville residents.
The orchestra, which began to
come into its own in 1948, now
plays to about 18,000 people each
year.
We play in Daytona Beach each
year, and last year we went to
New Orleans, he said.
Lost and Found
Booth To Open
The Lost and Found Bootn in
the Student Service Center (HUB)
will be open from 2 to 4 p.m.
Friday.
Many lost items remain at the
booth to be claimed, according to
the Mens President Council, op operators
erators operators of the booth.
The council urges students to
take advantage of this last char-ce
to reclaim their lost articles from
the booth.
Student Rates
Double Occupancy $6
April 9 Mon., April 16
Tom Sawyer
Motor Inn
3335 S.W. 13th St.

Faculty, Students
Set Europe Flight

Thirty-five UF faculty and stu students
dents students will be flown to London via
Alitalia Airlines for two months
of travel and sightseeing in Europe
this summer.
The Florida Union Board of
Student Activities has launched its
first successful Group Flight to
Europe, with people on a waiting
list hoping for cancellations.
We were afraid we wouldnt
get the minimum 25 deposits for
the flight, said program coor coordinator
dinator coordinator Karen Hendrick. But now
find we are over the maximum 35.
The first 35 who registered
will make the trip, she said.
We didnt realize we could only
register 35 until it was too late.

UF Scientists Study Cattle

UF scientists are currently
conducting studies with cattle and
sheep to find out just what is
required for digestion of cellulose
an important livestock energy
source.
Cellulose is the carbohydrate
contained in roughages, the
primary ingredient in the diets
of ruminants.
According to Dr. John Moore,
assistant animal nutritionist with
the Agricultural Experiment

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SHOES selected group, solids and
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FILTHY fILTER SPEC IAL
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Town House
CHICKEN DINNER
2 vegetablesrolls
or-french fries, cole slaw....
formerly GOLD HOUSE
2200 S.W. 13th Street

Last year the idea flopped
because we started too late, Mrs.
Hendrick said.
This year we started planning
in November and still had a tough
time making group plane reser reservations
vations reservations for this summer.
The group, about half faculty
and half students, will be on their
own once they reach London.
We are providing for trans transportation
portation transportation to and from London and
thats it, Mrs. Hendrick said.
The group will have two free
months in Europe.
Some members will be going
to work and study, others to tour
and a couple professors are going
to lecture at foreign universities,
she said.

Stations Animal Science Depart Department,
ment, Department, the development of
microorganisms and fermentation
are necessary in the stomach of
an animal before digestion of
cellulose can take place.
In research studies designed
to gain basic information about
rumen fermentation, UF graduate
student J. E. Martin found
magnesium is required by rumen
microorganisms which digest
cellulose.



