Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
The Florida
Alligator

iVol. 55, No. 116 University of Florida, Gainesville Friday, March 29, 1963

f rofs Slam Exams
Set on Good Friday

By 808 WILSON
Editorial Assistant
opinion yesterday threw
K a wall of disapproval against
the jamming of final exams into
M|pter observances.
J|n a telephone survey conducted
v the Alligator, faculty members
jpmed thumbs down on bolding
Hols on Good Friday and E aster
fttturday by a four to one margin.
H Representatives from every UF
OOllege and most departments were
jbntacted during the random
Sampling, baaed on the campus
Jpiephone directory.
| 75 per cent of those contacted
agreed they would prefer to avoid
administering finals on religious
Holidays if possible. Most, however
Belt the conflict this year cropped
p because of the demands of the
Brimester system and was a
pecessary evil.
Psychology Prof. Richard J.
Anderson pretty well summed up
Ithe feeling's of the faculty.
I'm in favor of universities
land you can't run a university
without final exams, Anderson
! said. Since under the trimester
this is the only time finals can be
given, Pm willing to accept it,
even if I don't like it.
Anderson said he would like
to see the practice avoided in the
future but the Board of Control
was the only agency that could
step in and slam the exam door
shut during Easter.
UF Vice Pres. Harry M. Philpott
pointed out that under the switch
to the trimester a joint

Salary Cut Causes
Position Vacancy

A publications salary reduction
will cause at least a temporary
absence of a business manager
of student publications for next
fall.
Jay Fountain, present student
business manager, yesterday
applied for business manager for
next fall but when he was told of
the Student Government finance
law which cut the salary of his
position he refused to take the
spot.
There were no other app' '.ants.

Lawrence Elected
As Gator Editor

David Lawrence Jr., current
editor-in-chief of the Florida
Alligator, was re-elected editor
for the Fall and Winter trimesters
of next year.
Also elected was Bob Wilson,
managing editor.
Lawrence, who has served as
editor this trimester is a Journal Journalism
ism Journalism major from Onco, Fla., and
is a member of Delta Upsilon
fraternity*
He has worked on the St.
Petersburg Times for three
summers and was editor of his
high school newspaper.
Wilson, who was elected
managiz editor, for the Fall and

Institutional Committee and the
Board of Control hammered out
the academic calendar.
The board prescribes the holi holidays,
days, holidays, Philpott said. As far
as I know the setting of a holiday
at Easter was not discussed when
the calendar was drawn up.
The Institutional Committee was
composed of representatives from
the UF, FSU, University of South
Florida and Florida A & M. All
schools observe the same
academic calendar, Philpott added.
Final exams are slated to begin
April 11 and will continue through
April 18 according to the University
Record. Easter observances begin
with Good Friday. April 12.
Local religious leaders also
raised their voice against putting
Good Friday and Easter Saturday
into the academic calendar.
Prof. Delton L. Scudder, UF
Religious Association leader and
head professor of religion, said
he was going to take the adminis administration
tration administration to task for overlapping
Easter and finals.
I plan to call the admin administration's
istration's administration's attention to the
matter, Scudder said. Students
should have the opportunity to
observe Easter at home if they so
desire.
Scudder also laid blame for the
mixup at the feet of the trimester.
This year we're trying out the
trimester for the first time and
some changes will have to be
made, Scudder said. The people
who set up the time schedule for
finals were trying to meet the
requirements of state law and had

Fountain, who is presently being
paid S3O per week, said they now
alloted salary of SIOO per month
was not enough.
c
Its not that I dont want to
work for a cut in salary, but I
feel it would be unfair to future
business managers.
Chairman of the Board of Student
Publications Ralph B. Thompson
said be did *>ot blame Fountain.
He will be uolng the same work,

Winter trimesters, is a past editor
of several Air Force publications
and is a past staff writer for the
Daytona Beach Evening Journal.
The 28-year-old veteran, will
be the only managing editor next
fall. This trimester three
managing editors were employed.
Wilson is a member of Theta
Chi fraternity.
Lawrence Indicated that there
would be a survey taken to see
what changes the student body
would like in the Alligator.
The Alligator elections for
summer positions will be Tuesday
night.

to exclude every consideration
except meeting time limits.
Scudder conceded, however, that
things might have been worked
out by beginning exams on Tuesday
following Easter and pushing the
whole trimess ahead a few days.
This would have created a number
of administrative problems, how however,
ever, however, he added.
Scudder pointed to the varibillty
of religious holidays within the
framework of a rigid lay calendar
as one of the problems faced In
scheduling.
Holidays don't fall on the same
day every year, he said. Yom
Kippur (Jewish Day of Atonement)
is celebrated while the UF is In
session and we're not able to take
time off for the whole thing. This
is a similar problem.
Philpott said he sincerely
regrets that exams conflicted with
Easter observances.

First Family Star
To Frolic Tonight

Spring Frolics, headlined by
comedian Vaughn Meader, singer
Anita Bryant and rock and roll
artist Steve Alaimo, is slated for
8 tonight in Florida Gymnasium.
Tickets are stil on sale today
at the information booth across
from the Student Service Center
(Hub) and will be on sale tonight

with the same competence, and they
(Student Governme , want him to
work for less money.
I agree with him, Thompson
said.
The application was tabled and
thr boards acting executive sec secretary
retary secretary BillEpperbeimer was asked
to advertise for another business
manager.
Election for the summer
positions will be Tuesday night.
Sets Fire
On U.S. Ship
WASHINGTON (UPI) The State
Department reported that unidenti unidentified
fied unidentified Jet aircraft fired Thursday
night on a UJS. ship off the north
coast of Cuba. It said bursts
were fired across the bow and stern
of the ship, but it was not hit.
I
The department said the vessel,
the UJS. motor ship Floridian,
was in international waters en
route from San Juan, Puerto Rico,
to Miami when the attack occurred
about 6:05 p.m. EST.

...JB
VAUGHN MEADER

at the door, according to frolics
chairman Howard Gllcken. Prices
are $3.50 per couple or $1.75 stag.
Miami disc Jockey Bob Green,
Miss Bryant's husband, will emcee
the show and will announce the
winner of the King Ugly contest.
Alpha Phi O mega, national ser service
vice service fraternity, is snonsnring the
*
' 1:
ANITA BRYANT
PBK Selects
Bright UF,ers
Twenty-three undergraduates
have been elected to membership
in the local chapter Phi Beta
Kappa.
They include: Thomas Ralph
Banks, Patricia Ann Bates, Jack
S.:aad Blocker Jr., Donald Denby
Bode Jr., Dain Bogue, Linda
Virginia Crow, Carroll G. Frison,
Elmer B. Fetscher.
James RichardGober, Benjamin
Edgar Hendriks Jr., Ann Frances
Hofbauer, Helen Marie Jensen,
P.osemary Ashworth Lamb,
William Charles Putnam, Dorothy
Shepard.
Russell Donald Slmbarl, Robert
Samuel Smith, Pepl Hilda Spiel Spielberger,
berger, Spielberger, Judith C. Spurlock, Peter
Alan St. John, Michael Dee Taylor,
Robert Garland Williamson,
Elizabeth Llgon.

annual King Ugly conteat to find
the ugliest man on campus" and
to raise money for UF scholar scholarships.
ships. scholarships.
Meader, who is most famous
for his imitation of President John
F. Kennedy, last year recorded the
all-time best-selling record
album, The First Family. Since
then he has been doing night club
work.
Miss Bryant has had a long
list of musical hit recordings, in including
cluding including "My Little Corner of the
World, Paper Roses, and her
latest hit, Honest John.
Alalmo, a native Miamian who
has appeared previously at the
UF, is currently on the record
charts with his rock and roll
version of Every Day I Have
To Cry Some.
Daniels Hits
" W 6--
Board Plan
To Expand
The former chairman of the State
Board of Control said Thursday
night be supports present plane
to expand the facilities of existing
universities in Florida, but
opposes opening new schools to
accommodate rising enrollment.
In a speech prepared for de delivery
livery delivery before new members of the
UF chapter of Beta Gamma Sigma
J. J. Daniel, a hve-year member
of the board said, the stetewould
gain far more by building upon
four mature unlveraltles already
operating and the new university
at Boca Raton.
It would commit a tragic
error If it tried to improve higher
education by placing new schools
closer to prospective caedMaftas.
Daniel, who was Chatman of
the board of control 1990-fl, wee
among the new members tapped
by the national business honorary
society.



The Florida Alligator Friday, March 29, 1963

Page 2

Forestryers Operate Mill,
Manufacture Own Lumber

By CAROL BULLER
From stump to finished prq,-
ductUF forestry students man manufacture
ufacture manufacture their own lumber at an
all-student operated sawmill in
Austin Cary Memorial Forest.
The laboratory" is 2,000 acres
of the University-owned forest, a about
bout about 10 miles north of Gainesville.
Students fell about 50,000 square
feet of timber each year.
An elective course for juniors
and seniors, Professor Don Post
tries to impress his students with
the importance of technology, skill
and accuracy that goes into a good
lumber product. We learn how to
do it the best way and the safest,
he said.
Only five students are enrolled
in the course, which offers three
credits, but Post does not like to

SUMMER
JOBS
INCLUDES 5000
PERMANENT JOBS
and FREE TRIPS TO
EUROPE
Over 25,000 summer Jobs
(also permanent) open right
NOW in U. S. and Overseas.
Not just a list gives specific
job data, salaries, addresses,
etc. Hurry; Jobs are filled
early. Regular price, $4.
Special rush $3 now! Resume
manuel $1 or free with order.
SUMMER JOB INSTITUTE,I63
N. 9th St., Brooklyn 11, N.Y.
(Add .25$ reg. mail, .75$ First
Class).

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mUd...made to taste even milder through H|i-j iKIXG |HH ~ )
the longer length of Chesterfield King. | uiarnu>
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work with more than seven. It is
quite hazardous, he said.
The mill itself is student-built.
Original equipment was acquired
from Camp Blanding and is valued
new at about $75,000. People dont
realize that 50 per cent of the cost
of lumber production is the har harvesting
vesting harvesting and processing, Post
said.
T
Besides working with such e equipment
quipment equipment as axes, bulldozers and
chainsaws, students must also
learn to operate the edger tore toremove
move toremove bark and the planer.
Post, who has taught the course
for twelvfe years, emphasizes pro proper
per proper care of all equipment.
Most students enrolled are for forestry
estry forestry management majors. We
do not stress production primar primarily,
ily, primarily, Post said, but want the stu students
dents students to gain an appreciation of
the problems a manager of a tract
of land has.
Students must decide themselves
where to cut on the logs, planning
ahead by fractions of an inch. This
is the most diffucult thing for stu students
dents students to master, Pst said.
Although miscalculation means
dollars down the drain, Post
agrees that This is the place to
make mistakes. He boasts that
his students still recover more
lumber than the average sawmill.

