Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
The Florida
Alligator

Vol. 55, No. 118 The University of Florida, Gainesville Wednesday, April 3, 1963

Fee Allocations
Passed by Council

Legislative Council last night
passed summer trimester fee
allocations, on the first reading,
but budgets under the allocations
will be postponed until the first
council meeting during the
summer.
A second reading on the allo allocations
cations allocations is expected also at the
Phi Gam Fiat
To Sell House
For *45,000
By BARBARA GEYER
Staff Writer
Phi Gamma Social fraternity
will sell its house almost immedi immediately
ately immediately to Alpha Tau Omega fra fraternity
ternity fraternity prior to and expected to
move on campus.
Purchase price is $45,000.
Fear that a gas station or some
business establishment will be
built on the site is the main reason
the A T O s are purchasing the
house, siad ATO Pres. WilsonD.
(Dee) Ayala, Ato president.
The house will be torn down,
but the ATO's are undecided what
to do with the property, Ayala
said. Several suggestions have
been made that we use the lot
as a parking lot or build a swim swimming
ming swimming pool or handball courts.
Because the house belonged to
the ATOs before the Phi Gams
purchased it in 1941, the ATOs
had the first option to buy it if
it was ever sold.
The new Phi Gam house, cost costing
ing costing about $200,000, will be built
on fraternity row between the
Sigma Phi Epsilon house and the
Tau Epsilon Phi house.
Construction is to begin on the
new Phi Gam house the end of
May or the beginning of June, ac according
cording according to Phi Gam Pres. Jack
Gill. The Phi Gams will stay
in the old house until the new one
is completed.

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H-ANNING FOR THE SUNDAY
... oratorio of "King David" at 3 p.m. in the Florida Gymnasium are, from left,
violinist Mary Bennett, director Dr. El wood Keister, concert mistress Ina Claire
Forbes and Dean of Student Affairs Lester L. Hale.

first meeting of the next school
term.
Discrepancies between the
current finance law and the budgets
caused postponement of the budget
passage.
Total budget requested for the
summer trimester is about
$97,000, council members heard.
According to Student Body Vice
Pres. Frank Harshaw, council
chairman, the errors in the bud budgets
gets budgets submitted were due .to a
misunderstanding by the council
budget and finance committee.
Harshaw said the budget and
finance committee had gone ahead
with budget preparations based on
a proposed revision of the finance
law, which has not been approved
by council yet.
The revision was on the agenda
the previous meeting, Harshaw
said, but it was not considered
because a quorum call revealed
that there was not a quorum
present. The meeting was then
adjourned.
The proposed revisions will
come up at the summer session's
first scheduled council meeting,
May 7.
Consideration of fall and winter

5G Sponsors Film
In McCarty Thursday

A Student Government (SG) sponsored program on Floridas
immediate higher education needs will be presented Thursday, in
McCarty Auditorium at 7 p.m., according toSG Secretary of Academic
Affairs John Ritch.
Purpose of the program is to give students concrete information
on the position of the UF today and how it can be Improved, he said.
Higher education has to meet the challenge of helping the state
of Florida reach its full potential, Ritch said.
Included in the program will be a showing of the Florida
Universities Need Dollars (FUND) film, which was put together
by SG and the Florida Industrial Commission. The film points out
the services and needs of the UF.
Dean of Academic Affairs Robert B. Mautz will discuss the recent
budget request of the UF now up for state legislative consideration.
Mautz will explain the necessity of the amount asked and will also
show how much the State Board of Control has cut that budget.
Invitations are being sent out to officers of fraternities, sororities
dormitories, Florida Blue Key, Mortorboard and all other campus
organizations by UF Pres. J. Wayne Reitz and Student Body Pres.
Paul Hendrick.
All interested students are invited to attend.

fee allocations was postponed until
after the finance law revision has
gone up for approval.
Other action at the council
session included a grant of $l6O
to the UF Music Department to
send student Peter DeWitt and
instructor Willis Bodine to a
Spartanburg, S.C., music contest.
In other action last night,
council:
Allocated $lB3 to the May
International Week celebration to
be used for bringing a speaker
to the Festival of Nations Supper.
The speaker is from Ecuador;
Approved a $445 budget, to come
from UF Pres. J. Wayne Reitz's
concession fund, for the
Educational Analysis Committee
(EAC), and
Passed a charter revision for
the U F band.
Harshaw last night praised the
budget and finance committee,
saying, These people and
Secretary of Finance Jim Crab Crabtree
tree Crabtree have done a lot of work in
the past few weeks.
They have accomplished more
than any similar committee has
done in the same length of time
as long as I can remember.

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THIS GARBAGh CAN
. . display won first prize yesterday in an interfra interfratemity
temity interfratemity contest sponsored by the State Theatre. It is
a product of Phi Gamma Delta imagination.

College Deans
Wife Dead at 65

Mrs. Anna Abrams Weil, wife
of Dean Joseph Well of the UF
College of Engineering, died at
the J. Hill is Miller Health Center
after a heart attack Monday night.
Site was 65.
Dean Well this week announced
his retirement as dean of the
engineering college so he could
return |p teaching and research
in biomedical engineering.
Mr. and Mrs. Well came to
Gainesville on their honeymoon
in 1921 from Pittsburgh, making
this their home since then.
Mrs. Well was well known as a
hostess for the many official
social functions given by the
College of Engineering and the UF
and for her work in a score of
local organizations.
She was made an honorary
professor of engineering by UF
decree in 1957. She was also a
charter member and founder of
the Alpha Tau Chapter of Alpha
Epsilon Phi sorority and for many
years the faculty advisor of the
Kurtz Wins
Top Grant
Dr. Albert K. Kurtz, UF
professor of psychology, has been
selected for a Fulbright grant
to teach in the United Arab
Republic.
He will serve as visiting lecturer
at Einshams University in Cairo,
.Egypt, for the academic year
beginning September 1963.
A member of the faculty here
since 1953, Dr. Kurtz has taught
in numerous universities
throughout the nation including
Yale, Michigan State and Pennsyl Pennsylvania
vania Pennsylvania State.

sorority.
She was a charter member of
Founders' Circle of the Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville Garden Clubs, and the founder
of the UF Engineering Wives Club.
She was past treasurer of the
UF Women's Club.
Mrs. Weil was active in aiding
and advising students at the UF.
In 1957 the Anna A. Well Loan
Fund for girls was established.
Miss Awirey
Wins Summer
Editorship
Miss Maryanne Awtrey, a
fourth- year journalism student,
was elected editor of the Florida
Alligator for the summer tri trimester
mester trimester last night.
Currently a managing editor of
the paper, Miss Awtrey will grad graduate
uate graduate in August.
Elected managing editor was
George Moore, a junior majoring
in political science. He's a
member of Alpha Tau Omega (ATO)
Social fraternity.
Miss Awtrey has worked since
her freshman year on the Alli Alligator,
gator, Alligator, ami has held positions, in including
cluding including wire editor, coed page
editor, editorial assistant, staff
writer and managing editor.
She's a resident of Gainesville
and a member of Theta Sigma
Phi, professional journalism so soceity
ceity soceity for women.
Moore has worked on the Alli Alligator
gator Alligator for three trimesters, and
has held titles of assistant layout
editor and editorial assistant.
In addition to editorial positions,
Miss Awtrey also served as bus business
iness business manager of the Alligator
during the summer of 1961.



Page 2

The Florida Alligator Wednesday, April 3, 1963

Science Not
Buying Bodies

Anyone planning to sell his body
to science is out of luckcontrary
to popular opinionaccording to
Dr. James G. Wilson, head of the
J. Hillis Miller Health Center
Anatomy Department.
It is against the law in every
state of this country to give money
for the body of a human being,
he said. "The cadavers we use
for science are donated by people
who want their bodies to continue
to serve a useful purpose after
death.
In Florida the donor is asked
to pay for transportation to the
medical center.
Phi Eta Sigma
Elects Officers
Robert N. Solomon recently was
elected president of Phi Eta Sigma
freshmen men's honorary
fraternity.
Serving with him will be S. Roy
Higginbotham, vice president;
Kirby Smith, secretary and Gerald
M. Haskins, treasurer.

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UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS
1 (Mm. og. 19 icompl.iion olotl.ott 1 y.or of collage )
GRADUATE STUDENTS and FACULTY MEMBERS
THE ASSOCIATION OF PRIVATE CAMPS
| . comprising 3SO outstanding Boys. Girls. Brothar-Sistar
I and Co-Ed Camps, locaiad throughout tha Naw England. Mid-
I dla Atlantic Statas and Canada.
§ ... INVITES YOUR INQUIRIES concerning summer employment as Haad
8 Counselor*. Group Leaders. Specialties. General Counselors.
Write, Phone, or Call in Person
Association of Private Camps Dept. C
Maxwell M. Alexander, executive Director
Km 55 West 42nd Street, OX 5-2454, New York 34, N. Y. M

ALL IT TAMES
Nothing else needed but you to complete this picture of filter
smoking at its flavorful best. Enjoy yourself...light up a Winston.
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PURE WHITE, |
MODERN FILTER I
plus i FILTER BLEND up front
a
like a cigarette should!
l*6l aJ. Reynolds Tobacco Company. Winstoa-S*len. N. C

Wilson said the health center
uses about 25 cadavers each year
for instructing students in
medicine, nursing and physical
therapy.
Since the public has been
assured that the cadavers are
never treated disrespectfully, we
have as many as we need," Wilson
said. California is the only other
state which has an abundance of
anatomy material.
According to Wilson, persons
wishing to donate their bodies
can write the Florida Anatomical
Board at the health center, and
will be sent applications.
We have more than a 100
applications in the files now," he
said. They are from people of
all social and economic levels.
It all depends on a persons frame
of mind."
In some cases whole families
have donated their bodies," Wilson
said. However, we never take
a body without the full cooperation
of the next of kin at the time of
death even though the papers have
been signed.

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STETSON TRANSFER
...Judi Judson is today's
Gator Girl. A senior major majoring
ing majoring in occupational therapy
the blonde blue-eyed coed is
from Fort Lauderdale, prov proving
ing proving it's not just "where the
boys are." She has served as
secretary-treasurer and pres president
ident president of the Florida Christa in
Fellowship.
Pre-Law
Rites Held
The Pre-Law Society installed
- newly elected officers at abanquet
last night at the Student Service
Center (Hub).
Guest speaker was Dean Frank
Maloney of the College of Law.
Officers are Pres. William
Merwin, Vice Pres. Fred Abrams,
Secretary Stephen Kahmand
Treas. Byron Winn.