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1958 VESPA Motorscooter, 125 cc.
Good condition. sl2o. Call 2-9138.
Ask for M. Wexler, Room 524,
Murphree "G. (A-122-3t-c).
1959 ALL STATE CRUISAIRE
Motorscooter. 4.8 bp. Good
condition, new paint Job. SIOO. Call
FR 6-9236. Hal Davis, Room 4128
Hume. (A-123-3t-c).
AIR CONDITIONER, Feders, 110
volts, 8200 BTU. Less than
years old. Excellent conditionalso
FR 2-5898. 1420 NW Ist Avenue.
(A-121-ts-c).
THORENS 3 Speed turntable. G.E.
Mono cartldge. Extra head.
Walnut base. Call after 6 p.m. FR
2-5686. (A-123-3t-c).
180 POUND BARBELL SET.
Includes 25 pound bar, 2 barbells,
all adjustable, like new, S3O. Call
FR 2-6927. (A-122-4t-c).
1962 DUCATI MOTORCYCLE 50
cc., 50 MPH. Asking $l6O. Call
FR 2-9438 or see at 1092 Hume
Hall. (A-122-3t-p).
ENGLISH RACER. Hand Brakes,
gears, baskets, excellent
condition. $25. Call 2-6297.
(A-124-2t-c).
LUXO FLOURESCENT Lamp.
Brand new. S2O. Call W. Payne
FR 6-6203. (A-124-2t-c).
TV AERIAL 21 Sylvania table
model. SSO. FR 6-8642 after 6
p.m. (A-123-3t-c).
FOR SALE One 8 x 46 trailer.
Very good condition. Call FR
6-5576. (A-123-3t-c).
FOR SALE Heater with thermo thermostat,
stat, thermostat, sls. 2 book cases, finished
wood, $5 Wrought iron, $2.
Telescope, 3 in. reflector, sls
with mount. Assorted political
science books and other books of
all types. 1420 NW Ist Ave. FR 2-
5898. (A-121-3t-c).
BEAUTY REST box spring with
legs and mattress. Includes Brown
and yellow cover with full skirt.
S2O. Single box spring with legs,
SB. Two brown wooden chairs chairsflowered
flowered chairsflowered seats, $2 each. Call FR
6-8088 after 12 noon.(A-123-3t-c).
MARRIED STUDENTS Throw off
your shackles of conformity and
move into decent housing. 2 bed bedroom
room bedroom -CB home for sale by student
owner. Aided feature no taxes
outside city limits. FR 6-1908
after 5 p.m. AU day weekends.
(A-113-ts-c).
BY OWNER Very attractive new
home five minutes to campus in
S. W. Large wooded lot. Beam
ceilings, Cyprus paneling,
hardwood floors, large center hall,
tiled kitchen and bathrooms.
Designed for Florida living. FR
2-0328. (A-111-16t-c).
1951 SAFE WAY TRAILER.
30* x 8* with a 10* x 8* cabana.
Fenced in yard. $995. See
at Archer Road Village, 3620 SW
Archer Road, or call Joe Wills,
FR 2-6940. (A-110-ts-c).
FOR SALE Harley-Davidson
motor cycle. 165 cc. Excellent
condition. New tires and battery.
Fariest offer accepted. Call Roger
Kay at FR 2-3780. (A-123-3t-p).
FOR SALE 39' x 8 Southwestern
mobile home with two room cabana.
Must seU by May 4. See at Sheffield
Trailer Park, 4700 SW Archer
'Road, or call jjj. Seals at FR
6-1162. (A-111-ts-c).

For Sale

FOR SALE Banjo and Zenith
Stereo record player. Call FR
6-1523. Riders wanted: New York
City, Washington, Philadelphia.
Leavind April 18. CallF6-1523.
(A-123-3t-p).

1 11
For Rent

FOR RENT 2 room furnished
motel type units with air condi conditioning
tioning conditioning and refrigerator. $28.31
a month per person, double occu occupancy.
pancy. occupancy. 1 block from main library.
Call FR 6-6494 or see at 127 NW
15th Terr. (B-15-lt-c).
TWO 4 room furnished apartments,
$55 per month each. One ef effeciency
feciency effeciency apartment, $35 per month.
Available April 27. Call FR 2-4140
after 5:30 or weekends. (B-125-
lt-c).
FOR RENT. House near univer university.
sity. university. 2 bedrooms, sleeping porch,
large living room. Call FR
2-4647 or see at 411 NW 15th
St. (B-125-lt-c),
FOR RENT- TWO APARTMENTS
2 bedroom with porch. S6O. Call
FR 2-4647 or see at 411 NW 15th
St. (B-125-lt-c).
LARGE APARTMENT -1 mile
from campus. Stultable for couples
or three students. $45 per month.
Immediate occupancy. Call FR 6-
2693. (B-124-2t-c).
UNFURNEHED HOUSE one block
from campus. Suitable for 4 5
students. $75 per month.
Occupancy April 18. Call FR 6-
2693. (B-124-2t-c).
FOR RENT three twin bedrooms
for ladies, one twin bedroom with
study, private bath, private
entrance for male or female,
bachelors room with bath. Two
bedroom garage apartment, furn furnished.
ished. furnished. All one block from Norman
Hall and Campus Food Service
Facilities. Call FR 6-4031 or FR
6-4417. (B-124-2t-c).
AIR CONDITIONED apartments for
Summer B or for Fall trimester.
Will accomodate four. 1824 NW
4th Avenue. Call FR 6-4353.
(B-122-ts-c).
FOR RENT -3 room apartment
second floor. $55 per month. Call
FR 2-3794 or FR 2-1823. (B-118-
ts-p).
NICE TWO BEDROOM Furnished
Apartments for students beginning
Mat first. Will accomodate up to
4 students comfortably. Right near
campus. Reduced rates for
summer. Call Mrs. Jones at
FR 6-5636. Occupancy may be
had at end of this trimester. (B (B---112-ts-c).
--112-ts-c). (B---112-ts-c).
MOVING? Avoid semester end
rush. Reserve your own way trailer
while all aixes are available.
United Rent-All, 625 NWBth
Avenue. Phone FR 6-2835.
(B-117-9t-c).
ATTRACTIVE ROOM in quiet
home, private entrance, kitchen
privileges, excellent for students
who need to study. Call FR 2-7883.
(B-123-3t-c).
FOR RENT -Efficiency Apartment
Air conditioned. $260 3rd
trimester. Call FR 6-5576.
(B-123-3t-c).
FOR RENT Air conditioned room.
Private entrance, private bath.
Everything furnished except
linens. Good location to campus.
Call after 5 p.m. FR 6-6905.
(B-123-3t-c).

