Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
The Florida
Alligator

Vol. 55, No. 115 University of Florida, Gainesville Thursday, March 28, 1963

Board Washes Out UF
|ln Ocean Study Area

The UFs hopes of establishing
||an undergraduate program in
oceanography were all but drowned
pby the Board of Control in a
special meeting yesterday in
KTampa to polish up the education
Sbudget to be presented to the
1 legislature.
The Board, while approving a
It budget asking for $257,853,248 for
H higher education in the next two
a years, cut the UF from the
|fMacDonald recommendation of
. $220,000 to improve and build
J|W|* f i \
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1 K. B. MEURLOTT
. . tapped to post.
Meurlott
Appointed
Florida newspaperman K. B.
Meurlott has joined the UF
Editorial Department.
Dr. J.R. Beckenbach, director
of the Agricultural Experiment
Stations, and Dr. M.O. Watkins,
director of the Agricultural Exten Extension
sion Extension Service, announced Meurlotts
appointment here this week.
Meurlott will edit publications for
both the Agricultural Extension
Service and the Agricultural
Experiment Stations.
A native of southern Illinois,
Meurlott obtained aB. A. in English
in 1955 from the University of
Illinois. Upon graduation he joined
the Air Force for two years of
pilot training at Bartow, and at
Laredo and Denison, Texas,
following his Air Force career,
he became an assistant editor of
two weekly newspapers at
V and alls, Illinois.
In 1959, Meurlott moved to Lake
Placid, where he started a paper
for the Ebersole Publishing
Company of Arcadia. He later
developed a cooperative among
local citizens and purchased the
Lake Placid Journal.
He accepted the position of
executive-secretary of die Board
of Student Publications at the UF
in July 1961 where he remained
until transferring to the editorial
department. While with the board,
he was in charge of financial
affairs and production for die
campus student publications.
Meurlott started his journalistic
training at the age of 13 on his
ome town paper. While attending
the University of Illinois, ne
worked on the Champaign-Urbana
Courier, an Urbana daily with a
circulation of 35,000.

facilities at Sea Horse Key, while
where the UF has been operating
a small oceanographic program
for several years.
This leaves FSU and Florida
Atlantic University the only two
state universities given capital
outlays for ocean research.
FSU will get $1.5 million for
improvements at its Alligator
Harbor research site and Florida
Atlantic will receive $2 million
for a hydrographic center at the
new school at Boca Raton.
A half million dollars of the
$5.7 million oceanographic budget
will go for a research ship and
the rest of the money will be
used for faculty salaries and equip equipment.
ment. equipment.
Dr. J. Broward Culpepper
executive director of the Board
of Control, said the UFs role in
oceanography should be to con concentrate
centrate concentrate on expanding the coastal
and harbor projects being done by
the College of Engineering.
UF Vice President Harry M.
Philpott asked the Board to
reconsider the action.
Our role in this area is minor
but the UF expected to be able to
develop an undergraduate program
in oceanography. Our students will
not be able to participate in the
Alligator Harbor programs and
those at Boca Raton, Phillpott
said.
However, in a $4.3 million space
science and research package the
UF Medical Center got $1 million
for a space medicine building and
$240,000 for equipment.
Still heading the priority list is
the UFs request for more than
sl7 million for construction and
operation of an engineering and
science center.
The Space Era Education Study
report strongly endorsed this item,
and yesterday the Board
reemphasized the need for adoption
of this portion of the budget.

. m 4|
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CAMP WAUBURG PLAYDAY QUEEN OF 1962
. . plans to crown the 1963 queen at this Saturday's festivities. Flanking the
queen are runners up Jeanie McCabe and Sharon Testy.

at the UF

*
t
BLUE KEY PRESIDENT
. . Steve Gardner speaks
at initiation ceremonies.

WauburgPlayday
OnSaturday Slate

Carnival booths, parades and
more contests have been added
to Camp Wauburg Playday, slated
Saturday from 11 a.m.-5 p.m.
The traditional event is set aside
for UF students to get together
for a day of just plain fun and
sun.
Free transportation will be pro provided
vided provided to Wauburg. UF buses will
stop at the Florida Union, Hub,
Tolbert Area Office, Beta house,.
Jennings hall and AXO house at
11 a.m. and 12 noon. Buses will
return at 5 p.m. and 5:45 p.m.
Over S2OO in prizes will be
awarded to the winner of the Miss
Wauburg contest, doubling last
years awards.
Since there is no entry fee and

Army Band Set
For UF Concert

A musical concert with a
Broadway style will be presented
free to UF students when the
U. S. Army Field Band of
Washington, D.C., plays in the
Florida Gymnasium 3 p.m.
Sunday.
The local appearance is being
sponsored by the Deaprtment of
Army in coordination with the
Lyceum Council and the UF
Department of Music.
Major Robert L. Bierly,
commanding officer and director
of the 100-member organization,
said no admission is ever charged
for appearances of theU.S. Army
Field Band.
Singing several numbers from
great musicals in Broadway
Chorus style willbe the
Soldiers Chorus. The chorus
is an intergral part of the band
and includes a number of in instrumentalists.
strumentalists. instrumentalists.
Experienced in playing before
large throngs, the band will offer
a range of musical compositions
to interest all music lovers. Its
light to semi-classical renditions
have been played to audiences
in all 50 states as well as in
Europe and the Orient.
The band is self sufficient as
an Army unit and is completely
mobile so that it can fulfill its
prime mission of playing in
the grassroot communities of

the prize is so high we believe
every organization on campus
should have an entry, said Play Playday
day Playday Chairman Larry Hardy.
Trophies in each event will be
awarded to the over-all individual,
and over-all organization winners.
Competitive events Include
swimming, water ball, canoe race,
canoe jousting, limbo, canoe sink sinking,
ing, sinking, mud crawling, tug-of-war, and
chug-a-lug.
Beauty contest entrants will be
judged at 2 in bathing suitsthe
winner will be announced im immediately.
mediately. immediately.
This is a chance for organiza organizations
tions organizations to receive recognition recognitionwhether
whether recognitionwhether it be a trophy or a sun
tan, said Hardy.

the nation. r>
The motto of the band 1 u We
are the Kings of the Highway
is In keeping with the old
Kings of the Highway song
of the Infantry which the band
uses as its musical signature.

I i I
pt
MAJOR BIERLY
. . leads band.

Major Bierly
To Lead Band
Major Robert L. Bierly, com commanding
manding commanding officer and director of the
U.S. Army Field Band of Washing Washington
ton Washington D.C., has spent a quarter
of a century In the field of military
music!
A 1928 graduate of Clearfield,
Pa., High School, he majored in
music at Ithaca College, Ithaca,
N.Y., and received a bachelor
of science degree in Instrumental
music from the college in 1932.
He was supervisor of music in
the Brockway, Pa., Public Schools
from 1933 to 1935 and the Clarion,
Pa., Pa., Public Schools from
1935 to 1936. In 1936 he moved
to Lynchburg, Va., to become
director of Instrumental music In
all the city's schools. At the
same time he was director of
vocal music in the E. C. Glass
High School, Lynchburg.
Major Blerly's affiliation with
the field of military music began
In 1936 when he Joined the Vir Virginia
ginia Virginia National Guards 246th Coast
Artillery Band. He earned an ap appointment
pointment appointment as a Warrant Officer
Bandmaster and took command of
the band In 1937. The band was
one of the first National Guard
units In the country to be called
Into Federal service In 1940.
From June 1942, to August 1943,
Bierly was bandmaster of the 88th
(Blue Devils) Infantry Division
Artillery Band, which he organized
and trained at Camp G ruber, Okla.
From the Artillery Band he was
moved to the Division Band, which
he reorganized and retrained and
took overseas as its commanding
officer In December, 1943.
WSA Selects
New Officers
Womens Student Association
(WSA) newly elected president
Is Toba Ulman.
Other officers Include Mary
Anne Millsap, vice president;
corresponding secretary Vicki
Weithorn; recording secretary
Cynthia Stillman, treasurer,Sara
Robinson, senior representative
Peggy Williams; junior repre representative
sentative representative Nancy Lucas, and
sophomore representative Kay
Lundquist.



