Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
The Florida
Alligator

V 01.55, No. 106 The University of Florida, Gainesville Friday, March 15, 1963

Gator Gras Opens
On Saturday Night

Gator Gras gets off to a flying
start at 7 p.m. Saturday at the
University Auditorium lawn with
an aerial barrage including
everything but the kitchen sink.
Pies, eggs, potatoes, darts,
water ballons and even spaghetti
should keep everybodys pitching
flipper busier than a beaver
gnawing at a fireplug, says Gras
Chairman Wilson Atkinson.
Sigma Phi Epsilon will hold an
egg throw. The Delta Gammas
will be tossing around pies and
Kappa Deltas try out their luck
in flinging some spaghetti.
Losers from the past student
body election will be the target
of darts hurled at pictures of
campus politicians.
If a student takes a date and
Pearson Sets
Talk Tonite
Drew Pearson, nationally known
syndicated columnist, will go
Behind the Scenes with Kennedy
and Khrushchev to night in a public
lecture here.
Speaking at 8:15 in the
University Auditorium, Pearson is
being sponsored by the Forums
Committee of the Florida Union
Activities Board.
Orange Peel
Still on Sale
Not quite 1,000 copies of the
slew Orange Peel of an ordered
4,000, were left after sales of
the magazine began yesterday.
According to Editor Marcello
Truzzi, sales will continue today.
Truzzi expects to unload the
remaining copies in today's sales.
The New Peel may be
purchased at the Hub, the library,
Matherly and Peabodyfor 25 cents.
The Peel returned to campus
yesterday with a new format
including humor and satire,
literature and art, features and
opinions, after a years absence
under an administrative ban.
The New Orange Peel is
aimed specifically at UF students
and serves as an outlet for original
and creative student work, said
Truzzi.
Sororities
Plan Drill
For the first time in UF history
sorority houses will participate
in fire drills.
Maxine Taylor, Delta Phi
Epsilon, working with campus
Police Chief A. L. Shuler said
a mass fire drill for all sororities
will be held soon.
Chief Shuler has been checking
fire safety devices in each
sorority house and compiled a
list of deficiencies for each house.
The main complaint was the
lack of a modern fire extinguisher
at many of the houses. Ancient
models are now being replaced.
Fire escapes were found to be
satisfactory.

gets bored, he can lock her up
in Graham Areas jail!
Prizes will be given away during
the course of the evening. Gras
officials will call out numbers
from tickets bought at the gate.
Top prize is a dinner-date with
the new Gator Gras sweetheart,
who will be announced during the
Sir
itfoA
\ / ***** jjjr-f
. v \
it . I
l I
SANDY TAYLOR
. . exhibits the new
Angel Flight uniforms.
FBK Eleds
Gardner Prexy
Steve Gardner, second-year law
student, is the newly elected
president of Florida Blue Key,
UF mens leadership honorary.
He ran unopposed.
A member of Pi Lambda Phi
fraternity, Gardner will serve until
December 1963.
Vice president is Mike
Jamieson. Bruce Culpepper is
secretary, and Elder Sumner is
treasurer.
Moot Court
Edward Moore and Burl George
took top honors in the UF Law
School Moot Court Competition
held here this week.
Moore, 3LW, took first place
as the best individual speaker,
after he and George defeated Steve
Gardner, 3LW, and Larry Stewart
4LW, in the finals Wednesday night.
Twenty six students comprising
13 teams originally entered the
local competition which began
Monday.
The final team, which will
include four debaters, will be
announced Monday. The team will
compete against other Florida law
schools in Miami Beach May 1.

evening.
In addition, there will be a
talent show in the University
Auditorium at 8:30.
The show will consist of 13
acts including such performers
as folksinging Southgate Singers;
The Jokers, a band whosq
speciality is Greenback Dollar
Bill Pettit, a ballad singer, and
Marilyn Yulesman and Marty
Schuman, who won the Florida
Union folksinging contest.
Larry Rosen, assistant talent
show chairman, said, This year
the talent show should be greatly
improved over last years. Some
of the acts are really excellent.
We have all worked very hard
to put together a program that
will be a lot of fun, said
Atkinson.
Profs Receive
Free Tax Aid
Students enrolled in one or more
courses in the College of Business
Administration can get their
Federal Income Tax returns
prepared free by members of Beta
Alpha Psi.
The honorary accounting
fraternity and the accounting
department will begin the second
Federal Income Tax Internship
program on Tuesday. Students
majoring in accounting will
prepare returns.
Interviews for those swing this
service will be held on Tuesday
and Thursday from 2-4 p.m.,
until April 12. Applicants may
make appointments in Matherly
Hall 17.
Students should bring his I.D.
card, a copy of the previous years
income tax return if one was filed,
his social security card and
information concerning income and
deductions.
The program is under the
supervision of ErhartG. Peterson,
associate professor of accounting.
'Playboy
Party Set
Graham area has an extra for
their Playboy party tonight. A
Playmate calendar featuring 12
UF coeds will go on sale for
50? at the party.
The coeds are Penny Skordas,
Quinn Flood, Betsy Rumps, Lee
Magee, Martha Warrender, Linda
Slade, Judy Harland, Jeanne Lucas,
Carolyn Williams, Sandy Stovall,
Sue Miller, and Charlene Glasser.
The exclusive Key Club will be
downstairs. Dress for the night
club atmosphere is coat and tie
and dresses. To enter, men must
purchase a special Playboy key
for 50?. Three floor shows will
be featured and bunny hostesses
will serve as barmaids and
cigarette girls.
Special drinks for the occasion
include the Tom Rawlings, Saylor
Sizzl'er, Brian Broiler, and the
Yulee Coolie.
Upstairs, a more casual
atmosphere has been arranged with
a rock and roll band. Bur mud as
and long pants are permissible.

Bryant Hits Plan
Boosting Board
Power on Funds

Gov. Farris Bryant said
yesterday he would be unwilling
to approve the Florida space era
education study committees
recommendation that the
legislature give the State Board
of Control power to spend all funds
appropriated to state universities.
Im not sure it would be a
good thing, Bryant told his news
conference. I recognize it would
be an opportunity for the board
of control to achieve its goals,
but Im not willing to go that far."
The governor said the
legislature should outline its
educational goals for the board
of control and provide the board
with the machinery for reaching
them.
Bryant said he would favor board
members being appointed for
longer terms, but he said it did

Sen. Cross Speaks
Sunday to SELL

Alachua County State Sen. Emory
J. (Red) Cross speaks Sunday at
a meeting for persons working on
the Student Educational Legislative
Lobby (SELL).
The meeting will begin at 2
p.m. in Florida Union Auditorium.
The meeting will concern a
detailed discussion of the report
on the FlorldaSpace Era Education
Study (SEES) presented last
Monday in Tallahassee to the Third
Governors Conference on Higher
Education.
All committee members and
workers will be given information

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GRAHAM BUNNIES
. waiting to please students at the Playboy party
tonight are, from left, Carolyn Williams, Betsy Rumps
and Charlene Glasser.

not matter whether they were
appointed by the governor or the
State Board of Education.
It depends," Bryant said, on
whether one feels that the governor
or the Board of Education members
are more expressive of the desires
of the people."
Bryant said he would not favor
the board of control being placed
under political control, as this
would mean removing it from the
control of the voters.
Commenting on his plans for
financing university construction,
he said the state should meet the
needs of higher education now.
I dont believe there will be
any member of the legislature
who will quarrel with the idea
of going forward, Bryant added.
The questions is whether to put
the heavy burden on current taxes
or spread it out over coming years.

for presentation to their
legislators.
According to SELL Chairman
John Strickland, representatives
are expected to be here from
similar programs at Florida State
University and University of South
Florida.
It seems to me that the SEES
report represents an opportunity
for the greatest stride forward in
higher education in our state since
the creation of Ihe university
system itself in 1905," Strickland
said. It is important that all
county representatives and policy
committee members are present
at the meeting."



The Florida Alligator Friday, March 15, 1963

Page 2

Girl Murals For Summer

A summer trimester girls
intramurals system will definitely
be planned, according to Carol
Brashears, intramural swimming
manager.
We were unable to have
swimming this fall because of the
weather, and this trimester it
would run too close to finals. A
swimming program will be planned
for this summer, said Miss
Brashears.
The summer competition will
probably be between independent
teams only, said intramural
student director Carolyn
Pogo Sticks?
Australian kangaroos on
campus?
No, only Alpha Delta Pi (ADPi)
pogo races Saturday night at the
Gator Gras carnival. However,
the ADPis cant find any pogo
sticks, and would appreciate any
information where pogo sticks
could be rented or borrowed.

