Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Honor Bike Parts Gone

By SALLY TRUITT
Staff Writer
At least $124 worth of Honor
Bicycle tools and parts have
completely vanished from the
Campus Police Station, Secretary
of Finance Jim Crabtree reported
yesterday.
We have no idea where the tools
and parts are, Crabtree said,
but were 95 per cent sure that
the fraternities working on the
project have nothing to do with
this problem.
Campus policemen report they
know nothing of the missing tools
anil parts.
According to Crabtree, of the
$1,133 originally appropriated for

The Florida
111 /
Alligator

V 01.55, No. 101

4 m _
Sound of Music Sets
UF Showing Tuesday

The Sound of Music, Rogers
. and Hammersteins last and
perhaps greatest sucesSjWill come
to the UF Tuesday, for one per performance
formance performance at 8:15 p.m. in the
Florida Gym.
A Lyceum Council production,
| the show is free to students with
UF Identification cards, $2 for
; adults and $1 for other students.
Mary Marins Broadway role of

Forestrys Newins
Funeral Today

Funeral services for Harold S.
Newins, founder of the UF School
of Forestry, will be held at 11
a.m. today In the First
Presbyterian Church with Rev,
U. S, Gordon officiating.
Coming to the UF in 1935, Newins
founded the department of forestry,
which was made a school two years
later. He retired from the UF
in 1951.
Born in Patchogue, Long Island,
N.y., Prof. Newins received his
bachelor of philosophy degree from

the project, $741 in tools and parts
now is in the police station. In
addition, $269 in tools and parts
are being used by the fraternity fraternityhouses
houses fraternityhouses involved for the project.
Fraternities which have used
parts and tools include Sigma Alpha
Epsilon, Tau Epsilon Phi, Kappa
Alpha and Lambda Chi Alpha.
To further complicate matters,
Crabtree says Student Government
(SG) cant do much about the
missing funds.
It will probably be written off
and accepted as missing because
we cant put any legal blame on
anyone, he added.
Crabtree discovered the missing
tools and parts during a recent
SG inventory.

The University of Florida, Gainesville

Maria von Trapp will be per performed
formed performed by Jeannie Carson, an
English singing star who has been
playing the lead role in the New
York company this past summer.
John Van Dreelen, came to
America from Holland to play the
part of the Baron von Trapp.
Under personal supervision of
Richard Rogers* the special touring

Lafayette College in Easton, Pa.
Two years later he was awarded
a master of forestry at Oregon
State College.
During the war years, he was
with the U.S. Air Service Bureau
of Airplane Production.
From 1931 until coming to the
UF, he was a professor of
utilization at Michigan State
College and a coordinator with the
field office of Civilian
Conservation Corps.

No attempt will be made,
Crabtree said, to bill either Doug
Midgley or Steve Freedman, past
chairmen of the bike program,
because we cant place legal
blame on them.
According to Midgley, who
claims he resigned before he
was fired because of political
reasons, I certainly dont envy
my successor. He certainly isnt
going to have an easy time. When
you have to coach and cajole you
cant get anything done, Midgley
added.
Students should take into
consideration that the bike frames
themselves cost student
government nothing, Crabtree
said. The bikes were collected

Friday, March 8, 1963

company has the scenic production,
lighting and costumes and orches orchestrations
trations orchestrations of the original play.
Unlike most musicals, The
Sound of Music story is based on
the life and adventures of people
who are still alive today in various
parts of the world. For over
20 years, the Trapp Family Singers
performed in America on the Com Community
munity Community and Civic Concert circuit.
Currently in its third year on
Broadway, The Sound of Music
is taking its place in the gallery
of Rogers and Hammersteins
smash hit musicals, which include
Oklahoma with 2248 pe performances
rformances performances on Broadway; South
Pacific with 1925 performances;
The King and I, with 1246. The
Sound of Music passed its 1000th
performance and is expected to run
most of the coming theatrical
season.
The play was written by Howard
Lindsay and Russel Crouse -of
Life with Father fame and the
new musical Mr. President.