For Rent

ONE BEDROOM completely fur furnished
nished furnished apartment one block
from campus. Water furnished.
S6O a month. Call FR 2-6758.
(B-123-2t-c).
ONE ROOM efficiency apartment
for single woman only. 305 NW
Ist St. FR 6-2012 or FR 6-7568.
(B-1224t-c),
TWO BEDROOM unfurnished
apartment, includes refrigerator
and stove. $75 a month. 1806 NW
6th St. FR 2-1362. (B-122-4t-c).
WANTED: Graduate student to
share 2 Bdrm. duplex apt. at
825 NE Bth Ave. Private bedroom.
Your share of phone, rent, utilities
approx. SSO mo. Marvin Moss. 230
D Engineering Bldg. (Ext. 2986)
or FR 6-2365. (B-122-4t-p).

Wanted

WANTED-22 automatic rifle or
double barrel shot gun. Call after
6:00 p.m. (C-125-lt-c).
RIDERS TO NEW YORK April
18th or later. Share gas. 2-5898.
(C-124-2t-c).
DRIVING TO NEW YORK on or
about April 17. Riders wanted.
Call FR 6-8849. (C-123-3t-p).
FOUR ROOMATES ( or even three )
wanted to share large furnished
apartment with themselves. S9O
a month. Summer trimester or
forever. Call FR 2-7713.
(C-123-3t-p).
WELL PAY CASH for large 10'
wide trailer. Please call Mr. Lee
at FR 6-1261 during the day.
(C-122-st-c).
WANTSD-ROOMATE for summer
trimester. House off campus. Call
Madeline at FR 6-9875.
(C-123-3t-p).

Help Wanted

WANTED-Part time student as assistant.
sistant. assistant. Experienced in crafts
desirable. Inquire 120 Florida
Union. (E-125-lt-c).
SUMMER CAMP COUNSELORS.
Experienced student nurse and
water front man. Boys and girls
Camp Bell Ridge. Call Jerry FR
2-6658 or 481-2387. (E-124-2t-c).
YOUNG LADY NEEDED to assist
as part time instructor at Florida
Union dance classes during the
third trimester. Call ext. 2741
immediately. (E-123-2t-c).
HELP WANTED Young man to
make deliveries and drapery
installations. Mechanical ability
Important. G add um Interiors.
(E-122-4t-c).
HELP WANTED waiters. Must
be 21 or over. Call FR 6-9335
between 12 and 2 p.m. No
experience needed. (E-123-3t-c).
SUMMER JOBS -for musicians,
dancers, folk guitar, modern Jazz,
rock and toll, etc.For employment
in the Carribean. other than
summer seasons open also. Call
FR 2-7360. (E-123-3t-c),

Autos
1 - -

'6O IMPALA 2 door hardtop
with all power equipment and air
conditioner. Phone FR 2-2256 after
6. (G-124-2t-c).
1954 FORD STATIONWAGON.
Automatic transmission. Best
offer tag included. Call FR
2-9631. (G-124-2t-c).