Page 2

The Florida Alligator Thursday, March 28, 1963

'lnsect Comedy Stage
One of Cubist Motif

The Insect Comedy curtain
rises at 7:30 on April 3 with one
of the most unusual sets the UF
has ever seen.
The set follows a cubist motif.
Henry Swanson, set director,
said he has been doing sets for
10 to 13 years, and this is the
first cubist set he has done.
The set floor is composed of
intersecting planes, the whole
under-floor slanting toward the
audience at an angle of about
30 degrees. The set also projects
far beyond the proscenium and has
planes which appear to be
suspended in air farther back in
the set.
The Insect Comedy, is an
expressionistic play written in the

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50 CASH AWARDS A MONTH. ENTER NOW. HERES HOW:
First, think of an answer. Any answer. Then come up with
a nutty, surprising question for it, and you've done a
Crazy Question. Its the easy new way for students to
make loot. Study the examples below; then do your own.
Send them, with your name, address, college and class,
to GET LUCKY, Box 64F, Mt. Vernon 10, N. Y. Winning
entries will be awarded $25.00. Winning entries sub submitted
mitted submitted on the inside of a Lucky Strike wrapper will get a
$25.00 bonus. Enter as often as you like. Start right now!

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THE QUESTION IS: WHAT 00 YOU GET WHEN YOU REQUEST A PACK OF THE j V |/
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Right! You get Lucky; you get the fine-tobacco taste of Lucky Strike. This great /- c .' 4 g rT g s I
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* r C*. Product of Uttfon Jv&*jer*>~£myuvnp
early 1920sbytwo brothers, Karel
and Joseph Capek. In order to
update the play, director Ron Jaret
decided to use a cubistic motif.
Cubistic painting grew out of a
AIAA Appoints
UFAerospacer
Associate Professor John W.
Hoover, a member of the aero aerospace
space aerospace engineering faculty, has
been appointed a member of the
American Institute of
Aeronautics and Astronautics
Education Advisory (AIAA)
Committee.

need to incorporate time-space
elements onto a flat canvas.
Cubism also helps to de-human de-humanize
ize de-humanize the actors. Masks are worn
by all players to further the effect.
The play is essentially unreal unrealistic
istic unrealistic and emotional in nature.
There are three vignettes or
parts of the drama, unified by
a central character, a tramp, who
appears in all three acts.
The first vignette concerns the
transiency of love and the actors
are costumed as butterflies.
The second is titled the
creepers and the crawlers and
is a series of sketches on mater materialism.
ialism. materialism. Ants star in the third
vignette, which is an allegroy on
mechanization and war.
The play will be presented Wed Wednesday,
nesday, Wednesday, April 3 through Saturday,
April 6 in Norman Auditorium*
Wednesday and Thursday the
curtain rises at 7:30 p.m. and on
Friday and Saturday the play starts
at 8 p.m.
Admission is free to U. of F.
students with ID. Non-Florida
students tickets are 50£. Adult
tickets are 75£. Tickets are being
sold at the Ihfornjation Booth
across from the Student Service
Center.

(Based on the hilarious book "The Question Mon.''}
RULES: The Reuben H. Donnelley Corp. will judge entries on the basis of
humor (up to */ 3 ), clarity and freshness (up to V 3). and appropriateness (up
to Vi), and their decisions will be final. Duplicate prizes will be awarded
in the event of ties. Entries must be the original works of the entrants and
must be submitted in the entrant's own name. There will be 50 awards
every month, October through April. Entries received during each month
will be considered for that month's awards. Any entry received after April
30. 1963, will not be eligible, and all become the property of The American
Tobacco Company. Any college student may enter the contest, except em employees
ployees employees of The American Tobacco Company, its advertising agencies and
Reuben H. Donnelley, and relatives of the said employees. Winners will be
notified by mail. Contest subject to all federal, state, and local regulations.

Teacher Examination
Deadline Approaches

An April 5 deadline has been
set for candidates to register for
the National Teacher Examinations

gaiat gttl

NANCY CHANEY
... is today's Gator Girl.
Nancy is a blue-eyed
freshman from Lakeland
planning on a pre-med
major. She is a Yu lee
resident.

to be held May 4, according to
UF Examiners Dr. John v. Mc-
Quitty.
A bulletin of information,
containing an application and
describing registration pro procedures,
cedures, procedures, may be obtained from
county superintendents of public
instruction or from the Board of
Examiners, 408 Seagle Building,
Gainesville. The May 4 date is for
teachers in Alachua and nearby
counties. The National Teacher
Examinations are prepared and
administered by Educational
Testing Service.
At the one-day testing session
a candidate may take the Common
Examinations, which include tests
in Professional Information,
General Culture, English
Expression, and Nonverbal
Reasoning, as well as one or two
of thirteen Optional Examinations
designed to demonstrate mastery
of subject matter to be taught.
Grant Assists
Cancer Study
A $15,120 grant has been
awwrded to the UF*s College of
Agriculture by the American
Cancer Society to find out what
happens to chemical weed controls
sprayed on crop plants.
Dr. Merrill Wilcox and Dr.E.G.
Rogers, both agronomists with the
Agricultural Experiment Stations
and the College of Agriculture,
will conduct the research at
Gainesville. Wilcox says grain
and legume plants will be grown
in the laboratory and then treated
with herbicides. The study will
then involve finding out what hap happens
pens happens to the herbicide once it has
been introduced into the plant.
According to, Wilcox, this will
lead to finding out what effect
the herbicides have on plants and
will ensure that herbicide-treated
plants do not affect animals.
The experiment station scientist
aid the research will be a step
toward finding out how to improve
herbicides and make them more
effective.
Official title of the research
study is theUnsaturated Gamma-
Lactones in Crop plants. Wilcox
says most of the research in this
area has been done by British
scientists. Some study was made
in this area in the United States
following World War n.
Two Contests
Otter Prizes
An International Week poster
contest and a contest for two
tickets to Germany this year
are being sponsored by the Board
of International Activities.
The tickets to Germany will
be awarded to entrants on the
basis of interest in the German
language and European affairs.
Details of the contest havent
been worked out.
The poster contest will bring
the winner $25.
Entries must be 30 by 40
inches and bear the words,
University of Florida,
International Week 1963. The
deadline for submitting entries
to Ahmed Roderiguez at the
International Center is April 15.
International week will be May
18 25.
An International Queen will be
chosen from entrants submitted
by campus organizations x>n the
first night of the contest. An
International Supper is slated for
May 19.
May 24 will be the International
Talent Show. A soccer game, a
banquet and an international ball
are on tap for May 25, the final
day at the observance.