Ife, rM 'lk /f
CONFUSION WAS KING
. . yesterday as the controversial Old Orange Peel
went on sale. Many students thought the magazine was
sold on campus, in fact so many that the Campus Shop
and Book Store had to post the above signs. The off offcampus
campus offcampus Old Peel sold 7,000 copies yesterday. The New
Orange Peel will be out next week.

by the Campus Police and donated
to student government.
There are still plenty of parts
and tools left to fix over 100 honor
bikes so you cant say student
government paid $l,lOO for ten
honor bikes, Crabtree added.
Student Body Pres. Paul
Hendrick said he realized one
of the major problems in the
whole project is getting students
and organizations to do menial
tasks without any reward.
The Honor Bike program began
to roll under past Student Body
Pres. Bill Trickels ad administration
ministration administration when Freedman got
assurance from Florida Atty. Gen.
Richard Ervin and the State Board
of Control that student government


Commission Planned
To Handle Program
Student Body Pres. Paul Hendrick yesterday
announced a revision of the honor bike plan is
underway.
Hendrick plans to establish a commission to
handle the affair. Commission members will be
announced Monday.
All parts, tools and bike frames will be re recollected
collected recollected and placed in a store house. Student
government and volunteers will repair the bikes
in a centrally located place, Hendrick said.
We will get organizations to volunteer and work
with the Student Government Service Organization,
whose purpose is to do this type of service,
Hendrick added.
I realize one of the major problems in the whole
project was getting students and organizations to
do menial tasks without any reward, Hendrick
said.
Engineers'Space
Fair Opens Today

The 18th annual UF Engineering
Fair opens today.
Efforts of 575 student engineers
and physicists will be on public
display throughout the UF College
of Engineering Friday, Saturday
and Sunday.
Exhibits in this years Fair
include everything from smoke smoketesting

would not be liable If anyone was
hurt on the bikes.
The plan was Initiated to cut
down on bike stealing by UF
students, Hendrick said.
Under Freedmans chairman chairmanship
ship chairmanship money was appropriated, and
parts were ordered. About two
months before his term was
expected to end Trickel appointed
Midgley as chairman.
* project was a failure under the
start it got under Freedman,
Trickel said.
Hendrick feels too many
promises have been made to
students without taking a realistic
view of the work and planning
entailed.

testing smoketesting of visitors cigarettes to
a special machine to rate
spectators physical fitness.
Individual students, 11
engineering societies and about 25
commercial industries will make
up the 75 exhibits on public
display.
Fair Chairman Harry A. Ferran,
4EG, said "We hope to top last
years attendance of 25,000 by at
least 50 per cent."
"The purpose of the fair is
to entertain the general public
and show them what is done here,"
Ferran said, "We also want to
focus the attention of high school
students on the opportunities of
an engineering career."
Pretty Frosh
Wins Ag Title
A pretty freshman from Fort
Walton Beach was last night picked
to reign over the 1963 UF
Agricultural Fair.
Mary Ann Beall, sponsored by the
Agricultural Economics Club won
out over 10 other coeds vying for
the title. Dean M. A. Brooker of
the College of Agriculture crowned
the new queen.
Gall McCaleb, sponsored by the
Citrus Club, was first runnerup
and Karen Roberts, sponsored by
the Agronomy and Soils Club, was
second runner up.
The candidates were narrowed to
the three finalists in street clothes
and personality test compel
yesterday afternoon and swln ult :
competition last night.
The new queen will rei

all the 1963 Agricultural v
festivities.



Page 2

The Florida Alligator Friday, March 8, 1963

Reitzes Plan Party

UF Pres, and Mrs. J. Wayne
Reitz will host a freshman class
reception Sunday, March 31, from
3-5 p.m.
Entertainment will be by the
Floridians, a singing group from
the UF Mens Glee Club, and pianist
Peter Dewitt.

WANTED I
Men who are graduating and looking for positions where
the sky is the limit for progress and advancement.
The College Life Insurance Company of America, the original
and only company specializing in insurance for the college
man. .represented only by college men. .selling exclusively
to college men, has a limited number of openings for men
interested in sales and sales management careers in Florida.
We will be conducting campus interviews on March 12, 1963.
Contact Mr. Mayberry at the Placement Office for an appointment.

mmm| gg m | 7ffW nmm
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Mpwik Jr jSpjsH m P
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'rjfflsjflP
get Lots More from EM
__
3 more flavor ~ j
*"'" in the smoke | ¥ sjt# jlf
criCD more taste I Ulfi !
,1,1 1 pi. FILTBRS i... TO..CCO co
through the filter *...- OT j
Its the rich-flavor leaf that does it! Among L&M's choice tobaccos there's more
longer-aged, extra-cured leaf than even in some imtihered cigarettes. And L&M's
Liter is the modern filter all white, inside and outside so only pure white
touches your lips. L&Ms the filter cigarette for people who really like to smoke.