Thursday, April 11,1963 The Florida Alligator

Autos

'57 FORD. Automatic transmission
radio and heater. Excellent con condition.
dition. condition. FR 2-5879 after 5:00 p.m.
(G-123-St-c).
"
SALE OF A LIFETIME:'S4 Maroon
Olds. Skirts, two antennas, two
fender mirrors, plus pair of fuzzy
dice. SSO. Need money for
fraternity bill. Call Qualf (Sambo)
Biegler, FR 2-9307. (G-123-3t-p).
'55 PONTIAC, metallic blue, new
battery, new tires, new interior.
Perfect condition. Call FR 2-9128,
Room 110, EastHall.(G-122-4t-p).
GOING TO EUROPE? THE CON CONTINENT?
TINENT? CONTINENT? Let us arrange for a
delivery of your new Triumph or
Fiat anywhere. We take your old
car in trade here and arrange
for delivery of your new car there.
Use it to tour the continent and
return it to the States with you.
Call Ken Bowman FR 2-4373.
Barkley Motors Inc.Llncoln-Mer Inc.Llncoln-Mercury
cury Inc.Llncoln-Mercury Meteor Comet Tri Triumph
umph Triumph Flat. (G-114-13t-c).
WANTED TO BUY 'SO through '54
Fords and Chevrolets. A1 Herndon
Service Station, 916 SE 4th Street.
FR 2-1308. (G-94-ts-c).
'54 OLDSMOBILE. Automatic
transmission, radio and heater,
good engine, good body with
original paint. $295. Call Lex at
FR 6-9236. (G-121-st-c).
*SB ANGLIA. Good condition.
Reasonable price. Call Flo at
FR 2-2566. (G-121-st-c).
GOING OVERSEAS THE YEAR?
Buy a new car at European prices
and save. Mercedes -Benz, Volvo,
English Ford or D.K.W. Call
Hubert Barlow, FR 2-4251, Crane
Motor Company. (G-86-40t-c)
1957 ALL WHITE FORD
CONVERTIBLE. T Bird
engine, automatic -good condition.
Must sell. S4OO. Wess Patterson.
306 N.E. 6th Street. Call 4-6
p.m. (G-104-ts-c).
HAVE FUN THE SUMMER *6O
Sprite with removable hardtop,
several custom features, in good
condition. A real girl getter!
Call FR 6-3357 afternoons.
(G-119-st-c).
'SB VW CONVERTIBLE Fully
equipped. Excellent condition.
Lake Wauburg Riding Stables. Call
Mlcanopy 2471. (G-120-st-c).

Lost (Sc Found

FOUND BICYCLE. Red,
American style with baskets.
Found near information booth on
13th St. and 2nd Ave. Call FR 6-
1170. (L-123-3t-p).

LEATHER WALLET, light brown,
lost Tuesday, April 2, in either
the Medical Science Parking Lot
or the 1700 block of NW 2nd Ave.
Finder keep money but return
wallet and cards. (L-121-c).

Services

TYPING DONE on electric type typewriter.
writer. typewriter. Term paper*, report*,
theses. Reasonable rates. Contact
Mrs. Rose Martinez at FR 6-3261
ext. 2575 from 8-5 p.m. or FR
6-1859 weekends and evenings. (M (M---124-2t-c),
--124-2t-c), (M---124-2t-c),
YAMAHA WINS '63 DAYTONA
GRAND PRIX. You win with
Sportsman's Cycle Center.
Yamaha-Lilac Sales and Services.
Phone FR 2-3038 or FR 6-4263.
Open 6-9 p.m. and Saturdays.
fM-122-4t-c).

2 Flavet Tots
Plan Venture
To Gay Paree
Two Flavet m tots wllL take
the Group Flight to Europe*'
this summer to see their maternal
grandparents for the first time.
Five-year-old Michael Parrish
and his three-year-old sister Eli Elisabeth
sabeth Elisabeth will journey more than
4,000 miles from the UF to see
their grandparents in the French
village of Angouleme, 350 miles
south of Paris.
Michael and Elizabeth are the
children of Mr. and Mrs. Wil William
liam William Parrish, 256 C Flavet UL
French-born Mrs. Parrish will
see her parents for the first time
since she was married six years
ago and moved to the United States.
Parrish, SEG, will remain at the
UF for the summer trimester.
The trip was made possible by
the Group Flight to Europe"
sponsored by the Florida Union
Board of Student Activities.
Contributions
Top Record
UF contributions to the World
University Service (WUS) for
1962-63 topped all time records.
The UF contribution for the
past year totaled $6Ol, far
exceeding the $166.10 raised last
year and topping the record $536.15
contributed in 1946-47.
Final donations were sent this
week to the WUS Southeast Re Regional
gional Regional Office in Atlanta.
Donations came from numerous
organizations as well as individual
students, faculty and staff
members.
The two argest contributions
-SSO- came from the Inter Interfraternity
fraternity Interfraternity Council and Murphree
Area Hall Council.