STUDYING LATE?
Open 'til 4 a.m. Thur, Fri, Sat.
King Burger
303 N.W. 13* St. Ph. 2-0388^%23?

ir.nim-tr-w it v -'**' ~ ~ yr. >
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Jb Lf 8 \
fimr >Jtjk mSf
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AG BOYS JUDGING SWINE
. . as part of a "practical" course in meat evaluation and livestock judging taught
in the UF College of Agriculture.

City-Bred Dudes At UF
Learn To Be Farm Boys

Farm boys may be becoming
passe.
But in the UF animal science

department the city-bred dude
may now get the practical exper experience
ience experience he missed by not being
raised on the farm.
One such practical course is
meat evaluation and livestock jud judging.
ging. judging.
Students are learning that there
is a little more to preparing meat
for market than just putting a grade

on it and reading the scale, said
Professor D on Wakeman.
Evaluating meat is a science,
not just skill.
During two 3-hour labs a week,
students practice to the tune of
about $250 per animal. The steer
or hog is appraised by the judgers
who- must predict within two or
three per cent how many pounds of
major cuts the carcass will vield.

Then the animal is slaughtered,
graded by professional graders,
and students see the carcass on
the rail where it it given a marb marbling
ling marbling score.
You improve yourself by ac actually
tually actually seeing your mistakes, ex explained
plained explained animal science student
Elder Summer. I think it is the
most practical course in the de department.
partment. department. It tests your ability to
appraise livestock and improve on
it.
There are no tests* Students are
graded on proficiency alone. Their
goal is to estimate within a quarter
of an inch the percentage of major
cuts a carcass will yield.
Animals are furnished from
within the framework of the local
Agricultural Experiment Stations
which includes a purebred beef
unit containing three herds of reg registered
istered registered Angus, Herford and Brah Brahman
man Brahman cattle; the swine unit of about
60 brood sows; a sheep unit con containing
taining containing a flock of ewes and a beef
research unit.
Besides the student who will be become
come become a cattle and hog buyer, the
course is aimed for prospective
meat inspectors, federal graders,
appraisers in industry or in industrial
dustrial industrial or field representatives.
Relatively new is the field of agri agricultural
cultural agricultural consultants for banks
where a man must be able to ap appraise
praise appraise the value of large ranches
and its stock.
Occasionally the class, current currently
ly currently 28 students, practices by judg judging
ing judging animals at the Gainesville
Stockyard.
For further experience, animal
science has two departmental jud judging
ging judging teams which are selected on
a competitive basis form qualified
students each year. The livestock
judging team competes with about
40 other land grant schools in the
southeast area. The meat judging
team may compete at one regional
contest and at a national contest in
Chicago or Madison, Wisconsin.
Team members also have an
opportunity to familiarize them themselves
selves themselves with outstanding ranches
and meat firms during
their trips and contests.
The teams offer an added in incentive
centive incentive to specialize, said Wake Wakeman,
man, Wakeman, team coach.
The UF will host upcoming re regional
gional regional competition April 2-7.



Drugstore Is
Closed Shop

By JOY RICHARDS
The sign over the door says
Prescriptions. The shelves are
full and the counters are stocked
with merchandise. The door is
usually locked.
This drug store is a very special
kind. Used exclusively by students
of pharmacy at the J. Hillis Miller
Health Center, it is a working
laboratory of the drug store down
the street.
Dr. Richard J. Hampton, asso associate
ciate associate professor of pharmacy uses
the pharmacy to teach his retail
pharmacy management students
display techniques, merchandising
and inventory control.
The pharmacy has two display
windows which the students are

Interns Learn
While Teaching

By EVY BUZZELL
Copy Editor
Education interns become both
teacher and student for ten weeks
of their senior year.
During their internship, future
teachers encounter most all class classroom
room classroom situations that normally
arise. However, the biggest and
most important aspect of the
internship is learning responsi responsibility.
bility. responsibility.
This responsibility is something
that cant be learned from books,
explained Gary Lieberman, speech
intern at Gainesville High School.
By practice teaching, education
students learn to win the confidence
of their students and confidence
in themselves as well.
Without the internship, we walk
into a teaching situation cold,
said Lieberman.
When Lieberman finished his
internship in a few weeks, he will
have about 250 teaching hours to
his credit. The state of Florida
requires at least 100 hours of
actual teaching for credit in
internship.
Lieberman is currently helping
high school students produce a
play.
I completely run the class,
compile the teaching units, and
make up a class plan,' Lieberman
said.
The intern sometimes finds that

What To Do After
The Stork Comes

By LINDA GUELKER
What to do with a newborn baby
and how to cope with it in a small
apartment are questions young
couples face.
These questions can be answer answered
ed answered by a six-week course taught at
the J.Hillis Miller Health Center
each Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.
The course is designed to help
parents to be with any problems
they may have. When the couples
get to class, they have an open
discussion on any topic they want.
The course is not only centered
around taking care of the baby when
it arrives. It is preparation for the
whole child-bearing event, said
Miss Jennet Wilson, assistant pro professor
fessor professor in the College of Nursing.
Registered nurses are on hand
to show parents how to take care
of their baby. Real babies are
used to make the situation seem
more practical. A nurse asks a
mother who has had a baby at the
hospital to bring her baby to the
class. Then the nurse demon demonresponsible

responsible demonresponsible for decorating and
evaluating. This is an important
concept to the modern pharmacist
and experience is the best
teacher, Hampton said.
About 100 students use the
pharmacy to learn how to dispense
drugs under actual conditions. In
addition they study the packing of
drugs and the laws that concern
drug packaging.
Plans are presently under con consideration
sideration consideration to use the pharmacy
as an operating unit of either the
health center or the student health
service.
We want to use this modern
concept of teaching pharmacy
under real conditions as much as
possible and we feel that by having
students operate the pharmacy on
a real basis we could use this
facility to the best advantage, said
Hampton.

his directing teacher learns from
him. A teacher who has not had
refresher courses in several years
will find new methods used by the
intern.
In most instances, the students
are very receptive to the intern
in the classroom, Lieberman said.
Usually the intern brings new ideas
that are more exciting to the
students.
Because the intern is usually
closer in age to the student, he
is more likely to talk at their
level instead of down to them,
Lieberman said.
The College of Education con considers
siders considers the internship as the
cumulation of all the education
material a student has had at
the UF.
The intern period is usually
taken the trimester before a
student graduates, so he immed immediately
iately immediately goes from learning to be
a teacher to being a teacher.
Lieberman said students usually
find their internship more reward rewarding
ing rewarding and exciting than they
anticipated.
Interns returning to the UF
campus after their ten weeks of
internship, are enthusiastic about
their experiences in teaching.
The period of practice teaching
seems to be the most enjoyable
part of the education curriculum
said Lieberman.

strates how to bathe the baby and
meet his other needs.
Films and books are available
to answer any further questions
that the parents might have. A
that the parents might have. A copy
of Expectant Motherhood by
Nicholas J. Eastmen is given to
everyone who attends the course.
A doctor is usually present at a
meeting during the course to ans answer
wer answer questions.
Also, a tour of the hospital is in included
cluded included in the course so parents to
be can take a look at the delivery
room and other facilities.
Generally more fathers come
on this night because they are in interested
terested interested in seeing where their wife
will be when she has the baby,
Miss Wilson said.
The course is sponsored by the
College of Nursing and taught by
Its faculty.
Miss Wilson said this is a com community
munity community project and not just students
at the university take part.
This is a course designed to
help all parents with their prob problems,
lems, problems, she said.

HEALTH CENTER PHARMACY

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The Florida Alligator Friday, March 29, 1963

Page 3



i The Florida Alligator Friday, March 29, 1963

Page 4

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ENGINEERING STUDENT LEARNS SKILLS
... to put into practice after graduation. He checks his figures with those of the
machine

pFO^THOSEI
I PREFER I
EXECUTIVE I
|CANS!^|
SEE THE
GARBAGE MAN
ffi UN-AO WC.
(jamtmut
I DRIVEN THEATRE
2400 Hawthorne Road, KU 20
Movie information PR 6-5011
LAST n All-Star
NITE Smash Hits
CHARLTON YVETTE
HESTON MIMIEUX
1
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HEAD
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NAWLTeWOOO WARREN BEATTY
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UF Students Get
Literary Praise

Two UF students have recently
received note for creative literary
works.
Frank Hannold, 7 AS, received
honorable mention and a SSO prize
in a short story contest sponsored
by Story Magazine.
Harry Crews, who received his
masters degree in June, has been
notified two stories written in
creative writing class in 1962 will
be published in the Sewanee
Review and Georgia Review.
The spring issue of Sewanee
Review, the nations oldest
literary magazine, will contain

WINNER OF TWO
Academy Award Nominations
Bp
Features:
SUN. I GAINESVILLE Theatre
2400 Hawthorne Road, Rt. 20 Movie information PR 6-5011
exclusive first run showing!
y**M*TiNToroNT?|Npsco?irM9SH
jjjMjjgj
PALANCE j
WARRIORS# v &
LarorWO'.W(W* 'ST '> ' **' 'WT "'.S. Y sifluwj
STARTS GAINESVILLE Drive-In Theatre
SUN. 1400 Hewymrae Road, RL 20 Movie information fr 6-5011

works of three former U F students,
including English Prof. Smith
Kirkpatrick. Students Harry B.
Crews and Madison Jones will also
have work appearing.
The work by Kirkpatrick will
be a chapter from his novel After Aftermath.
math. Aftermath. It is the story of a college
campus after world war 11, and
is being considered for publication
by Don McKay.
According to Kirkpatrick, novels
by former UF students have been
published by Random House, Dodd
and Mead, Lipponcott, Atlantic, and
Vicking Press.

Co-op Joins
Work, Class

By KARL KRISTOFFERSON
The first great revelation a col college
lege college graduate encounters in the
business world is the vast gap be between
tween between the theory of the classroom
and practical application.
Engineering students at the UF
are bridging this gap through the
Florida Industries Cooperative
Plan better known as the coop
plan.
The plan has a two-fold pur purpose
pose purpose to develop in the student
the desire and ability to continue
learning from experience before
and after graduation and to produce
professional men and women, ci citizens
tizens citizens and individuals of the high highest
est highest caliber.
The earn and learn program
benefits the student in another way.
It allows himwhile still in school
--to decide on the field of engi engineering
neering engineering in which he is best suited.
If he decides he has taken the
wrong path, he can change to a another
nother another field before completing
college at a personal savings of
time and money.
According to A. N. Stubblebine,
Jr., coop coordinator for the Col College
lege College of Engineering, there are over
200 engineering students presently
enrolled in the program, with 108
engaged in space related work.
Since 1958, Stubblebine pointed
out, 56 students have participated
in the NASA program at Cape Can Canaveral,
averal, Canaveral, Redstone Arsenal at Hunts Huntsville,
ville, Huntsville, Ala. and the Manned Space
Craft Center at Houston.
The reputation of the College
of Engineering is such that at no
time have we lacked positions for
qualified coop students, he added.
Stubblebine said the American
Society for Engineering Education
recently made a study of the coop
program on a national basis and it
was discovered that the number of
coop graduates finding increasing
satisfaction in their work greatly
exceeded that of non-coop gra graduates.