STUDYING LATE?
Open 'til 4a.m. Thur, Fri, Sat.
King Burger
303 N.W. 13th St. Ph. 2-0388^535*

Penned pretty SPORTSWEAR
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Jamaica SETS
JAMAICA AND SHIRT
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<9
Matthews.
I doubt if enough sorority
members will be here to compete
as a team.
This year there have been
sixteen independent teams
consisting of dorm areas, women womenoff-campus,
off-campus, womenoff-campus, the Newman Club, and
the Order of Athena.
The girls intramurals program
is run on a point system with 150
points for the winner of a major
sport, such as volleyball and 120
points sos a minor sporffspch as
bowling. Jy
Hop Scheduled
Tonite at Hub
A Gator Hop will be held tonight
from 8:30 to 12:30 in the Student
Service Center (Hub).
The Playboys will provide
musical entertainment and the
snack bar will be open downstairs
in the Hub. Dress is casual and
admission is free.

gaioi (pi

KAY WILLIAMS
o . Today's Gator Girl is
a sophomore transfer from
the University of South
Floridao Kay, who was re recently
cently recently elected sweetheart
of Delta Chi fraternity,
is planning to major in
English. A native of Winter
Haven, Kay is engaged to
Delta Chi Bill Tisdale.

UF Given Grant
To Study Defects

Two new grants totalling $57,915
from the National Foundation-March
of Dimes have been awarded to
expar.a the program and services
of the special Birth Defects Center
at the UFs J. Hillis Miller Health
Center.
The double grant was announced
jointly yesterday by College of
Medicine Dean George T. Harrell,
and Basil OConnor, president of
The National Foundation. The
three-way program for patient care,
research and teaching is under the
direction of Dr. Melvin Greer,
assistant professor of pediatrics
and medicine (neurology) in the
College of Medicine.
The new unit, to be known as a
Birth Defects Clinical Study Center,
is the seventh such center
established in the U.S. by The
National Foundation-March of
Dimes.
The research got under way a
year ago with the establishment
of a Birth Defects Special Treatment
Center with funds awarded by
Alachua and other Florida county
chapters amounts to $32,915.
The money, donated by Floridians
to help the March of Dimes fight
against birth defects, will be used
primarily for providing care and
treatment for babies and young
children born with congenital
abnormalities and disease.
The second grant, for $25,000,
is from the foundations national
headquarters. With these funds
the center will expand its clinical
research, continue to seek new and
better methods of treating patients
with birth defects, and intensify
its program of teaching and
demonstrating up-to-date treatment
techniques to medical personnel.
The hospital and clinics here
constitute a major center to which
physicians in Florida and
neighboring states refer problem
patients, Greer said.
An increasing proportion of
children who come to us this way
have structural defects or metabolic
diseases caused either by hereditary
factors or by something that went
wrong during pregnancy, and these

Ten Receive Wilson Grants

A record number of top-ranking
UF students won ten coveted
fellowships yesterday from the
Woodrow Wilson National
Fellowship Foundation.
The fellowships are awarded
annually to recruit the nation's top
academic talent into college
teaching.
Announcement of the 1,475
fellowships awarded nationally was
made by Foundation pres. Hugh
Wilson.
The fellowships cover tuition and
fees for the first year at the graduate
school of the fellows choice, plus
a stipend of $1,500 and dependency
allowances.
The 10, largest number in UFs
history, are: Thomas Anthony of
Pittsburgh, to continue his study
of physics; Thomas R. Banks, of
Washington, D.C., for the study of
sociology; Jack S. Blocker of
Arlington, Va., history and Ann
F. Dryden of Flora City political
science.

The United States
Department of Labor
CAREERS for graduates with BA,MA,or PhD in:
Economics
Statistics
Business Administration
Industrial Relations
Law
' s $3/565, $5,540 or $6,675 per year
INTERVIEWS on campus

patients represent one of our
greatest medical Challenges today.
Many have complex problems
requiring the medical team
approach, utilizing the services of
specialists from several different
medical and surgical disciplines,
he said.
A broad and intensive teaching
program is expected to make it
possible for doctors, nurses,
therapists, other specialists and
students to learn first hand, at the
bedside of the patients, about the
diagnoses and treatment for children
with birth malformations and
disorders.
In research, Dr. Greer and his
associates will concentrate
particularly on abnormalities in
body chemistry found in patients
with certain birth defects.
Included will be study of diseases
in which defective metabolism leads
to brain damage and retardation.
In hereditary blood disorders they
will investigate the fundamental
basis for the elaboration of abnormal
cells and the effects of specialized
therapy on these cells.
In a form of dwarfism which
affects connective tissue, they will
study drug therapy and will also
investigate heart ailments suffered
by some patients with this hereditary
disorder.
They will conduct family studies
in connection with a number of
allergic diseases in which
hereditary factors are believed to
play a part, including rhemumatoid
arthritis.
They will investigate appearance
of unusual cells in the blood of
children who have apparent virus
infections, specifically roseola,
German measles, ECHO virus
infections and infectious
mononucleosis. There may be an
hereditary basis for this peculiar
reaction to virus attacks, Dr. Greer
said.
The team will study defects in
body chemistry related to specific
tumors and evaluate the effects of
anti-metabolites on the ability to
alter the chemistry of the tumors.

Also receiving the fellowships
are Frederick O. Goddard of
Naples, economics; Rosemary. Lamb
of Gainesville, classics; William
Putnam of West Hollywood, Russian;
Daniel S. Smith of Bradenton,
history; Judith C. Spurlock of
Gainesville, Spanish, and Michael
D. Taylor of Cocoa, mathematics.
Dr. Alton C. Morris, campus
representative to the foundation,
credited the UF's new high honors
program with having helped garner
the record number of fellowships.
Previous high was six.
There has been an upgrading
of academics nationally, he said.
But I believe this recognition
reflects a particularly significant
increase here.
Four Florida State University apd
five University of Miami students
received the fellowships.
UF students receiving honorable
mention are Louis Herman of Miami,
Lyndel Larsen of Gainesville and
Wallace Swan of Delray Beach.



The Florida Alligator Friday, March 15, 1963 F

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...is practiced by Dan Honeywell on unidentified subject in the new ROTC program.
Student Claims Hate
For Numbers / Reds

(EDITORS NOTE: This is the
first in a two-part series of
articles on the Cuban Revolution
in 1958. Caesar Gonzmart is a
freshman at the U F who has stepped
from warfare to an academic
career and is planning to major
in political science. He is head
of the Gator Raider Unit of the
Army R.0.T.C.)
By 808 THOMAS
Caesar Gonzmart hates two
thingscommunists and numbers.
Born in Cuba of American
parents, the tall, dark and
handsome UF political science
major in his first year here as
a student has been waging war
against the tyrannical regimes of
Batista and Fidel Castro since
he was 12-years-old.
And after having waged guerilla
warfare with Castros rebel army
against Batista and later against
Castro himself, Gonzmart is now
a guest consultant for the ROTC
new counter-insurgency unit-the
Gator Raiders.
Gonzmart bulks at giving his age.
since people will look down on him.
Adults scorn college students
because theyre young. Some of
the most heroic actions Ive ever
seen were done by college students
and young people. It is not the
age that counts, but the individual.
I hate numbers-they mean little.
But I hate communists more.
Gonzmart started his battle for
democracy in 1952 shortly after
Batista took over Cuba. He became
acquainted with several University
of Havana students, leaders of a
liberal anti-Batista group later to
be known as the Directorio
Revolucionario-13 de Marzo. This
name stemmed from their ill illfated
fated illfated March 13, 1957, attack on
Batistas presidential palace.
In 1956 the Havana police chief
led his forces and a group of
Batista soldiers in an attack on
the campus, killing several
students and professors.
Soon afterwards eightof
Gonzmarts student friends
attacked the Havana 16th precinct
police station to protest the deaths.
Three of these students
-e arrested and later found

GUERRILLA WARFARE

assassinated.
Their bodies were mutilated/
said Gonzmart, One was
castrated, another had his fingers
cut off, the third had his eyes
gouged out. This was common
practice under Batista. If you were
arrested and thrown in prison, the
least that would happen to you was
to have your fingernails pulled
out.
Many Americans dont realize
why Cubans fought against Batista,
he led a brutal regime."
A year later the March 13 group
attacked the presidential palace
in an attempt to kill Batista. The
youths were armed with gernades
and machine guns partially
supplied by some Dominican
Republic army officers.
Gonzmart, who waited in a truck
the group planned to escape in
recalls, Batista was on the third
floor. The boys made it only to
the second floor. They had to get
through several doors to the third
floor, but the gernades to open
the doors would not explode.
Batista soldiers arrived and
fighting broke out. Only five boys
managed to escape with their
lives."
Two of these came to the U.S.
to solicit aid. The other three
fled to the mountains of Las Villas
Province where they established
guerilla bands to fight the Batista
soldiers.
At this time, Castro, who had
been a candidate for the Cuban
congress when Batista took over
and canceled the election, was 300
miles away in Oriente Province
leading a guerilla band known as
the 26th of July group.
As a matter of fact," he
continued, when our group of
students attacked Batistas palace
Castro was in the mountains with
his rebels and said, Who are
those children playing with guns."
A short time later, Castro sent
two trusted lieutenants, Ernesto
Che" Gvevara, and Camilo
Cienfuegos (later killed by Raul
Castro) to meet with the March
13 group.
The two rebel forces signed the
Pact of Pedrero uniting their
military force forfeatistas
overthrow and prr. mising to take

Page 3

their governmental differences to
the people at the polls after the
revolution.