Work Turnover
Plagues UF

By PAT WILKINSON
Staff Writer
UF students may be taking com compulsory
pulsory compulsory non-credit courses in
campus gardening, restroom
cleaning and secretarial work if
the present 33-62 per cent turn turnover
over turnover in UF non-academic workers
continues to increase.
A UF budget analysis for the
1963-65 biennium shows these non nonacademic
academic nonacademic salary levels are so low
as to endanger efficient UF opera operation/
tion/ operation/ Mautz said.
With the upcoming large
Veterans Administration(VA) hos hospital
pital hospital slated in Gainesville Mautz
warned that higher pay scales of
civil service will force the UF
into a nightmare competition.
In fact Mautz predicts the
turnover rate for secretarial help
may grow to 166 per cent.
The State Budget Commission
is requesting the State Legislature
to increase non-academic salaries
less than 10 per centhalf of what
the UF budget asks.
The UF is requesting more than
$67 million in UF salariesl 6
per cent more than the budget
commissions request, which lops
$lO million off that figure.
Average pay scale for all pro professorial
fessorial professorial ranks here is not quite
SIO,OOO a year.
According to Mautz, this is above
the average non-academic salaries
which range as low as $1,895

Former Board Head
Tapped by Fraternity

J. J. Daniel, former chairman
of the State Board of Control,
will be initiated by the UF Chapter
of Beta Gamma Sigma national
honorary business fraternity
Thursday.
Daniel is president of the Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville investment firm, Stockton,
Whatley, Davin and Co., and is
vice president and director of the
Arvida Corporation.
Beta Gamma Sigma, the top
scholastic honorary in colleges of
business throughout the country,
taps an outstanding business leader
for honorary membership each
spring.
Initiation ceremonies will be
held in Room 116 of the Florida

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.
jSB Operation Lady-Killer calls for the clean-cut All-American
approach. Which makes h.i.s. Post-Grads a natural. Tried Triedand-true
and-true Triedand-true tailored with belt loops, regular-guy pockets
and cuffs. Lean, lithe and legit, Post-Grads are on-the on-thelevel
level on-thelevel authentics, traditional to the last stitch. In color colorful,
ful, colorful, washable fabrics at hip shops., .$4.95 to $8.95
savvy bachelors wear lIJaS post-trad slacks

annually.
Faculty salaries here are not
adequate for good morale, deep
dedication to job or desire to make
full use of abilities, and, in addi addition,
tion, addition, these salaries are not enough
to entice top quality faculty or
retain those who do come, Mautz
said.
Do we want to hitch our wagon
to a star or to a submarine?
Martz asked.
The McDonald Reportthe
Space Era Education Study (SEES)
involves going through 10 different
state officials before hiring a UF
faculty member with a salary over
SIO,OOO a year.
In the new budget, the UF is
requesting an average faculty
salary increase of about 15 per
cent. This, however, is still three
per cent below what the United
States Office of Education Study
reports as the average salary for
the other 46 state universities
with more than 10,000 students
enrolled.
The State Budget Commissions
recommendation is 10 per cent
below the three per cent figure.
The Office of Education Study
also reveals that each year theUF
will fall one per cent behind even
if the UF budget request is ac accepted.
cepted. accepted. After a 10-year period,
for example, theUF salaries would
be 10 per cent behind the average
of the universities used in the
study.

Union at 6:15 p.m. A banquet
honoring the new initiates follows
at 6:45 in the Student Service
Center.
Students tapped include David
W. Hambrlck of Sarasota, the only
junior selected for this term, and
seniors Sally Anne Cornelius oi
Miami, Robert A. Behrman and
Michael B. Lappin of Miami Beach,
Earnest E. Hamilton of Key West,
Blake D. Hartill and Carlos J.
Fernandez of Gainesville, William
F. Steiner of Orlando, Robert T.
Brockman, Richard Allen DeCaire
and Edward V. McKlntyre of St.
Petersburg, Bruce C. Starling of
Kissimmee and Grant E. Sabin of
Deerfield Beach.

. .will be part of Saturday's activities at the annual Camp Wauburg Playday.

Oratorio Slated for Sunday

A choral union of 300 voices
will tell the dramatic Biblical
story of David and Bathsheba at
the UF on Palm Sunday, April
7.
King David, a three-part
oratorio by the Swiss composer
Arthur Honegger, will represent
the UFs biggest concert event
of the year. It will be a joint
effort of the symphony

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The Florida Alligator Thursday, March 28, 1963

orchestra and the choral union of
the Department of Music.
Columbia recording artists
Doris Yerick, soprano; Beverly
Wolff, contralto; and Charles K.
L. Davis, tenor will come to
campus as soloists for the
oratorio.
UF Dean of Students Lester
L. Hale will narrate the produc production.
tion. production. Dean Hale is well known

for his readings throughout the
Southeast and for his annual
Ranging from the menacing
sounds of the brass to the melodic
tenderness of the strings and the
harp, the background music con contrasts
trasts contrasts the tragedy of Saul, the
soldier, with the youth and naivety
of David, the shepherd.
The oratorio ends with the
peaceful death of David.

Page 3



Page 4

The Florido Alligator Thursday, March 28/ 1963

David and Lisa
A Great Film

By BRUCE KORTH
Staff Writer
David and Lisa all by itself
has put America back in
competition with the rest of the
' world* as far as moviemaking
goes.
It has not only put America
in the running, but has given it
a very strong position
David and Lisa is an unusual
love story, because of the lovers'
condition and the rarity of this
type of love. David has a dread
fear of death and of being hurt hurtso
so hurtso great that he wont let anyone
even touch him. Lisa is an
adolescent schizophrenic--part of
(amtsfiue
I DRIVE-IN THEATRE
2400 Hawthorne Road, RL 20
Movie information FR 6-5011
TONITE 3
*1 in color shown 9:20
CHARLTON YVETTE
HESTON MIMIEUX
DIAMOND HEAd
*2 smash hit at 7 p.m.
Academy Award Nominee
Jack Lemon Kim Novak
Notorious
LANDLADY"
'3 adult color hit at 11:20
NATALIE WARREN
WOOD BEATTY
* Splendor in
the Grass

WINNER OF TWO
Academy Award Nominations
r Features:
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the time Muriel, a six-year -old
who ryhmes her speech and part
of the time Lisa a, 14-year-old.
The story takes place inside a
home for exceptional" disturbed
children, those of successful
parents according to the American
formulasuccess equals money.
Fortunately, the movie does not
try to pinpoint why the children
are here, but concentrates on how
they may be helped to get out.
The film does point vaguely
at parents and society in general
as the chief causes, an almost
universally accepted diagnosis.
The parents, however, are closer
to being average rather than vilely,
blatantly evil as they are in some
pictures about teen-agers (e.g.
Rebel Without a Cause).
The two who play David and
Lisa, Keir Dullea and Janet
Margolin, play the parts with
surprising perfection for
newcomers. There are few parts
more difficult to play than that
of a person who is mentally dis disturbed,
turbed, disturbed, requiring a vast range
of emtion. Dullea and Margolin
dont miss a one.
They are tender, wrathful, at
times violent, Joyous, cautious,
vindictive, spiteful, loving, but
always right. The psychiatrist,
Howard DaSilva, has a slightly
easier part, but it is handled
with the same perfection.
Both Dullea and Margolin have
already won top awards for their
acting at the San Francisco Film
Festival.
SOLES pvt on in IF minutes I
MODERN SHOEI
REPAIR SHOP T
cross from Ist notional bonk I

GATOR CLASSIFIED
CLASSIFIED ADS ARE A VALUABLE SERVICE TO ALL
WHEN YOU CALL ABOUT THE ADS ON THIS PAGE,
PLEASE MENTION YOU SAW IT IN THE GATOR