Written by 4 Profs Here

Novel Explores
Political 'Revolt

New industry moves into town.
Retirees bring antagonistic
interests to a city.
A big developer doubles a towns
population.
Any one of these events could
plant the seed for a political
revolution", says a new book on
urban politics by four UF pro professors.
fessors. professors.
What happens when a Florida
towns old guard is challenged
by new interests is one of
the central topics of The Urban
Political Community," by Dr.
Gladys M. Kammerer written in
collaboration with Dr. Charles D.
Farris, Dr. John M DeGrove and
Alfred B. Clubok, all of the UF
Department of Political Science.
Released last week by Houghton
Mifflin Company, the paperback
book presents political profiles of
eight Florida communities ranging
in size from 5,000 to nearly 100,-
000 population.
Actual Florida towns hide behind
such fictitious names as
Floriana," a food-processing
center; Dorado," a millionaires
retreat turned retirement city, and
Westbourne," a sleepy suburb
for status seekers.
Essentially the profiles are
portraits over a 15-year span,
1945-1960, of the changing power
structure of the towns.
Because all are council councilmanager
manager councilmanager cities, there are no
political parties as such operating,
but in most of the towns there
are fairly well-defined cliques or
factions that have certain policy
objectives for the domination of
local government.

To uncover the power elites the
political scientists obtained most
of their data from on-the-spot
interviews with local leaders.
The analysis explores two
issues: The firing of the city
manager, as one of the towns most
important political events, and the
identification of problems that have
arisen in town politics.
The authors find that as towns
grow in population they move from
monopolistic to competitive poli politics
tics politics if new economic interests or
social classes come into play.
For example, the coming of a
new industry, with new types of
employees following a different
style of life has brought a new
political element into the mix
of one town.
According to the book, retirees
representing a different income
level provide a tax-conscious and
zoning-conscious political faction.
Banks also play a central role in
attracting policy-minded business
interests to them and forming
political cliques in almost all towns
studied.
Realtors and developers join
tourists interests in towns posses possessed
sed possessed of the natural advantages to
attract tourists and retirees.

Sun May Be
Moon Man's
Best Friend
The sun may turn out to be
man-on-the moons best friend.
The sun may cook his meals,
drive his engines, furnish his
building materials, send his
messages and even give him a
drink of water, according to Dr.
Erich Farber, UF solar energy
expert currently engaged in lunar
probe research.
Dr. Farber told a solar energy
symposium audience here this
week that solar furnaces would be
one of the first and most useful
tools man will carry to the moon.
Farber reported on his work
with solar furnaces in forming
crystals from such substances as
calcium and aluminum which he
believes man will find on the
moon.
The crystals, he anticipates,
may be made into solar batteries
to generate electricity on the moon,
or into laser beams for commun communications.
ications. communications.
He is director of the UFs Solar
Energy Laboratory, a consultant
to the Air Force Office of scientific
Research, professor and research
professor in the Universitys
College of Engineering.
The more man can use of
the materials he finds on the
moon, the less hell have to haul
in expensive space freighters,
he says.
Farber has made crystals in
his laboratory which do not exist
in nature because they need very
high temperatures and cannot
survive in the earths moist
atmosphere They will survive
on the moon, however, where an
atmosphere is almost non-existent
he reports.
He has made crystals as large
as one centimeter and is aiming
for larger and more perfect ones.
In his search to determine if
they have properties which can be
utilized on the moon, be reports,
they have x-ray patterns, and that
he is able to determine how well
they conduct heat.
What materials do scientists
expect to find on the moon?
Farber says they are counting
on finding such minerals as
calcium, silicon, aluminum and
iron.



SELL Needs To'Sell
In Aiding Education

By KING D. WHITE
Staff Writer
A hard-core group of about 50
UF students has been working for
two-thirds of a year with no way
of measuring the success of its
efforts and no sure way of ever
knowing the fruits of its labor.
The group is the Student Edu Educational
cational Educational Legislative Lobby (SELL),
chartered by the Legislative
Council with the stated purpose of
representing the interests of the
student body in Florida legislation
concerning the University of
Florida and higher education in
general.
The name SELL isnt entirely
accidental, said Chairman John
Strickland. We do have a selling
job to do we want to sell the
legislature on the concern of
students and their families for
higher education in Florida.
To do this we must establish
a channel of communications be between
tween between the legislators and the
student body. $
Under Strickland, SELL ihas
undertaken a program of direct

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cital recital Monday.

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contact with members of the
Florida legislature to convince
the lawmakers of studentsinterest
in higher education.
We cant really measure the
degree of our success, Strickland
said,* but we feel these contacts
with the legislators have been
useful to students, the legislature
and the university.
Working with other groups
throughout the state, SELL has
devoted its efforts this year to
general support of the university
budget soon to be before the
legislature.
Similar groups of students have
been active at the University of
South Florida (USF) in Tamps and
at Florida State University (FSU)
in Tallahassee.
In addition to overall support
of the budget for higher education,
Strickland pointed to another major
concern of SELL.
We are also trying to acquaint
the legislators with the necessity
of removing the present obstacles
to efficient administration and
corttrol of the university system,

Strickland said.
We wish to make the lawmakers
aware of the fact that the present
system is not good, without pre presuming
suming presuming to suggest a specific
alternative, he continued.
Strickland said the UF body
and other groups have taken the
McDonald Report of the Space
Era Education Study (SEES) as a
source book in their I%islative
contacts.
SELL, as well as the groups
at USF and FSU, has taken the
report as the basis for facts and
information in our legislative
contacts, he said. In this way,
we are all using the same source
and talking about the same things.
Strickland noted, however, that
the UF group probably was putting
more emphasis on certain sections
of the report than were some of
the others.

Flavet Three Holds Art Show

Flavet 111 painters and sculptors
placed their works on display last
weekend as the village Trivette
club sponsored an art show.
The free show featured
58 artistic creations supplied by
Flavet art students, professional
artists and hobbyists. The art was
on display at the village recreation
hall.
According to Trivette Art
Exhibition Chairman Carol Nichol,
more than 300 persons attended the
show. The Flavet 111 womens
organization plans to make the
AF Squadron
Gives Training
A new Air Force reserve
squadron will enable UF students
with a reserve military obligation
to whittle away on reserve time
while in school.
The 9324 Air Force Reserve
Recovery Squadron has about 100
positions available for its one
week end per month, two-week
summer camp duty requirements.
Headquarters are at the Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville Airport.
The two-week summer camp is
scheduled during mid August to
take advantage of the students
summer break. Pay is- received
for 24 days per year plus two weeks
of active duty.
The recovery squadron is
designed, in case of emergency,
to prepare a plane base repair
the plane and send it back into
action.

The Florida Alligator Wednesday, April 3, 1963 I

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mr* -

PHOTOGRAPHY WINNERS
. . in the first Annual All-Campus Student Photog Photography
raphy Photography Show are Ann Holmes and Joe Patanella. The
contest was sponsored by the Florida Union Board of
Student Activities.

art show an annual event.
Mrs. Nichol and co-chairman
Shirley Wisser organized the
shovr.
Paintings, watercolors and
sculptures were shown.
Aluminum and rock sculptures
by Johann Eyfells were exhibited,
as well as a work in plywood
and strings by Don Kalec.
Marie Vanzant displayed two
Japanese-like paintings on silk,
and a watercolor called Misty
Morning by Joel Easom was
shown.

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Some shapes are hard
to improve on.
i. 1
Ask any hen,
You just can't design a more functional shape
for an egg.
And we figure the same is true of the Volks Volkswagen
wagen Volkswagen Sedan.
Don't think we haven't tried.
(As a matter of fact, the Volkswagen's been
changed nearly 3,000 times.)
But we can't improve our basic design.
like the egg, its the right kind of package for
what goes inside.
So that's where most of our energy goes.
To get more power without using more gas. To
put synchromesh on first gear. To improve the
heater. That kind of thing.
As a result, our package carries four adults,
and their luggage, at about 32 miles to a gallon
of regular gas and 40,000 miles to a set of fires.
We've made a few external changes, of course
Such os push-button doorknobs.
Which is one up on the egg.
MILLER-BROWN
MOTORS
1030 East University Avenue STS"

Also exhibiting were Jo Palmer,
Jim Palmer, Warren Estrin,
Kristin Eyfells, Bernard and
Shirley Wisser, Leanard Tuchyer,
Elthea Childress, Betty Sweinhart,
Robin and Chris Ford.
Also, Gerard Vermey, Marie
Vanzant, Tom Cooper, Gary
Ridgdill, Barbara Shields.
Prescott Gould, Emilo Lebolo,
Benita Zimmerman, Angel Caban,
Milton Bailey, Janet Fernandez,
Arnold Hart, Charlotte Kaiser,
Alex Powell, Tobie Stitt and W.M.
Cullar.

Page 3



Page 4

The Florida April 3, 1963

alligator
editorials
The Papers Aim: All the news uith decency our only limit
daily or no?
The basic purpose of a papercampus or otherwiseshould be
to Inform its readers of the news that is current. Another purpose
also is, or should be, prominentthat is, to uplift the standards
of its readers.
At the University of Florida, the readership of the Florida Alligator
is composed not only of students, but also of faculty and administration.
We said at the beginning of this trimester that the operation of a
daily newspaper and its feasibility quite probably could be proved
during this period. We said we aimed not to miss the boat on news
coverage.
We know in some instances we have, but we do feel that in the main
we have fulfilled this aim. We do wonder, however, if there is enough
news to warrant the continuance of adaily newspaper at the University
of Florida.
The arguments for a daily are these:
1) This is one of the largest higher education institutions in the
country22nd in the nation at last estimateand all comparable
universities have daily newspapers.
2) There is enough news and uplifting material in the daily
paper.
The argument against a daily newspaper is simply this: there
isnt enough news to warrant daily publication.
Frankly, well be happy to put out a daily paper, or a weekly
semi-weekly or tri-weekly, for that matter.
But we do think it would be valuable to find out what is the student
bodyfaculty and administration, alsoreaction to this first year of
dally publication.
We hope you like our effortsand like them well enough to support
us for another year.
But there's absolutely no sense in continuing a daily if the paper
isnt meeting the needs of its readers.
***** ***** *****
Please fill out the blank below, using your name if you prefer.
Name
Year in school and major
Does the Alligator warrant daily publication
If not, how many days a week should it be put out
Any suggestions for Improvement
Please return by mail or person to The Florida Alligator, room
10, Florida Union.
The Florida Alligator
Editor-In-Chief David Lawrence Jr.
Managing Editors Maryanne Awtrey, Ben Garrett
Business Manager Jay Fountain
Sports Editor Walker Lundy
Assistant to the Editor Sandy Sweitzer
News Editor Judy Barnes
Editorial Page Editor Ron Spencer
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of
the University of Florida and is published daily except Saturday and
Sunday. THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is entered as second class
matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida.
Offices are located in Rooms 8, 10, and 15 in the Florida Union
Building Basement. Telephone University of Florida, FR 6-3261,
Ext. 2832, and request either editorial office or business office.
Opinions voiced in personal columns on this page do not necessarily
reflect the opinions of the editors. Only editorials are the official
voice of the paper.