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Steps To Recruit
Scholars Started

Beginning steps to recruit top
high school scholars to attend the
UF 'ill get under way today in
Jacksonville in a meeting of the
Operation Brainpower Committee,
of the Jacksonville Alumni Club.
Operation Brainpower is an
extensive program of personal
contact and counseling with
individual high school juniors
sponsored by the Alumni
Association, according to A1 V.
Alsobrook, assistant director of
Alumni Affairs.
; The top 5 per cent of the students
In each high school class is
contacted, Alsobrook said. The
advantages of the UF are presented
to them in an effort to get them
to come here.
If financial aid is needed, an
effort will be made through the
local Alumni Clubs and the Alumni
association to find scholarship
money, Alsobrook pointed out.
The Jacksonville and Gainesville
Alumni Clubs are engaged in pilot
Civil Defense
Professor Arthur Broyles will
present estimates of fallout
danger in Gainesville and the
progress of Russian civil defense
at a public meeting at
Gainesville High School at 8 p.m.
Tuesday.

STAFF POSITIONS OPFN IN
JACKSONVILLE C.P.A. FIRM
Interviews on campus, March 18, with Mr.
Carter. For accounting major graduating this
summer. Very little travel required. Arrange
for your interview with the Placement Service
of the College of Business Administration.

programs to work out problems in
the operation, Alsobrook said. It
will be a statewide effort in its
final organization, he added.
Held in conjunction with and prior
to the committee meeting, will be
an alumnl-sponsored breakfast for
UF alumni attending the Florida
Educational Association convention
this week.
GET IT OVER
with
Gator Classifieds



Page 4

I The Florida Alligator Friday, March 15, 1963

8 ACADEMY AWARD f
a>< jjOMWATIONS I
i GREGORY PECK
Best Picture, Actor director,
Supporting Actress,Art Di-
I ll | rection, Cinematography,
Musical Score,Screenplay
-* ***- ** -
FLORIDA UNION
FILMS COMMITTEE
PRESENTS /
'MZsue
FRIDAY & SUNDAY DEBORAH KERR
7 and 9:30 p.m. 1
SUNDAY & MONDAY
\ a *' p.m. only
Q|y TOPPEDORUM'
v i y glennford
ERNEST BORGNINE
Florida Union Auditorium
Saturday! Shows!"*
lit At.. .1:00-4:40-8:20
KM LOVK IS A MANY- ***]
THIMO IB
KIDDIE SHOW
EVERY SATURDAY 10:00 A.M.
Featuring:.MOVlES, GAMES, PRIZES
CONTESTS & CARTOON CARNIVALS
(SPONSORED BY i. M. FIELDS)
Get FREE |
TICKETS at
J. M. FIELDS
Feature Mowe front ttoge of
gMSama^
Srirz^ls

Summer Jobs
Open After
Term Start
The time for students to apply
for part time jobs is after the
summer trimester begins on April
29.
No predictions as to the number
and kind of jobs available can be
made before then, administration
officials report.
*We don't want crowds of students
coming over to apply for employment
until after the trimester begins,
Dean of Student Affairs Hayes K.
McClelland said.
McClelland estimates between 10
and 12 per cent of the total student
enrollment are regularly placed in
jobs on or off campus.
If student enrollment for the
summer trimester is 8,000 then we
should be able to place 800 students.
If enrollment is only 3,500, then
only 350 jobs will be open,
McClelland said.
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Jane Howard Russ
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SATURDAY 3 HITS
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2nd Smash Action Hit
Clark Gable
Marilyn Monroe
"MISFITS'
3rd Color Family Hit
Frank Sinatra
HOlf iM THE HEAD"
Sunday-Monday,
Mar. 17-18
2 Hit .Thrill &Lass Show
Doris Day James Cagney
joVEMfoR LEAVE ME"
2nd Action Thriller
Clark Gable
Barbara Stanwyck
x QZB>ftoTWHm$"

A THOUSANDS I.AUDHS... A THOUSAND TSARS \
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?Hit Year!

GATOR CLASSIFIED
CLASSIFIED ADS ARE A VALUABLE SERVICE TO ALL
WHEN YOU CALL ABOUT THE ADS ON THIS PAGE,
PLEASE MENTION YOU SAW IT IN THE GATOR


Personal___J

ORANGE LAKE DRIVE IN
THEATRE Saturday and Sunday
Hatari starring John Wayne.
18 miles South on 441 -Concession
Stand. $1.25 carload. (J-106 -It-p).
I. Q. TESTS. Accurate,
home administered,
professionally scored. Research
data needed. University Testing
Institute, R-39, Box 6744, Stanford,
Calif. (J-105-3t-p).

I Autos I

For Rent

RENTALS house and
apartments. Furnished and
unfurnished in all sections of
Gainesville. Contact Wayne Mason,
c/o Arnold Realty Co. Two blocks
east of campus. 1119 West
University Avenue. FR 2-3522.
(B-102-st-c).
THREE BEDROOM HOUSE to I
lease. Three miles from Medical
Center. Call FR 2-0845 weekends
and weekdays after 3 p.m. (B (B---102-ts-c).
--102-ts-c). (B---102-ts-c).
NEW] AIR CONDITIONED
Apartments for summer. Two
room efficiency close to campus.
Utilities paid except lights. sllO
per month with 4 in Apt. SIOO
with fewer than 4. Available for
girls or boys. Call FR 6-4353.
Available for Fall trimester.
(B-106-st-c).
TWO BEDROOM furnished house,
$65 month. 1322 N.W. 3rd Avenue,
3 blocks from Matherly. Contact
Off-Campus Housing.(B-105-3t-c).
HOUSE TRAILER furnished for
2. Close to campus, ssoper month.
Call FR 6-7871 or see at 2212
SW 13th Street. (B-103-st-c).

ATTRACTIVE, clean apartments
one block from campus. Available
3rd Trimester. S7O per month.
Call FR 6-6205 after 5:30 p.m!
weekends. (B-106-st-c).

|

NO DOWN PAYMENTS VETS
Low down payments F.H.A. 23
models. 2,3 and 4 bedroom designs.
Free swim club membership.
Monthly payments from $74. High Highland
land Highland Court Manor. NE 23rd Blvd.
and Uth Terr. (1-78-ts-c).

For Sale ]

LAMBRETTA Motor Scooter.
Overhauled motor, new tire and
cables, windshield, second seat,
basket. Perfect condition. Call
FR 6-2691. (A-102-st-c).
"&OW HAVE CAR -1961 Yamaha
motor scooter, electric starter,
new battery, three geared
unbelievable power for 50 c.c.
Double seats. Jim White FR 2-
9303. (A-103-st-c).
DRUM TRAP SET Snare,
tom-tom, bass, cymbal, and
accessories. Excellent condition.
Must sell. Call Jeff Williams,
FR 2-1549. (A-103-st-p).
FOR SALE: Just in time for
the golf season. .Nearly new
set of Wilson's Patty Berg Golf
Clubs. .6 irons, 3 woods, only
SSO complete with red plaid bag.
Cost nearly SIOO new. Call FR
2-2975 or see at Flavet 3 Apt.
200-C. (A-106-ts-c).
FOR SALE BY OWNER. Two"
bedroom furnished house. N.W.
section. Convenient to shopping
center and school. $51.00 a month.
Phone FR 2-3095 after 5 p.m.
Weekdays anytime weekends.
(A-106-st-p).
FURNISHED 26 Travilite Trailer.
Located 1/2 mile west of Medical
Center on Archer Road. Full
kitchen and bath. Very clean. Good
for study, $695. Don Dalton,
FR 2-9283. (A-104-st-c).
KEYSTONE 16 mm movie camera
(Criterion A-9), in perfect
condition. Must sacrifice, $35.1105
N. W. 6th Street, FR 6-3612.
(A-105-3t-c).
AIR CONDITIONED, furnished
American trailer and cabana, full
size refrigerator, hot water
heater, range, oversize built-in
book shelves; 2 miles from campus
in Oak Grove overlooking Bivens
Arm. Congenial neighbors, needs
painting. SBOO or best offer. Move
in around finals. McClellan, FR
2-0972. (A-105-st-c).
FOR SALEi Sacrifice.
Sunbeam Trailer. 35' by 8 with
24 by 9' cabana. SI7OO. Phone
FR 2-5510. Hillcrest Trailer
Park. (A-104-st-c).
ELECTRIC PIANO Loud volume.
Ideal for Fraternity or Sorority.
Portable $195. Call FR 2-1270
after 5 p.m. Before 5 p.m. Call
FR 6-8333. (A-104-st-c).