Autos

FOR SALE 1953 Ford. Radio,
heater, stick shift, original paint.
Best offer over $195. Call Gus
Sanchez, FR 2-9190 after 6 p.m.
(G-115-3t-c).
1957 ALL WHITE FORD
CONVERTIBLE. Thunderbird
automatic good condition. Must
sell $450. Wes Patterson, 306
N. E. 6th Street. Call 4-6 p.m.
(G-104-ts-c).
GOING OVERSEAS THE YEAR?
Buy a new car at European prices
and save. Mercedes-Benz, Volvo,
English Ford or D.K.W. Call
Hubert Barlow, FR 2-4251, Crane
Motor Company. (G-86-30t-c).
1949 OLDSMOBILE 98 in unusually
good condition. This fine vehicle
has been in family since new.
$l5O. Call FR 6-2349. (G-111-st-c).
1959 CHEVROLET BEL AIR
2 door hardtop convertible. Radio,
heater. SBOO. Call Guy Lombardi,
FR 2-5429 or FR 6-9295. (G-111-st-c).
st-c).
WANTED TO BUY SO through 54
Fords and Chevrolets. Al Herndon
Service Station, 916 SE 4th Street.
FR 2-1308. (G-94-ts-c).
FOR SALE TR-3 sports car.
1958 with 1960 engine. Excellent
condition. Brand new tires all
around. Phone FR 6-7641. (G (G---114-st-p).
--114-st-p). (G---114-st-p).
GOING TO EUROPE? THE
CONTINENT? Let us arrange
for delivery of your new Triumph
or Fiat anywhere. We take your
old car in trade here and arrange
for delivery of your new car there.
Use it to tour the continent and
return it to the States with you.
Call Ken Bowman FR 2-4373.
Barklay Motors Inc. Lincoln-
Mercury Meteor Comet-
Triumph-Fiat. (G-114-13t-c).

Real Estate

NO DOWN PAYMENTS VETS
Low down payments F.H.A. 23
models. 2,3 and 4 bedroom designs.
Free swim club membership.
Monthly payments from $74.
Highland Court Manor. NE 23rd
Blvd. and 11th Terr. (I-78-ts-c).

THERE
ARE NO
SECRETS
FROM
From The Man Who
Examines This Can
- V S'E II 1

For Rent

ROOM FOR RE NT for short period.
April 25th to June 20th. Breakfast
privileges and garage. S3O a month.
FR 2-9803. (B-115-lt-c).
FOR THE SOPHISTICATED ONLY
Elegantly furnished apartment for
summer trimester. Has been
photographed and published in The
Alligator. Preferrably women.
Call FR 6-2018 between 6 and 8
p.m. (B-114-3t-c).
NICE TWO BEDROOM Furnished
Apartments for students beginning
May first. Will accomodate up to
4 students comfortably. Right near
campus. Reduced rates for
summer. Call Mrs. Jones at FR
6-5636. Occupancy may be had at
end of this trimester.(B-112-tf-c).
QUIET ROOMS to rent for students.
Also experienced florist designer
wanted. Colonial Flowers, 826
West University Ave. FR 2-5775.
(B-113-st-c).
NEW AIR CONDITIONED
Apartments for summer for boys
or girls. Two room efficiency
close to campus. Utilities paid
except lights. slls per month with
4 in apartment. SIOO per month
with less than four. Also renting
for fall trimester to boys only.
See at 1518 NW 4th Ave. Call
FR 6-4353. (B-113-ts-c).

Personal

EUROPEAN TOURS for Young
Adults. June departure, 54 days,
$1375. Write Prof. Loring Knecht,
Knight Tours (C), Northfield,
Minn. (J-113-3t-p).
GIDDYAP To Wauberg Riding
Stables. 441 1/2 mile North of
Lake Wauberg. Horseback riding,
night rides and hay rides. Call
Micanopy 2471 for reservations
and pick-up. (J-U3-st-p).

Services
*

WILL CARE FOR infants or small
children by day or night in private
home. 1406 NW sth Avenue, Phone
FR 6-8961. (M-65-ts-c).
NESTOR'S TV, RADIO, HI FI
SERVICE Tubes checked free.
Free estimates. Next to Florida
Bookstore Parking Lot. 1627 NW
Ist Avenue, Phone FR 2-7326.
(M-99-20t-p).
TYPING term papers, theses,
dissertations, on IBM electric.
Reasonable rates. FR 2-0328.
(M-111-st-p).

Wanted

WANTED TO BUY: Binocular
microscope meeting all
requirements of the College of
Medicine. Must be in good to
excellent condition. Forward
complete information to: K. R.
Safko, 4224 Elkcam Blvd. SE, St.
Petersburg,

Lost & F ound

FOUND Plain gold wedding band
in University College Readily
Room. Initials on the inside are
C. A. L to D. L. L. 9-1-62.
(L-114-3t-c).


Help Wanted

HELP WANTED Waiters must
be 21 or over. Call FR 6-9335
between 12 and 3 p.m. No
experience needed. (E-113-ts-c).

For Sale

IDEAL HOME for University and
Medical Center personnel. Lovely
location 5 minutes from
University. Call FR 6-4097.
(A-U5-st-c).
FOR SALE 1951 Travelmaster
house trailer, 8 x 33. Spacious
11 1/2 x 22* cabana with large
closet, air conditioner, reasonable.
Call FR 6-1112 (after 5:30
weekdays). (A-115-lt-c).
SPELUNKERS AND DIVERS -Now
selling new Hydro-lite all purpose
lanterns for skindiving and caving.
List price $16.00. Now SIO.OO
(including batteries). Call Guy
Lombardi FR 2-5429 or FR 6-
9295. (A-111-st-c).
FOR SALE 39* x 8 Southwestern
mobile home with two room cabana.
Must sell by May 4. See at Sheffield
Trailer Park. 4700 SW Archer
Road, or call J. H. Seals at FR
6-1162. (A-111-ts-c).
1951 SAFE WAY TRAILER. 30
x 8 with a 10 x 8* cabana.
Fenced-in-yard. $995. See
at Archer Road Village, 3620 SW
Archer Road, or call Joe Wills,
FR 2-6940. (A-110-ts-c).
FOR SALE 1956, two bedroom
Nashua Trailer. 35' x 8 witn 15
x 9* cabana. Furnished and air
conditioned. Excellent condition.
Call FR 6-1387 after 6:00 p.m.
(A-108-ts-c).
BY OWNER Very attractive new
home five minutes to campus in
S. W. Large wooded lot. Beam
ceilings, Cyprus paneling,
hardwood floors, large center hall,
tiled kitchen and bathrooms.
Designed for Florida living. FR
2-0328. (A-111-16t-c).
EVETT BY BUFFET CLARINET
for sale. S3O. Call Karen at FR
2-5521 between 5 and 7:00 p.m.
(A-112-ts-c).
1961 MUSTANG Thoroughbred
Motorcycle. Like new. Engine just
rebuilt. 13 H. P., 4 speed
transmission. $295 firm. Call Ron
Anderson FR 2-9177.(A-113-3t-p).
MARRIED STUDENTS Throw off
your shackles of conformity and
move into decent housing. 2
bedroom-CB home for sale by
student owner. Low down payment
$66 a month. Added feature no
taxes outside city limits. FR
6-1908 after 5 p.m. All day
weekends. (A-113-st-c).
S ACRIFICE: New Stenorette
dictation machine-tape recorder;
earphones and transistor outfit,
three tapes. Cost S3OO, sell for
$265. Call FR 6-3172. Also SSO
blending liquifier for $29.
(A-113-3t-p).

il
11
s&ntMUji'



UF Listing
New Jobs
Camp counselorships, park jobs
hotel work and a job as a Good
Humor ice cream salesman may
be found within the files of the
Secretary of Labor Bob Setzer.
The Secretary of Labor office
handles mostly seasonal jobs.
Setzer and his committee act as
middle-men in enabling students
to contact prospective employers.
Pete Portley 2UC, committee
member said the office -has
approximately 50 to 60 people per
week coming in to inquire about
summer work.
The department, which works
in conjunction with the placement
service and the part-time labor
office, provides students with
names and addresses of interested
employers. It has nothing to do
with the placement beyond this.
Other projects to be sponsored
by the committee include baby babysitter
sitter babysitter service, listings of all
available Gainesville jobs, and a
talent round-up, providing names
and addresses of amateur and
professional talent in the
Gainesville area for the
convenience of prospective
employers.