Bela Alpha Psi Prepares
Federal Tax Reports

Members of Beta Alpha Psi ~
honorary accounting fraternity fraternityare
are fraternityare learning by doing outside
the classroom by preparing income
tax forms for their fellow students
in the College of Business Admin Administration.
istration. Administration.
The fraternity and the accounting
department started the Federal
Income Internship Program last
year and its success prompted
them to continue it this year.
Working under the direction of
Prof. Erhart G. Peterson of the
College of Business Admin Administration,
istration, Administration, two students are
assigned to work on the returns
each Tuesday and Thursday after afternoon.Ah?ut

. omoi ing V £ _j|B
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|Ar I HI 3j J1 *! JH a
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SA -r GAINESVILLE
vAlf DRIVE-IN THEATRE

duates. graduates.
This is a statistically signi significant
ficant significant trend, he said.
He said it proved the value of
the coop program in education and
it was recommended that the pro program
gram program be expanded to include other
disciplines.
Presently, a UF committee on
student aid is conducting an in investigation
vestigation investigation of coop education on
campus and a sub-committee is
recommending its extension, he
said.
To take advantage of the pro program,
gram, program, engineering students apply
during the second trimester of
freshman year. Transfer students
are allowed to apply during their
first trimester on campus. Accep Acceptance
tance Acceptance is based on the students
academic standing and availability
of a cooperative assignment.
The program usually requires
a maximum of five years to earn
a degree and the student does not
work in industry during his first
and last two trimesters.
During his training, the coop
student is paid commensurate with
his assignment, which parallels his
school work and increases in dif difficulty.
ficulty. difficulty.
Once assigned to an industry, he
becomes a member of a two-man
team and alternates with his part partner
ner partner in the classroom and on the job.
This assures that one member of
the team is always with the com company
pany company and provides the cooperating
industry with a continuity in the
program.
Five training periods totaling 20
months of industrial experience
are available to the coop student
before graduation.
The coop plan offers advantages
to the woman also. Last year Miss
Judith Huff broke the male barrier
and became the first woman to
complete her degree under the
program. She is now employed by
the company with which she
trained.

noon.Ah?ut afternoon.Ah?ut 12 students are involved
in the program.
T be eligible for the service
students must be enrolled in one
or more courses in the College
of Business Administration.
Interviews for the service are
held Tuee>Say and Thursday from
2-4 p.m. through April 12. Appoint Appointments
ments Appointments may be made in Matherly
Hall 17.
Students should bring ID cards
and a copy of last year's income
tax return if one was filed, along
with his social security card and
information concerning income
deductions.



Journalists Learn
Newsman's Tactics

By KARL KRISTOFFERSON
The doctor has his hospital, the
lawyer his courtroom and the re reporter
porter reporter his battlefieldthe news newsroom.
room. newsroom.
The description of a newsroom
while a newspaper is being pre prepared
pared prepared for press defies description.
It can't be described in the class classroom
room classroom so the next best thing is to
take the classroom to the news newsroom.
room. newsroom.
This is what is being done at the
UF School of Journalism and Com Communications.
munications. Communications. And aspiring report reporters
ers reporters cant escape it because its
required.
The vehicles for this practical
bent of journalism education are
Applied Journalism (JM 450) and
the ditorial room of the Gainesville
Daily Sun. Here, smooth-tongued,
sympathetic professors are trans transformed
formed transformed into raging editors whose
vocabulary is reduced to keep the
copy moving! How about a new head
for this story?
For the would-be reporter this
means the end of the world or
something similar. Hes on the spot
and he must draw on everything
hes learned up to this point. For Fortunately,
tunately, Fortunately, hes been adequately pre prepared
pared prepared for this moment and after
some early morning jittersbe jittersbeginning
ginning jittersbeginning at 6:30 a.m.he suddenly
realizes he isnt such a bad re reporter
porter reporter after all.
So far this cooperative program
between the School of Journalism
and the local newspaper has opened
the way to practical newspapering
for 17 Applied Journalism students
who spend a full day each week

I HEELS pvt on in 5* minutes
SOLES pvt on in IS minutes
MODERNSHQE
REPAIR SHQP
oeros^omlstnotiona^onli

AT THE FLORIDA SEE IT TODAYI
FLORIDA UNION
FILMS COMMITTEE
PRESENTS
"Low Is a
Splendored
Thing
Wi 11 iam Hoi den '.jl
Jennifer Jones ;
FRIDAY & SATURDAY /^
7 and 9:30 p.m.
SUNDAY & MONDAY
at 7 p.m. only
5 % Never Was
Clifton Webb
Gloria Grahame
/ Florida Union Auditorium

m \M
- ; fl j f m
W j
CHECKING THE FINAL PROOF
. . of Thursday's Gainesville Daily Sun are (from
left to right) Prof. Hugh Cunningham, Bob Kent and
Don Moore.

working as Sun staffers.
They gather news, write stories
and headlines, copy and design
pages, always fighting actual news newsroom
room newsroom deadlines, to be met on time.
Behind this venture are Sun Ex Executive
ecutive Executive Editor Ed Johnson, BS 57,
and Prof. Hugh Cunningham. Both
men agree that the program is a
success.
According to Cunningham, the
laboratory deal with the Sun is one
of the best things to happen to the
school in several years.
You can never emphasize the
importance of practical experience
enough, he said.
But what about the students?
What do they think of the idea?
Don Moore, 4JM, gave a typical

reply. If you have any doubts on
whether or not you can do the work,
you will find out for sure in this
course.
Believe it or not, I look forward
to the trip downtown every week.
I know I will face these pressures
when I enter the profession and
its better to find out about them
now than later.
Broadcasting, too, has a part in
the schools work and learn pro program.
gram. program. Students enrolled in Radio-
TV Reporting (JM 560), help to
put out Channel ss daily newscast.
They write copy, edit and supply
pictures and visual aids for the
program.
They also aid in a weekly com commentary
mentary commentary which analyzes in depth
the most important events of the
week in the city or the county.
According to faculty member
Will Lewis, who supervises the
students, the course gives the stu student
dent student a preview of what is to come.
Our program, with its practical
side of actual production, provides
the basic equipment a student needs
to hold down a job inb. jadcasting.
Many of our former students
have established successful ca careers
reers careers in radio and television and
this is indicative of the training
they receive at th school, said
Lewis.
The opportunity to participate in
actual professional work while
still in school is just one reason
why the UF School of Journalism
and Communications is considered
r e of the top schools in the nation.
Classifieds

Real Estate j

NO DOWN PAYMENTS VETS-
Low 4 down payments F.H.A. 23
models. 2,3 and 4 bedroom designs.
Free swim club membership.
Monthly payments from $74. High Highland
land Highland Court Manor N E 23rd
Blvd. and 11th Terr. (I-78-ts-c).

Help Wanted

HELP WANTED Walters must
be 21 or over. Call FR 6-9335
between 12 and 3 p.m. No
experience needed. (E-113-ts-c).
SECRETARY NEEDED Must be
proficient in typing and shorthand.
5 1/2 day week. Good salary
and working conditions for quali qualified
fied qualified person. Write Scruggs and
Carmichael, P.O. Box 136 or call
FR 6-5242 for an interview. (E (E---116-lt-c).
--116-lt-c). (E---116-lt-c).

The Florida Alligator Friday March 29, 1963

- i JSSSS*

Autos

FOR SALE 1953 Ford. Radio,
heater, stick shift, original paint.
Best offer over $195. Call Gus
Sanchez, FR 2-9190 after 6p.m.
(G-115-3t-c).
1957 ALL WHITE FORD
CONVERTIBLE. Thunderbird
automatic good condition. Must
sell $450. Wes Patterson, 306
N. E. 6th Street. Call 4-6 p.m.
(G-104-ts-c).
GOING OVERSEAS THIS YEAR?
Buy a new car at European prices
and save. Mercedes-Benz, Volvo,
English Ford or D.K.W. Call
Hubert Barlow, FR 2-4251, Crane
Motor Company. (G-86-40t-c).

WANTED TO BUY SO through '54
Fords and Chevrolets. A1 Herndon
Service Station, 916 SE 4th Street.
FR 2-1308. (G-94-ts-c).
FOR SALE TR-3 sports car.
1958 with 1960 engine. Excellent
condition. Brand new tires all
around. Phone FR 6-7641. (G (G---114-st-p).
--114-st-p). (G---114-st-p).
GOING TO EUROPE? THE
CONTINENT? Let us arrange
for delivery of your new Triumph
or Flat anywhere. We take your
old car in trade here and arrange
for delivery of your new car there.
Use it to tour the continent and
return it to the States with you.
Call Ken Bowman FR 2-4373.
Barkley Motors Inc. Lincoln-
Mercury Meteor Comet-
Triumph-Fiat. (G-114-13t-c).
1962 RED VOLKSWAGON with sun sunroof,
roof, sunroof, seat belts, and heater. Looks
and drives like new. $1595. Call
FR 2-2975. (G-116-ts-c).

Wanted

WANTED TO BUY: Binocular
microscope meeting all
requirements of the College of
Medicine. Must be in good to
excellent condition. Forward
complete information to : K.R.
Safko, 4224 Elkcam Blvd. SE, St.
Petersburg, Florida.(C-113-st-c).
WANTED-RIDERS to Auburn, Ala Alabama.
bama. Alabama. Leaving Gainesville Friday
April 19th. Share expenses. Call
FR 2-0996 between 5 and 6 p.m.
(C-116-lt-P).

Lost
LOST MAC GREGOR Jacket in
vicinity of Peabody Hall. Light
brown with gloves in pocket. Call
Jim Greever FR 6-2265. (L-116-
3t-c).

FOUND Plain gold wedding band
in University College Reading
Room, initials on the inside are
C. A. L to D.L.L. 9-1-62.
'L-114-3t-c).

Services

WILL CAR*. FOR infants or small
children by day or night in private
home. 1406 NW sth Avenue, Phone
FR 6-8961. (M-65-ts-c).
NESTORS TV, RADIO, HI FI
SERVICE Tubes checked free.
Free estimates. Next to Florida
Bookstore Parking Lot. 1627 NW
Ist Avenue,- Phone FR 2-7326.
(M-99-20t-p).