Services


WHOA! Horseback riding, hay
rides, barn dancing. Circle M
Raney on Kincaid Road (27th Ave)
5 miles from campus. Phone
FR 2-8460. (M-120-7t-c).
SPECIAL This week only, on
lease from the Smithsonian
Institute, Paul Rever's original
horse, Strawberry. Lake Wauburg
Riding Stables. 441 South. Ride
Wednesdays for SIOO an hour. Call
Mlcanopy for free transportation.
(M-120-st-c).
WILL CARE FOR Infants or small
children by day or night In private
home. 1406 NW sth Avenue, Phone
FR 6-8961. (M-65-ts-c).
NESTORS TV, RADIO, HI FI
SERVICE Tubes checked free.
Free estimates. Next to Florida
Bookstore Parking Lot. 1627 NW
Ist Avenue, Phone FR 2-7326.
(M-99-28t-p).

TROT IT ON
OVER
-# . Mfln
w
B
GATOR
CLASSIFIEDS
WILL SELL IT

Page 5



Page 6

The Florida Alligator Thursday, April 11,1963

alli^atop
editorials

The Paper's Aim: All the news with decency our only limit

'foreign foreigner
(EDITORS NOTE. . The following editorial is reprinted in full
from the April, 1963 issue of The Arab Gator, monthly journalistic
publication of the Arab Club at the UF, The editorial written by a
UF Arab student, concerns the so-called Gap existing between
foreign students and UJS. students here on campus, a theme of a
Alligator editorial earlier this trimester entitled Bridging The
Cap.)

Dear Fellow Students,
This is the first issue of our Arabgator in its brand new spring
suit. We will not write an editorial about politics in the Middle
East or anything of the sort, but we shall tell you a story in the
Oriental style, a story of a human being who walks on his two legs,
has two ears, and to make it short, he is like everybody else except
that he has a very funny accent when he speaks English which
embarrasses him sometimes and makes everybody around him laugh.
Poor Fellow!
Our friends name is Mr. Foreign Student. He was born around
two decades ago in a little town in a country called Islandla which
belongs in its turn to a Federal Union called the Federal Union of
the Un-American States (its a mighty country, but very poor).
Mr. Foreign Student had many a nice idea about America and the
Americans before he came over, but after a year or two in the UJS.A.
ha started changing his ideas about Americans one after another.
Why? We shall tell you. That is the subject of our story.
HE TRIED TO BE NICE TO everybody, for he learned that he is
regarded as a guest on the campus and thats what everybody tells
him. Besides that, he learned when he was still young the rules
of hospitality and that he should never complain about his hosts
Ijospltality no matter what. But our friend read many times in his
school newspaper that he is blamed partly for a Gap between the
Americans and his follow foreigners. He couldnt understand why,
maybe the Americans are not laughing enough at him and not having
a good time. Besides, he traveled ten thousand miles to meet them,
and here he finds them talking about a Gap which is only an arms
length long. Poor fellow probably didnt have enough money to pay
fare on the airplane for the whole distanceten thousand miles plus
an arm length.
HE SAT DOWN THINKING ABOUT this problem. Perhaps if they
share with him his clubs and activities, the gap might be bridged.
His friend Bill cannot afford two dollars a trimester for the fee.
Rick is sorry because he is busy in his fraternity house, but the
smartest and the most honest was John. He didnt want to join a
Foreign Club because he thought it was a waste of time for him, and
as he put it, Ill never get anything out of it. Well, Mr. Foreign
Student tried another thing. He started accepting some special kinds
of Invitations where you have to pay for it, like for instance the
last one thrown for a big Washington, D.C. journalist (he doesnt
know why they call it an invitation). Everybody was there, frat fratguys,
guys, fratguys, sorority-girls, teachers, deans, etc., and he and a cousin of
his. He stood there smiling at people with his cousin, bending his
head down to every passer-by. He tried to show good manners, but
nobody bothered to meet him even with a political or social smile,
save the girl at the door who was collecting tickets.
He felt so lonesome, so foreign, so strange, he couldnt even
eat because a nice guy beside him cracked a joke about the Moslems
and it just happened that they were serving ham. You dig it? His
cousin and he looked at each other silently and knew what each was
thinking. Revenge. When those same people on his table visit his
country, he will get even with them. How? Hell show them how to
host people and what the word guest means. Hell show them that
the word guest is used only in some strict cases and not in every
commercial on T.V. or elsewhere.
OUR FRIEND IS STILL HERE. He'll always be here, saddened
by this gap and thinking about a solution. He is not lonesome
because he has many cousins around. He is not asking for sympathy
or mercy. His pride is ten times higher than their Empire State
or Seagle Building, but he dislikes being blamed for something which
is not his fault nor his doing. Dont you agree with him, or perhaps
we were telling your own story?