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- (AjcMS
LETTERS:
Kennedy Is Not Blindfolded

EDITOR:
We would like to answer the
questions raised by Messrs.
Garcia and Malavasi in their letter
entitled, Was Kennedy
Blindfolded. With such astute
critics as these, any attempts by
the present administration to
alleviate the Cuban menace would
seem insufficient.
It seems that you, Messrs.
Garcia and Malavasi, interpret the
news concerning Cuba to your own
satisfaction. This is not fair to
the administration, and certainly
an unnecessary waste of the stu students
dents students newspaper space.
Probably the most important are
your misinterpretations of the
reasons behind the Presidents
conference with the leaders of
the Central American countries.
By rereading these points, it be becomes
comes becomes obvious that the President
is only too aware of Cubas real
danger in this hemisphere.
This danger is not the danger
of a direct attack, which is what
the President meant when he said
that Castro is no longer a menace
to this continent; instead, it is the
danger of Communist subversion.
We believe that this is the harder
problem to contend with. The points
presented in the Presidents con conference
ference conference call for tighter controls
over the people of these countries.
This desire to show the
governments how to help them themselves
selves themselves is probably the only course
open to this country in its running
battle with Communist Cuba.
The principles that the President
set forth are aimed at controlling
the propaganda, arms, Communist
sympathisers, and the citizens
right to riot and demonstrate.
One of the less important errors
in your judgement of the adminis administration
tration administration revolves around the
removal of Soviet troops from
Cuba. Russia agreed to BEGIN
removing troops from Cuba by
March 15th, not to completely
remove them by that date! Also,
Mr. Khrushchev declared that he
would consider any agression
against Cuba as an attack on the
Soviet Union. On this one point
you were right; but, he did this
to avert any U.S. invasion of Cuba
arising from the attack on the
UJS. shrimp boat, and not to scare
the smaller nations, but the United
States.
In conclusion, we would like to
say that although you are too
inclined to underestimate the
willingness of Russia to come to

Cubas aid;we are not. Fortunately,
neither is the administration, for
they have chosen another course
in solving the Cuban problem.
So you would see, if you would
lift up the corner of your blindfold
that it is not President Kennedy
but you, Mr. J. F. Garcia, and you,
Mr. S. Malavais, who are blind blindfolded.
folded. blindfolded.
Ed Lachman, lUC
Bill Fischette, 2UC

A Southerner Protesting

Southern Society Changing

Cotton was once king in the
Deep South. But the monarch has
left his domain, has fled westward
to Texas, to the irrigated fields
of Arizona, and to California,
where the white fiber is- now the
leading money crop of all the
hundreds raised in that lush and
DONALD
GRUBBS
Southerner
Protesting
fertile state. In Dixie, by contrast
cotton acreage has been cut almost
in half since 1929, and other crops
are raised instead.
A major milestone in this change
was the New Deals AAA cotton
reduction program. Southern
planters, since then, have recieved
benefit payments enabling them to
mechanize and diversify their
operations. The mules which began
this revolution by plowing under
an old way of life.
And why has the end of cottons
dominance had such far-reaching
effects?
Primarily because cotton was
inseparably connected with the
cheap-labor plantation system. At
chopping (hoeing) and picking time,
a tremendous amount of unskilled
hand labor was needed. Southern
planters first secured this supply
through slavery and then, after
1865, through crop-lien slavery
peonageand by denying the
supposedly freed slaves the edu education
cation education and political rights that
would enable them to move off
the plantations. (Real freedom freedomthe
the freedomthe same freedom a white
man has--is only now being slowly
and bitterly won by our Negro
slaves, and some of you who read
these lines are opposing the
process).
Cotton thus produced in the
South, until recently, a feudal
society with the wealthy planters
and professional men at the top,
the yeoman farmers and trades men
in the middle, and the mass of
poor whites and unfree Negroes
under the doormat.
The Souths first industry of
consequence, textiles, did little
to disturb this stratification. First,
the industry was largely limited
to a narrow strip of territory

Little Coverage
Os UF Tennis
EDITOR:

Hats off to Bill Tym, Jem
Pfeiffer, Fred Shaya, Ron Rebhuhn
Don Losman, Bobby Dodd, Jr.,
and Bob Agnew. In case you havp
never heard of these people, they
are on our tennis team.
It seems that every time I pick
up the Alligator, football articles
are plastered all over the sports
page, regardless of the season.
Well, I like football, but this is
tennis season and the Gators are
now sporting the fine record of
seven wins and one loss. This is
a record any school should be
proud of.
On several occasions, there
has been neither an annoucement
of an upcoming match or coverage
of match results. What coverage
-has appeared in the Alligator
seems to be only a filler.
If you have never played tennis
before, try it some time in 85
degree or 90 degree weather. Its
not only an exhausting sport, as
Jerry Pfeiffer will attest, but it
requires top individual ability.
To really be efficient in tennis,
practice is demanded year round.
The team is now seven-and one,
including victories over Navy,
Duke, Georgia Tech, and Georgia.
I realize that the Alligator office
is a long distance from the tennis
courts, but if you will supply the
reporter, I will supply the trans transportation.
portation. transportation.
Chuck Schroedel, 2UC
Editors Note:
See pages 11 and 12.

between Danville, Virginia and
Columbus, Georgia; second, the
mill villages were usually private
domains whose owner-foremen owner-foremen,
, owner-foremen, operatives social structure was as
feudal as that of the rest of the
South,
Only in the twentieth century,
to a great extent within the last
thirty years, has this agrarian
structure been overshadowed by
the complex, fluid society which
industry, with its manifold em employment
ployment employment opportunities, had
created. Half of the South Atlantic
states now have more of their
non-agricultural workers em employed
ployed employed in manufacturing than the
national average. During 1954-1959
manufacturing payroll increased
by 40 per cent in these states
and investment in new plant and
equipment by 30 per cent; the
comparable national figures were
only 30 per cent and 13 per cent,
.respectively. The rapidly
industrializing South is now more
urban than rural; even Mississippi
that horrible example of everything
is almost 40 per cent urban. This
industrialization and urbanization
has expanded employment oppor opportunities,
tunities, opportunities, all of therti well-paid
as compared to most agricultural
work, has blurred class lines and
created diversity, promoted
controversy, and weakened dogma.
But these changes in Southern
society are only slowly being re reflected
flected reflected in the beliefs of Southern
politicians. In the next few columns
a discussion of the fossilized
injustices of Southern politics will
make it clear just what this
protesting Southerner is
protesting.
LETTERS
All letters to the editor should
be addressed to the Florida Alli Alligator,
gator, Alligator, Florida Union Building, and
should preferably be typewritten
on 8-1/2 by 11 paper, although
letters not conforming to these
above standards will be accepted.
Every letter submitted must be
signed, but names will be withheld
upon request. The Ailigaior re reserves
serves reserves the right to refrain from
printing any letter which we feel
is in poor taste, and also reserves
the right to shorten letters
(without changing their meaning)
for reasons of brevity.



The Florida Alligator Wednesday April 3, 1963

GATOR CLASSIFIED

For Sale

IDEAL HOME for University and
Medical Center personnel. Lovely
location 5 minutes from
University. Call FR 6 -4097.
(A-115-st-c).
TIRED OF WALKING or pedelling?
N.S.U. Motor. Make offer. Call
FR 2-6023. See at 1642 West
University Avenue. (A-119-3t-c).
FOR SALE End table, dining
room table, 4 chairs, 2 piece
bedroom suite, 2 tables. Good
condition. Call FR 6-9078. (A (A-1182t-p).
1182t-p). (A-1182t-p).
MARRIED STUDENTS Throw off
your shackles of conformity and
move into decent housing. 2
bedroom-CB home for sale by
student owner. Added feature no
taxes outside city limits. FR
6-1908 after 5 p.m. All day
weekends. (A-113-ts-c).
FOR SALE Black leather
Symphonic portable stereo record
player in good condition. Must
sell immediately. Call Cynthia at
FR 2-1675. (A-117-3t-c).
BURROUGHS ELECTRIC Adding
Machine for sale.
reasonable. Call FR 2-1176.
(A-118-3t-c).
1951 SAFE WAY TRAILER.
30 x 8 with a 10 x 8 cabana.
Fenced in yard. $995. See
at Archer Road Village, 3620 SW
Archer Road, or call Joe Wills,
FR 2-6940. (A-110-ts-c).
FOR SALfi 39 x 8 Southwestern
mobile home with two room cabana.
Must sell by May 4.See at Sheffield
Trailer Park. 4700 SW Archer
Road, or call J. H. Seals at FR
6-1162. (A-111-ts-c).
BY OWNER Very attractive new
home five minutes to campus in
S. W. Large wooded lot. Beam
ceilings, Cyprus paneling,
lardwood floors, large center hall,
tiled kitchen and bathrooms.
Designed for Florida living. FR
2-0328. (A-111-16t-c).