For Sale

IDEAL HOME for University and
Medical Center personnel. Lovely
location 5 minutes from Uni University.
versity. University. Call FR 6-4097. (A (A---115-st-c).
--115-st-c). (A---115-st-c).
FOR SALE 39 x 8 Southwestern
mobile home with two room cabana.
Must sell by May 4.See at Sheffield
Trailer Park. 4700 SW Archer
Road, or call J.H. Seals at FR
6-1162. (A-111-ts-c).
1951 SAFE WAY TRAILER. 30
x 8 with a 10 x 8 cabana.
Fenced-in-yard. $995. See
at Archer Road Village, 3620 SW
Archer Road, or call Joe Wills,
FR 2-6940. (A-110-ts-c).
FOR SALE 1956, two bedroom
Nashua Trailer. 35 x with 15
x 9 cabana. Furnished and air
conditioned. Excellent condition.
Call FR 6-1387 after 6;00 p.m.
(A-108-ts-c).
BY OWNER Very attractive new
home five minutes to campus in
S.W. Large wooded lot. Beam
ceilings, Cyprus paneling,
hardwood floors, large center hall,
tiled kitchen and bathrooms.
Designed for Florida living. FR
2-0328. (A-11l -16 t-c).
MARRIED STUDENTS Throw off
your shackles of conformity and
move into decent housing. 2
bedroom-CB home for sale by
student owner. Low down payment
$66 a month. Added feature -no
taxes outside city limits. FR
6-1908 after 5 p.m. All day
weekends. (A-113-ts-c),

For Rent
-

FOR THE SOPHISTICATED O NEY
Elegantly furnished apartment for
summer trimester. Has been
photographed and published in The
Alligator. Preferrably women.
Call FR 6-2018 between 6 and 8
p.m. (B-114-3t-c),
NICE TWO BEDROOM Furnished
Apartments for students beginning
May first. Will accomodate up to
4 students comfortably. Right near
campus. Reduced rates for
summer. Call Mrs. Jones at FR
6-"''36. Occupancy may be had at
ena of thlstrimester.(B-112-tf-c).
i i immmmmammmmmmammmmmmm**
QUIET ROOMS to rent for students.
Also experienced florist designer
wanted. Colonial Flowers, 826
West University Ave. FR 2-5775.
(B-l >-st-c).
NEW AIR CONDITIONED
Apartments for summer for boys
or girls. Two room efficiency
close to campus. Utilities paid
except lights. slls per month with
4 in apartment. SIOO per month
with less than four. Also renting
for fall trimester to boys only.
See at 1518 NW 4th Ave. Call
FR 6-4353. (B-113-ts-c).
ATTRACTIVE ROOM in quiet home
private entrance, kitchen pri privileges.
vileges. privileges. Excellent for student'
who needs to study. 372-7883.
(B-116-st-c).

Personal J

EUROPEAN TOURS for Youl*
Adults. June departure, 54 days,
$1375. Write Prof. Loring Knecht,
Knight Tours (C), Northfleld,
Mim>. (J-113-3t-p).
GIDDYAP To Wauberg Riding
Stables. 441 1/2 mile North oft
Lake Wauberg. Horseback riding,
night rides and hay rides. Call.
Micanopy 2471 for reservations
and pick-up. (J-113-st-p).

Page 5



Page 6

The Florida Alligator Friday, March 29, 1963

alligator
editorials

The Papers Aim: All the news with decency our onl\ limit

a challenge

A major challenge to our national welfare is the rapidly accelerating
flood of scientific information. Immediate dissemination of pertinent
research or development activities is an unsolved problem everywhere.
Graduate education in library science with strong specialization
in techniques of informational retrelval should be Implemented;
continuing research programs for improving techniques for retrieval
of scientific literature should be supported on the various university
campuses. The McDonald (SEES) Report.
*
dne sometimes wonders when in the University library watching the
often belter-skelter and haphazard search for knowledge by U F students
(especially the under classmen) whether or not we have fallen down
somewhere along the line.
Someone once said long ago that the intelligent person is he who
knows where to find the pertinent information, not the one who attempts
to stash away all the knowledge of the world in some nook or cranny
of an overstuffed cerebrum.
At a university such as ours, this need to know where to locate
the books and magazines housing the needed information becomes even
more important As the McDonald report asserts, we are today in
vital need of graduate education in the field of library science, with
special emphasis on information retrieval.
In the past fifty years, man has truly made gigantic leaps forward
at such an astounding rate as to completely dwarf the achievements
of men in previous centuries. We have made great strides everywhere,
especially in science and technology, where there seems no limit
to man's ability to unearth new knowledge and concepts.
Specialization has resulted. No longer is versatility practical. One
today can only hope to be "versatile in his own select field with minor
exceptions.
In this the Space Era, we are being virtually flooded by the printed
word. It seems almost as if everyone is writing these days about
something new from the discovery of new animal life in bathyscape
voyages on the ocean floor to weightlessness in Colonel Glenn's space
capsule; from the effect of excessive radiation on the human body
to the calculation of the temperature on the planet Venus; from
experiments concerning the key to life to exhaustive studies on how
to lengthen man's existence on this planet by curing certain "incurable
diseases.
Libraries are being swamped with information. The result is often
chaos. Technology and research Is advancing at a far greater rate
than the capacity of libraries to store and accurately catalog these
booklets, books, etc.
Often the UF student not well versed in library procedures finds
himself lost in a maze of printed words. The externally friendly
atmosphere of the library is suddenly transformed into an imposing
Internal view of row after row of books, shelf after shelf of pamphlets
and magazines. To the inexperienced student, acquiring information
for a term paper may possibly become much like looking for a needle
in the haystack.
Information retrieval Is becoming a very Important part of higher
information today. Hours upon hours of valuable time are often wasted
in fruitless search for information by those students who do cot know
where to look.
This university offers a course in library science; one which is
required for students in certain fields. We feel however, that the
scope of this course should perhaps be broadend so as to Include a
far greater percentage of the student body.
Furthermore, we suggest a close examination concerning the
feasibility and possibility of requiring all UF students to take at
least one library science course before graduation. Learning to
employ the correct methods in library research technique should
be a vital part of any student's schooling. After all, once the student
is out of college, he or she will in most cases find a need sometime
in their career to do work at some library.
Perhaps our plan is not feasibile, but at the very minimum this
course should be expanded and improved.
Half the task of acquiring knowledge is merely knowing where to
locate the information. We urge thoughtful consideration toward the
expansion of the current program in order to meet the needs of an ever everexpanding
expanding everexpanding age.
The Florida Alligator
Editor-In-Chief. David Lawrence Jr.
Managing Editors Maryanne Awtrey, Ben Garrett
Business Manager jay Fountain
Layout Editor David West
Sports Editor Walker Lundy
Assistant to the Editor Sandy Sweltzer
News Editor Judy Barnes
Editorial Page Editor Ron Spencer
THE FLO RIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of
the University of Florida and is published daily except Saturday and
Sunday. THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is entered as second class matter
at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida. Offices are
located In Rooms 8,10, and 15 in the Florida Union Building Basement.
Telephone University of Florida, FR 6-3261, Ext. 2832, and request
either editorial office or business office.
Opinions voiced in personal columns on this page do not necessarily
reflect the opinions of the editors. Only editorials are the official
voice of the paper.

"OOPS! THE CITIZENS ARE II fi\ >i TZC

LETTERS:
Was Kennedy Blindfolded

EDITOR:
In connection with the conference
of the presidents of Central
America and Mr. K ennedy, we
consider of great importance that
you should be well-informed as to
different aspects of Latin
American social and political pro problems,
blems, problems, and so we would like to
express our feelings about said
conference.
President Kennedy has
announced in the last few days,
and also the Secretary of Defense
Mr. McNamara, that the Cuban
problem is no longer a direct
menace to the Latin countries,
and that they will protect those

Cliff Landers
/
Dont Bet On Peru Elections

DONT TAKE ANY bets on
elections being held in peru on
June 9. And if you do, dont count
on their being honest.
This is the opinion expressed
in the March issue of HE MIS MISPHE
PHE MISPHE RICA, a publication of the
Inter-American Association for
Democracy and Freedom (IADF).
Although from the title one would
think the IADF is a communist
front organization, it is far from
\ t CLIFF
LANDERS .
r Latin American
\j Viewpoint
it, and numbers among its
members such Latin American
experts as Robert J. Alexander,
Serafino Romualdi and Frank
Tannenbaum.
When the military junta headed
by General Ricardo Perez Godoy
deposed President Manueal Prado
ten days before the expiration of
his term, it gave as its reason
democracy and the preservation
of order. Or have we heard that
before?
After the indecisive Peruvian
elections of July, 1962, in which
no candidate gained the necessary
one-third of the popular vote, it
appeared the winner would be
determined by the congress, but the
juntas coup put the quietus to that
idea.
The generals, apparently fearing
the selection of Victor Raul Haya
de la Torre, leader of the popular
based Aprlsta party, took over
power and Immediately pledged
to return the country to civilian
control in June of this year, by
means of free elections.
Close behind Haya in the aborted

countries against any attack from
Castro; therefore, no direct action
against him was taken at this
conference, except some
resolutions suggestions to the O.
A.S. and other small fireworks.
This declaration does very little
favor to our nations, because they
imply that either we are all asleep
or countries are composed of many
ignorant or foolish people. We
believe that after all the shakings
and tremblings of the last four
years in America, not even a*
polar bear could be asleep and we
are absolutely sure that in every
one of our republics there are
many capable men with as much

presidential race was one Belaunde
Terry, a man whose talent for
stirring up the masses is
surpassed only by his own personal
ambitions. Belaundes connection
with the junta has now become
evident.
Belaundes hopes have taken a
sharp upturn since the coup within
a coup whereby Godoy was
deposed as head of the junta by
General Nicolas Lindley Lopez,
a relative of Belaunde by marriage.
On this point, HEMISPHERICA
states, Belaunde Terry never had
any intention of finding a solution
(for the electoral crisis) even
though he met with other leaders
in a pretense of doing so. Belaunde
and his alter-ego, General Lindley,
. . had obviously decided that
with a military regime they could
later foist Belaunde Terry into
power.
THE SAME SOURCE sees
Lindleys recent action as an
attempt to set up a screen for
possible hanky-panky in the up upcoming
coming upcoming elections in behalf of his
in-law.
A fraudulent election could well
rob the Apristas, once again, of
the presidency. In past elections
the APRA, Perus largest political
party, has been frustrated in its
attempt to win through democratic
means, and it is to the partys
credit that it has not seen fit to
call its hordes of Indian followers
to arms.
BUT THE APRETAS are men,
not gods, and cannot be expected
to suffer in silence forever, if
rigged elections thwart their hopes
once again a peasant uprising such
as Bolivias 1952 revolution could
be the result.
It all boils down to one question:
just how cynical are the demo democratic
cratic democratic leaders of Perus military
junta?