Invitations will be placed on
bulletin boards around campus and
in fraternity and sorority houses,
according to Invitations Chairman
Jeannie Maynard.
Buses will pick up freshmen at
dormitory area offices at 3 and
4 p.m.

Qlhl^

A
FLOSSIE COVINGTON
... is today's Gator Girl.
A 20-year-old Jackson Jacksonville
ville Jacksonville lass, Flossie is a sen senior
ior senior in the College of Edu Education.
cation. Education. i

Secession Parade
Kicks Off Party

With a rebel yell, a cannon blast,
and unfurled stars and bars, the
southern gentlemen of Kappa Alpha
Order will march west on
University Ave. at 3 p.m. today
to defend the glory, chivalry,
right, and honor of the Confed Confederacy.
eracy. Confederacy.
They will stop but twice--once
for a salute to the Confederate
Memorial on the square, and at
the telegraph office to wire
President .Kennedy of their
intention to secede from the Union
Military Ball
Set Saturday;
Sea Theme
A Furlough in the SouthSeas,
1963 version of the Military Ball,
will be presented in the Student
Service Center (HUB), Saturday
night.
Highlighting the annual event will
be the crowning of the new Military
Ball Queen by past titilist Delores
Loll. Three finalists vying for
the crown are Libby Baker, Susan
Saunders and Jeanne Maynard.
Maj. Gen Leighton I. Davis,
commander of the Atlantic Missile
Range, Patrick Air Force Base,
will be the guest of honor.
Entertainment has also been
scheduled for the annual event. The
Hustlers and The Melodettes will
be featured in a University Audi Auditorium
torium Auditorium performance.
Couples will danced to the music
of an 18 piece band from Warner
Robbins Air Force Base.

COEDS!!
men students t 00...
SAVE MONEY
\ Save Money On
Cleaning Bills
I By Using Our
J XiV Coin Dry Cleaners
Bring your books and NOT 8, BUT A BIG
enjoy our comfortable 9 LBS 15% MORk
*" LOUNGE 9 n ANWHKi
You'll save 40% by using ELSE, ONLY
our 20 lb. washers.
"Buddy-up", come on C 4
down to: | JW
Koin Kleen
Coin Operated Dry Cleaning fr Laondry
704 w. Univ. Are., aerate tram Buchholx Jr. Hifb

for 48 hours.
Last night, General William
Tecumsch Sherman was
assassinated attheFlorida
Theatre while making a threat of
Union violence to the citizens of
Gainesville.
We felt we could not tolerate
any yankee violence, said General
Fred Hohnadel C.S.A., who is also
KA president That is why
we must march in protest.
The parade will cuminate in a
Ceremony of Secession, a Kappa
Alpha tradition for over 20 years.
I will issue a proclamation
withdrawing Fort Kappa Alpha
from the Union for 48 hours,
Gen. Hohnadel said. Then we
will adjourn to the veranda for cold
coon and collards.
Tonight, at the Plantation Ball,
men will wear authentic Confeder Confederate
ate Confederate and southern gentlemen
uniforms, and ladies will dress
ante-bellum.
Prizes will be given to men with
,the best unusual beard, and best
sideburns.
Presentation of the new Kappa
Alpha Rose and her Rosecourt
will also take place at the ball.
Tomorrow, according to
Plantation Ball chairman, Joe
Coudin, there will be a trip to
a lake near Keystone Heights and
a picnic, with black-eyed peas and
cornbread as the main course.
Then we will regroup at the
Mansion for barbecue, southern
style, said Coudin.
TommorrOw night will see the
return to the colorful plantation
life at the Sharecroppers
Stomp.
During the spring Plantation
(Old South) Ball weekend is staged
at practically every KA chapter
in the country, according to Coudin.
Each Chapter has a little dif different
ferent different variation, said Coudin,
but basically they are all the same
--a return to the glory of the Con Confederacy
federacy Confederacy for the weekend.