Survey Analyzes Students
In Dollars, Cents Figures

By MARY ANNE WALKER
UF students quaff down an esti estimated
mated estimated SIBO,OOO worth of beer and
alcoholic beverages annually, but
they spend a half million dollars
on books, school supplies, news newspapers,
papers, newspapers, and magazines.
A study published by the market marketing
ing marketing department in the fall presents
a profile of the UF student in dol dollars
lars dollars and cents language. The study
was conducted on a random sample
of 292 UF students and gives pro projected
jected projected statistical data for the stu student
dent student body on the basis of questions
asked.
The study estimated UF students
spend an excess of ten million
dollars annually in Gainesville and
in 1961 provided 15 per cent of
the total expenditures iii the city.
The study indicated under the tri trimester
mester trimester system with more students
remaining in Gainesville for ten
or eleven month this percentage
should be even greater.
Part of the study analyzed stu student
dent student expenditures for a single
month, November, 1961 which was
considered a typical month. It
presented the median amount spent
for several types of goods and
services and the percentages of
respondents who reported having
spent money for the item in Nov November.
ember. November.
This portion of the study also
indicated the number of students
at the UF who could be expected
to have amde similar purchases
during that month.
The study indicated students
spend $29,000 each month
on cigaretts and tobacco. They
shell out an additional $21,000
for beer and alcohol, not including
that paid for through fraternity
funds.
The largest amount of money
paid by students is $586,250
a month for prepared food, on the
basis of SSO per month per student.
If he buys his own groceries the
student spends only $25 each month
for food.
The most expensive single item
in student budgets is motor vehicle
installment payments. S6O a month
for the individual student and about
$16,000 for the student body.
Fifty cents was the smallest
amount allocated to any item on
the list. The half dollar was
spent for personal toiletries and
totals $5,044 monthly.
To maintain that look the
Florida man and women spend
$350,000 on clothes over a 9 month
period. Local clothing merchants
collect about $39,000 every momu
during the school year. Almost

GATOR RAIDER MASCOT SALLY RAFFA
. . inspects rifle of Army ROTC cadet.

hall of the students invest eight
dollars each month in wearing ap apparel.
parel. apparel.
About the same amount is spent
on shoes monthly, but by a smaller
number of people. Shoe stores
pocket only $16,000 monthly from
students.
One forth of the receipts of the
entertainment and amusement con concerns
cerns concerns in Gainesville come from
the UF. Students spend $24,000
monthly for these concerns. This
is compared to $14,500 they spend
on newspaper and magazines in
the area. During the same period
$32,500 is spent on books and
school supplies.
The marketing study indicated
that $22,495 is handed over every
month in dues to various clubs,
organizations, honoraries, and
Greeks.
Maintaining the suave look
accounts for a third of the receipts
of barber and beauty shops in the
city. Although the median figure

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[ 111 STUDENT/ >/ 4 Carat
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enlarged to show detail
l\ Gainesville's Quality Jewelers
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per student is $2.50 for a single
month it is estimated that 9,135
students take advantage of these
services. Keeping Joe College
primed and Sally Coed in bouf bouffant
fant bouffant hairstyles of the latest color
brings in a neat $22,800 each
month.
On a monthly basis students
more money keeping clean than
they spend for entertainment.
Cleaning and laundry expenses tap
$29,000 every month, $5,000 more
than entertainment.
Foot-weary collegiates deposit
$4,704 monthly into bus and taxi
meters. They spend another $4,000
on photographic equipment and
supplies. A trifling $3,407
is spent each month on jewelry.
Because a students income,
place of residence, marital status,
and sex all effect how much money
he spends and what he spends it
on all of these areas were in investigated.
vestigated. investigated.

The Florida Alligator Thursday, March 28, 1963

Raiders Boast
Coed Mascot

Guerilla warfare never had it
so good.
At least that's what 33 Reserve
Officers Training Corps (ROTC)
Gator Raiders must think every everytime
time everytime they invade the depths of Beta
Woods with their new unit mascot.
She's Sally Raffa, a pretty 19-
year-old UF coed. A girl with
a yen for odd things, she has
become the queen and best looking
soldier in the entire ROTC pro program-bar
gram-bar program-bar none.
Sally, a sophomore from West
Palm Beach, attends all Raider
lectures, Classes and even parti participates
cipates participates with the boys in their field
maneuvers.
Major John M. Holko, group
leader, said Sally is a great
morale booster to the boys. She's
a real nice girl."
A crack shot on the Florida
Riflettes, Floridas girl rifle
team, she goes on hikes, runs
through battle manuevers and even
scurries through the woods on
compass-reading courses with the
counter-insurgency group.
She says she first became in interested
terested interested in joining the organiza organization
tion organization when she was watching them
on the drill field,
I liked their spirit," she said,
"They look so enthusiastic."
Sally claims she has been fas fascinated

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I junior \\
youll be the beauty of the summer
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of ice-creamy colors enhanced with
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with contrasting ribbon. Colors i iJfIH
are Ice Mint, Laurel Pink, Dream KAMI
Blue, Maize or whipped, creamy JCroS(g
White. In sizes 9-15
Jr*. Dress Shop,

cinated fascinated by military and war life
ever since she can remember.
My father was in the infantry
for 23 years and Ive grown up
on army and battle tales, she
says.
And besides", she says, "I
like to do odd things. I think too
many college people miss a lot
of fun in life because their too
sophisticated.
When her rifle team coach sug suggested
gested suggested the idea of her being the
Gator Raider mascot, she was all
for the idea.
The Raiders plan to supply their
mascot with a guerilla warfare
outfit complete with green beret,
black combat boots and green fati fatigues.
gues. fatigues.
Every week on field maneuveurs,
Hollke appoints one Raider to guard
over the mascot. This guard must
watch over her and explain what
the raiders are doing.
When on hikes, Sally rides along
with the group in a Jeep.
A girl who likes things exciting,
she plans to be a top-notch guerilla
warfare trainee next trimester and
wear her new guerilla outfit with
pride.
As for her 33 guerilla comrades
they think its different too.