culture as those in other parts
of the world, and that every one
of them is perfectly aware that
CASTRO E NOT STUPID ENOUGH
to make a direct attack on any
of our nations hence we ask To
whom are those declarations di directed?.
rected?. directed?. . .To the uncivilized
Indians of the Amazon territory
or the eskimos in Greenland?
Even the less cultured people
south of the border are perfectly
conscious of the continuous in infiltration
filtration infiltration of communism from
Cuba. Their members have left
many scarfs in every place. They
started with the invasion of
Panama, Nicaragua, and
Guatemala. The affair of the Cuban
embassy in Peru; the assassination
of political refugees in the embassy
of Brazil in Havana; the acts of
terrorism in Venezuela; the
training in Cuba of more than
1200 young men from Latin
America in the trades of sabotage,
guerilla warfare, rioting and many
other social trades; the widespread
use of Cuban legations for com communist
munist communist propaganda, and, finally,
the continuous flow of arms of all
makes to every place on this
continent, including the United
States.
But as we seem to be using
bows and arrows yet and as if
we would be living in the moon,
Mr. Kennedy, Mr. McNamara and
the State Department have con convinced
vinced convinced us that CASTRO E NO
LONGER A MENACE TO THE
CONTINENT, and that we should
live in pacific coexistence with
him, since he has not shot any
missiles yet. Besides, we have
the "definite proof that there
are no more warheads in Cuba
by PHOTOGRAPHIC "FACTS.
Right now, the Russians are
removing their troops out of Cuba
and to count them there are the
PICTURES TO PRO VE IT.'
Really, we have to admit that
the Russians are not as dumb as
us "INDIANS OF AMERICA.
First, they make the declaration
that they were to remove Russian
troops from Cuba before March
15.
This was a direct hit to the
heart of this meeting in Costa
Rica. A few days later, Mr.
Khrushchev declares that any
direct action against Cuba may
cause the war. This is to scare
OUr little naHpns and to avoid
any showdown in the Cuban Case.
We are asking you. . did or
did not prove the Cuban Quarantine
that Russia was not ready for war?
That Mr. Khrushchev will not fight
for Cuba? Why did Mr. Kennedy
turn a victory into a defeat? Is
it that the State Department,
through Chester Bowles or Adlai
Stevenson, or some others, blind blindfolded
folded blindfolded Mr. Kennedy in such away
that we are going HE ADON INTO
DE ASTER?
J. F. Garcia
S. Malavasi



Students Help Teach Others To Speak

By BEN GARRETT
Managing Editor
Student speech therapists each
week help put the speech handi handicapped
capped handicapped on the road to recovery
while getting on-the-job
training at the UF Speech and
Hearing Clinic.
Student therapists--enrolled in
Speech 521, Clinical Practices and
procedures with Dr. M. W. Buck,
clinic head--work free with anyone
coming to the clinic with a speech
problem.
A typical day at the clinic may
include everything from a UF pro professor
fessor professor or afirst grader undergoing
speech therapy to aR.O.T.C. cadet
having his hearing tested for
summer training camp.
Every patient at the clinic is
an individual and his therapy is
planned with individuality always
in mind, a marked difference from
the usual public school therapy,
Dr. Buck said.
We dont consider the person
a speech defect, but as an indi individual
vidual individual with a problem which we
are trying to help, he said.
Sue Rose senior in speech
therapy this trimester has three
cases who have been referred
to the clinic for help.
We play games like bingo,
tic-tac-toe and substitute words
having the sound we are working
on with the children to stimulate
and motivate them to better
speech, Miss Rose said.
Some of the childrens speech
is unintelligible when they first
come to the clinic, and it is a
real thrill at the end of therapy
series to play back the tapes
made when the children first came
to the clinic and hear improve improvements,
ments, improvements, she said.
A unique feature of the UF
Clinic is that students in basic basicspeech
speech basicspeech courses may gain by
viewing senior therapists in action
through one-way mirrors.
The type of therapy each
individual is to receive is based
on tests and interviews given the
first day he arrives at the clinic.
One student therapist tests the
speech through articulation tests
and the Peabody Picture Vocab Vocabulary
ulary Vocabulary test is used as a screening
device for intelligence. Hearing
is also tested and parents are
interviewed with an eye toward
finding the real cause of the trouble
be it emotional or physical.
With the results of these tests
before them, the students gather
with the professors and graduate
students who have supervised the
case to decide what kind of therapy
is best suited to the particular
problem.
Once therapy techniques have
been decided upon, it becomes
the duty of t..e student therapists
to carry it ov*.
Its most rewarding and I really
get excited when one of my patients
correctly forms a sound we have
been working on, Miss Rose said.

LUTHERAN STUDENTS
I
Special attention is called to a meeting of all
Lutheran students who will be enrolled at the
University during the Spring Trimester. This
meeting will be held at First Lutheran Church,
1801 N.W. sth Avenue at 6:00 p.m. Sunday,
March 31.
PLAN TO ATTEND

But the therapy does have its
other rewards.
She remembers one day coming
home with a nasty bite on the
arm inflicted by one of her young
patients.
* But he didnt mean it, she
said.
Another day a parliamentary
procedure class passed a motion
to adjourn to see what was causing
the screams up the corridor on
the third floor of Tigert Hall,
scene of the clinic, it was Miss
Rose with one of her noisier
young patients.
In addition to games, tape re recordings,
cordings, recordings, pictures and books are
also used in the clinic as therapy
aids. The Language Master is
a machine developed by Speech
Department Head Paul G. Moore
which allows constant repeating
of a word via recorded tape while
showing a picture of the object
in a window.
According to Dr. Buck, the
program is designed to provide
the student with on-the-job training
while allowing him to accumulate
part of the necessary 200 hours
of practical clinical experience
to be accredited by the American
Speech and Hearing Association.
Each student spends a half-hour
three times a week with his patient.
Student therapists this year also
have done therapy at P.K. Yonge
and at the Sunland Training Center
for the retarded.
Miss Rose, 21-year-old
Miamian, is one of four students
enrolled in the program this tri trimester.
mester. trimester. She switched from
elementary education to speech
therapy after developing an
interest in helping handicapped
children while working at Hope
School for the Mentally Retarded
in Miami during the summer.
Pharmacy Prize
Goes To Lumb
Wilfred E. Lumb, graduating
senior at the UF College of
Pharmacy, has won the 1963 Lehn
& Fink Gold Medal Award for
outstanding scholastic achieve achievement.
ment. achievement. The presentation will be
made tormorrow at the Annual
Senior Banquet.
The Gold Medal Award program
is now in its 39th year, having
been established in 1924 by Lehn
& Fink Products Corporation, a
leading producer of proprietary
drugs, cosmetus and toiletries,
as a scholarship incentive for
pharmacy students. The shield shieldshaped
shaped shieldshaped plaque, incorporating the
medal, is engraved with the name
of each of the 63 participating
colleges and the years winner.
Lumb transferred to the UF
in September 1960 after two years
at Carroll College at Waukesha,
Wisconsin. He plans to work for
a Ph.D. degree.

""" 1 v"
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HEARING TESTS
.. o are only part of the therapy process conducted by students and faculty at the
UF Speech and Hearing Clinic. Sue Rose, senior in speech therapy, tests a small
patient.

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§


The Florida Alligator Friday, March 29, 1963

Page 7



Page 8

The Florida Alligator Friday, March 29, 1963

Hospital Vital To Learning

Labs Build Skills

By SANDY SWEITZER
Few people would be willing to
work 40 hours a week for a year
without pay.
Yet this is the program of nine
senior medical technology students
in the College of Health Related
Services at the UF. In addition
they pay tuition.
Our training is superb, said
graduating senior Judy Schaf.
We're trained in new methods
such as operation of automated
equipment most hospitals can't
afford.
Technology students, patholo pathological
gical pathological fact-finders, get their years
training by working in laboratories
at the J. Hillis Miller Health
Center. Most of the students are
women but the junior class in includes
cludes includes one man.
Students are on their own two
feet during their stay in

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bacteriology, chemistry,
hematology, microscopy, histology
labs and the blood bank, according
to Judy.
As students were accorded no
special privileges in the labs,
she said. If you dont finish
by noon you .dont go to lunch.
The attitude of the labs is
oriented toward teaching.
Technologists hired by the
Teaching Hospital are expected to
teach.
Students are considered
individually and graded objectively
and subjectively by everyone in
each lab..
You are shown the grades for
your own improvement, said
Judy.
The program Includes lectures
in fields related to medical techn technology
ology technology and oral written and practical
tests. Training is research researchoriented
oriented researchoriented to provide background and
theory in addition to practice. Stu Students
dents Students get 16 credits for each
trimester. Four extra months are
spent in the Teaching Hospital to
meet the requirements for regis registration
tration registration by the American Society
of Clinical Pathologists (ASCP).
Well be well prepared to work
anywhere, Judy said, especially
in bigger institutions with newer
methods as used at the Health
Center.
Patient contact during training
is not great, according to Judy.
Most test specimens are collected
by the medical students but we
do work with the doctors.
Experience outside of the Health
Center includes trips to Raiford to
collect blood for the blood bank
and two days work in the lab at
Alachua General Hospital.
During my six weeks in the
blood bank I had to stick lots
of fraternity men. The biggest
men are often the ones who react,
Judy said.
Some students have seen open
heart surgery and the new heart heartlung
lung heartlung machine, according to Judy.
Everyone also has the opportunity
to see an autopsy.
Med. Techs, are the only women
on campus who customarily dress
in white uniforms and lab coats

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CHEMISTRY WITH A PURPOSE
. . Judy Schaf, 4HRS and resident assistant in Jennings Hall, interns in a lab laboratory
oratory laboratory at the Health Center. Judy, who is from St. Pete, made a 3.75 last tri trimester.
mester. trimester.

with matching white hospital shoes.
You can always recognize us,
said Judy.
Responsibility is the key trait
for a successful medical technolo technologist,
gist, technologist, said Judy. Other traits
ranking high on the list include
dependability, manual dexterity,
scientific aptitude and a strong
constitution.
A medical technologist should
have personal integrity as well as
being an organized, systematic and
neat person, she said. Youve
got to be interested in what youre
doing for medicine is progressive
and you must learn as it changes.
Interest in patients is
necessary but you must divorce
yourself from them too, Judy
said.
A strong background in
chemistry, biology, math and
physics is recommended for the
program. Students receive a
bachelors degree in medical
technology but must take a national

registry exam before being
qualified to write MT (ASCP) after
their names.
Job prospects are excellent in
research, industry and government
according to Judy. You may also
take more training and specialize.

Nursing Program
Based On Experience

By SANDY SWEITZER
An opportunity to care for
patients needing all types of med medical
ical medical aid is afforded the student in
the College of Nursing at the UF.
Through a program of selected
learning experiences the nurse-in nurse-intraining
training nurse-intraining may see a delivery, work
in pediatrics, L j psychiatric unit
or surgical recovery room. She
may gain experience in public
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"It's a variety of work and
never dull," she said. "You could
never learn it all. Its the un unexpected
expected unexpected you have to expect and
results that are most important."
Medical technologists
remember the motto of the ASCP
"A life in your hands."