Help Wanted

SECRETARY needed. Must be
proficient in typing and shorthand.
5 1/2 day week. Good salary and
pleasant working conditions.
Interesting work for qualified
person. Write Scruggs and
Carmichael, P.O. Box 136 or call
FR 6-5242 for an interview.
(E -106-lt-c).
HELP WANTED NOW desk
clerk, 10 p.m. to 7 a.m., also
split shifts. Accounting major
preferred. Only those remaining
in this school for at least 1 year
need apply. University Inn, U.S.
441 South, Mr. Pozin. (E -105-st-c).

Services

NESTORS TV, RADIO, HI FI
SERVICE Tubes checked free.
Free estimates. Next to Florida
Bookstore Parking-Lot. 1627 NW
LST Avenue, Phone FR 2-7326.
(M-99-20t-p).
WILL CARE FOR infants or small
children by day or night in private
home. 1406 NW sth Avenue, Phone
FBb6-8961. (M-65-ts-c).



Thespian Group Seeks
Any College Performers

You dont have to be a professional
to be a member of the UF drama
group, Florida Players.
One of the most wide-spread
misconceptions about Florida
Players than any other single group
but they dont represent the
majority, explained Henry
Swanson, speech instructor at the
UF.
We dont train for the
professional theatre, said
associate speech professor Leland
L. Zimmerman.
According to Zimmerman,
sometimes training provides a
beginning fpr work in educational
theatre.
We have a responsibility to the
campus to provide not only
entertainment but education by
means of the theater, Zimmerman
said.
Florida Players first came to the
UF campus in 1931. It operates
on a traditional point system.
The point system is prorated,
according to Zimmerman.
One point is given for every six
hours on crew. Two points are
given for a walk-on and as many
as 10 or 12 for a major role.
To become a member of Florida
Players, 25 points are needed. To
receive a key, 60 points are needed.
People in the process of earning
points are members of the
Apprentice Players, Swanson said.
National Collegiate Players is
the honorary theatrical
organization. Applications are made
through the national chapter.
Applicants must have a *B in all
theater courses and junior standing.
There are presently 18 members
of Florida Players and four in
National Collegiate Players.
Approximately one-half of
current Florida Players will be
working in summer theater this
season, said Zimmerman.
We keep a file of information
on jobs available. If talented people
apply, we are happy to recommend
them, Zimmerman said.
The former UF speech students
who went on to work in professional
theatre are Pat ONeil and Al Lewis.
O'Neil graduated from UF in late
40s. His recent works include a
role in Tennessee Williams Night
of the Iguana.
Lewis is a lighting technician
who has worked at Radio City Music
Hall and with No Time for
Sergents and Pajama Games.
The forensic program at UF
includes inter-mural forensic
competition, a high school drama
festival, a speech clinic and a
communications science laboratory.
Coedikette
Makes Debut
At Banquet
Coedikette Magazine will be
presented at the Women Students
Association (WSA) banquet April 1,
according to Editor Lea Bussey.
The magazine, sent to all incoming
coeds, contains information about
all aspects of university life that
are helpful as pre-information.
Coedikette will be mailed out
along with housing forms, but
because of the trimester we will
have the magazine ready for
presentation, Miss Bussey said.
The theme and art work of this
year's book have been done changed
from past magazines.
We've tried to keep it at the
level of a young moderns magazine
and there a few surprises, she
added.
The book is sponsored by WSA
and the dean of women's office
and is sent at no cost to incoming
girls.

-¥¥-
Bugs to Invade Stage
In Player Production
Bugs of all descriptions will raid the stage of
Norman Hall Auditorium April 3-6 when the Florida
Players produce Capeks Insect Comedy.
The play, directed by Ron Jerit, will satirize life
and society through dance, dialogue and pantomine
by a cast of more than 40 people portraying insects.
Mike Doyle will play the one human being in the
satire, a tramp through whose eyes the action is
seen.
Each act, complete within itself, will satrize a
segment of life.
Act one, entitled The Butterflies, deals with
love, and mans inability to communicate.
Act two, Creepers and Crawlers, is concerned
with the way people use others-mans injustice to
man. The parasitic ways of society are exposed.
Act three, The Ants, deals with th foolishness
or war.

.- > I in ' ' I I. M mm
Play "Crazy Questions
(Based on the hilarious book "The Question Won.")
50 CASH AWARDS A MONTH. ENTER NOW. HERES HOW:
First, think of an answer. Any answer. Then come up with RULES: The Reuben H Donnelley Corp will judge entries on the basis of
humor (up to Vs), clarity and freshness (up to Vs), and appropriateness (up
a nutty, surprising question for it, and you ve done a to Vs), and their decisions will be final. Duplicate prizes will be awarded
Crazy Question. Its the easy new way for students to in the event of ,l 1 x must be submitted in the entrant's own name. There will be 50 awards
make loot. Study the examples below; then do your own. every month, October through April Entries received during each month
Send them, with your name, address, college and class, wiH be considered for that month s awards. Any entry received after April
. 30. 1963, will not be eligible, and al! become the properly of The American
tO GET LUCKY, Box 64F, Mt. VGmOn 10, N. Y. Winning Tobacco Company. Any college student may enter the contest, except cm cmentries
entries cmentries will be awarded $25.00. Winning entries sub- ployees of The American Tobacco Company, its advertising agencies and
Reuben H. Donnelley, and relatives of the said employees. Winners will be
mitted on the inside of a Lucky Strike wrapper will get a notified by mail. Contest subject to all federal, state, and local regulations,
$25.00 bonus. Enter as often as you like. Start right now!
i V 1
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I I
THE QUESTION IS: HOW DO YOU HIT THE BULLS-EYE FOR GREAT SMOKING / XJ LeX //
TASTE? Let the-big red bulls-eye on the Lucky Strike pack be your target. Its a [ c > o ****** *
sign of fine-tobacco taste youll want to settle down and stay with. And the sign
of the most popular regular-size cigarette among college students, to boot! v
r c Product of J&nMXtean
The Florida Alligator Friday, March 15, 1963

Faculty-Alumni
Barbeque Planned

UF Facylty and alumni will hold
their traditional barbecue Saturday,
March 23, as part of the spring
assembly and reunion program
sponsored by the Alumni
Association.
Director of Alumni Affairs Bill
A. Fie mins said yesterday
reservations for the barbecue must
be made with the alumni office here
by Thursday. Local alumni and
faculty may obtain tickets from the
alumni office on campus.
A large number of alumni are
expected to return to the campus
for the spring homecoming,
according to Fleming. The annual
association business meeting will
be Saturday morning.
Other activities during the
weekend include a joint reunion
banquet honoring the classes of 1913,
1923, 1928, 1933 and 1938 on the
next day. Officers of local alumni
Quota Filled
The Florida Union group flight
to Europe will definitely leave
from New York City on June 20
as originally scheduled.
Students ,and faculty members
and their immediate families are
eligible for the round trip flight.

clubs will hold a workshop the same
Friday and be honored at a luncheon
meeting with members of the alumni
executive councils.
The alumni will attend a special
convocation Friday afternoon when
the millionth volume will be added
to the UF Library. Saturday
afternoon features the intra-squad
Orange and Blue football game.
PATRONIZE
GATOR
ADVERTISERS
THEYRE A
GOOD GROUP