Page 5



Page 6

The Florida Alligator Thursday, March 28, 1963

editorials
The Papers Aim : All the news with decency our only limit.
medicine for
a sickness
IT IS TRUE THAT we have an Honor System that is whatever
we make it, and also true that we haven't made it much.
What to do? We could abolish the Honor System. If this is to be
done, it must be done by the students. If we abolish it, with what
do we replace it?
We could replace the Honor System with a full proctored system.
A proctor system approaches the ultimate in police systems. When
you take a test, you can depend on not one, but several proctors to
shadow you throughout the entire test. Proctors are very efficient.
They accompany you to get a coke or a smoke. They usher you to
the restrooms. They sit beside you while you work. They are your
conscience.
STUDENTS GRADUATING FROM colleges and universities with
proctor systems never know if they could have made it on their
own. Even worse, they have no proctors to shadow them the rest
of their lives. Let's face up to a cold, hard fact about proctor systems systemscheating
cheating systemscheating still goes on. Several nationally circulated magazines have
published stories attesting to how slick you have to be in order
to cheat under a proctor's nose. People who cheat under a proctor
system are just a little foxier than we. Proctor systems make no
pretense of curbing stealing or passing of worthless checks. Proctor
systems make no pretense of allowing the individual to discover
his own moral fibre.
More desirable than a proctor system is a non-descript device
known as letting the professor use his own system. Some UF
professors use this device. It is comforting to know that professors
possess the omnicient discretion to catch the cheaters and protect
the innocent. Many professors pride themselves in the statement,
Since I've been using my own system, not a single case of cheating
has been reported.
Well now, if students are hesitant to report cheating to other
students, let's not kid ourselves into thinking they will report them
to professors. Remember, students who know they're being
checked on are just a little foxier than average. And the
professor, like the proctor, won't be with his students after graduation.
Can such a professor say with equal certainty, Since I've been
using my own method, every student has determined his individual
responsibility to himself and others?
NON-DESCRIPT METHODS OF CATCHING cheaters have one
horrendous faultthere is essentially only one mind involved in
judging Innocence or guilt. Professors are hesitant to admit personal
bias, but quick to admit others have faults in their methods of dealing
with cheating.
What does the Honor System have that makegJjLdeslrable?
It has the integrity of the individual student who, if caught cheating,
will honestly admit his guilt. The Important thing here is not that
a student is caught and admits his guilt. The importance lies in the
student's reason for admitting his guilt, a reason that only he could
have determined.
When a student pleads not-guilty to charges of Honor System
violation, he has something he has under no other system involving
determination of morals and character. He has the scalpel-like action
of both proponents and opponents of his guilt and innocence,
diametrically opposing each other in desperate attempts to search
out and reveal the truth. This truth is to be determined by a group
of the accused students peers, a student jury. Regardless of how
sincere or objective an individual or administrative agency of a
university may be, it cannot possess this two-sided quality in
determining truth.
we caiuioi ne* F ut feel that students who graduate from an Honor
System have at least a few more strands of a little stronger moral
fibre than students from other systems. He knows he has made it
on his own. He doesnt need a professor or proctor with him the
rest of his life.
WHAT CAN BE DONE to improve the Honor System Squeal on
cheaters? It's all according to what you call squealing. if you see
a stranger hustling off with your transistor radio, bicycle, or wallet,
is it squealing to do something about it. If somebody steals your
girl friend or boy friend, do you sit around and let somebody else
take care of it? If enough cheating goes on to reduce your honest
effort by at least one letter grade, have you been done wrong?
There are other alternatives than spotting a cheater and rushing
to turn him in. If you saw a strange student preparing to pick up
your books, would you not be quick to tell him they were yours and
that he had better leave them alone? If you spot someone cheating
probably the best thing you can do for him and yourself is to tell
him to his face that you dont like it. If the same student persists
after one or several warnings, try telling him youre going to turn
him in. The same applies to stealing and passing of worthless
checks. Even more Important than specifically What-to-do is
why-to-do-it. Consider how much more significant it would be
if it were your idea to have students determine for themselves
what value there is in an Honor System.
The Florida Alligator
Editor-In-Chief David Lawrence Jr.
Managing Editors. Maryanne Awtrey, Ben Garrett
Business Manager Jay Fountain
Layout Editor David West
Sports Editor Walker Lundy
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of
the University of Florida and is published daily except Saturday and
Sunday. THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is entered as second class matter
at the United States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida.-Offices are
located in Rooms 8, 10, and 15 in the Florida Union Building Basement.
Telephone University of Florida, FR 6-3261, Ext. 2832, and request
either editorial office or business office.
Opinions voiced in personal columns on this page do not necessarily
reflect the opinions of the editors. Only editorials are the official
voice of the paper.

'iV'"

By Dieter Plasse

Hungers Impact On Ideologies

(EDITORS NOTE. . This is
the second segment in Dieter
Plasses article, Hunger's
Impact On Ideologies, a look
into the role of poverty and hunger
has played in the development of
todays political ideologies)
(TOMORROW UNDEVELOPED
ECONOMY)
COUNTRIES IN TRANSITION.
In their search for raw materials
Europeans and North Americans
penetrated into Asia, Africa, and
Latin America. They built up
capitalistic enterprises of
monopolistic character, often
exploited the rich natural
resources and thus gave reason to
the basic doctrine of Marxism-
Leninism, that capitalism can only
exist through means of colonialism
and exploitation, a dogma which
was proven to be wrong by recent
history. In many areas, western
civilization was imposed upon
cultures of distinct pattern.
Feudalism developed to its
extreme in Latin America, and
is still in existence in many areas.
Only in the middle of this century
have many of these countries
succeeded in shedding the strings
of colonialism and attaining
political independence. Many are
still fighting against traditional
feudal or totalitarian authorities.
While the industrialized nations
of the West have been shaped in

Political Potshots

'Other Side Os Student Govt.

Some say this column has not
presented both sides of the
Student Government story.
In an exclusive interview with
an avid critic of Student Govern Government
ment Government I have obtained the other
side. Now for its humor. . I
hope. .is that critics satire,
1 HUGH
v 4? ?*\) mcarthur .
Potshots
complete and unabridged, for
your indulgence.
'Student Government is not
Mickey Mouse.
Student Government is not
Peanuts.
Student Government is more
like Dick Tracy. Student Gov Government
ernment Government is akin to the sensational
stories found in the pages of
True Confession, Man, or
Fantastic Science Fiction.
Student Government is
a combination of the bizarre
and the bloody, the false and
the true, the hopelessness of a
cold bleak dawn in the Plaza
of the Americans and the warm
glowing sunsets in Beta Woods.
The truth of the matter is,
and the truth that has never
been told, is that Student
Government is a seething bed of
lust, corruption, savage
back stabbing and raging

centuries of scientific, technical
political, and econoidc
development, the young, developing
nations are challenged to cover
this time range from the feudal
age to the space age in a short
time in order to adjust themselves
to the 20th. century.
EDUCATION THE PRESSING
PROBLEM. One of the most
pressing problems of the
developing countries is education.
Technical skill and knowledge have
been* the basis on which the
development of the industrialized
countries has taken place. In many
parts of the world however, the
technical skill of the labor force
is totally inadequate to fullfill the
tasks ahead. .Illiteracy is very
widespread. UNESCO gives the
following figures for 1950: Haiti;
89.3; India, 82.1; Egypt, 74.5;
Brazil, 51.4; Bolivia, 68.9;
Guatemala, 70.3% of the population
above ten years of age being
illiterate. Though there is
progress being made, the
percentage of children enrolled in
schools is still very low in many
of the developing countries.
This low educational standard
along with the lack of technical
skill not only hinders the devel development
opment development of many countries towards
a modern state with a functioning
administration and democratic
system of western type, but has

immorality.
Student Government is run by
the most decadent, sneaky
students on campus. Decisions
are made in back-rooms of beer
parlors and fraternity houses,
and the back bedrooms of off offcampus
campus offcampus apartments.
From the disheveled
publications' staff in the Florida
Union basement to the suave
politicos who haunt the Law
School by day and the back
alleys of Gainesville by night,
those who wield the power in
Student Government know what
it means to conive.
UF Student Government is only
a small cog in the nationwide
syndicate of student governments
manned by the corrupters of
youth. Student Government is
subsidized by purveyors of evil
products.
Student government workers
drink;
Student Government workers
smoke!
Student Government workers
neck!
Student Government workers
drive fast!
Student Government is aimed
at leading students to Lauderdale
in the spring, New York in the
fall, and to eating crackers in
bed.
Students, unite! Do not let
Student Government lead you
down the primrose path. . do
not let Student Government lead
you astray.
Go astray by yourself!