The Florida Alligator

Editor-In-Chief. David Lawrence Jr.
Managing Editors. Maryanne Awtrey, Ben Garrett
Business Manager .. Jay Fountain
Sports Editor... Walker Lundy
Assistant to the Editor Sandy Sweitzer
News Editor Judy Barnes
Editorial Page Editor Ron Spencer
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of
the University of Florida and is published daily except Saturday and
Sunday. THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is entered as second class matter
at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida. Offices are
located in Rooms 8,10, and 15 in the Florida Union Building Basement.
Telephone University of Florida, FR 6-3261, Ext. 2832, and request
either editorial office or business office.
Opinions voiced in personal columns on this page do not necessarily
reflect the opinions of the editors. Only editorials are the official
voice of the paper.

The Longest Part of the Trip
" | TWoiNsUr -rae great wail
Mil **

LETTERS:

Cant Find An Alligator

EDITOR:
The end of the trimester is at
hand, and The Alligator will soon
cease printing in order to give its
staff time to study for finals.
Id like to congratulate the staff
for putting out an interesting and
generally informative daily paper.
At least Ive been told that its
interesting, informative, and daily
by my more fortunate fellow stu students
dents students who have access to The
Alligator.
Unfortunately for me, my first
class every day is at 11 oclock.
When I leave the dorm at 10:45,
I go straight to The Alligator
dispenser in front of Broward.
Alas, I havent found an Alligator
there in months. I charge over
to Tigert Hall where my first
class is, and to my distress, the
dispenser is invariably empty. Can
you imagine the traumatic effect
this has on my psyche?
I then go to Anderson for my
next class hoping, but no longer
expecting to find a paper. I neednt
fear, because at this ridiculously
late hour (12:10) all of the papers
are gone. My final class is
journalism. I walk to the stadium
and on rare occasions I have found
that the dispenser outside of the
journalism building still has a few
papers left. Ecstasy!
Iitt\v er y enthusiastic about
supporting The Alligator, ie. with
my fees, but Id be even more
enthusiastic if I could occasionally
More Than Just
A Lousy Movie
EDITOR:
Over the past few months Florida
students have been treated to a
series of nothing pictures at
the Gainesville Drive-In. All were
much advertised; all were duds.
In the past, I have kept silent,
but I can do so no longer. The
Garbage Man was more than just
a lousy movie. It was an obvious
attempt by confidence men to make
a fast buck at the expense of the
public.
I call for a boycott of the
Gainesville Drive-In until the
present situation is remedied.
' (Name Withheld)
* >
Summer Gator
Students who will be enrolled
at any time during the Spring
Trimester and who are Interested
in working on the Florida Alligator
are requested to contact Maryanne
Awtrey, Editor, in Room 10,
Florida Union before leaving
school this trimester.
The paper will be published
once a week, if at all.
No experience 1s necessary, but
dependability is an absolute
necessity.

clutch our newspaper in my hand.
I suppose I must be made a
martyr of, but please, please pleasewill
will pleasewill the person in charge of
distributing The Alligator see to
it that in the future The Alligator

Episcopal Services
*
Good Friday
12:00-3:00 p.m. Holy Trinity Church
116 N.E. Ist St.
8:00 p.m. Chapel of the Incarnation
1522 W. Univ. Ave.
Easter
8:00 a.m. Holy Communion
9:30 a.m. Family Service (Communion)
11:00a.m. Holy Communion
Chapel of the Incarnation
SILVERMANS
END 0 TRIMESTER
SPORT SHIRT SALE
IX&: m
Authentic University Styles. Neat Patterns,
Handsome Plaids, Many Solid Colors.
Contour Cut to Fit Your Figure. Small,
Medium, Large, Extra Large. Fora Limited
Time Only. 0 49
Each
2 FOR $6.50
oituemam
1 225 W. Univ. Ave.