Campus Cop Turns Student
After 13 Years on Force

Frank Ridenour was apoliceman
and a part time student for 13
years.
Now he is a student and part
time policeman.
A husky 36-year-old political
science major from Ft.
Lauderdale, Ridenour says he first
started in police work by doing
Shore Patrol duty in the Navy.
Ridenour was a policeman in
Broward County for 13 years. He
served with the Fort Lauderdale
police, the Broward County
Sheriffs Department, and as a
private investigator.
During his service with the
Broward County Sheriffs Depart Departure
ure Departure nt, Ridenour taught judo,
attended three police academies
Hillel to Host
Purim Fete
By TOVA LEVINE
Staff Writer
The third annual Purim carnival
will be held Sunday at the Hillel
Foundation, 4-10 p.m.
Booths will be set up in the
street in front of the Hillel house.
The booths, sponsored by Alpha
Epsilon Pi, Alpha Epsilon Phi,
Delta Phi Epsilon, Phi Epsilon Pi,
and Tau Epsilon Phi, will feature
water balloon throws, dart throws,
pin and pitching and the cake
walk. Popcorn, kosher hot dogs,
candied apples, cokes and the
three- cornered Purim cakes,
hamantashen will be sold.
Mark Fowler, WDVH disc jockey
will be on hand at 7 p.m. to spin
the platters for a social following
the carnival.
The carnival is a celebration of
the Jewish festival of Purim.
Purim commemorates the
deliverance of the Persian Jews
from the plot of Haman who wished
to exterminate them.
Purim is a joyous holiday, one
for merrymaking and feasting. It
is also a day for exchanging cakes
and delicacies from one household
to another and for giving charity.
All the proceeds from the Hillel
Purim carnival go to Hillels
adopted child, Yaakov, a ten tenyear
year tenyear old boy who lives in
a childrens home in Israel.
The foster parent plan was begun
by the UF Hillel club last May.
Illf*
3 DAY
SALE
Fri. Sat. Mon.
IVY TAILORED DACRON
& COTTON SUMMER
WEIGHT MEN'S
Suits $ 22.95
EtngS
men's shop
(11 Wt A*.

and several FBI police schools.
Ridenour said he was once a
contestant on Name That Tune,
tl!
FRANK RIDENOUR.
. . policeman-student.

PENNEYS (rtn Saturday \ T\
Is The
COLOR! COLOR! COLOR! D s3^
TOWNCRAFT DRESS SHIRTS b "" d stylb
regular 3.25 and 2.98 continental cut
2 mm AA wash 6l wear
$ C 00 tan, olive
TAD j
rUK black
sizes: U Qk
28-36 J.UU!
USE OUR EASY LAY-AWAY PLAN OR YOUR PENNEY CHARGE
CARD SCOOP UP A WARDROBE FULL AND SAVE! I

a now defunct television program.
He had been sent to New York
City on police business and to
bring a prisoner back to Florida.
At present, Ridenour says he
is a student and has been accepted
by the UF Law School, which he
will enter after graduating in April.
I could not go any higher than
captain in the sheriffs department,
and I knew that if I was going to
get an education I had best do it
now, Ridenour said.
Married and the father of a
three-year-old boy, Ridenour lists
his hobbies as fishing and flying.
I like to fly and fish, but I
dont have time now, Ridenour
said.
Ridenour is a substitute
policeman for the Campus Police
Department, filling in when a
regular policeman is sick or on
vacation. He is also in charge of
fingerprinting all UF personnel.
A small law office and private
practice in Fort Lauderdale are
Ridenours plans for the future.