its impact also on economic
development.
POVERTY AND SOCIAL
STRUCTURE. In many of the
countries in question the static
stability of traditional social
structure, determined by a
distinct cultural and religious
pattern, has been broken up,
superimposed by westernization
or is in a process of change. In
fact, the adjustment to the technical
age does require changes in the
infrastructure of many socieltes.
While such social revolutions are
in progress, energies are set free
and can be channeled for useor
misuse. They can be used to bring
about the change which is best
for that particular country, or
they can be misused for the
benefit of a foreign ideology.
Feudalism still is in existence
in many areas. The fact that most
of the low-income countries have
a percentage of agriculture
population higher than that of the
world average and far higher than
that of western industrialized
countries makes an effective
agrarian reform both a social
and economic necessity. (UN
estimates for the percentage of
agriculture population of the whole
population; World, 55%; Africa,
66%; Asia, 50%; USA, 14%; Europe,
33%; some countries up to 90%) In
areas where 10% of the people own
90% of the land, the gap between
the large number of people existing
on subsistence level and a small
very wealthy group which controlls
the entire circulation of money,
creates an unsound and unjust
distribution of the national income
low as it is.
The average daily intake of
calories is well below the
subsistence level for more than
two-thirds of the world's
population, and most of these
people lack an adequate supply of
of proteins, minerals and vitamins.
Although the recognized minimum
requirement is 2200 Calories per
day, the average Indian consumes,
1860; the average Peruvian, 1970
Calories daily; compared to an
average consumption of more than
3000 Calories in the USA and
western European countries, (UN
figures for 1959/60.).
Undernourishment and lack of
medical care are reflected in
the low lifetime expectency (in
many areas half of what western
people can expect) and high death
rate of infants (In 1960 death
rate for children tinder 1 year
of age: in Brazil, 17.0%; Tan Tanganyika,
ganyika, Tanganyika, 17.0%; India, 14.6%;
compared to USA 2.5%; and
Swpded, 1.6% (UNESCO figures).
LETTERS
All letters to the editor should)
be addressed to the Florida Alli Alligator,
gator, Alligator, Florida Union Building, and 1
should preferably be typewritten
on 8-1/2" by 11 paper, although
letters not conforming to these
above standards will be accepted.
Every letter submitted must be
signed, but names will be withheld
upon request.



BOARD OF CONTROL LETTER

Why Florida Adopted The Trimester System

(EDITOR'S NOTE. . Today,
in another of a series of
informative articles concerning
the trimester system, we are
reprinting in toto the text of the
letter received by Student Body
Inspector-General Warren Spiller
from .the State Board of Control,
answering questions pertaining to
the trimester which Spiller asked
the Board in an earlier letter.)
Mr. Warren Spiller
Inspector General
Student Body
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida
Dear Mr. Spiller:
Dr. Culpepper received your
letter of March 7 in which you
requested answers to several
questions related to the adoption
of the trimester plan of year yearround
round yearround operation. Dr. Culpepper
has asked me, as present
chairman of the Inter-
Institutional Committee on the
Trimester Operation, to respond
to your letter. I am very much
pleased to do so. Your concern
is appreciated.
I shall first deal with your
numbered questions.
1. WHY WAS THE TRIMESTER
SYSTEM CHOSEN OVER THE
QUARTER SYSTEM, WHICH HAS
ALREADY BEEN PROVEN AT
MANY UNIVERSITIES ACROSS
THE NATION?
The Council of Presidents and
the Board of Control
recommended the trimester plan
after studying the problem of
how best to place the University
System on a year-round basis.
The Legislature of 1961 re required
quired required that the State University
System adopt a year-round
calendar and begin its operation
by September, 1962. A committee
made up of representatives of
all of the universities of the
System, immediately undertook
a thorough study of the various
alternative types of year-round
calendars; they recommended the
trimester calendar.
In examining the work of that
committee I find the following
unique advantages of the
trimester plan to have figured
in the decision to recommend
it:
(a) The trimester plan required
less course and curriculum re reorganization
organization reorganization than would have been
necessary if the quarter system
had been adopted.
(This was a most important
consideration in view of the fact
the Legislature required the
adoption of a year-round plan
by September of 1962.)
(b) The trimester plan
eliminates the post-Christmas
lame-duck season.
(c) The trimester calendar can
provide for three full 15-week
trimesters; in the quarter system
it is practically impossible to
achieve four full 12-week
quarters in the calendar year.
(d) The trimester calendar was
the calendar most easily adapted
to the semester plan of operation;
thus less re-engineering of the
entire University System
Operation was required.
(e) The trimester system
would provide for a longer period
of employment for those students
who would not enroll in one
trimester each year in order
to work to earn funds needed to
finance college attendance.
(f) The trimester system
makes it possible for faculty
members to take vacations other
than in the summer.
2. THUS FAR, HAS THE
TRIMESTER SYSTEM LIVED UP
TO THE EXPECTATIONS OF
THOSE WHO INITIATED IT? HAVE
ANY UNEXPECTED PROBLEMS
ARISEN?

We have not completed a year
of operation under the trimester
plan. Any knowledge we have of
its effects at this moment is
very preliminary. The first part
of your question could only be
answered on the basis of the
data yielded from one (1)
trimester of operation. However
it can be said with full confidence
that we do not have knowledge
today which would lead us to
say the trimester plan has not
lived up to the expectations of
those who initiated it. The
common sense of the matter
is simply that no one has the
knowledge necessary to answer
definitively, the question posed.
With reference to the second
part of query No. 2, I do not
know of any significant problems
which have arisen thus far which
were not some degree forecast.
t
3. HAS ANY LENGTH OF TIME
BEEN SET AT WHICH THE
RESULTS OF THE SYSTEM ARE
TO BE ANALYZED? IF SO, WHAT
IS THE TIME?
Evaluation of the trimester
operation in all of its con conceivable
ceivable conceivable aspects is being
planned. The Inter-institutional
Committee on Trimester
Operation has developed the
broad outlines of a
comprehensive two-year study of
the effects of the trimester plan.
We are at this moment in the
final stages of preparing a
proposal which will be used in
seeking foundation assistance in
making this study. The
installation of the trimester
calendar in an entire State
University System is another
first for Florida in American
education. Our experience with
the trimester calendar has past
implications for higher education
all over the country. We are
confident we will be able to
secure assistance in financing
the study.

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The study as it is conceived
today would use data to be
yielded from the six (6) trimester
periods, September, 1962,
through August, 1964. For com comparisons
parisons comparisons with operations under
the semester calendar, data will
be gathered for the four (4)
semester periods, September,
1960, through August, 1962.
I
4. HAVE ANY PROVISIONS
BEEN MADE FOR A CHANGE
IN THE SYSTEM, SHOULD IT
PROVE DISADVANTAGEOUS? IF
SO, WHAT ARE THEY?
On the basic assumption that
there is no procedure, no
calendar, no method which cannot
be improved if enough
intelligence is focused upon it,
we expect improvements to be
made in the trimester operation.
Scientific method and the
reflective attitude, by their
nature, require us to locate and
eradicate the bugs in the
trimester operation. If, after
extending our best efforts to
intelligently adapt the trimester
system to the State University
System, it should develop that
this calendar has Inherent defects
that cannot be remedied by our
best intelligence, then lam
confident that appropriate
alternatives would be weighed
and considered.
The study mentioned above
would be of great help to the
universities in accomplishing a
respectably scientific
shakedown of the trimester
plan in our System.
5. IN GENERAL, WHAT WOULD
BE THE FEASIBILITY OF
SHIFTING INTO A QUARTER
SYSTEM?
The question could be read
to assume that the trimester
plan has been thoroughly and
reflectively Installed and refined,
and that it has been found to be
inherently defective. Os course,