is evenly distributed in time
periods, throughout the day. This
will enable late risers to have an
equal chance to get an Alligator.
Rona Levine, 3ED



HEMISPHERE IN ACTION

'Hemispheric Democracy Dealt Two Blows

By CESAR GONZMART
THE CONCEPT OF Democracy
as an opponent to Marxism-
Leninism in the Hemisphere has
been dealt two severe blows that
may well destroy it forever.
The overthrow of Guatemalas
liberal, but staunchly anti-com anti-communist,
munist, anti-communist, Miguel Yidigoras Fuentes
has been the first of these assaults,
president Yidigoras has been a
militant advocate of social
progress and reform among the
indigenous masses of Latin-
America. Yet this man waged a
losing battle against Marxist
aggression simply because he had
to carry out a continuous campaign
against the subversive maneuvers
of the first Socialist state of
the Americas Cuba.
When he took office, several
monumental tasks were set before
him. Foremost among these was
the reorganization of Guatemalas
socio-political institutions that had
been left in a semi-chaotic state
by the former pro-Marxist
regimes of JacoboArbenz and Jose
Arevalo. Furthermore, he had to
establish vast economic reforms
which would henceforth be
assailed by the Caribbean Comin Comintern.
tern. Comintern. Yidigoras tried to bring these
changes into effect with one hand
while combating his ultra-leftist
opponents with the other. These
pseudo-revolutionists who had sold
their political souls to Marxism-
Leninism rather than associating
themselves with truly
revolutionary national reforms,
had waged their subversive actions
since Yidigoras first day in office.
CONDITIONS gradually
deteriorated and the only solution
on hand while the U. S. spoke
of walls of determined men to
contain Castro-inspired insurrec insurrectionswas
tionswas insurrectionswas a rightist strongman
dictatorship. Yidigoras did not
want this, and (although he did
have to call several states of
siege to put down the various
Communist revolts) he tried in
vain to restrict his actions to those
prescribed under Guatemalas
Constitutional Code. The outcome
of Yidigoras Fuentes futile
struggle has been the creation
of a military dictatorship in
Guatemala. In brief, democracy
has lost one of her great cham champions,
pions, champions, and this coup detat will
in all certainty promote further
Communist agitation which may
very well incite the newly
oppressed Guatemalans into
massive popular insurrection at
some future date. The issue now
is only a matter of time.
Furthermore, although the current
junta has proclaimed itself to be
anti-communist and the champion
of social reform, nevertheless it
is still an overt dictatorship and
certainly in opposition to that type
of democratic government which
Latin American states need in
order to advance the process of
social evolution.
Second Blow
The second, and perhaps most
dangerous blow cast upon the
forces of Democracy has been
committed by the United States.
Within the 1 ast week, Cuban
anti-Marxist patriots have
attacked Fidel Castros supposedly
impregnable Fortress Cuba,and
have caused the great barbudo
to again raise the cry that HE
is being assaulted. Although he has
hypocritically cried out on several
occasions, especially when the U.S.
Central Intelligence Agency (CIA)
organized and effected the ill-fated
Bay of 'Pigs invasion, his calls
were this time answered by our
own government. Indedd, the
attitude shown by President
Kennedy is contradictory to his
sentiment-arousing declaration of
1960 when he stated that, We
must end the harassment which
this government has carried on of
liberty-loving anti-Castro forces
in Cuba and other lands. . We
must recognize these exiles ahtf
rebels represent the real voice of
Cuba and should not be constantly
handicapped by our immigration
and Justice Department
authorities.

In short, the United States has
placed this nations naval and air
power at the disposal of the Soviet
Union, which in turn uses it as a
type of police force to protect its
Caribbean base. If the U. S. were
considering some form of overt
military action against the Havana
regime, then the Administration
would certainly have a reason for
restricting the anti-Castro forces.