' tj-
BECKY BRANDON
. .public health nursing
is part of the regular pro program
gram program
health nursing and the out-patient
ellnic.
Courses, taught by the Nursing
Faculty, are primarily lectures
and laboratories with the hospital
and clinic serving as a laboratory,
according to Nursing Instructor
Elizabeth Bear.
As sophomores, nursing stu students
dents students buy uniforms and caps. Each
year a single gold bar is added to
the cap. Upon graduation each
nurse receives a pin with the UF
insignia on it to wear wherever she
practices.
"Our course is designed so that
each graduate can function at the
basic level in all areas of nursing,"
said Miss Bear.
During training the nurse has
opportunity to visit various health
institutions throughout the state
as the School for the Blind in St.
Augustine and the TB Hospital in
Lake City.
As seniors in tne College this
year, 53 students find their lab
time exceeds time spent in lecture.



By JOY RICHARDS
One-hundred and eighty dollars
month isnt very good pay for
ie college graduate with eight
ears of school and an advanced
egree.
Yet, in just two months, Jim
jooher, then M.D. will begin his
nternship at an average hourly
salary of 40 For Jim and most medical
students the conferring of the
doctor of Medicine degree is just
a beginning. For all, the internship
program following graduation is a
continuation of the learning
process begun four years before.
For many, it is a bridge between
he exposure to all areas of
medicine and the concentration of
urther years of study spent in
specialization.
Behind Jim now are the long
two years spent in the foundation
of anatomy, physiology and bio biochemistry
chemistry biochemistry that are esential to
the medical sciences. Also behind
him is the thrill of first exposure
to the clinical side of medicine
in pediatrics, obstetrics, surgery
general medicine and psychiatry.
In the fourth year there is a

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STRENGTH THROUGH MOVEMENT
. o physical therapist Sue Langford aids a young patient in the hubbard tank at

J. Hillis Miller Health Center.

By SANDY SWEITZER
Teaching patients to help them themselves
selves themselves in activities of daily living
is the aim of both occupational
and physical therapy students.
Physical therapy is oriented
toward the physiological aspects
of illness or accident while
occupational therapy stresses the
psychological. Both are divisions
of the College of Health Related
Services at the UF.
This year nine students are
completing the occupational
therapy program under the
direction of Miss Alice Jantzen.
These students get practical
clinical experience in about five
courses taught at the J. Hillis
Miller Health Center while nine
months of internship are required.
Three months of this internship
are completed after the junior
year and the rest served after
graduation.
At the Teaching Hospital stu students
dents students are assigned to the
occupational therapy clinics and
work with the regular staff. They
make rounds and discuss patients
with the doctors, medical students
and nui >s.
The internship must include
three months each in a psychiatric
hospital, an institution for handi handicapped
capped handicapped people and doing general
work including aid to children.
Students travel to hospitals all
over the country to fulfill these
requirements, while at the UF
they are allowed a stipend on
tuition and they receive room and
board during internships in other
places.
Occupational therapists use
meaningful acts to help rehabilitate
people, said Miss Jantzen. Over
50 per cent of our work is with
mentally disturbed people.
Ks a pleasant way to work
people and the patients are

looking inward -a constant
questioning of myself as to how
I would treat each patient if he
were in my office, said Jim.
Patient contact begins for the
medical student in his third year.
The technique of doing a physical
examination and taking a patients
medical history are basic to the
third year students whole
program.
During this year, the medical
student assists during major sur surge
ge surge ry, performs some minor
surgery with supervision and de delivers
livers delivers his first although probably
not his last baby.
In surgery during his third year,
Jim had the rare privilege of being
the acting intern while he was on
this area of study. As a result he
was allowed to assist in many
major procedures including open
heart surgery and to perform many
minor surgical procedures on his
own.
Surgery was probably the most
rewarding area I worked in during
the third year. I guess this is
because I was allowed to give so
much of myself. Lunch didnt exist
on the surgical service and we
rarely finished all of our work
until the next day had begun,

our best press agents, she said.
Patients may express them themselves
selves themselves non-verbally. Its a creative
outlet to express individuality,
said Miss Jantzen.
Mordality instruments are
primary tools of physical
therapists, according to Director
Miss Barbara White.
They include various means of
altering physiological functions
such as heat, cold, light, electric
and water treatments.
Physical therapy students have
their first contact with patients
in an initial skill course where
they learn to move patients.
Through their program students
experience all of the treatments
administered to patients so they
can get the feeling of being
patients, according to Miss
White.
Physical therapy training is
administered in the departmental
suite on the ground floor of the
J. Hillis Miller Teaching Hospital.
It includes a gym for adults and
a room with equipment especially
designed to aid children, a spe specially
cially specially equipped classroom and con considerable
siderable considerable equipment.
Students deal with both
in-patients and people who visit
the out-patient clinic. Some of
the skills learned include various
exercises, muscle testing, work
with artificial limbs and activity
programs with emphasis on time
and rhythm.
The physical therapists program
also includes three months of
clinical affiliation to be taken
after graduation usually in Florida.
This year the six physical
therapy seniors have planned and
executed an outdoor recreation
for patients. Students donate their
time on Saturday afternoon to
supervise a program of fun.

J
- J m- J : m
JaBU : > 'XK- #-V'Jr
MEET MAftV CHASE '
. . senior medical student Jim Booher and daughters, Blythe and
Bridqetts, look over nurse's training doll.

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The Florida Alligator Friday. March 29, 1963

Jim commented.
The University of Florida
medical school is unique in that
so much of what one does is
self taught. The approach to a
medical problem in general is
taught to the student but the appli application
cation application of this approach is left
pretty much up to the individual.
In his final year, the student
is allowed to elect one of his
study areas except two. These
courses are chosen by the senior
student because he feels that they
will better prepare him for his

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internship or for his further spe specialization
cialization specialization or fora general
practice.
At the same time that Jim the
student is intensifying his course
of study he is developing many
other things that are expected of
the doctor. The handling of patients
bedside manner- a philosophy of
treatment and much thought about
the type of medicine that he will
work in occupy much of the students
time and thoughts, With each
patient 1 see, 1 must consider how
I would treat him in an office
practice.

Page 9



The Florida Alligator Friday, March 29, 1963

Page 10

n
1 ft. ;/ 7^
|B\ : *&
FUTURE LAWYERS
. . learn realistic court procedure through moot court proceedings at the UF Col College
lege College of Law. The moot court is patterned after the Florida Supreme Court.

Future Lawyers Compete

By CAROLE BARDELLA
Fledgling lawyers at the UF
learn by taking part in realistic
court proceedings through com competition
petition competition on three levels of moot
court.
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According to Assistant
Professor of Law Sheldon Pleger,
moot court is conducted on the
local, state and nation levels.
The local moot court, referred
to as intramural, is courtroom
competition between students
within the UF Law School. Taking
place in the winter trimester, 26
students in groups of two-men
teams are paired against each
other.
The moot court is an appelate
proceeding patterned after the
Florida Supreme Court. Florida
attorneys and law professors act
as judges.
To be eligible for the intra intramural
mural intramural moot court, students must
successfully complete the legal
research and writing program in
the UF Law School. This would
make them about juniors and
seniors, Pleger said, who is UF
Moot Court advisor.
In this years court, held March
11-13, teams went through a process
of elimination as they argued the
question liability of a munici municipality
pality municipality for the intentional wrongful
acts oi its police officers. Each
group also had to prepare a brief
on the point argued.
T he winning team this year was
Ed Moore and Burl George.
Students chosen from the in-
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tramural competition participate
in a state moot court competition
sponsored by the Florida Bar and
held annually in conjunction with
the Florida Bar Convention.
The four law schools in Florida
send two two-men teams to the
State Moot Court which will be
held this year May 2 and 3 at
the Americana Hotel in Miami
Beach. Representing the UF will
be Ed Moore and Perry O dom
as respondents and Larry Stewart
and Steve Gardner as particioners.
George Moss will be team manager
and alternate. The question to be
argued is the same as that used
by the UFs intermural moot court.
UF students are also eligible for
the National Moot Court
competition sponsored by the Bar
of the city of New York, in which
schools from all over the country
compete.
The country is divided into re regents,
gents, regents, each regent holding a
preliminary series of elimination
rounds. Winners of the various
regents to to New York to take
part in the National Moot Court.
The UF sends a team to the
Southeast regents held in Atlanta
each fall.
According to Pleger, moot
courts provide law students with
an opportunity to take part in as
realistic as possible appelate pro proceeding.
ceeding. proceeding.
Each argument in a moot
proceeding is designed to closely
approximate that which a lawyer
would encounter in appelate prac practice,
tice, practice, he said. Moot trials
provide an opportunity for students
to setf et tht i r feet wet in advance
before going into practices.

ROTC Men Do
More Than Learn

. By LINDA GUELKER
Air Force ROTC cadets some sometimes
times sometimes feel they 'do' more often
that they learn. But this is gen generally
erally generally true after they have drilled
for several hours and have sore
feet.
Leadership lab for advanced ca cadets-juniors
dets-juniors cadets-juniors and seniors-is a good
example of learning by doing.
The whole purpose of this pro program
gram program is to develop officers for the
Air Force. Presently 83 students
are studying for commissions.
To qualify for admission, the
student must possess leadership
qualities and have a good grade
average.
Only juniors and seniors are in included
cluded included in the program, but fresh freshmen
men freshmen and sophomores are carefully
watched as potential Air Force
material.
The Air Force is looking for
the whole man as well as the
military man, according to Dir Director
ector Director Major Stephen Pritz.
In leadership lab, drill concepts
are stressed and the student is
taught how to give commands ef effectively.
fectively. effectively. Special emphasis is also
placed on the psychology of leader leadership
ship leadership for which the student makes
staff studies. Problem areas are
considered and solutions found.
Everything is centered around es esfective

Building Construction Goal:
'Practice Above Theory

By EVY BUZZELL
Copy Editor
Building Construction majors at
the UF dont just learn how to
build, but how to build for profit.
Unlike engineers, who are
theorectical people, building con construction
struction construction people are practical,
said Bob McQuady of the Student
Contractors and Builders Asso Association.
ciation. Association.
The whole curriculum in
building construction is
practical, he said. The main
purpose is to train students to
build--with a profit.
According to McQuady,
estimating courses are where
students get the most experience
at learning by doing. Three
such courses are offered and they
are designed to help the student
learn how to get job contracts.
The first course is offered in
the first trimester of the students
junior year. Each student is given
the plans for a small building,
usually a house. Through these
plans, students price out the
components and labor. After
taxes, and other costs have been
added they come up with an
estimated price of construction.
1..e second estimating course
involves a more complicated
building. The ROTC building was
used one year, as was the electrical
technology building in Daytona
Beach. Students take the plans,
price out each item and come up
with a building estimate.
The third course provides an
even more complex problem. This
year the students are using the
UF Nuclear Science Building now
under construction.
The complex buildingusing
9,000 cubic feet of pre-stressed
concretehas been itemized by
the students to obtain an estimated
cost.
Under the directs of Head
Professor Dr. Gordon Crosby, a
chief cost engineer for more than
32 years, the students main goal
is to make low enough estimates
to get the job and high enough to
make a profit.
Other learning by doing
courses in building construction
include surveying.
Students survey on campus for
one semester.

fective esfective leadership.
One of the first things that the
advanced student learns is how to
control a body of men. He learns
this by actual experience because
he is given control of a unit of men
in his junior year.
As a junior, the cadet devotes
six hours a week to training and
additional work in the evenings
and on weekends.
As a senior, he has two hours of
leadership lab, but no actual cam campus
pus campus classes in military science.
They take two hours of political
science instead.
We expect all our military of officers
ficers officers to know what is going on in
the outside world and political
science courses are important for
understanding world problems,
Major Pritz said.
Sometime during this advanced
program the cadet has to spend
four weeks in summer training.
At this time he is sent to a base
which specializes in his interest
area. For example, the student
technically orientated is sent to
Edwin Air Force Base while the
student interested in flying is sent
to a base at Myrtle Beach, S.C.
When the advanced student grad graduates,
uates, graduates, he is a commissioned second
lieutenant in the Air Force and goes
on active duty. If he is interested
in graduate study, he can do this.