" 1 ii n> i
Services


WILL CARE FOR infants or small
children by day or night in private
lome. 1406 NW sth Avenue, Phone
?R 6-8961. (M-65-ts-c).
NESTORS TV, RADIO, HI FI
SERVICE Tubes checked free.
Free estimates. Next to Florida
Bookstore Parking Lot. 1627 NW
Ist Avenue, Phone FR 2-7326.
(M-99-28t-p).
TYPING DONE on electric
typewriter. Term papers, reports,
theses. Reasonable rates. Contact
Mrs. Rose Martinez at FR 6-3261
ext. 2575 from 8 5:00 or FR
6-1859 weekends or evenings. (M (M---ii9itc).
--ii9itc).tc). (M---ii9itc). :

Wanted

WANTED: Set of weights with
barbells. Call FR 6-4301. (C-119-
3t-c).
RIDE WANTED to Yellowstone
Park or points west. Leaving
around April 28. Call FR 6-5790.
[C-119-3t-c).
TWO ROOM MATES to share two
jedroom apartment with kitchen,
"lose to campus. $25 per month
)lus utilities. Call FR 6-9873 or
see at 1314 NW 2nd Ave. (C-118-
it-c).

Real Estate

Cheaper to buy? we say
iefinitely! See our 3 bedroom,
yto bath home at 713 NW 25th
flvenue. Payment S7O per month.
3rd bedroom has own bath and
seperate entrance. Call FR 2-
)356. Any reasonable offer or
irade accepted. (I-119-st~c).

For Rent

AIR CONDITIONED apartment for
rent. Two bedroom, close to
campus, completely furnished.
Available for summer trimester.
Call FR 2-7575 or FR 6-4819.
(B-117-st-c).
FOR RENT Furnished garage
apartment. Completely private.
Water furnished. $75 per month.
Also 3 room apartment second
floor. $55 per month. Call FR
2-3794 or FR 2-1823. (B-118-ts-p).
FOR RENT Large 2 bedroom house
in the country. Available for 3
or 4 male or female students.
Available after April 20. Anyone
interested, call Mr. Kaplin. FR
2-0481. (B-U9-st-c).
FOR RENT across from campus.
Convenient and clean garage effi efficiency
ciency efficiency apartment. From April 22
to July 1. Apply 321 SW 13th St.
(Bll9-Itc).
LARGE Wood-paneled apartment
for rent 3rd trimester. Perfect
for 2 or 3, close to campus. Call
372-9712 after 4 p.m.(B-119-3t-p).
TRAILER RENTALS In town,
$3.50 up per day out of town,
$6.50 up per day. F. & M. Trailer
Rentals. 524 NW Bth Avenue. FR
6-3118. (B-117-st-c).
ATTRACTIVE ROOM in quiet
home. Private entrance, kitchen
privileges. Excellent for student
who needs to study. 372 7883.
(B-116-st-c).
NICE TWO BEDROOM Furnished
Apartments for students beginning
May first. Will accomodate up to
4 students comfortably. Right near
campus. Reduced rates for
summer. Call Mrs. Jones at
FR 6-5636. Occupancy my be had
at end of this trimester.
(B-112-ts-c).
NEW AIR CONDITIONED
Apartments for summer for boys
or girls. Two room efficiency
close to campus. Utilities paid
except lights. slls per month
with 4 in apartment. SIOO per
month with less than four. Also
renting for fall trimester to boys
only. See at 1518 NW 4th Avenue.
Call FR 6-4353. (B-113-ts-c).
TWO BEDROOM Apartment with
kitchen and bath. Presently
accomodated 3. $75 per month.
Available for summer trimester.
503 SE 7th St. FR 2-6716. (B (B---118-4tc).
--118-4tc). (B---118-4tc).
MOVING? Avoid semester end
rush. Reserve your one way
trailer while all aixes are
available. United Rent-All, 625
NW Bth Avenue. Phone FR 6-2835.
(B-117-9t-c).
RENTALS House and
apartments. Furnished and
unfurnished in all sections
of Gainesville. Contact Wayne
Mason c/o Arnold Realty Co. Two
blocks east of campus, 1119 West
University Avenue. FR 2-3522.
(B-117-st-c).

j Autos

FOR SALE 1953 Chevrolet 2
door, radio, heater, stick shift.
Good condition. FR 2-2119. (G (G---1
--1- (G---1
WANTED TO BUY 'SO through '54
Fords and Chevrolets. Al Herndon
Service Station, 916 SE 4th Street.
FR 2-1308. (G-94-tf-cL
1959 VOLKSWAGON Excellent
condition $950. Call Frank
Cross. Days: FR 6-3261, ext.
2256, nights FR 2-9343. Buckman
4-A. (G-118-3t-c).
HAVE FUN THE SUMMER '6O
Sprite with removable hardtop,
several custom features, in good
condition, A real girl getter! Call
FR 6-3357
119-
1962 RED VOLKSWAGON with
sunroof, seat belts, and beater.
Looks and drives like new. $1595.
Call FR 2-2975. (G-116-ts-c).

Page 5

THIRD IN A SERIES

Hungers
(EDITORS NOTE. . This is the
third in a series of fdur articles
dealing with the topic -Hungers
Impact On The Worlds
Ideologies," written by l'F student
Dieter Plasse. In the first two
segments, Plassee discussed the
ISSUE at hand, namely hunger,
and world POPULATION
GROWTH.)
UNDEVELOPED ECONOMY.
In many areas with a predom predominating
inating predominating agricultural population,
the farms do not produce above
the subsistence level. As a
consequence, a monetized
economy cannot develop unless
agriculture production is
stimulated.
Such stimulus of a stagnating
agriculture production, however,
demands skill and capital and a
sound agriculture policy. It is
necessary to encourage local
savings and thus set in motion
the cycle of sustained economic
growth: marketing of agriculture
products, monetary income of
farming population, demand for
industrial products, stimulation
of industrial production and
creation of jobs to employ the
labor force which is set free
in rural areas by rationalization
of agriculture.
The dependence of many
growing economies on the export
of one product (Brazil, coffee;
Honduras, bananas; Bolivia, tin;
Cuba, sugar) and the price de decrease
crease decrease for raw materials in the
world market in recent years
have brought many countries to
economic ruin. There are
countries which have lost more
income because of this fact than
they obtained as foreign aid.
Maldistribution of land and
inappropriate taxing system have
prevented increase of production
and deprived the national budget
of a source of income. Per capita
food production in 1957 58 was
lower than that in the prewar
years for the Far East, Latin

Classifieds

Autos

1957 ALL WHITE FORD
CONVERTIBLE. Thunderbird
automatic good condition. Must
sell. $450. Wes Patterson. 306
N. E. 6th Street. Call 4-6 p.m.
(G-104-ts-c).
GOING OVERSEAS THE YEAR?
Buy a new car at European prices
and save. Mercedes-Benz, Volvo,
English Ford or D.K.W. Call
Hubert Barlow, FR 2-4251, Crane
Motor Company. (G-86-40t-c).
FOR SALE TR-3 sports car.
1958 with 1960 engine. Excellent
condition. Brand new tires all
around. Phone FR 6 7641.
(G-114-st-p).
GOING TO EUROPE? THE
CONTINENT? Let us arrange
for a delivery of your new Triumph
or Fiat anywhere. We take your
old car in trade here and arrange
for delivery of your new car there.
Use it to tour the continent and
return it to the States with you.
Call Ken Bowman FR 2-4373.
Barkley Motors Inc. Lincoln-
Mercury Meteor Comet
Triumph Flat, (G-114-13t-c).
'sl STUPE BAKER. Radio,
overdrive, 20 m.p.g., good
mechanical condition. Best offer
over $75. Call FR 2-5283. (G (G---117-st-c).
--117-st-c). (G---117-st-c).

Help Wanted j

HELP WANTED Walters must
be 21 or over. Call FR 2-9335
between 12 and 2 p.m. No
experience needed. (E-113-ti-c).

Situations Wanted

PROFESSORS Taking an early
summer vacation? Reliable UF
graduate working in area April
to July will live in and care for
your home, pets, and plants. Call
FR 6-6565. (F-119-st-c).

Impact on Ideology

America and Oceania.
On the whole, agriculture
production has increased only
slightly more than the population.
A UN study shows that in 1939,
390 f the worlds population
was undernourished, in 1950, 62%
This figure is even higher today.
Overproduction of food in some
areas does :ot help to solve
the problem of food shortage
in others.
The profit on investment is
usually high in these countries.
However, in many instances this
profit is taken out from the
country, put in Swiss banks or
invested in safer areas.
It is estimated, for instance
that the present flight capital
from Latin America amounts to
20 billion dollars, a sum which
is equal to the amount supposed
to be put into this area in the
program of the Alliance for
Progress during the next 10
years.
Hunger is increasing. IT is
a potential ferment for discontent
and instability in the largest
part of the world.
DEMOCRACY OR COM COMMUNISM
MUNISM COMMUNISM A FALSE
ALTERNATIVE. A western-type
system of democracy and free
economy depends on a high degree
of education and division of labor,
on a complex administration and
a differentiated coordinating
apparatus of economical and
political activities. It depends
on a social structure which pro provides
vides provides equal rights for everybody.
It depends on thinking and acting
beyond the small economical unit
(farm) and the small social unit
(family, tribe, caste, etc.).
Because these prerequisites
are not met in most developing
countries, as has been shown
above, democracy and an
economic system with western
features can be a desirable goal,
but not a reality in many countries
at the present moment.
It must not be forgotten that
political maturity cannot be
reached Just through release
from colonialism and feudalism.
It must be recalled that it has
taken countries in Europe cen centuries
turies centuries to go through
totalitarianism and nationalism,
centuries to establish the present
form of economic (if they are
through them yet) system after
passing through many other
different forms. It took the
western nations time and effort
to pass through the Industrial
revolution and get rid of the
tumors of the early capitalistic
era.
While western countries im impatiently
patiently impatiently wait for the developing
countries to form a democracy
and a free economic system, thdy
are afraid that these countries
might go communist". The term
communism is unjustifiably
applied to young nations as soon
as some signs of socialism
appear. Socialism is something
entirely different from
communism and has been
practiced by European nations
for decades to a greater or lesser
extent. Many developing
countries have made good'
progress along a socialist line
and have shown that the
alternative if you are not a
democratic capitalist, you are a
communist and supporter of
Soviet Russia" is fiction, born
in the mind of rightists of the
John Birch type.
KNOWLEDGE OF THE
COMMUNBT ideology and the
major objective of Marxism
Leninism world communism
as well as the understanding of
the communist tactics show us
that HUNGER E THE BEST ALLY.
OF THB IDEOLOGY. It must
be understood that 'freedom' and
'individualism, terms which are
often deprived of their real
meaning, are relative values in
the light of hunger. People who
do not live, but merely exist
on the garbage can of a small,
rich society, suppressed by
feudal landlords, often governed
by corrupt, irresponsible