The Florida Alligator Friday, March 8, 1963

"Nix on the wine and grapes, Herbie.
I'd rather have a sandwich from Alan's"
ALANS CUBANA 6-1252
Next to Seagle Building

Page 3



Page 4

The Florida Alligator Friday, March 8, 1963

Addis Gets Roses from Reoieioer
For Mouie With No Plot, Message

By JUDY BARNES
Movie Reviewer
The film has no plot, no theme,
no social message, cartoonist
Don Addis said about his own
,movie Algri Somnia (a sick
mans dream). And Addis is right.
The shoestring-budget,
homemade film doesnt have
I HEELS put on in S minutes I
I SOLES put on in IS minutes I
I moderkTshoel
* REPAIR SHOP 1
gocross from Ist notionol bonk M

- Nine 50 Mile Hikes
If you think a 50 mile hike proves you're physically
fit we suggest you try a delicious Bar-B-Q sandwich
from Parker's with Super-Duper Sabre Jet hot sauce.
If you can down one without yelling "FIRE" you
should be ready to try Dr. Parker's secret new hot
sauce (un-named). Rumor has it that this new Bar-
B.Q. sauce is 9 times as hot as Super-Duper Sabre
Jet!
PARKER S BAR-B-Q
Open 'til Way Late 1107 NW 6th Place
SUMMER SCHOOL AND EUROPE! YES!!
through the
HEART OF EUROPE
A comprehensive visit of Europe for students,
recent graduates, and young adults; Fifty
fun-filled days visiting:
ENGLAND SCOTLAND NORWAY* SWEDEN
DENMARK*GERMA NY* AUSTRIA* ITALY*
SWITZERLA ND FRA NCE SPAIN* PORTUGAL
Departs from New York per
On Sunday, June 16
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION
write or telephone at once: Mrs. Lois H. Boggs, 714
714 Lothian Drive, Tallahassee, Florida. Telephone
Telephone 385-2264 (Evenings).
"FLORIDA UNION'
FILMS COMMITTEE
PRESENTS
"TEA & SYMPATHY
Deborah Kerr
FRIDAY and SATURDAY
7 and 9:30
Admission 30$
Sunday and Monday
AT 7 P.M. ONLY
"INTERRUPTED MELODY
k Glenn Ford
Eleanor Parker
H.ORIDA UNION AUDITORIUM
.

anything the ordinary movie does.
It doesnt have skilled photography,
dialogue, coherence or length. But
it does have one thing that the
ordinary movie doesnt have--
REAL LAUGHS.
At least that was the reaction
of the art class to whom the
Bmm movie made its debut
Wednesday night. Poor little
temporary Building X almost
rocked down with the chuckles.
The movie is basically a group
of loosely, if not uncoordinated
Addis-like jokes. Addis says that
it is irrational like dreams are,
and that it was practically made
up during the 15 minutes shooting
time.

The funniest scene, judging from
the laughs, concerned a duel in
which the dueling partners backed
up and backed upfor miles.
Another laugh-provoking scene
was one of a boxer. A close-up
of his gloves revealed that one
of them was a gesticulating hand handpuppet.
puppet. handpuppet.
Supposedly a parody on art films,
Addis calls the movie a creative
enterprize. Especially creative
was the production of Anne Holmes
ballet dancing in a field. The
scene was shot through a wire
fence.
Reminicent of silent movie days,
the jokes came so fast one after
the other that it was sometimes
hard to catch them all. Quite a
few were missed laughing at the
preceeding one.
Aside from generally poor
photography and lack of coherence,
the movie is far superior than
the ordinary home job. It was
produced at a cost of about S2O
on a farm near Reddick.
Anne Holmes, the heroine, was
self-conscious in some scenes,
but in others looked like an out outdoorsy
doorsy outdoorsy Playboy girl.
Other characters were Jerry
Uelsmann as John L. Sullivan,
Addis as Charles Lindberg and
Bob Fitcher as male lead. Other
players were George Chillag and
Nancy Beckett.
Sound was by tape, and consisted
mostly of a poem read at the
beginning and Andre Segovias
guitar music in other parts.
Peace Corps
Visits Fair
Two representatives from the
United States Peace Corps will
be on the UF campus Friday,
Saturday and Sunday in conjunction
with the 1963 Agriculture Fair.
Harriet Parsons and Paul A.
Daly of the Corps will be in
charge of a display in the main
lobby of McCarty Hall.
According to Miss Parsons, 24
UF students already are in the
Peace Corps as compared to seven
from Florida State University
(FSU) in Tallahassee.
Opportunities with the Corps
include a chance at scholarships
and fellowships, Miss Parsons
said.
Want To Know More
About Diamonds?
This is Laure Young going out on the
town. In our office, she designs
diamond jewelry. Miss Young is an
authoress, consultant, and lecturer on
diamonds, and may be able to make a
presentation at your college. Write for
information on how to save from V 4 to
% on the purchase, of diamond jewelry
through the mail direct from one of
Americas well known diamond cutters.
Ovar 5,000 styias SIOO to SIOO,OOO |
Scad tor FREE 72-PAGE CATALOG
MISS LAURE YOUNG
Empire Diamond Corp.
Empire State Bldg., New York 1
Address