Page 5



The Florida Alligator Friday, March 15, 1963

Page 6

editorials
healthy signs
The wave of expansion which is hitting the state
university system seems to be spreading as well
to UF married housing villages and off-campus
housing.
In late January it was announced that a new
married students housing unit costing an
approximate $1.75 million is expected to be
completed by fall 1964 a scant year and a half
away.
If these plans are executed, some 208 more
units will be added to the existing total of married
units, thus bringing the expected 1964 total up to
1008 units after deducting the planned loss of
78 units when Flavet I makes its exit from the
UF scene this summer.
We see this move as well as the recent
announcement that a 156-unit, five-story apartment
house costing almost a million dollars will be
erected off-campus and will be ready for partial
occupancy by Sept. 1 as healthy signs that the
anticipated spurts of growth in UF enrollment
will be met by adequate housing arrangements.
This new off-campus apartment which will be
called Colonial Manor is expected to be ready
for partial occupancy by next fall. It is the third
off-campus luxury apartment to be initiated in the
past two months. Lakeshore Towers, a towering
two-story building costing $1.4 million and scheduled
for completion in a year and a $150,000 three threebuilding
building threebuilding complex are the other two.
We recently commented both in a series and
editorially on the current problems in off-campus
housing. These above-mentioned modern building
complexes are positive proof that at least some
of the sub-standard conditions existing in the past
are most likely to be eliminated in the near future
in an organized manner.
The growth pangs currently heard in Floridas
higher education system must be dealt with, and
it seems that positive steps are being made in
order to quell these pangs at least as far as
two areas of housing are concerned.
explosion
Included in a recent Tampa Tribune editorial
was a graph showing the expected growth of college
enrollment in Florida during the next 15 or so
years. To say the least, the figures represented
in this graph were astounding.
For instance, in 1955 only some 44,526 students
were enrolled in Florida colleges, universities
and junior colleges. By 1960 this figure had jumped
by some 150 percent to some 68,172 students.
This was in the past. How about the future?
According to this projected enrollment estimate,
enrollment in state higher education is expected
to reach the 100,000 plateau by 1965, then gather
momentum and skyrocket to 185,000 by 1970 according
to the graph.
The real clincher, however, is the estimate
for 1975 308,000 students. Such a figure is so
astronomical as to make the reader completely
lose comprehension of its immensity. It represents
the equivalent of some six Gainesvilles or some
22 University of Floridas.
These estimated figures only serve to back the
Monday report presented at the third annual
governors conference in Tallahassee which
declared the state university system needs a
dollar-tipped hypodermic needle and a general
overhaul to cure its ills
And the Chinese and Indians boast of a population
explosionl We have one of our ownuniversity
enrollment style.
The Florida Alligator
Editor-In-Chief David Lawrence Jr.
Managing Editors Maryanne Awtrey, Ben Garrett
Acting Managing Editor David West
Business Manager Jay Fountain
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published daily except Saturday and Sunday.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is entered as second class matter at the
United States Post Office at Gainesville. Florida. Offices are located in
Rooms 8, 10, and 15 in the Florida Union Building Basement. Telephone
University of Florida, FR 6-3261, Ext. 2832, and request either editorial
office or business office.
Opinions voiced in personal columns on this page do not necessarily
reflert the opinions of the editors. Only editorials are the official voice
of the paper.

"You'd think the Russian's could see what's wrong with their ideology.
It's un-American'."
LETTERS:
Women Voters Return Fire

EDITOR:
We were interested to read your
editorial, shot-in-arm',
Monday, March 11.
The League of Women Voters of
Florida is opposed to the extension
of the 3% sales tax to cover
groceries and medicines for two
reasons, both relative to the
interests of the general public.
First, such an extension would
make the sales tax a regressive
one, not graduated according to
ability to pay, but rather placing

Cliff Landers
Three Latin Fallacies Refuted

Perhaps no other area of the
world is the subject of as many
misconceptions in the United States
as is Latin America. This column
and next week's will attempt to
clear up a few of these fallacies.
FALLACY #1: Latin America
suffers from overpopulation.
f § CUFF
I*,,rn n landers ...
kJv/ ) Latin American
Viewpoint
This is untrue, for with the
exception of some of the smaller
nations and some of the Caribbean
islands, Latin American nations
have plenty of space. The
population of all South America,
for instance is approximately 140
. million, but the continent could,
if fully utilized, easily support
500 million.
The basic problem, therefore,
is NOT overpopulation, but rather
maldistribution of population. In
Venezuela and the Guianas, to cite
from among the more glaring
examples, about the only people
who live in the interior are still
painting themselves blue and
hunting heads.
This first fallacy possibly
arises from the fact that South
Americas annual population
growth (3%) is the highest in the
world, but this in itself constitutes
no problem. The real problem
lies in expanding the regions
economy
FALLACY #2: Personalism and
militarism make Latin American
political parties meaningless
window-dressing in the real fight
for power.
This charge might have been
valid at the turn of the century,
but not any longer. As. Porter
and Alexander point out in THE
STRUGGLE FOR DEMOCRACY IN
LATIN AMERICA, the real hope
for the future of democracy in
that area lies with the parties of
the Democratic Left. Venezuelan
President Betancourts
Democratic Action party, the
APR A in Peru, Costa Ricas
National Liberation partythese
popularly-based parties, urging
land reform, campaigns against
illiteracy and a fairer
reorganization of society, are the

a burden on low-income people
because of a disproportionate
amount of taxes required of them,
compared to the percentage of
taxes paid by higher income
groups. This does not appear to
be and equitable solution for
securing additional state revenues.
Second, the League opposes an
extension of the sales tax to
groceries and medicines until
existing inequities are corrected;
namely, items now presently
exempted from the 3% sales tax.

best weapons against Communist
takeover in Latin America.
Both the Reds and the
Democratic Left appeal to the same
oppressed groups and, for that
reason, the Communists consider
such parties their worst enemy,
as evidenced by Red agitation
against Betancourt in recent years.
This second fallacy involves
some grain of truth. It is undeniable
for instance, that in Paraguay and
Haita dictators still hold sway.
Nor can it be denied that
personalism elected Quadros
Brazils president in 1960. But
the trend in Latin America as a
whole is away from militarism
and personalism and toward
meaningful party politics.
FALLACY #3: Latin America
is still a church-dominated
society.
The Roman Catholic faith was
at one time the official state
religion of nearly all of Latin
America; in many places it was
the only religion allowed within the
national borders. Today, however,
the all-pervasive influence of the
Church has been greatly lessened.
What brought about this change?
Primarily, it was because the
Church has not traditionally
favored democracy in Latin
America. During the last century
it seemed more concerned with
protecting its immense
landholdings, gained during the
colonial period, than with saving
souls, and this placed it squarely
on the side of the conservative
* forces which backed dictatorships.
As a result, the popular leftist
movements have tended toward
neutrality, if not downright anti anticlericalism,
clericalism, anticlericalism, vis-a-vis the role of
the Church in society, and as their
strength grows, the influence of
the Church diminishes. Since
World War n a compromise has
evolved as the Church becomes
more aware of the profound
changes taking place in Latin
America; a Social Christian
outlook seems to be the future
economic philosophy of the
present-day Church.
Finally, the role of the Church
in aiding the downfall of Peron
and Batista indicates that it Is
beginning to obligation to support
democracy rather than despotism.

Comptroller Ray Green estimates
that a tax on these items could
produce $152.9 million per year
as compared to the $51.4 million
available from food and medicines
if taxed. Some sources that should
be considered are;
(1) The 1% sales tax on the
purchase of motor vehicles could
be raised to 3%, the case in most
other states.
(2) Broadening of the sales
tax to apply to repair, business
and personal services.
(3) A 1% rate on real estate
transfers could be levied.
(4) Expansion of the severance
tax to include other natural
resources, particularly minerals
and timber.
(5) The tax rate of diesel fuel
could be increased to bring it
above the comparable rate for
gasoline because of the extra
mileage possible from diesel fuel.
Further, the League of Women
Voters of Florida believes the
greatest fault in the present tax
system is the inequity in property
taxation within the state, that state statewide
wide statewide uniformity in assessment
practices and procedures and
state-wide assessments that more
closely approach full cash value,
would result in substantial
improvement in the states tax
picture.
In the interests of the general
tax-paying public inequities should
be resolved and the sales tax
extended to wholly or partially
exempted goods and services
before a general across-the-board
sales tax is levied, in a regressive
manner, against the people of
Florida.
We recognize the need for
additional state revenues,
particularly for educational needs,
but urge the Legislature to
rigorously pursue all possible
alternatives to the extension of
the 3% sales tax on food and
medicines.
Mrs. James G. Wilson, president
League of Women Voters
of Gainesville
Reduced Fees
EDITOR:
Many UF students were quite
put-off last year to find that
presentation of ID cards alone
would not admit them to the State
High School Basketball
Tournament.
No doubt the limited number
of seats in Florida Gym was the
primary reason for these students
having to pay cash 5O cents,
I believe. On the other hand, the
event nonetheless took place in
OUR gymnasium, on OUR campus.
Would not a fair compromise
for this year's tournament be a
reduced admission fee of perhaps
25£ plus ID card?
Lyle Kielley, 2UC



LETTERS:

Seating Situation: Old Problem, New Faces

EDITOR:
Tuesday night, I was forced,
along with many of my fellow
students, to sit in a portion of
Florida Gymnasium where we
could barely see or hear the
Lyceum Council presentation,
The Sound of Music."