governments, are very
susceptible to communism. For
them, it is not an important issue
that under communist rule they
would only change feudalism for
communist totalitarianism. For
them, the issue of importance
is the promise of land, the
promise of destruction of the
privileged feudal class,
the promise of bread. While
western democracy has the
stigma of colonialism,
communism identifies itself with
education, land distribution, and
technical progress. It also pro proclaims
claims proclaims to be antl-colonialistlc.
While western democracy puts
individual freedom above all,
communism organizes working
armies and rules with a
centralized system, not
hesitating a moment to use every
means which might guarantee
technical and economic progress.
Communist leaders, though
they are devoted to the
international movement of their
ideology, have better understood
that the developing countries will
go through a period of nationalism
which can not be bypassed. Where
communism has been successful,
a strong middle class was either
not existing or was destroyed.
Lack of firsthand knowledge
makes illiterate people
susceptible to communist
agitation and manipulation.
The offer of a scientific
shaped" ideology, emphasis on
promises for the future are
tempting as well as the reference
to the progress Soviet Russia
has made from emergence of
the feudal age at the beginning
of this century to the active
participation o f the shaping of
the space age 40 years later.
Is it surprising that nations who
stand at the same stage of
development as Russia did 45
years agonations that are
challenged by the same pro problemsare
blemsare problemsare tempted to try
communism as a shortcut
towards Industrialization and
improvement of living standards.
Hunger thus might work in
favor of communists to an extent
which would threaten the security
* of western nations.
THE OUTLOOK. It has been
shown that hunger exists in many
parts of the world that are in a
stage of political, economical
and social transition. Low
educational standards, low level
of industrialization, unfavorable
social and sociological
structures are hindering
progress towards a new political
and social stability.
The industrialized nations of
the West must speed up the
solution of their own social
problems and must help the
improvement of living conditions
of 70% of the worlds population
If the traditional values of
western philosophy and religion
shall have any validity. Beyond
this moral reason there is one
of self Interest. Politically
speaking, the balance of power
between communism and western
ideology will be decided by the
young, developing nations, to a
large extent. Economically, the
aspect of saturation of western
markets and the necessity to
create new ones must be taken
into consideration.
The western countries must
stop trying to offer their way
of living, their political system,
their economical system, their
Christianity, to non -western
nations. The west should
encourage these countries with
tact and tolerance to search for
their own economic, political and
social system which is best
adapted to their particular
cultural background and econo economic
mic economic condition. Such systems wIH
necessarily often be ones of
authoritarian and socialistic
nature.
(To Be Continued)



- &*?*&* SB IRE H!
d SALE RUNS APRII

CAMPUS SHOP & BOOKSTORE
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA
Each
John Herseys THE WAR
LOVER. Extraordinary novel of
an American World War n pilot
with a secret pass ion for
destruction, and the lovers whose
destinies strangely intertwine
with his. Unmasks the horrors of
war and false heroism with all
the epic power of The Wall*'
and Hiroshima. Pub. at $5.00.
Sale .99
CHESS VICTORY, by Fred
Relnfeld. Shows you, move by
move, how to checkmate your
opponent brilliantly and consis consistently.
tently. consistently. Pub. at $2.50. Sale .99
Angus WilsonTHE OLD MEN
AT THE ZOO. The London Zoo
is the placeand 1970 the time.
A wildly witty, prophetic novel
in which a Uni-European
movement threatens the
sovereignty of England. Pub. at
$4.50. Sale .99
LAROUSSE FRENCH FRENCHENGLISH
ENGLISH FRENCHENGLISH FRENCH DIC DICTIONARY,
TIONARY, DICTIONARY, by L. Chaffurin.
Standard desk-dictionary, indis indispensable
pensable indispensable for every student,
teacher and businessman who
uses French. Includes special
sections on grammar, pronun pronunciation,
ciation, pronunciation, names and idiomatic
phrases. 768 pp. Special .99
SUNSET COX-Irrepressible
Democrat, by David Lindsey.Llfe,
opinions and Incomparable wit
of Samuel Sullivan Cox, the
congressman from Ohio who
advocated a peaceful settlement
between North and South. A
fascinating portrait of American
politics from 1824 to 1889. Pub.
at $5.00. Sale .99
American Humanist:HOACE
BUSHNELL, by B. M. Cross.
Life and work of the Congre Congregatlonalist
gatlonalist Congregatlonalist theologian who, like
Kierkegaard, explored Christian
thought in the contextof
humanistic patterns. Pub. at
$6.00. Sale .99
THE SABRES OF PARADBE,
by Lesley Blanch. A magnificent
saga of the courage, fanaticism
and wild excesses of the thirty
year war when the might of
nineteenth-century Russia was
hurled against the Oaucaslan
Muslim tribes led by the
immortal Shamyl the Avar.nius.
495 pp. Pub. at $6.95.5a1e .99
RED CARPET TO CHINA, by
Michael Croft. Immensely
readable, highly critical, yet ob objective
jective objective report of the achievements
of the Mao regime. Pub. at $5.00.
Sale .99
THE SOCIAL SELF, by Paul
E. Pfuelze, Ph.D. A brilliant
study at the parallelism between
Martin Buber's 1-and Thou
and the empirical philosophy of
G. H. Mead. Pub. at $4.50. Sale
.99
GROUP PSYCHOANALYSE, by
Bohdan Wassell, M.D. Thought
provoking presentation of this
rapidly expanding psychoanalytic
methodhow it works, who it
helps. Pub. at $3.75. Sale .99
Contemporary Poetry
PRISMATIC VOICES. An
anthology of new, distinguished
verse by 19 young American and
European poets. Spanish, Italian
and German verse with English
translations of on facing pages;
French and English poetry in
the original. Over 700 pages.
Special Import. Sale .99
CONCISE DICTIONARY OF
ABBREVIATIONS, ed. by G.
Mayberry. Spells out thousands
of frequently encountered abbre abbreviations.
viations. abbreviations. Highly useful v.m.

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DICTIONARY OF MODERN
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Early West WILLIAM
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CONCEE DICTIONARY OF
THE AMERICAN LANGUAGE, by
A. Waldhorn. Here Is the book
that tells where our
Americanisms come from.
For all who work with words.
Pub. at $4.50. Sale $1.98
THE EARLY INHABITANTS
OF THE AMERICAS, by H. E.
Stafford. Massive history of the
Aztec, Incan, Mayan and North
American Indian civilizations
based on neglected ancient
records and highly original
theories. Pub. at $6.50. Sale
$1.98
PART OF A LONG STORY:
Eugene ONeill as a Young Man
in Love, by Agnes Boulton. The
great playwrights first wife re recalls
calls recalls years of obscurity in
Greenwich Village and Province Provincetown,
town, Provincetown, during which O'Neill
completed some of his greatest
dramas. Pub. at $4.50. Sale $1.98
Alan Villiers SONS OF
SINBAD. Spellbinding narrative
of a years adventures sailing
on a big deep-sea dhow, from
Kuwait to Zanzibar and back,

visiting exotic ports, and livinj
according to Arab customs. B)
the great sailor of fortune whose
sagas of the sea have entrance*
millions of readers. Over 5(
unusual photos. Pub. at $6.00,
Sale $1.98
ROAD TO MANASSAS, by R
H. Beattie, Jr. Absorbing
detailed narrative of the strateg}
tactics, leading personalities ant
basic inadequacies of the Uniat
forces, from the fall of Fora
Sumter on April 14th to the ent
of the first Battle of Bull Rut
on July 21st, 1861. Based o
personal accounts, regiment*
histories, and manuscrlfl
sources, this is an imports*
contribution to Civil War liter literature.
ature. literature. nius. Pub. at $3.95. Salt
$1.98
Barbara W. Tuchman-- THE
ZIMMERMAN TELEGRAM. En Engrossing,
grossing, Engrossing, thoroughly documents!
narrative of the secret diplomacy
International politics anl
espionage of January, 1917aal
the famous Intercepted messagi
which triggered Americas entry
into World War I. By the
celebrated author of The Gum
of August. Pub. at $3.95. Sala
$1.98
The Life of JOHN MIDDLE TOV
MURRY, by F. A. Lea. Fug
dress biography, by a close frlead
and fellow author, of the brillisto
critic, prophet and pacifist, hus husband
band husband of Katherine Mansfield
intimate of D. H. Lawrence Lawrencewhose
whose Lawrencewhose literary, social anl
political writings profoundly in influenced
fluenced influenced world literature from
W. W. I until his death in 1957.
Pub. at $6.50. Sale $1.98
SEAMANSHIP A Guide to
Its Principles and Pleasures,
by Norris D. Hoyt. Practical
guide to the basic theories an!
techniques of cruising and racing
under sail or power. Everything
the sailor needs to knowfrom
splices, boat handling and docking
to racing, piloting and heavy
weather seamanship. Over 61
drawings, diagrams and maps.
Pub. at $4.00. Sale $1.98
SCIENCE, PROPHECY AND
PREDICTION, by R. Lewinsohn.
Fascinating history, theory and
practice of divination, astrology,
parapsychology and every other
mode of foretelling the future
from Delphic Oracles to 1.8. M.
machines. 49 lllus. Pub. at $4.95.
Sale $1.98
THE CRITICAL READER, ed
by Douglas. Lamson and Smith.
Over 770 pages of the world's
greatest poems, stories and
essays with critical suggestions
design ed to stimulate good
writing as well as careful
reading. Every Important writer
from Shakespeare to Thurber
Is amply represented. Pub. to
$6.00. Sale $1.98
Nobel Prize Winner:
SALVATORE QUASIMODO:
SELECTED WRITINGS, ed. and
trans. by Allen Mandelbaum.Most
of the poetry and two essays,
Discourse on Poetry and
Dante, in the only authorized
English translation. Pub. at
$5.00. Sale $1.98
WILD OCEANThe North
Atlantic, by Alan Villiers. Ex Explorers,
plorers, Explorers, Pirates,
privateersall sailed this tur turbulent
bulent turbulent highroad to the farflung
oceans and seas. Here is the
fascinating history of seafaring
adventures from the ancient
Phoenicians and Vikings, through
Columbus, Cook, Magellan,
Drake to today's sailing
masters. Pub. at $5.00. Sale
sl.<*
MUCH LOVED BOOKS: 60 Beto
Sellers of the Ages, by James
O'D. Bennett. Brilliant brief
introductions to and synopses of
such masterpieces of world lit literature
erature literature as the Bible, Hamlet**
Treasure Island, Plutarch's
Lives, The Scarlet Letter,*
David Copperfleld, Las
Miserables, Don Quixote and
52 more great books. 461 pp.
Pub. at $3.95. Sale $1.98
THE THIRD ROSEGertruds
Stein A Her World, by Jobe
Malcolm Brinnln. A warm and
knowledgable portrait of Mias
Stein from Radcliffe to the finto
years in France. Ulus. Pub. to
$6.00. Sale SL9B
Ami Mosy Mold



The Florida Alligator Wednesday, April 3, 1963

Page 8

N/H Grant
Given UF
A $250,000 grant has been
awarded by the National Institutes
of Health (NIH) to Dr. M.K. Corbett
and Dr. W. C. Price of the UF
plant virus laboratory to continue
research aimed at determining
the nature of plant viruses.