In an effort to estimate the cost
one semester in an effort to
estimate the cost of preparing
a site for some construction.
Music Seniors
Give Recital
By CAROLE BARDELLA
Voices and instruments combine
in recitals given by UF seniors
in music as part of their training
in applied music or music edu education.
cation. education.
According to Music Department
Head Reid Poole, applied music
majors are required to give a
senior recital before graduation.
However, this trimester there are
no applied music majors.
He said students majoring in
music education may elect to give
a recital and are encouraged to
do so.
Students gain a lot of valuable
experience from these recitals,
Poole said. Performance is the
end purpose of music studies.
These performances give the stu student
dent student a chance to show their
abilities and to learn in the
process.
Lamar Cathcart and Marshall
Thomas, music education majors,
will present a joint senior recital
April 9 at 8:15 p.m. in the Uni University
versity University Auditorium. Mrs. Cathcart
a soprano, and Thomas, a bara baratone,
tone, baratone, will present vocal selections
from four centuries of opera,
oratorio and art songs.
These recitals provide the
opportunity for seniors in the
department of music to participate
in an extended performance situ situation,
ation, situation, said Mrs. Cathcart.
According to Mrs. Cathcart arid
Thomas, the senior recital
program offers a fine opportunity
for the music major to display the
degree of proficiency which has
been achieved on his major in instrument
strument instrument during his course of
study, and to meet and solve some
of the problems which are involved
in performance.
Included in the program April 9
will be arias from Mendelssohns
Elijah and from Gounods Faust
sung by Thomas. Mrs. Cathcart
will sing arias from Adriana Le
couvreur by Francesco Cilea.
Senior recitals are open to the
public.



Track Relays Saturday

Confidence Says
Champ Pennel

John Pennel, who will go for an extension of his world record pole
vault mark in the Florida Relays here Saturday, is a perfect example
of the importance of mental attitude in athletics.
He credits much more than physical ability for his record-breaking
efforts thus far in his event.
You can only go so far on physical ability, he said. You have
to have confidence in any athletic endeavor. I believe, for example,
that you can talk yourself over that bar in the pole vault.
THE NORTHEAST LOUISIANA senior did a good job of talking
himself over last Saturday in Memphis when he vaulted 16-feet 3-inches
in the AAU Relays to set the new world mark, shattering the 16-2 1/2
record held by Petti Nikula of Finland.
There are a great number of factors involved in confidence,
he said. My coach (Bob Groseclose) and my parents have helped
me a great deal. They all believe in me and have worked hard for
my benefit. This has given me a boost, mentally.
First time I cleared 16 feet in practice last summer, it convinced
me it could be done in competition.
A SERIES OF INJURIES set Pennel back earlier this season, and
his favorite pole was broken. He got a new fiberglass pole a week
ago Wednesday, and started his move toward the 16 foot standard.
I cleared that bar at 16 feet easily in practice, time after time,
and became certain well, as certain as you can be about those
things--that it could be done in Memphis, he said.
Pennel believes 16-3 will be cleared by many others this year and
that he may have to clear 17 feet to keep the world record.
It can be done, he keeps telling himself.

Hammer Stars As
Golfing Sophomore

By BARRY FRENCHMAN
Staff Writer
Women, beware 0
There is a 6-5, 210-pound
sophomore bound tg make one
of you a golf widow.
The young man referred to
is Laurie Hammer,
sophomore sparkplug of the
HHMIIR' 9
HAMMER
UF golf team.
Laurie, said golf coach
Conrad Rehling, is probably
one of the finest new golfers
to come to the UF in a long
time. He is a big boy with
a lot of desire, and this *a *asire
sire *asire has produced in him a
great ability to learn.
A GRADUATE of Sarasota
High School Hammer
received scholarship offers
in both basketball and golf.
He decided to play golf to
lessen any academic
pressure. Hammer, a den dentistry
tistry dentistry major, rates academics
first, golf second.

SANITONE
Colon sparkle, patterns revive, fine fobrics stay new looking longer
thot'a whot these famous fashion houses m test otter
test of the Sanitone Dry Cleaning Process. And that s why they
recommend Sanitone to give clothes a "like-new" look every time
you wear them.
COSTS NO MORE
You pay as much for any quality dry cleaning, so why not be sure
of America's best? Call on us toenjj for nationally odvertised
Sanitone service. ~
KLEAN-A-MATIC
1724 w. iiNivmsmr avi.
OtIVC IN 1717 N.W. Ist AVI.

Last year Hammers
average for the season was
around 72. This year he has
two 79s and a 73. The 73
led the Gators over Florid:.
State.
When coach Rehling w...->
asked to compare Laurie to
such Florida greats as Tommy
Aaron and Frank Beard he
said:
Laurie, as a sophomore,
is as good as Aaron or Beard
were when they were sopho sophomores.
mores. sophomores. The thing that may mayput
put mayput him ahead is his desire.
And if he wants to he can be
an All-American.
Like most golfers Laurie
would like to experience the
professional circuit, but
relying on the tour as an
income is too risky, he said.
But I would like to experience
the tour after I graduate.
Trimester Finals
Cancel Tourney
The All-Florida Wrestling
Championships, the UF Wrestling
Clubs scheduled meet at the Bre Brevard
vard Brevard Junior College (Cocoa Beach),
this weekend, has been cancelled,
a casualty of the trimester system.
Outgoing wrestling coach Joe
Edmisten, 7AG has that due to the various participat participating
ing participating schools trimester systems,
the tournament has been cancelled
due to a conflict with final exams.
The tournament is being
tentatively re-scheduled for the
first week of May when the UF
wrestlers will be under the leader leadership
ship leadership of Keith Tennant since
Edmisten graduates in April.
The Wrestling Club is also plan planning
ning planning a match with the University
of Tampa during the first week of
May.

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JOHN PENNEL
alligator classifieds
DON'T COST VERYMUCH
Yachting
Summer
Positions
The Wetherill Company, a
crew placement intermed intermediary
iary intermediary with yacht listings on
the East coast, West Coast,
Gulf area and the Gre"t
Lakes is soliciting for
crew members.
Due to the preference of most
yachtsmen, we are accepting appli applications
cations applications from college students and
graduates as crew on motor
cru ;rs ai.. sailboats. Positions
for experienced as well as in inexperienced
experienced inexperienced men and women are
available. Experience with cooking
or child care is helpful.
Each application will be sent
to over 3000 large yacht owners
in April. Crewing affords an
opportunity to acquire or sharpen
boating skills, visit new places
here and abroad while earning a
good salary in pleasant outdoor
surroundings.
To apply, send us a short resume
using the following form along with
$5.00 processing fee.
(1) Name, address, ; one no.
(2) Age, school (3) Available from
_to In l.e. Northeast,
Great Lakes, East and South, etc.
(4)Previous boating and relevant
work experience (5) two refer references
ences references (6) Preference i. e. Racing
sailboat cruising, motorboating,
none, etc. (7) Other pertinent facts.
Two applicants tshing to work
together, state this preference.
Every applicant will receive a
finished resume.
Deadline for applications is
April 12, 1963. Send to Wetberill
Company, Box 12304, Phila. 19,
Pa.

The Florida Alligator Friday, March 29, 1963

By CHARLIE GOODYEAR
Sports Writer
Almost 100 colleges, highschools, and junior colleges, have entered
the 20th annual Florida Relays which get underway with the trials
at 9:30 a.m. Saturday. The main events will get underway at 1:30 p.m.
The University Class broad jump and pole vault will start on the
west runways while the high jump is in the south pit. The shot will

will be put from the south ring
and the javelin will occupy the
center of the oval.
HIGH SCHOOL BOYS will high
jump in the north pit and pole
vault from the east runway. If
this is not enough, the 120 yard
high hurdles for university and
high school athletes will be start starting
ing starting at the same time.
John Pennel of Northeast
Louisiana State who vaulted 16-3
in Memphis last weekend, to set a
new world record, can be assured
of an accurate measure to 17 feet,
as Coach Beard had the pole vault
standards raised a foot and a half
this week. Henry Wadsworths
Relay mark of 15-1/4 is in danger.
It is difficult to assess the
times and distances of the college
athletes because many have not
participated outdoors this year.
In the high school class, the mile
run shapes up as a tight race to
wire
FRANK LAGOTIC, of Christo Christopher
pher Christopher Columbus, and FarnumSmith,
of Miami Edison, have both run
4:26 miles this year. The Relays
record is held by Smith at 4:31.6.
Merrill Moore of Gainesville High
could be a dark horse.
Fred Ayer, of Tallahassee
Florida High, a junior, has already
run a 9.8 100 yard dash. His
time has beelT equaled by Carroll
Thrift of Greenville, S.C,
The 330-yard Intermediate
hurdles will be run for the first
time this year. The only records
that are safe are the university
class mile and 250 yard hurdles,
since they will not be run.

Penneys canvas
ALWAYS FIRST QUALITY
FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY
air cooled cot- Womens cotton army
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soles. insoles. B, D 6 to 13. sole. AA, B 4 to 11.
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MONDAY & FRIDAY TIL 9 P.M.