A Southerner Protesting

Southern Provincialism Dying

By Donald H. Grubbs
We have to begin by observing
the amenities. I must take an
anti-Yankee oath. I am not one,
so help me God!
I have lived in Florida all my
life; my father was from Decatur,
Alabama; his father edited a
newspaper there; and his fathers
father, family legend has it,
founded the Methodist Church in
Kentucky and Tennessee. (Had
he not done this, however, I am
sure somebody else would have.)
Now, this family history would
be entirely unnecessary, were it
not for the fact that many
Southerners, before they will
hearmuch less heedany
criticism whatever, must be sure
that the critic is no Yankee. This
fear of "outsiders" and "foreign
do-gooders," combined with the
demand that they "stay away and
let us solve our own problems"
this provincialism, in a word wordis
is wordis one of the outstanding
intellectual characteristics of the
South which is today dying. This
regional sense of persecution is
worth examining.
It originated after the South,
whose great spokesmen had been
champions of human freedom,
became committed to cotton and
slavery. The paradox thus created
was obviously indefensible, but
the regional economy was based
so firmly on cotton that practically
all educated persons in the South
had some direct or indirect
interest in it. Hence, criticism
came almost entirely from outside.
The Souths rulers, therefore,
did not have to oppose criticism
per se; it was sufficient to make
"outside interference" the villain.
This was much more effective as
it implied that critics didnt really
know what they were talking about.
First the abolitionists were the
"wicked, outside agitators," then,
after the Civil War, the carpet carpetbaggers.
baggers. carpetbaggers. The injustice of these
aliens became a part of Southern
folklore. At Vanderbilt, I met a
co-ed from Rosedale, Mississippi
("We have a seven-to-one ratio
of nigras theah. Do youknowthats
moah than intheelgianCongo?).
She asked me to suggest some
books from which she could write
"an impahtial tuhm papuh showing
objectively how those
cahpetbaggahs came down heah
an jus toah ever'thing all up!"
My Aunt Lil has often assured
me that carpetbaggers sent a
division of Negro troops
into Selma, Alabama, to rape every
woman there. Her sensitivity to
"outsiders," however, is no
greater than that which theologian
Reinhold Niebuhr encountered
some years ago. Arriving in a
Southern town, he saw a public
gallows on which a local citizen
proudly assured him, two little
Negro boys bad just beeir hanged
We reserve the right
to edit all letters for
reasons of brevity.
All letters submitted
to the Alligator must
be signed. Nomes
will be withheld up upon
on upon request.

The reasons for this poor seating
situation stem from (1) an old
problem, with new faces: Lyceum
Council domination of front row
center. (2) Our local townspeople
who just never seem to miss a
Lyceum Council program.
Lyceum Council members seem

for petty theft. Then Niebuhr was
asked whether he agreed that
"foreigners" should not question
Southern customs.
And so ingrained is this reaction
against "outsiders" that today, 95
years after the Fourteenth
Amendment and nine years after
the Supreme Courts Brown
v. Topeka decision, when the first
Negro finally gets into a white
Mississippi school, we hear cries
about "the trampling of states
rights," "the Kennedy
dictatorship," and "impeach Earl
Warren."
But the Old South that uses
these slogans is moribund. A

The story of a classic
In many ways the story ot the Thunderbird is one ot
the most unusual in the automobile business. The
1955 whole idea ot the car was horn at one ot the great
European automobile shows. The then president ot
, our company pointed to some ot the small, lush sports
cars that are always a center ot attention at such
asked his ( "Why < an t
1956 The companion, who later became a vice president
ot the company, said, "It just so happens I have one
on boards. I'll show it to you when we get back to
ASaaWk Detroit." Then as last as he could discreetly get to a
telephone he called his told
Finish those sketches on it."
1957
The Thunderbird became one ot the lew-cars ever
''Cpj built that was produced essentially as the original
- un, sketches presented it. Most cars undergo countless
changes in the design period But there was a natural
clarity and cleanness to the Thundeibird design that
immediately captured all ot us at Ford.
1958 p Wtls probably this clean, sharp look that won so
many triends so last when the car* went into produc*
y tion. That fjrst Thunderbird had its drawbacks. For
example-, it was toco solt-sprung tor true sports-car
handling. But, the truth is, designed in the
tradition the Some
people called it a sports car but we never did. We
1959 called it a "personal" car; a small, fairly luxurious car
that was fun to look at and tun to drive. It had its
z ''T own integrity: it was one alone.
|j h. h I* b' J k||
appeared first on the Thunderbird, for instance. How However,
ever, However, we never foresaw the extraordinary influence
/JA* Thunderbird would have on the whole automobile
' |J '{ mmmmmm business here and abroad. Almost everybody offers
the Thunderbird bucket seats these days. And the
Thunderbird look is the most the '6os.
1961 The Thunderbird is a classic, made so by a peculiar
blend of magic ingredients of which we would love
yyi to know the secret. We're building cars right now we
hope will become classics, but the truth is, we don't
make classics, we make cars. People make the car
the story the
Americas liveliest,
most care-free cars!
FAICON FAIKIAMi WO THU*0fl0
' t * \
FOR 60 YEARS THE SYMBOL OF DEPENDABLE PRODUCTS MOTOR COMPANY

to have forgotten their campaign
promises about showing favoritism
at their presentations. When I
went to the polls to vote, I thought
I was voting for people to work
behind the scenes, not sit in front
of them. I am glad that all the
Lyceum Council members sitting

modern South is replacing it. Some
characteristics of this newer South
will be outlined in future columns.
*** *
(EDITORS NOTE. . Don Grubbs,
26-year old history graduate and
native of Miami, attended
Vanderbilt, but received both his
B.A. and M.A. at the UF. Married
and currently living with his wife
and son in Corry Village, Grubbs
will be teaching history southern
history, among other things, at
the University of the Pacific in
Stockton, California, next fall after
receiving his Ph.D. here this
August.)

The Florida Alligator Friday, March 15, 1963

in the reserved section at the
musical didnt appear on the
Student Government ballot,
because I fear we would all still
be in the voting machines pulling
levers.
We were forced farther back in
the gym by our beloved migrants
from the city who took advantage
of the $2.00 admission prlce.The
price of a ticket for another per performance
formance performance of the same musical in
Jacksonville was $6.00. The
townspeople take advantage of our
activity fee to get in on student
presentations. These are the same
people who take advantage of us
in their stores six days a week.
The combination of the Lyceum

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Council domination and the influx
of the townspeople left many
students sitting on the outer fringes
of the gym trying desperately to
see a superb performance.
I think the answer to the whole
problem lies in one simple
solution. ALL seats should be
taken by students on a first-come
basis. Any remaining seats could
be sold to the townspeople.
We students pay to see Lyceum
Council production through our
activity fee,and I think the Lyceum
Council should take the students
into consideration first and
foremost.
Edward E. Bowns, 2UC

Page 7



J

Page 8

1 The Florida Alligator Friday, March 15, 1963

UFs 19th Century Floor Plan
Causes Problems For the Auto

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HARDLY A PARKING
. . place available in the Medical Center parking lot. Residents of Schucht Vil Village
lage Village find difficulty parking their cars, as overflow from this lot goes into the re reserved
served reserved area.

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VOLKSWAGENS
. . and the other small cars could be one solution
to the problem.

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PARKING WAS
... a slight problem In the 1920 s as available parking spaces are taken in front of Peabody Hall.

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REPORTER
. . Jerry Warren gives up trying to find a parking
space in front of the Florida Union. He did make dead deadline
line deadline time.