I HEELS put on in 5 minutes
SOLES put on in 15 minutes I
moderkTshoel
KFPAIR SHOP I
ocross from Ist notionol bonk p

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rUKD* JUNEo *-conthn.o LAST TIMES TODAY
Academy Awards IfTTITTI WALT DISNEY'S
I April 8 ABC TV SON OF RUBBER'! I

t
I meet and greet you at the New State Theatre, 7:00 p.m., and at the §
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introducing TONEY NAYLOR JOSEPH LINCOLN
7:00p.m. Gainesville Drive-In Theatre
at Both Theatres
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ALL SET TO SING
Sunday at 3 p.m. in the "King David" Qratorio are,
left, Beverly Wolff and Doris Yarick. The program will
be in the Florida Gymnasium.

Last in a Series

UF Budget Is
Like Subway

* By PAT WILKINSON
Staff Writer
*UF students who have never seen
the New York subways need only
to view the staircases and hallways
of some UF buildings while classes
are changing, according to Dean
Robert B. Mautz of Academic
Affairs.
"The New York subways at rush
hour are no worse/ Mautz said.
The UF new-building program is
lagging 10 years behind UF needs,
he said. Even if the $32 million
UF request for new buildings is
granted by the state legislature
in the 1963-65 biennium only
present needs would be fulfilled,
Mautz added.
Mautz hopes the State Budget
Commisssion will recommend that
the full amount be granted by the
state legislature.
"The UF cant wait and hope
that President Kennedys new edu education
cation education bill, which includes federal
aid for building new classrooms,
will be successful. The funds must
be appropriated now/ Mautz said.
"During the past 20 years the
UF has never been able to meet
current demands/ Mautz said.

WUFT Highlights

TONIGHT
9:30 a.m. New Horizons
Seventh grade science taught by
Michael Dechman.
10 Science Around You --
Sixth grade science taught by Mrs.
N. E. Bingham.
10:45 Visiting Spanish Neighbors
-- Fifth grade Spanish taught by
Mrs. Rosa Rabell.
11:15 Lets Speak Spanish
Fourth grade conversational Span Spanish.
ish. Spanish.
11:30 High School Chemistry
Dr. John F. Baxter.
12:05 Americanism vs.
Communism.
5:45 p.m. American Economy
What happens at the collective
bargaining table.
6:15 Channel Five News
Exclusive coverage of local news,
weather and sports.
6:3t) World of Numbers and
Forms Arithmetic principles
for fourth grade.
7, Whats New The story
of George Washingtons famous
crossing of the Delaware and the
resulting American victory in the
War for Independence.
7:30 Sports Almanac A
close-up look at the exciting sport
of sky diving.
7:45 Florida Blue Key Presents
-- An introspective look at Uni University
versity University of Florida students past,
present and future.
8 Turn of the Century
An interesting look at the recording
industry in its early days.
8:30 The House We Live In
Kenneth Rexroth, poet critic,
author 6 ivts his views
on how to adjust man to the world
in which he lives.
9 Glenn Gould: On The Record
-- A recording session at Columbia
Records in New York reveals the
creative side of pianist Glenn
Gould.
9:30 Tropical Gardner --
Growth and uses of small flowering
shrubs.
THURSDAY
10:45 a.m. Operation Alphabet --
Tutoring in the skills of reading
and writing on the adult level.
11:15 Elementary Spanish
Beginning Spanish for third grade.
11:30 High School Chemistry
Dr. John F. Baxter.
12:05 Americanism vs.
Communism -- A comparison and
contrast between the worlds major
competing ideologies.

More than 20 per cent of campus
buildings were built of frame
construction and declared
temporary some time ago.
, "Many of these have outlived
their usefulness and should have
been replaced earlier/ Mautz
said.
Another critical area is the
expansion of UF library facilities
which presently meet the needs
of 1958 studeilt enrollment--3,000
fewer than today. Enrollment esti estimates
mates estimates for 1963-65 widen the gap
to 5,000, Mautz said.
"It has been estimated that
mans knowledge is presently
doubling itself approximately
every 10 years," Mautz said. "The
library must collect this wealth
of information and make it avail available
able available to UF students and faculty.
The State Budget Commission
is recommending the UF budget
request for library expansion for
the 1963-65 biennium be slashed
almost $600,000. The UF is re requesting
questing requesting $2,406,656.
"If the UF is to be a quality
institution and a center for
graduate work and active research
the UF library must be adequately
supported," Mautz said.

5:45 p.m. American Economy
Policy problems involved in
calling a strike.
6:15 Channel Five News
Exclusive coverage of local news,
weather and sports.
6:30 Operation Alphabet --
Tutoring in reading and writing
skills on the adult level.
7 Whats New Murl Deusing
and children hunt for wildlife in
the wild northwoods.
7:30 This Week Local
activities talked about by guests
from surrounding communities.
7:45 Exposition Talented
guests and unusual activities
in North Central Florida.
8 Agriviews From the world
of agriculture, things of general
interest to all.
8:30 Parents and ur. Spock
What to do about the development
of competition, criticism and
fighting in children.
9 Computers And The Mind
Os Man Electronic "brain"
experts discuss the question of
whether machines will ever run
men.
9:30 Time For Living The
advantages and disadvantages of
self-employment and suggestions
of services that could be the basis
for setting up a small business.
FRIDAY
10:45 World Os Numbers And
Forms Principles of arithmetic
for fourth graders.
11:30 High School Chemistry
Dr. John F. Baxter.
12:05 Americanism vs. Com Communism.
munism. Communism. Comparison and contrast
of the two systems of government.
5:45 American Economy --
Labor and labor organizations.
6:15 Channel 5 News Com Complete
plete Complete local news, weather and
sports.
6:30 Visiting Spanish Neighbors
Fifth grade Spanish.
7 Whats New Children
demonstrate stalking deer.and a
moos£.
7:30 Medical Shows Peg
Lynch and Allen Bunch (TVs Ethel
and Albert ) demonstrate child
safety in a film called "Safe At
Home."
8 The Age of Overkill Max
Lerner describes the delicate
balance of terror that might lead
to war.
8:30 45 Years With Fitzpatrick
A review of Daniel Fitzpatricks
cartoons during the New Deal.
9 An Age Os Kings Acts
1 and 2 of Shakespeares Henry
IV, Part n.



Fijis Present a Festive Fete, Feast

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.of work wont into decorating the Phi Gam house.



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and wins femmme approval every time. Old Spice After Shave Lotion, v "* 1 1
(ymoMv the shave lotion men recommend to other men

The Florida Alligator Wednesday, Aprih 3, > 963

By JESS MARKHAM
Staff Writer
Annual college £fnd university fraternity weekends usually are
festive occasions of high spirits and good times and the UF Phi
Gamma Delta fraternity Luau Saturday night, was no different
according to Fiji House Manager Bill Grant of West Palm Beach.
The Luau is the highlight of Fiji chapter weekends all over the
United States and Canada," Grant said. We went to great lengths
to lend as much of an air of authenticity to the surroundings as
possible."
Architecture junior Bill Nigro designed the outside decorations
at the house. Construction consisted of a waterfall, stream and
fishpond with a native hut-bridge" over the stream.
Palm stumps decorated with faces and symbols were incorporated
into the overall design to depict a native ceremonial Lodge.
All the furniture was removed from the first floor and the entire
area was covered with palm fronds on the walls, floors and ceilings.
Simulated sculpture casts and masks also were used.
Invitations, consisting of decorated bones containing scroll
invitations, were delivered to Fiji dates in dormitories and houses
by pledges dressed in grass skirts and adorned by native coloring.
Everything at the house was designed by Nigro and built by brothers
and pledges. Forays to farms, sawmills and wooded areas of Alachua
County produced the needed ingredients. Bamboo, cypress, palm
trunks, fronds and rocks were liberated from uselessness and
transported to the house by foraging Fijis.
Festivities began at 5:30 p.m. Saturday and lasted until 1 a.in.
Lava lavas, sarongs, mu mus and hula skirts were the costumes
of the day.

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SOUTH SEA BALLADS
.. .and twist music are fine to dance by.

Page 9



Page 10

The Florida Alligator Wednesday, April 3, 1963

HesSeeking the Past

By PETE HATHAWAY
Staff Writer
While scientists are pushing to
catch the space age, at least one
UF professor will be searching
for the Stone Age.
Associate professor William C.
Massey of the Anthropology De Department
partment Department will head an expedition,
leaving May 1, to search for
implements and weapons of an
Indian civilization believed to have
existed almost 100 centuries ago.
The expedition, which will take
12 months, will explore Lower
California, a peninsula in Mexico
between the Pacific and the Gulf

At |H
r ?** m w a

BUSINESS FRATERNITY HONOREE
tapped into Beta Gamma Sigma, national business honorary, recently was coed
Sally Cornelius of Miami. Miss Cornelius is congratulated by Robert Harper, campus
chapter president from Kissimmee; J. J. Daniel, former Board of Control chairman
from Jacksonville, and UF Pres. J. Wayne Reitz.