Track Trophy
To Meet Star
Three members of Coach Percy
Beards first track team at the
University of Florida, now all
nationally prominent business
leaders, will arrive here Satur Saturday
day Saturday to keep alive a record of
attending every Florida Relays.
The Relays, started In 1942,
have never been missed by the
trio Ben McGaughey of Miami,
Bill Thompson of Washington, D.C.
and Billy Richardson of Ocala.
All were members of Beards
1936 team and were teammates
of Al Rayborn and Francis
Kearney, who were both killed In
World War 11.
In 1947 these three men started
an award, the Kearney-Rayborn
Trophy, given to the athlete judged
the outstanding individual of the
Florida Relays.
This trophy has the winners
name engraved upon it and remains
at the University, while the athlete
receives an Inscribed watch as
his personal trophy.
McGaughey is now president of
a Miami bank, Richardson a well wellknown
known wellknown Ocala rancher and
Thompson is president of the
Florida East Coast Railroad.

Page 11



Page 12

she Florida Alligator Friday, March 29, 1963

Tankers Fail
In Qualifying
RALEIGH, N. C, (Special to the Alligator) --Floridas Southeastern
Conference champion swim team ventured into its first day of NCAA
meet competition here yesterday and came out on the short end of the
straw.
The Gators crack 400-yard
medley relay team lopped four
seconds off the Florida record but
still failed to qualify in the race.
Their time of 3:43.6 got them
tenth place in the meet.
Eddie Reese, Gator senior,
swam a 4:36.5 in the 400-yard
individual medley but also failed
to qualify. He finished eight in the
meet.
Dick Farwell set a Florida
varsity record in the first leg of
the Gator relay team when he
backstroked to a 56.5 mark.
Reese, Jerry Livingston, and
Terry Green round out the team.
Both times were real good,
Florida head swim coach Bill
Harlan said after the first day of
the three-day meet had ended,
But they just werent quite fast
REESE enough to qualify.

Gridder TV Game
Set --Probably

If all goes A.A, (according to the administration's plans), the
University Athletic Board will vote yea to having the Florida Gator
football team make its second appearance on nation-wide television
in 12 months.
And we are glad.
THE CBS TELEVISION network told the Gators and Georgia Techs
Engineers that if the two schools could move their Sept. 21-scheduled
grid game in Atlanta next fall up seven days, it was 95 per cent certain
they would televise it as the NCAA Game of the Day.
Well, sir, thats like telling aUF freshman he can get an Ain
American Institutions If he will take the final a week early.
Lets Just say everybody jumped at the chance.
Techs head Yellow Jackets said yes last week quicker than you
can drop out of school and UF Pres. J. Wayne Reitz issued a statement
saying he liked the idea too.
All that remains for it to be official is for the Athletic Board to say
yes next week, which is almost certain, and for CBS to say its a
deal, which also is a pretty safe bet.
We repeat. This is great. Now all the UF students can view their
Gators in their season-opener from here.
FLORIDA WILL receive more publicity (not to mention the 100
grand-plus teevee gate) then they have since the Gator Bowl, the Gators
last appearance on the tube.
That was the day the Confederacy rose up in a violent tantrum and
flogged the North's Penn State Lions 17-7 before 60 million television
fans and 50,000 Gator Bowl fans.
It was a glorious day.
We hope next Sept. 14 will be likewise. We went 350 long miles to
Atlanta In 1961 for the last Gator-Jacket battle on Grant Field and had
to settle for a 21-0 skunking.
Perhaps a shorter Journey into our living room next fall will bear
sweeter fruit.
Who Needs It?
The Gator baseballers were ranked as the No. 4 team in the nation
last week, one spot behind Florida States Seminoles. The Gators
recent 85-run barrage in the last five games shouldnt do much damage
to their ranking.
Wonder long it will take em to reach No. 1 again.
Next week they meet Ferman here Monday and Tuesday and tangle
with tough Auburn Friday and Saturday. All games commence at
3 p.m. except Saturday games which starts at 2 p.m.
At the beginning of the season, the word came that they would be
weak in the pitching department. But as long as you score 27 runs
in a game, who needs pitching?

Gators Visit Georgia

Coach Bill Potters netters open
the trip opposing Georgia, today
at Athens, while the golfers will
meet Georgia Tech on the links
at Atlanta. Saturday afternoon, the
two squads will switch with the
tennis team meeting Tech and the
goiters, Georgia.
Todays tennis match will offer
the Bulldogs a chance at revenging
their earlier defeat at the hands
of the Gators in Gainesville earlier
this month. This match will mark
the Gators last appearance on
Georgias old courts as the Bull*
dogs will open a new eight-court
tennis complex before next season.
Saturday afternoon the Yellow

From the Sidelines

.By WALKER LUNDY\
Sports Editor

Jackets get their chance
at avenging their earlier loss also
in Gainesville.
This road trip will end the
golf teams regular schedule. The
golfers will compete in the All-
Florida Schools Tournament at
Tallahassee, April 4-5, and the
Southeastern Conference Tourney,
May 3-5, at Athens.
The tennis team will return
home for three matches with
Amherst, Hope, and Auburn, April
2,3 and 5 before closing action
for this trimester. The netters
will meet Rollins and Louisiana
State and compete in the SEC
tourney in May.

SHOWING HOW ITS DONE
. . is Florida s All-America third baseman Tom Moore as he practices sliding into
qome plate. Moore currently leads the Gators in hitting with a .500 average.

Fence-Busting Nine
Aims Bats at Georgia

ATHENS Ga. (Special) Floridas
baseball team, famous for its un unbelieveable
believeable unbelieveable scoring totals in recent
games, seeks to extend its winning
streak to nine games and get a
measure of revenge today when the
Gators face Georgia here in the
first game of a two game series.
Georgia has the distinction of
being the only team to beat Florida
so far this season. In the UF
opener the Bulldogs stopped the
Gators in 11 innings 3-2. Florida
rebounded in the second match 4-2.
The UFs baseballers have
changed in the last week from a
so-so hitting team with just enough
hits to win to a band of regular
fence busters. In their last five
encounters, the Gator bats
have rattled for a pair of 12-
run scores against Georgia Tech,
a pair of 16-run games against
Hampden-Sidney and 27-1 win over
previously unbeaten Pfieffer
College.
Stealing, where the Gators made
Sailing Club
Sels Races
The Gator Sailing Club will spon sponsor
sor sponsor the South Eastern Intercolle Intercollegiate
giate Intercollegiate Sailing Association (SEISA)
Dinghy Championships at Lake
Wauberg Saturday in the clubs Pen Penquin
quin Penquin class sailboats.
Schools scheduled to participate
in the regatta are Spring Hill
College, Florida Presbyterian
College, Tulane, Georgia Tech,
Rollins College and the UF. The
skippers meeting is scheduled for
9:00 a.m. in the Florida Union
Saturday. The participants will
proceed from there to the lake for
the days sailing.
The Intramural Department
which sponsors the Sailing Club,
is supplying housing for partici participants
pants participants and the facilities used for
the regatta. All university stu students
dents students and faculty are invited to
watch the regatta from the south
side of Lake Wauberg.
The Dinghy Championships are
the main eliminations used to de decide
cide decide the school which will repre represent
sent represent SEISA at the National Champ Championships
ionships Championships held each year in June.
This June Roger Straub who is
President of SEISA will be repre representing
senting representing the UF at the annual
meeting of intercollegiat Yacht
Racing Association of North
America in Boston.
The newly elected officers of the
Gator Sailing club are Pepper
Constable, President: Walter Har Harris,
ris, Harris, Vice-President; and Linda
Ivey, secretary.

a mark for themselves in 1962
with a collegiate stealing record,
has taken the back seat to the
hitting. In the Pfiefer game alone
the Gators picked up 19 hits, eight
of which were extra baggers.
Pitching, which was a question
mark before the season, is prov proving
ing proving fairly stable for head coach
Dave Fullers crew. In the last

Bama Legislature
Probes Coaches

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (UPI) An Alabama legislative committee
began secret hearings Thursday into accusations that two famous
coaches exchanged vital information prior to the 1962 Alabama-Georgia
foot ball game.

University of Alabama coach
Paul Bear" Bryant and Alabama
President Frank Rose were the
first witnesses before the seven
member committee.
The Saturday Evening Post said
in a recent article that former
University of Georgia athletic di director
rector director Wallace Butts telephoned
Bryant about Georgias plays
before last years season opener
between the two teams. Both have
denied insinuations that the call
provided information for rigging
the game.
I am happy to accept the
invitation to appear before this
committee, Bryant said in going
before the legislators. I'll try
to answer all their questions.
GEORGIA ATTORNEY General
Eugene Cook who was conducting
his own investigation, was asked
to appear before the Alabama group
Committee chairman Alton Turner
said Cook had responded to the
invitation.
Butts apparently will tell his
side of the alleged scandal soon,
possibly Friday, to Cook-but not
in' front of a lie detector as the
Georgia attorney general would
like to see him talk.
William Schroder, attorney for
the now retired Butts,
recommended that he not submit
to a new lie detector test at the
request of Cook. Bryant also has
refused.
It was known that negotiations
were in progress between Cook
and Schroder to produce Butts for
a talk with the investigators .Cook
told a reporter he would be avail available
able available to see Butts Friday.
George Burnett, an insurance
man who claimed to have over overheard
heard overheard an alleged telephone
conversation in which he said
Butts gave Bryant football

five games, starting hurlers went
the distance. Charles Anderson
in his only appearance so far this
season held Hampden-Sidney to
three hits in pitching a 16-2 Gator
win.
The Gators are in the midst of
a 8-game win streak and hold a
8-1 record overall and 3-1 in
conference play.

information, has agreed to take
a polygraph lie detector. test
at headquarters of the Georgia
Bureau of Investigation Friday.
BURNETT, BRYANT and Butts
have taken lie detector tests pre previously
viously previously from private agencies and
all three passed, according to
their lawyers.
In my report to Gov. Carl
Sanders, Im simply going to say
that three persons involved
Butts, Bryant and Burnett--took
so-called lie test examinations
by three different persons before
I began my investigation, Cook
said.
I felt in all fairness that all
three should take the same
examination on the same machine
administered by the same person.
Mr. Butts and Mr. Bryant have
refused. Mr. Burnett is taking
another test voluntarily. This will
be an official examination.
SCHRODER MADE IT CLEAR
that his client is through with lie
tests and that he was moving toward
a federal court battle on his $lO
million libel suit against the Post
for publishing the charges against
Butts.
The only lie detector test we
are interested in Mr. BOrnett
taking is when ho testifies as a
witness under oath before a Judge
and Jury in the U. S. District
Court in the case of Wally Butts
against the Saturday Evening
Post, Schroder said.
Cook issued a subpena for
Butts bank records to help him
in his investigation. To. this
development, Schroder said:
THIS E PURELY routine. When
this case comes to federal court,
we will certainly subpena every
record from Burnett, Milton Flack
and all the rest of that crowd
and also the records of the Saturday
Evening Post.