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Yet, it is notable the apparent
plan which our government desires
to use against Mr. Castro is merely
a long-term economic embargo
which President Kennedy out outlined
lined outlined in the recent chiefs-of-state
conference in San Jose, Costa
Rica.
The Reasons
The prime reasons why the

Thursday, April 11,1963 The Florida Alligator

Administration has denounced the
patriotic raids are that: (A) they
violate the U. S. Neutrality Law
and (B) the raids themselves are
materially Ineffectual against
Castro and they may provoke re reprisals
prisals reprisals on the part of Cuba. First
of all, it should be made clear
that the U. S. did not hesitate in
utilizing national territory (e. g.
the U. S. Navy Amphibious Base
near New Orleans, La., where
Major Nino Diaz trained with 120
Cubans to prepare an assault on

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C bas Oriente Province that would
precede the actual Bay of Pigs
invasion; also, the Puerto Rican
Viesques Island where the U. S.
maintains a Marinebasq and where
Cuban frogmen were trained for
the invasion) when the Bahia de
Cochinos invasion was launched.
Today the masses of the Hemis Hemisphere
phere Hemisphere await the results that the
activities which we have described
will bring upon Latin-America.
They wait and pray that these
actions will not prove fatal.

Page 7



The Florida Alligator Thursday / April 11,1963

Page 8

Gators Notch Seventh
Straight Victory, 9-4

By MARTY STONE
Staff Writer
Floridas Gator baseball team
closed out the trimester with their

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seventh straight victory, a 9-4
come-from-behind decision over
Kentuckys Wildcats at Perry Field
yesterday.
The win closed out the nationally
fifth-ranked Gators action for this

trimester -and left them with a 15-2
record for the season.
Danny Eggart, the Gators win winning
ning winning pitcher, chalked up his fifth
fictory against no losses. Eggart
allowed only eight hits, striking out
five and walking two. He now has
a 1.80 earned run average.
Cotton Nash, the tall basketball
All America from Kentucky,
pitched the entire game, picking up
the loss, his first of the year.
He gave up 15 hits while striking
out nine and walking four.
Right fielder Jim Elliott and
third baseman Tom Moore were
the big Gator bats. Each ahd a
triple and two singles. Elliot also
drove in three runs while Moore
knocked in two. Second baseman
Carol Lanoux also tripled and
drove in a run for the Gators.
Third baseman Randy Embry and
first baseman Karl Crandall were
the big men at the plate for
Kentucky. E mbry doubled, driving
in two runs, and Crandall collected
three singles in four at bats.
The Gators picked up five more
stolen bases yesterday. They
swiped three in Tuesdays game
and now have a season total of
51 in 17 games.

Investigators Look
Into BamaFix Case

ATLANTA (UPI) Alabama
investigators yesterday began
questioning eight to ten persons
in Georgia who figured in a report
that an Alabama-Georgia football
game last fall allegedly was
fixed.
Alabama' Atty. Gen. Richmond
Flowers, acting for an Alabama
Senate investigating committee,
started his investigation by con conferring
ferring conferring for two hours with Georgia
Atty. Gen. Eugene Cook. Flowers
said he would retrace ground
previously covered by Cook, who
recently completed an
investigation of a story published
in the Saturday Evening Post.
Flowers emphasized, however,
that he would not have time to
question the sources as extensively
as Cook did. The Alabama official
who arrived here Wednesday with
two aides, is scheduled to leave
the state Thursday.
Flowers said it was also doubtful
if he would talk to former Georgia
Athletic Director Wally Butts, who

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Pool Closed
The university swimming
pool will be closed from 6 p.m.
next Wednesday until Monday,
April 29 for repairs and re reconditioning.
conditioning. reconditioning.
The pool will re open then.

the Post alleged rigged the game
with Alabama coach Paul Bear
Bryant.
Both coaches have denied accu accusations
sations accusations in the Post story.
Cooks report," released last
week contained lengthy testimony
from most sources in his investi investigation.
gation. investigation.
Shortly before the two officials
met, the Curtis Publishing Co.,
defendant in a $lO million libel
suit filed by Butts, filed an
answer saying the accusations in
the Post were true.
Curtis said the accusations pub published
lished published by the Saturday Evening
Post were true and the company
still refuses to pring a correc correction
tion correction or retraction that Butts had
demanded.
The Alabama committee had
previously invited Cook to come
to the neighbor state to help with
its investigation but Cook declined.
Flowers said his group had already
questioned Bryant and members
of the Alabama football team.