NOTICE
APPLICATIONS ARE NOW BEING ACCEPTED
FOR
PUBLICATIONS
BUSINESS MANAGER
ior the
'V \
Fall and Winlei Trimesters,
1963-64
APPLICATION BLANKS MAY BE OBTAINED
AT THE STUDENT PUBLICATIONS CENTRAL
BUSINESS OFFICE, ROOM 14, FLORIDA
UNION, UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE.
j if.

of California.
Past trips Massey has been on
in Southern California, Nevada and
Arizona have uncovered remnants
of the Pinto-Gypsum Culture esti estimated
mated estimated to be 8,000-10,000 years
old.
The discoveries, which were
made in Pinto Basin, Calif, and
Gypsum Cave, Nev. were dated
by the carbon-14 method, a
scientific process which can
measure the age of fossils,
Massey said.
The expedition will attempt to
prove that the Indians in Lower
California came from the Pinto-

Gypsum Culture.
My guess is that these Indians
became trapped in a blind alley
when they pushed southward along
the peninsula, which is all desert
at the southern tip, Massey said.
The Indians are believed to be
among the first inhabitants of North
America and survivors on the
peninsula until the arrival of the
Spanish in the sixteenth century,
Massey said.
Discoveries made by Massey
will be placed in a museum in
La Paz, the capital of the southern
district of the peninsula.

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DODGING WATER SPRINKLERS
...is a "sport" known to most UF students.

Sprinklers Not Out
To Get Anyone

By 808 THOMAS
Staff Writer
Were not out to get anybody,
but sometimes accidents happen,
says UF Grounds Superintendent
N. R. Lake.
Lake is referring to the corps
of mad mechanical monsters
alias sprinkler systems which
spring from the earth during hot
spring days to drench unsuspecting
students in a rain of aquatic
vituperations.
Lake claims his watering crew
of five men are under specific
instructions for the dry-passing
of students. The instructions in include
clude include being in sight of each
sprinkler in their circuit, rolling
According to Lake, contrary
to a damp publics opinion, the
sprinkler crew is void of any
cruel, calculating individuals
plotting to aim their machines
wrath at passing victimes.
The trouble is, he said, we
have such a big turnover in ground
crew employment that many of
the men are just learning to operate

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I egjfryt-

up all car windows and not turning
on the sprinklers during class
changes.
the sprinklers.
If a water tower could be
installed in the Century Tower and
connected to the 500 gallon pump
now in the basement of the tower,
an automatic night sprinkling
system could be installed, Lake
said.
Until then students must continue
attempting to outguess the aquatic
monsters Lake said.
Senior Wins
Russell W. Carpenter, a senior
in business administration from
St. Petersburg, has been awarded
the Wall Street Journals annual
achievement award.
Given each year to the graduating
student who maintains the highest
grade average at the UF in finance
courses, the award was presented
last night at a Finance Association
Meeting.



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...tennis ace Rod Mandelstam slams a ball netward in
preparation for the state collegiate tournament in Cape
Coral later this month.

States Top Netter
Should Be Decided

CAPE CORAL (Special) -- Who is Floridas number one collegiate
tennis player?
The answer to that questionand which racquet squad Is the

states top powerwill be forth forthcoming
coming forthcoming at the first annual Florida
Intercollegiate Tennis Champion Championships,
ships, Championships, April 26-28, at Cape Coral.
At least six players,
representing four schools, are in
contention for the singles title.
Three netters from the
University of Miami a team that
opened the season with 106
consecutive victories must be
given strong consideration: Rod
Mandelstam, John Hammill and
John Karabasz.
BILL TYM, returning to the
University of Florida after a
years absence, is currently
ranked among the top five in the
state.
Florida State Universitys entry
in the singles race is a 25-year 25-yearold
old 25-yearold player from South Africa, Lex
Wood. Coach Eddie Cubbon labels
Wood the best weve ever had
at FSU.
John Lawrence, first year per performer
former performer at Rollins, is called by
Coach Norm Copeland one of the
finest prospects ever to enter the
school.
Despite this example of tennis
proficiency, the University of
Miami has the best chance of
bringing home top singles honors.
MANDELSTAM, rated first in
the latest Florida Lawn Tennis
Association rankings, and Hammill
ranked second, give Coach Dale
Lewis excellent representation.
Should they meet in the finals
and indications are good that the
talented twosome will be seeded
at opposite ends of the champion championship
ship championship draw-tennis enthusiasts who
have wondered just when the
Hurricanes will be defeated will
have their answer.
Rounding out the schools com*
petlng for singles, doubles and*
overall team honors at Cape
Coral are Florida Southern
College and Florida Presbyterian.
The three-day event, sanctioned
by the United States Lawn Tennis
Association, will be a single
contest.

MIAMI HURRICANE

Will Those Giants
Repeat N.L. Title?

PHOENK, Ariz. (UPI) Will
the self-assuredSanFranciscoGi self-assuredSanFranciscoGiants
ants self-assuredSanFranciscoGiants hang on to the National Lea League
gue League pennant or finish the season
on their sliding pads?
Its between us and the Los
Angeles Dodgers, murmers Wil Willie
lie Willie McCovey, turning on his warm
smile in the sun.
But further up the line in the
board of strategy is manager Al Alvin
vin Alvin Dark, who remains as poker pokerfaced
faced pokerfaced as your favorite western
hero.
I DONT KNOW what we will
do, Dark says But I do know
that this is the same club that
won last year Our strongest
point is that we are balanced and
know each other better.
.There is no over-confidence
around here, the manager con continues,
tinues, continues, We have to start another
season and we know that the Na National
tional National League will be gunning for
us just as it gunned for the Dod Dodgers
gers Dodgers last year.
One major and one minor deal
featured the clubs off-season
trading Pitchers Stu Miller and
Mike McCormick were traded to
Baltimore along with catcher
John Orsino In exchange, the
Giants got hurlers Jack Fischer
7-9 and left-hander Billy Hoeft
4-8 plus catcher Jim Coker.
DARK HOPES that the ex-
American leaguers can find a new
life with the Giants as did south southpaws
paws southpaws Bill ODell and Billy Pierce
ODell, who was with Baltimore
four years ago, posted a 19-14
mark last season Pierce, long a
landmark with the Chicago White
Sox, recorded a 16-6 record and
never lost a game in gusty Can Candlestick
dlestick Candlestick Park where he achieved
12 victories.
But there are some doubts about
Hoeft, who sustained an injured
shoulder when he fell about three
weeks ago and ihay not be able
to pitch until May.
In another deal, the Giants re regained
gained regained Joe Amalfitano from
Houston for left-handed pitcher
Dick Lemay and outfielder Manuel
Mota.

Ron Creeses Single
Downs Paladins, 2-1

BY MARTY STONE
Staff Writer
A line drive single off the bat
of Ron Creese in the tenth inning
drove in the winning run for the
Florida Gator baseball team as
they beat the Furman Paladins
2-1 yesterday at Perry Field.
The game was a pitchers duel
from the first inning. Gator pit pitcher
cher pitcher Charlie Anderson went the
full ten innings, allowing only six
hits. He retired the first 11
men he faced, but his bid for a
no-hitter went out the window when
Phil King and Sam Pickens singled
in the fourth inning. Anderson
struck out seven and did not walk
a man.
RALPH HARWOOD, the Pala Paladins
dins Paladins losing pitcher, also went the
distance. He allowed seven hits,
while striking out five and walking
seven. His bid for a no-hitter
was also broken up in the fourth
inning when Gator leftfielder Earl
Montgomery singled.
The Paladins scored their lone
run in the top of the ninth inning.
Third baseman King led off with
a double to deep right field. He
went to third on a ground out by
Pickens. Pickens then broke for
home, and Gator pitcher Anderson
made a wild pitch allowing Pickens
to score.
The Gators came back in the
bottom of the ninth, scoring one
run to tie up the game. Pinch Pinchhitter
hitter Pinchhitter Jim Elliott, batting for Mont Montgomery,
gomery, Montgomery, lined a single to lead

The entire regular squad is
back from the 1962 season that
saw San Francisco beat Los Ang Angeles
eles Angeles in a playoff for the pennant,
then narrowly lose the World Se Serises
rises Serises to the New York Yankees in
the seventh game.
WILLIE MAYS, collecting more
than SIOO,OOO this season, returns
to center field where Dark thinks
that he will enjoy four or five
more fine seasons.
It will be McCovey or right righthanded
handed righthanded hitting Harvey Kuenn in
left field, and Felipe Alou whose
clutch hits kept the Giants in busi business
ness business during September in right.
Orlando Cepeda, who should be
a 350 hitter according to Darks
plus and minus ratings, is back
at first base with a 306 average
for 1962 plus a token raise of
SI,OOO that ended his annual hold holdout.
out. holdout.
Chuck Hiller, the first National
Leaguer to hit a grand slam in
a World Series, will patrol sec second
ond second base again with Jose Pagan
at shortstop and Jim Daveport at
third.
The pitching staff, a headache
until last year, features Jack San Sanford
ford Sanford 24-7 and Juan Marichal 18-
11 as the key right-handed start starters
ers starters along with southpaws ODell
and Pierce.
BIG DON LARSEN 5-4 sparkled
in relief last year and Hoeft if
he recovers would be paired
with him as a left-handed fire fireman.
man. fireman. Dark looks to Fischer as
another starter or spot man.
The catching is the same with
Tom Haller and Ed Bailey plus
Coker Dark would like to retain
Coker and go with three back backstops
stops backstops as he rates the former Ori Oriole
ole Oriole a good kid and a fighter
Where are the Giants week?
We have weaknesses just like
any other club, but I prefer todls todlscuss
cuss todlscuss our strong points, says
Dark, who has turned more con conservative
servative conservative than ever.