GATOR CLASSIFIED
(i iSS r i w ' I ** [ i ~ 4.l -* ~. ro. V t *-.
* t-:* vn; i 'ARGi T T hF ads ON S PAGP
r ft I f ft. T f\ ft i A T T wt T P L J
r V % U N Ml J M L ]

Autos

GOING OVERSEAS THE YEAR?
Buy a new car at European prices
and save. Mercedes-Benz, Volvo,
English Ford or D.K.W. Call
Hubert Barlow, FR 2-4251, Crane
Motor Company. (G-86-30t-c).
STICK SHIFT 53 Olds. Super
88, $175.00. George Gross Frame.
Phone 2-9497. (G-100-st-c'>.
WANTED TO BUY SO through 54
Fords and Chevrolets. Al Herndon
Service Station, 916 SE 4th Street.
FR 2-1308. (G-94-ts-c).

For Sale

SPORTS CAR for Sale. 1952 TD TDMG
MG TDMG in excellent condition. Selling
to best offer. Will be in Florida
March 15-21. If interested, write:
David Getz, Alpha Gamma Sigma
Fraternity, 1918 Indianola Avenue,
Columbus, Ohio. (A-99-3t-p).
ELECTRIC PIANO Loud Volume.
Ideal for fraternity or sorority.
Portable. $194. Call FR 2-1270
after 5 p.m. Before, FR 6-8333.
(A-99-st-c).

Services

NESTORS TV, RADIO, HI FI
SERVICE Tubes checked free.
Free estimates. Next to Florida
Bookstore Parking Lot. 1627 NW
Ist Avenue. Phone FR 2-7326.
(M-99-20t-p).
WILL CARE FOR infants or small
children by day or night in private
home. 1406 NW sth Avenue, Phone
FR 6-8961. (M-65-ts-c).
I DO DRESS making, alterations
and ironing with reliable and
reasonable service. 1943 N.E. 16th
Terr. FR 2-6025. (M-99-st-c).

Real Estate

NO DOWN PAYMENTS VETS
Low down payments F.H.A. 23
models. 2,3 and 4 bedroom designs.
Free swim club membership.
Monthly payments from $74. High Highland
land Highland Court Manor. NE 23rd Blvd.
and 11th Terr. (I-78-ts-c),

s'-'" ]i<^
) /
e\^y

For Rent

ATTRACTIVE, bright, clean room
for mature student in new home.
Student desk. See to appreciate.
$35 per month. FR 2-8944. (B (B---99-st-c).
--99-st-c). (B---99-st-c).

Wanted

ALGERIAN REFUGEES NEED
used clothing and blankets. Leave
in dorm containers or at 1005 SW
Bth Ave. Gainesville Friends
Meeting. (C-101-st-c).
WANTED Unfurnished 3 or 4
bedroom house by June 1 on year
lease. Within walking distance of
Walker Hall. Central Heat and
Air Conditioning. Only mature
adults in family. Professor A.D.
Wallace, 1332 Audubon Street, New
Orleans 18, La. (C-99-st-c).

Help Wanted

SECRETARY NEEDED Must
be proficient in typing and
shorthand. 5 1/2 day week. Good
salary and pleasant working
conditions. Interesting work for
qualified person. Write Scruggs
and Carmichael, P.O. Box 136,
or call FR 6-5242 for an interview.
(E-101-ts-c).
INVESTIGATE ACCIDENTS-Earn
$750 to SIOOO monthly. Men urgently
needed. Car furnished. Business
expenses paid. No selling. No
prior experience necessary. Pick
own job location. Investigate full
time. Or earn $6.44, hour spare
time. Write for free literature.
No obligation. Universal CCA-3,
6801 Hilcrest, Dallas 5, Tex.
(E-99-3t-p).
PART TIME evening only.
Gainesville Drive-In Theatre
Manager. Married man presently
employed days with desire for
added income. Address application
to Box A. Florida Alligator,
Classified Dept., Fla. Union, U.
of F. (E-101-2t-c).