The Florida Alligator Thursday, March 28, 1963

it is too early and much too
much work remains to be done
before it could be decided that
it would be desirable to shift
to any other system. However,
with respect to the feasibility
of the quarter plan, I shall list
some of the considerations which
were felt to weigh against the
quarter system.
(1) To achieve year-round
operation by using a quarter
system of four twelve-week
terms would be very difficult.
A study of quarter system
calendars in institutions where
the system is used will reveal
that usually the fall quarter is
twelve weeks in length, but that
the winter and spring quarters
are often about ten weeks. This
is not desirable from the
academic point of view.
(2) To adopt a quarter system
in the State University System
would require such changes as
the following:
(a) A reconstruction of our
present semester courses to
adjust them to the shorter term;
(b) A reconstruction of budget
and fiscal methods and
procedures;
(c) A set of solutions to the
problems of the students who
wish to work part of the year
in order to earn money to
finance their attendance in
college;
(d) A set of solutions to
problems of vacation and other
leave for faculty members;
(e) Reconstruction of plan of
curricula offerings around the
year.
(3) The financial planning
for the 1963-65 biennium has
been done in terms o f the
trimester system; any change
, should be made at the beginning
of a new biennium.
With reference to personal
opinions which we have about
the trimester plan of year-round
operations, let me say that it
is felt that Florida men and
women attending the several

state universities give us cause
to be heartened with respect to
whether the trimester plan will
be tested in a genuinely
enthusiastic, reflective and open*
minded way. The faculties and
administrations of the several
institutions, along with students,
in our opinion, are determined
to make the plan achieve its
purposes, or to determine clearly
and impasslonately, the reason
why it will not achieve its
purposes.
In closing, let me congratulate
you on your letter. Please let
us know if there are other ways
in which we can be helpful.
Herbert F. Stallworth
Assistant Director
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Page 7



Page 8

1 The Florldo Alligotor Thursday, March 28, 1963

Pfeiffer Killed, 27-1

By MARTY STONE
Staff Writer
Florida's Gator baseball team
scoring nine runs in the second
inning and eight runs in the third,
finally downed the Pfeiffer Fal Falcons
cons Falcons 27-1 yesterday at Perry
Field.
Florida hits the road this week weekend
end weekend to play the University of Geor Georgia
gia Georgia in two very important South Southeastern
eastern Southeastern Conference games. Head
Coach, Dave Fuller, remarked that
he hoped the Gators had saved a

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few runs for Georgia. Florida has
scored 59 runs in their last three
games.
The Gators banged out 19 hits,
including a two run homer by right rightfielder
fielder rightfielder Bernie Haskins and a grand
slam homer by leftfielder Earl
Montgomery. Haskins, who also
tripled and singled, was top man
in the runs-batted-in department
with six.
Gator pitcher, Niel McMillan,
went the route, allowing one
run on six hits, striking out five
and only walking one.

Bill Parker, the Falcons start starting
ing starting and losing pitcher, gave up
12 runs on seven hits and seven
walks. Neil Shouse relieved
Parker in the third inning, coming
in with the bases loaded and no
outs. On Shouses second pitch,
batter Earl Montgomery hit his
grand slam home run.
Shouse was relieved in the eighth
inning after he was shelled for 12
runs on 15 hits. He walked 11
batters and threw wild pitches.
Ron Pare retired the last two
batters in the eighth.
Pfeiffer collected its only run in
the fourth inning. Second base baseman
man baseman Harold McManus lead off with
a triple and scored, after two
were out, when first baseman Dick
Pine singled to left field.

Gridders Slate
Final Drill
Florida's football Ga Gators
tors Gators will bid farewell to
action tonight in a
game -type scrimmage
set for p.m. in Florida
Field.

Relay Conditions
Ideal For Vault

John Pennel, who set a world record in the pole vault last weekend,
will find conditions ideal for reaching even greater heights Saturday
at the Florida Relays here.

The Northwest Louisiana State
athlete, whose vault of 16 feet
3 inches in the Memphis
AAU Relays Saturday broke a mark
of 16- 1/2 held by Petti Nikula
of Finland, will be in the Florida
Relays field which will
start vaulting at 1:30 p.m.
Saturday.
He will find a situation which will
suit him for any reasons. The
asphalt runway developed by
Florida track coach Percy Beard
gives an advantage to all vaulters,
especially to one like Pennel.
Its big advantage lies in the
fact it will not cutup, said Beard.
This is an event where you haVe
all contestants using the same
stretch of straightaway and this
naturally creates a great deal of
wear and tear.
As the average runway cuts up,
it becomes slower and cuts down
on a vaulters ability to pick up

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Fullback Spot
Poses 'Problem

By GEORGE MIMS
Sports Writer
Head football coach Ray Graves
has a problem at fullback, but
probably chuckles gleefully every
time he thinks about it.
The problem is whether to start
Larry Dupree, the sophomore of
the year in the Southeastern Con Conference
ference Conference and potential all-American
candidate next fall or veteran Jim
ODonnell who is slated to be the
monster in the Floridas new
monster" defense.
*irnr
DUPREE
Graves worked on the problem
recently by putting Dupree on
offense and ODonnell on defense.
Dupree, a 5-11, 195-pound
junior, was honorable mention all-

proper speed."
This is more important to Pennel
than to the average vaulter,
according to his track coach at
Northwest Louisiana, Bob
Groseclose.
"John isnt as tall (5-11) as
the average outstanding vaulter,"
said Groseclose. However, hes
got better speed down the runway
and better action on the pole than
any vaulter Ive ever seen."
Pennel will also be after a
Florida Relays record held by a
high school teammate at Coral
Gables, former Gator vaulting
great Henry Wadsworth.
Wadsworth vaulted 15-1/4 in
1960 for the current Relays record.
You kpow," muses Beard,
Our standards wont even go to
16 feet now. It looks as if well
have to get some blocks because
we appear to be a little behind
times as far as Pennel is
concerned."

Last In Grid Series

America last year and the leading
ground gainer in the SEC with
604 yards in 113 carries. Dupree,
who was recently married, played
both fullback and halfback last
year.
j '**!
He has speed, power and good
balance," said offensive coach
Pepper Rodgers.
Senior veteran, ODonnell, was
the starting fullback last year on
the Big Blue (offensive) unit. He
will provide depth and experience
to the position as the second lead leading
ing leading scorer and runner on the team
behind Dupree." said defensive
backfield coach Jimmy Dunn.
He was considered by the coach coaching
ing coaching staff as one of the team
standouts in almost every game
lasl year and an excellent line linebacker
backer linebacker with real drive for the
tough yardage.
Others that will play key roles
in the fullback picture next year
are senior Willie Lager of Daytona
Beach and junior Russ Mercer
of Tampa. Both have shown
great Improvement as defensive
cornerbacks tnd will be giving;
ODonnell a great race so the NO. I
position," reported Dunn.
Butts Called
Known Gam biers
ATLANTA (UPI)-Attorney Gen General
eral General Eugene Cook, investigat investigating
ing investigating an alleged Southeastern Con Conference
ference Conference football scandal, said
yesterday that Walley Butts tele telephoned
phoned telephoned known gamblers shortly be before
fore before the 1962 football game between
Georgia and Alabama.
Cook emphasized there was no
evidence that Butts profited from
any gambling on the game.
The Georgia attorney general is
conducting a sweeping investiga investigation
tion investigation into a study published in the
Saturday Evening Post that Butts
telephoned secret informa information
tion information about the Georgia team to
Alabama Coach f>aul Bear Bryant
shortly before the Alabama-Geor Alabama-Georgia
gia Alabama-Georgia season opener in Birm Birmingham
ingham Birmingham Alabama, favored by 17
points, won 35-0.
THERE
ARE NO
SECRETS
FROM
From The Man Who
Examines This Can
UN-AD INC. .2