By JEROME WARREN
Staff Writer
Since the horse and buggy days
of 1906, the automobile has created
a 20th-century traffic problem in
19th century UF streets.
The foremost problem is one
of space. With only 4,300 parking
spaces and 11,000 student-owned
cars, not everyone can park on
campus. Much of the existing
parking space is on otherwise
adequate streets, sometimes
creating rush-hour traffic chaos.
The Administration and the UF
police department have sought to
alieviate the situation both by
issuing decals to regulate the
number of automobiles in certain
areas, and by building more
parking lots on the fringes on the
campus.
There are six basic kinds of
decals; commuter, border zone,
campus resident, reserved area,

flavet and visitor. All automobiles
must have a decal to park on
campus and in married villages.
New Lots Planned
Plans have been drawn to create
new parking areas. A single lane
of parking is planned south of
Grove Hall and parallel to Inter
drive. The new Architecture and
Fine Arts Building as well as the
new Florida Union will be provided
with adequate parking facilities.
Funds have also been appropriated
for a new parking lot off Fraternity
Row. This last project should be
started during the 1963-64 fiscal
year, according to Campus
Engineer, Calvin C. Greene.
Yet with all of this organization
and expansion, the problem still
remains a large one.
Driving Privileges
In 1962 14,898 citations were
given out, averaging almost one
and one-half per driver. Although
the majority of these were parking
tickets, a student who accumulates
more than two or three of these
misdemeanors risks having his
driving privileges at the UF taken
away. He is brought before a
faculty disciplinary board which
rules on whether or not he should
be allowed to keep his decal.
Bicycle riding is encouraged
to lessen the number of
automobiles and auto traffic on
campus, said UF Police Chief
Audie Shuler. But these too, are
fast creating another traffic
problem.
He estimates that there are about
3,000 of these vehicles at the UF.
It is hoped that expansion of
parking facilities will help curb
traffic problems and the accident
rate. It is surprising, however,
that of a UF population of 13,000
only 146 accidents were reported
last year.
Expand Police Force
Another consideration of the
administration in attacking the
traffic problem might be to expand
the police force. The present force
is composed of three patrol cars
and 22 officers.
Cross-campus traffic has posed
a big problem recently. However,
the new post office has cut down
some of this since it serves nearby
residents as well as students.
The new Florida Union is
expected to increase the flow of
traffic on the bigger, wider streets
on campus.
on campus fringes. It should also
help fill up some of the parking
lots not presently used.
Oldest Area
The northeast section of the
campus is difficult to enter by
auto because most of the teaching
is done there and most students
usually walk to their classes in
that area. It is also the oldest
area of the campus and was not
originally designed for
automobiles.
In 1957, three entrances were
created in this northwest area,
and all other streets were made
one-way out of the area.
The streets in several other
areas have been re-routed to stop
cross-campus traffic. Flavet I is
an example of this, having only
one entrance and exit.
As the UF grows, present streets
will be widened and newer streets
will be built around new buildings,
according to Greene. Possibly,
the older sections of the campus
will be re-built with streets and
large, multi-level parking lots to
deal with this ever-growing
problem.



W ws p w
Â¥f y 05
L ife|P
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V WtM
(More Sports on Page TT)*
Weekend Sports
At A Glance
. TodayBaseball team vs.
Georgia at Perry Field, 3
p.m. Intramural Open House
at Florida Gymnasium, 7
p.m.
Saturday--Invitation Foil
Meet at Florida Gymnasium,
10 a.m. Baseball team vs.
Georgia at Perry Field, 2
p.m. Football team
scrimmage at Florida Field,
2:30 p.m. Tennis Team vs.
Georgia at the varsity courts
3 p.m.

V.
RAY WHITEHOUSE

Frosh Swim
ligh Schools
The UF freshman swimming
earn, its regular season concluded
ast Saturday with a 53-42 return
rictory over the Florida State
Erosh, head to south Florida this
weekend to take on two of the
op high school teams in the state.
Tonight at 8 p.m. the Baby
Gators meet last year's state Class
* champions, Pine Crest of Fort
-,auderdale. Saturday morning
Bill Harlans crew faces
he Class AA champs, Miami
fackson.
We are expecting rough battles
rom both of these teams, says
larlan, they both have some
?xtraordinary swimmers.
The Baby Gators, whom Harlan
ias called "the finest freshman
earn in UF history, have several
ecord-breaking swimmers to
show for their 4-1 season.
Captain Charlie King, a Fort
-auderdale High School product,
; et new frosh Gator records in
he 100 yard freestyle, 200-yard
ireaststroke, and the individual
nedley. Sandy Chandler, a
r ersatile swimmer from
lollywood, Fla., holds the new
00-yard breaststroke mark.
Ed Marino, who cracked the old
!00-yard freestyle record, was
aptain of last year's Miami
ackson team.
Ray Whitehouse, Rod Hubbert,
d Bill Corbin give the Gators
hree of the top freshman
Pecialists around.
Whitehouse broke standing
rosh marks in the 100 and 200-
ard butterfly events. Hubbert set
ew times for the 100 and 200-
ard backstroke races.
lates Practice
>occer Club
The Florida Soccer Club will
'id an important meeting Saturday
truing at 10 a.m. at Fleming
eld to discuss plans for the
bs u bs next game against Georgia
sch.
A practice session will follow
e meeting.

UF Baseball Today

Floridas Go-Go Gators, showing
signs of being even faster than last
year, open the 1963 baseball season
today at Perry Field against Georgia
starting at 3 p.m.
And Coach Dave Fullers team,
which set an NCAA record by stealing
108 bases last season en route to
ranking as the No. 1 college team in
the nation and Southeastern Con Conference
ference Conference championship, hope to get
things off on the right foot again.
Well run and well try to use the
hit and run, bunting and running
games to the fullest, said Fuller.
Weve got a little more speed this
year and I cant honestly name one
person in our lineup who is slow.
year and I cant honestly name one
person in our lineup who is slow.
Leading the way will be All-
America third baseman Tom Moore

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Tennis Team After
Win Over Georgia

The UF tennis team goes after
victory No. two Saturday when
it meets the Georgia Bulldogs
on Florida Courts.
The Gators (1-0) with a 6-3
victory Tuesday over Rollins under
their belts, will be taking on the
No. 2 tennis team in the
Southeastern Conference last

of Clearwater, who hit .319, drove
across 25 runs, scored 34 and wound
up with an amazing 1962 total of 26
stolen bases.
Fuller will field a veteran line lineup
up lineup against the Bulldogs, whom he
regards as one of the top two or three
teams in the SEC. He will start
junior right-hander Jim Biggart of
Bonifay on the mound in Fridays
game, and come back with sophomore
Danny Eggart of Pensacola Saturday
in a contest which starts at 2 p.m.
Fullers batting order will be:
A1 Lopez, Jr. (CF), Carol Lanoux
(2B), Earl Montgomery (LF), Tom
Moore (3B), Jim Duncan (RF), Ed
Braddy (IB), Ron Birchall (SS), Jack
Kenworthy (C) and pitcher Biggart.
After these opening SEC games,
the Gators take on Rollins Monday
and Tuesday here.

The Florida Alligator Friday, March 15/ 1963

season in the Bulldogs.
Georgia lost only two starters
off last years team, and they
will be tough, predicts Gator
coach Bill Potter. But we will
give them a battle.
Last year Florida finished just
behind Georgia, third in the SEC
with a 14-5 record.

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Page 9



The Florida Alligator Friday, March 15, 1963

Page 10

plough t un*i un*i'o/7>d
'o/7>d un*i'o/7>d to be i .auuojui
~ /y is. is that 0 oiiqnt l> r
,>4 e %^y Wi e DIO DUSIIIGSS lOT
\ A IZ,UUU You, Hr. Merchant
j gHr time would be i-qilM saoijjo sui % jai
/ / viewing applican-ioq ot saSanoo 1 j|
/ / application ip oMijgU s,-h, ( ,' |
/ / Applicants are drawn. I ~ irv I
I / He also aaviaet-*M* saJteuoc ,' I +
/ / to seek the courqt no 3ja3s I
versities and oth'SOJd [tiuoniPP 1 jj
/ j 4| tions that are v-01P 3J d <>qt P .[' i\'< 1 1 111 i
~
IF YOU CAN REACH HIM?
<
University of Florida students spend more than ONE MILLION DOLLARS A MONTH for goods
and services ranging from prepared meals (85% spend an average of $39.53 a month each) to
newspapers and magazines (71% spend an average of $1.65 a month each).
REACH HIM
*
(and his gal)
THROUGH THE MOST WIDELY CIRCULATED AND BEST READ
MEDIUM ON CAMPUS:
The Alligator
Phone 6-3261, Ext. 2832 Ask for Advertising
* U.F. Marketing Class Survey, 1961. Complete chart of expenditures upon request.