The Florida Alligator Wednesday, April 3, 1963

off the inning. After Tom Moore
flied out, Carol Lanoux singled,
pushing Elliott to third. Elliot
then scored on a single by Jack
Kenworthy.
ED BRADDY was intentionally
walked to load the bases. Dave
Porter, batting for Bernie Haskins,

W p

State Investigator
Says Wally Did It

ATLANTA (UPI) Attorney
General Eugene Cook said Tuesday
that former University of Georgia
athletic director Wallace Butts
divulged vital team secrets and was
in contact with kpown gamblers
prior to the 1962 Georgia-Alabama
football game.
In a report on a two-week in investigation
vestigation investigation to Gov. Carl Sanders
into an alleged Southeastern Con Conference
ference Conference football scandal, Cook dis disclosed
closed disclosed that the one-time famous
football mentor had amassed a
net fortune of approximately
$206,00. His salary was $16,000
a year.
BUTTS' RESIGNATION from
Georgia, where he had coached
or directed athletics for 25 years,
was summarily accepted Feb. 28,
less than a month before a maga magazine
zine magazine article accused him of tele telephoning
phoning telephoning football Information to
Alabama coach Paul Bear Bryant
just before the two teams clashed
in Birmingham last Sept. 22.
Bryant and Butts have denied
exchanging information that could
affect the outcome of the game.
But Cook produced signed state statements
ments statements from six Georgia athletic
staff members that the conversa conversation,
tion, conversation, as reported, conveyed vital
and Important information that
could have affected the outcome
of the game.
ALABAMA, FAVORED by 17
points, beat Georgia 35-0. Cook
emphasized that no player on
either team was Involved in any
way.
Sanders told a news conference
following his public release of
Cooks report that there was in

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struck out and Anderson hit a long
fly that was caught to end the inn inning.
ing. inning.
In the bottom of the tenth, Bandy
Morcroft singled and stole second
base. He went to third on a ground,
out by Elliot. Harwood then inten intentionally
tionally intentionally walked Moore andLanoux.
At this point Creese made his game
winning hit.
Asked if he knew it was a hit
when he connected, Creese
answered I was too scared
to watch. I only hoped the center
fielder was playing deep.
WINNING THIS game shows
the advantages of having a good
bench, remarked head coach Dave
Fuller.
The Gators overall baseball re record
cord record is now 11-2. Floridas next
game is against Auburn Friday
at 3 p.m. at Perry Field. Au Auburn
burn Auburn is currently the baseball lea-
der in the Southeastern Conference
with a 4-0 league mark.

the investigation so far nothing
to indicate the violation of any
criminal statute by Butts.
Cook said that during a closed closeddoor
door closeddoor conference he had with Butts
during his investigation, he was
shown telephone company
of calls made by Butts to per persons
sons persons known to be interested in
gambling.
A RUNDOWN of Butts long dis distance
tance distance calls, as released by Cook,
showed he made 16 calls to Frank
Scobey in Chicago, nine of them
during September, 1962, and one
from Birmingham on the day of
the game.
Scobey was a federal govern government
ment government witness in a 1959 gambling
ring trial in Terre Haute, Ind. He
listed his address as Chicago
where he had lived for 15 years.
He was a beer distributor for
Better Brands of Illinois.
He testified he made several
telephone calls to Terre Haute
based syndicate to place bets on
football games and the horse
races. He said he never made a
bet of less than SI .000.

PROPANE
IP- GAS
HOTTER THAN NATURAL GAi
Cook ond Hoot Wotor
Low Cost
FR 6-5110

Page 11



Page 12

The Florida Alligator Wednesday, April 3, 1963

Intramural Awards
Given at Banquet

Winners of intramural league
crowns, good spdFts, officials, and
outstanding intramural club
members were feted last night
at the annual Florida Intramural
Barbeque in the banquet room of
the Hub.
FRATERNITY LEAGUE intra intramural
mural intramural winners, Sigma Nu in the
Orange League and Phi Gamma
Delta in the Blue League, were
presented with the coveted

Jerry Livingston-
Double All-America

By ERNIE UTZ
Sports Writer
A swimmers swimmer thats
what he is! said head UF swim
coach Bill Harlan. He was
referring to junior butterfly ace
Jerry Livingston, who is the second
Florida swimmer to ever become a
two-event All-America in the same
year, which puts him in the same
class as Phil Drake who was a
world's record holder here in 1957.
At the same time Livingston
repeats a Florida All-America
for the second consecutive year.
LIVINGSTON HOLDS the Florida
records in the 100 and 200-yard
butterfly, and the SEC records
for the same events. He also
shares the records on the 400
yard medley relay and the 400
yard freestyle.
At the NCAA nationals Living Livingston
ston Livingston took sixth in the 200-yard
butterfly and fifth in the 100-yard
fly.
Jerry has what you might call
a real classic style, Harlan

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Presidents Cup by student
director George Keep.
In the Mens Independent League
the trophy went,to the Latin Ameri American
can American Club.
In the Sorority Leagues Delta
Delta Delta received the trophy
for Orange League play while
Kappa Alpha Theta was honored
for winning the Blue League.
GROVE HALL won the honors
in the Womens Off-Campus and

continued, it is one of the best
Ive ever seen. Some of his times
arent as beautiful as his style,
but he sure looks great in the
water from the spectators point
of view.
Jerry has great determination
hes a real fighter in the water.
Os course if you want to win
anything youve got to work for
LIVING LIVINGSTON
STON LIVINGSTON
it.
SPEAKING OF THE team and
its fortunes this past season es especially
pecially especially in the nationals at Raleigh
N.C. Livingston said, I think
we had a real great season. The
point is that people dont realize
how much we've improved.
Why our times this year would
have put Green (Terry) and Far Farwell
well Farwell (Dick) and me in last years
nationals. Our medly relay would
have won also.
Actually though, we made up
lost time this past season, and Im
sure the team will make up more
next year.
THE COMPETITION this year
was really fantasiic,he continued
Why only one boy won two events.
Usually you have one fellow take
first in two or three events. This
year a boy would win one event
and finish third or fourth in
another. Heck, the defending 100-
yard butterfly champ didnt even
qualify this year.
Theres no doubt that the com competition
petition competition gets tougher and tougher
every year, but were going to have
to meet more and more tough
competition if were going to
improve. FSU is usually the
toughest competition on our
schedule, but if we swam against
schools like Ohio State, FSU would
be a pushover.

Independent League.
Fletcher S received a trophy
for winning the Murphree Area
League. Henderson Section took
the honors in the Graham area,
Yocum in the Hume area and
Weaver 2 in the Tolbert area.
Sportsmanship trophies were
then presented to the representa representatives
tives representatives of the teams that were judged
to best exemplify good
sportsmanship. In the Orange
fraternity League the award went
to Sigma Alpha Epsilon, the Blue
League award was won by Alpha
Gamma Rho. In the Independent
League the Newman Club took the
sportsmanship trophy.
FOR THE WOMEN Zeta Tau
Alpha was awarded the sports sportsmanship
manship sportsmanship cup in theOrangeLeague,
Phi Mu in the Blue League and
North Rawlings in the Independent
League.
Trophies were then presented
to Dick Katz and Diane Pierpont
for being the most outstanding
Intramural officials of the year.
The last group of awards, given
for the first time this year, were
for outstanding service to an in intramural
tramural intramural club. They went to Bob
Cordell of the Judo Club, Taeko
Kumagai of the Womens Tennis
Club, Mike Kessler of the Soccer
Club and Joe Edminsten of the
Wrestling Club.

Final Standings
ORANGE LEAGUE
Sigma Nu. . 879
Phi Kappa Tau 815
Tau Epsilon Phi. 745
Sigma Alpha Epsilon 710
Phi Delta Theta. .' 695
Sigma Chi. .....' 669
Alpha Tau Omega. 641
Kappa Sigma 618
Alpha Epsilon Pi 600
Pi Lambda Phi 558
Beta Theta Pi 548
Sigma Phi Epsilon 527
Delta Tau Delta 507
Pi Kappa Alpha 500
Kappa Alpha. 480
Theta Chi 370
BLUE LEAGUE
Phi Gamma Delta 856
Delta Upsilon 846
Pi Kappa Phi 838
Chi Phi 799
Delta Chi 678
Tau Kappa Epsilon 650
Alpha Gamma Rho 609
Lambda Chi Alpna 579
Delta Sigma Phi 506
Phi Epsilon Pi .420
- - .

Tulane Wins
Sailing Meet
The Tulane Sailing Club won
the Southeastern Inter-Collegiate
Sailing Association (SEESA) Dinghy
Championship held on Lake
Wauberg Saturday.
Although the UF Sailing Club
won the first four races, they
were unable to hold the lead.
Tulane consistantly placed
although they won only two races.
The final scores were Tulane
40, UF 38, Florida Presbyterian
32 and Spring Hill College 25.
Saturdays winds were almost
ideal with the velocity ranging from
15 to 20 miles per hour from the
northwest. Surprisingly there
were no capslzals or damage to
the boats due to the gusty winds.
Pepper Constable, who sailed
in the A division for the Gator
team, won the high point skipper
award in that division with 20
points while Paul Baroco from
Tulane won the B division honors
with 22 points and also high point
skipper award.
The UF B division team won
second place in that division and
was sailed by Walt Harris with
(Ist, 4,3 & 3rd) and Roger Straub
with a single first place.

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GATOR NETMAN
.. .Fred Shaya paces the Florida tennis team to its win
over Amherst College in yesterday's match at the var varsity
sity varsity courts.

Florida Courtmen
Bop Lord Jeffs

BY ERIC JONAS
Staff Writer
The Gator tennis team, led by
No. 1 seeded Bill Tym, trounced
the Lord Jeffs of Amherst College
8-1 on the varsity courts
yesterday.
Tym, who returned to the UF
this year after spending last year
in the service, defeated the Jeffs
No. 1 man, Ken Cousens, 6-2,
6-1 and teamed with Jerry Pfeiffer
to defeat Amhersts No. 1 doubles
Match Today
The UF tennis team takes
on Hope Colleges netters this
afternoon at 2:30 on the
Varsity Courts, west of the drill
field.
- Pfeiffer, playing No. 1 singles,
suffered the Gators only defeat,
bowing to Levine 6-4, 6-2.
Fred Shaya the No. 3 singles
man, made easy work of the Jeffs
Tom Poor as Poor was able to
win only one game, losing 6-1,
6-0. Ron Rebhuhn, No. 4 singles
slipped by Bob Guthrie, after
dropping the second set, 6-4,1-6,
6-1.
Bob Agnew won the No. 5 match

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team of Cousens and Jack Levine
3-6, 6-3, 7-5.
coming on strong after losing the
first set 4-6. Agnew pulled out the
middle set, 7-5 and took the final
one easily, 6-1.
Playing No. 6 Dan Losman,
clinehed the match, defeating J.R.
Williams easily 6-4, 6-1.
The three doubles team made a
clean sweep, winning all three
matches as the Lord Jeffs were
able to win only two sets.
Tym and Pfeiffer defeated
Cousens and Levine in the No. 1
doubles match as Rebhuhn and
Bobby Dodd defeated the Jeffs
number two doubles pair, Poor and
John Ransmeier 3-6, 6-1, 6-3.
Shaya and Losman completed the
sweep defeating Peter Kleinman
and Bob Guthrie 6-0, 6-4.