Grid Series No. 2

Guards Galore
On Football Team

By GEORGE MIMS
Sports Writer
Five returning lettermen will
provide depth, size and experience
at the guard post when the Floridas
football Gators take to the gridiron
next fall, according to offensive
coach Gene Ellenson.
These five, Jack Katz of Key
West, Gerald Odom of Apopka, Bill
Richbourg of Pensacola, Jerome

j. From The Sidelines- =r
Gator 9 Off And
Running-Literally
By WAI/vER LUNDY
Sports Editor
Call them go go,run run, or hurry
hurry.
Whatever you call them, the Florida Gator base baseball
ball baseball team is right behind Robert Hayes and the Atlas
missies as the states fastest habitants. And thats a fact.
Coach Dave Fuller and his band of greyhounds go after high
regarded Georgia here this afternoon at 3 p.m. and we suggest
you take in the game if you like to pull for a Gator team thats
easy to pull for.
You cant help but cheer for a team that runs circles around the
bad guys.
And believe me. We remember last year thats exactly what they
did. They were No. 1 in the nation then and if they solve the pitching
shortage, they should be as tough this year.
Arise, Athletes
Attention, Gator sports enthusiasts!
The University of Florida has been extended an invitation to compete
in the 1963 National Collegiate Kite Flying Contest in Ashland, Ore.
April 27-28.
No spoof. A genuine, honest-to-goodness kite-flying contest.
Southern Oregon College sent an invitation to The Alligator asking
for a Gator entry, setting down various rules, and urging us to fly
our kites right out there immediately.
Just in case youve never flown collegiately (a kite, that is), well
clue you in on the rules of the tourney.
A kite-flying team is composed of six men and a manager, although
we suspect girls would be allowed. Please dont ask us why it takes
seven people to get one kite in the air but thats the rule. All must
also have at least a 2.5 grade average.
Divisions of competition are distance and altitude. The team with
the best personality also gets a trophy. This last one intrigues
us.
Other minute details have to do with the kite's construction. You
just dont toss one of these things together haphazardly, you know.
Motels in the Ashland area will give our team reduced rates to
spenc the night, our invitation tells us. They assume we won t make
the trip to Oregon and back in one day.
We think it would be a slur toUFs fun-loving reputation in colleges
across the land if some loyal Gators dont make it on out to the far
Northwest and go fly a kite.
Us? Oh no, we're busy that weekend. But thanks anyhow.

Intramural Club
Slates Activities

UF's intramural club
championships and the UF
Invitational Foil Meet scheduled
for tonight and Saturday makes
for the biggest weekend ever for
the recreation division of the UF
intramural.department.
We have a lot of interesting
and informative activities taking
place this weekend, said
recreation director Gary
Lieberman.
All the activities, beginning with
the weightlifting tournament slated
for Friday night at 7 oclock in
the Florida Gymnasium basement
and concluding with Satuday's
day-long invitational foil meet,
are open free of charge to the
public.
Friday night activities, which
are billed as an open house,
includes a fencing exhibition
a s 7:30, intra-campus judo finals
at 8 oclock,- wrestling finals at
9 and gymnastic competition at
9:30, as well as the weight
ifting competition.
Saturday's invitational foil meet,
sponsored by the UF Fencing Club,
features teams
Orlando, Savannah, Jacksonville,
Tampa, St. Petersburg and Atlanta.

Jones of Jacksonville and Jack
Thompson of Savannah, Ga., are
proven Southeastern Conference
football players who are capable
of outstanding performances,
said Ellenson.
Katz, a 6-2, 212-pound husky,
is a senior letterman who
transfered from The Citadel in
1961.

Competition between both men
and women will begin with the
preliminary events at 10 a.m. and
DR. JIM REED
. . fencing coach
last throughout the day. At present
40 men and 15 women have accepted
invitations to participate excluding
the UF club members.

Katz was a first-string guard
last year and we feel, if he
improves as much as he did lest
season, he should be one of the
better guards in the SEC. He
has speed, power and hustle,
reported Coach Don Brown,
assistant line coach.
Odom, a two-year letterman, is
a 5-11, 218-pound senior who was
moved from tackle to guard this
spring. Coach Pepper Rodgers
said, He is fast, powerful and
aggressive. We feel that he will
adjust to the change of position
and provide the guard position with
a steady and solid defense.
As one of the better defensive
guards we have, Richbourg will
be pushing Katz and Odom to their
limit as far as defense is con concerned,
cerned, concerned, said Brown. Richbourg
is a 5-11, 210-pounder with much
experience and desire. He had an
outstanding season last year
despite a severe knee injury.
Football
Prospectus
This is the second in a series
of position -by position football
stories on the Florida Gators by
Staff Writer George Mims.
Outlook at the tackle position will
appear Monday.
Thompson is the fastest
lineman we have, Ellenson said.
Though he is small in size (5-9,
185 pounds), he is one of the most
aggressive interior linemen on
the team. He excels in offensive
blocking and is a rugged defender.
Melton Callahan up from the
B-squad and Larry Beckman a
much-improved freshman team
graduate will be making strong
bids at guard next fall, according
to Brown.
John Whatley from Tampa,
along with Charles Gaussarian,
Bob Knight, Ron Canakaris,
Jones, and Allen Holt, figure
strongly in plans for the future,
explained Ellenson.
State Cagers
Play Despite
Injunction
JACKSON, Miss. (UPI) The
Southeastern Conference champion
Mississippi State basketball team
was given the green light yesterday
to play integrated games for the
national title.
State Supreme Court Justice
Robert Gillespie held up a
temporary injunction that was
issued Wednesday at the request
of two strong segregationists in an
effort to keep State from playing
against Negroes.
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The Florida Alligator Friday, March 15 / 1963

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Page 11



Page 12

The Florida Alligator Friday, March 15, 1963

Candidate Said Running as f Pawn

By PAT WILKINSON
Staff Writer
(Eighth In A Series)
Some opponents of Cadillac
auto-dealer John T. Brasington,
candidate for Gainesville City
Commissioner in the March 19
city election, have been saying
he's either a pawn for someone
who wants to throw votes or hes
running Just for the fun of it.
Brasington denies these
accusations.
He's running against Mrs.
Myrtle Cherry, local dress shop
owner, and Alan D. Sutherland,
research director at Sperry Co.
and UF graduate faculty member.
I have been preparing for this
election since 1949. I know a lot
more about the issues than those
people and have information
available they know nothing about,
Brasington said.
Brasington sadi he became
determined to run when he read

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a Gainesville newspaper story in
July, 1961. UF Pres. J. Wayne
Reitz was quoted as saying the
UF could not grow larger than
20,000 students because the
business community couldnt
handle any more.
Thats true and its terrible.
The UF is the biggest single asset
to Gainesville, Brasington said,
who has a daughter at the UF.
The UF is not getting the
appropriations it should because
the city impresses people as being
a little country townand acts
like it.
A conflict of interests would
not enter into any decisions he
made as city commissioner,
Brasington said.
I cant sell any Cadillacs to
the city.
Brasington is emphatic about
not holding secret meetings. The
commission should conduct all
business in public, he said.
According to Brasington, he

would work for cooperation on the
city commission. Plans need to
be completed that would improve
Gainesville and the UF instead of
the commission fighting and not
accomplishing anything, he added.
Im running alone, without
contributions. Somebody came
and offered a big contribution and
I told him no I wouldnt be tied.
Im going to do what I think is
right, Brasington said.
He said he deplored the wedge
that was being driven between
the town and the UF by the Civic
Action Association supporting
Sutherland. Cooperation is
needed badly, he added.
Brasington cited figures given
in the Washington Kiplinger News Newsletter
letter Newsletter on a Florida survey which
showed Alachua County to be the
slowest growing county in the
State.
The Alachua County Population
and Economic Survey showed
Florida as having grown 78.7 per

cent but Alachua County only 29.9
per cent from 1950-1960, he said.
I had a fellow ask me the other
day how much larger Ocala was
than Gainesville, Brasington
said. But thats not the worst
thing that happened. Another man
was under the impression that the
Seagle Building was all there was
to the UF.
He said Gainesville isnt getting
the revenue it should and the
towns growth is being stunted.
More of the older areas should be
zoned for business but the new
areas should have strict zoning
laws, according to Brasington.
But if Id known such a fuss
would be raised when the County
commission gave me permission
to put my used car lot across from
Gainesville High School I wouldnt
have gone through with it,
Brasington said.
Brasington said he was in favor
of an overall city plan on zoning
and capital improvements and that

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experts should be consulted.
Those experts should be
outside consultants. Only they can
have an objective view. Inside
people are so close to the problems
they cant see the forest for the
trees, he said.
Brasington has lived in
Gainesville since 1927, is married
and has three children. He is a
Baptist and a 32nd degree Mason.
He is a director of the
Gainesville Boys Club, the
University City Bank, the General
Motors Dealers Council of Detroit
and chairman of the Alachua County
Roads and Surface Transportation
Committee.
Brasington is a member of the
Commission and Governor Farris
Bryants Statewide Safety
Conference.
The American Cancer Society
and the United Community Fund
of Gainesville have cited
Brasington for his work with these
organizations.