Persona!

YOUR MESSAGE in this space is
the low-cost way to reach the
ENTIRE UF communitystudents,
faculty and staff. Call FR 6-3261,
ext. 2832 to place your ad.



Engineering, Agriculture In Focus at Fairs

* jf E ,1
SHOWS SATELLITE MODEL
...Mans assault on space is explained at special lectures during
the annual engineers fair. Here a space scientist shows models
of the Surveyor satellite.

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POSTERS TELL STORY
...Major space missile makers boast of their
accomplishments and their future ventures in space
on display at the Engineers Fair.

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/ KIDS TAKE THE WHEEL
. . Youth takes the drivers seat -at Agriculture fair. Annually
the latest in farm equipment is paraded for visitors. These kids
are among the many who get to take the drivers seat at least
for the click of a camera.

The space age will come "down
to earth for the 18th Annual
Engineers Fair here Friday
through Sunday.
Sponsored by the UF College of
Engineering and its student organ organizations,
izations, organizations, the fair will bring the
marvels of space age science to
the public.
The fair, which last year
attracted 25,000 persons, will
feature everything from an
analysis of the cigarette to a
scale model of the Cape Canaveral
moon shot complex.
It opens at noon Friday in the
engineering building and closes at
9:30 p. m., and Sunday from
2-8 p.m.
Projecting the benefits of the
space age on the farm will be a
model of "tomorrow's farm com complete
plete complete with a climate controlling
ballon.
Also on tap will be samples of
fresh water converted from salt
water by chemical engineering stu students.
dents. students.
More than 575 engineering and
physics students are currently
completing their exhibits which
they will enter in the fairs's prize
competition.

The Florida Alligator Friday, March 8, 1963

I O 3 slf )
:;. : '?Ksr- sV iljS3jSyW'.. sSEpi&jk >
v : ' L ?
Vi
AIR FORCE MISSILE
...On display behind the ROTC Building.
Story By Evy Buzzell
Photographs By Carolyn Johnston

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GETTING INSIDE STORY
...On the Friendship Seven, these children inspect
a full scale model ts the space capsule that has
been carrying Americans into orbit.

Page 5



Page 6

The Florida Alligator Friday/ March 8, 1963

Alligatox*
editorials
The Paper s Aim: All the news with decency our onlv limit
expand UF
(EDITORS NOTE. . .This is the second editorial
in a series of two dealing with the conflict in
state education circles and study groups concerning
expansion of the state higher education system
and the resulting specialization.)
We favor a plan whereby the UF would be greatly
expanded to meet the engineering needs of the
state-located industries. The other state schools,
USF, Atlantic, and FSU, would be directed toward
specialization in a particular field.
In advocating such a plan, we agree with Stanton
D. Sanson, Chairman of the Cocoa Beach higher
education committee that specialization must occur.
Through specialization, the physical plant size
of a university complex can be held to a minimum.
In reality, the now-separatfe schools would become
branches of one huge university. Such a condition
currently exists in North Carolina where the
engineering school is located in Raleigh and the
basic research school at Chapel Hill.
As Dean Weil of the UF College of Engineering
stated last fall, establishment of engineering schools
at USF and in the Orlando-Canaveral area would
severely hinder the UFs chances to become one
of the top ten engineering colleges in the nation.
In fact, the granting of these schools could well
create a condition whereby any area that wants
a college could lobby and readily obtain one. Such
an economic travesity, though not reality now,
is not beyond the realm of possibility.
Besides opening the door for possible future
economic chaos, the building of a state school
in the Orlando-Canaveral area would greatly limit
the potential held by Rollins College in Orlando
and Brevard Engineering College in Melbourne.
The former, with a bit of state aid and its own
ambition to expand, could train the majorfty of
the engineering students from the Orlando area.
And, in the case of BEC, it already has received
the support of two prime government aerospace
contractors, Pan American and RCA. BEC, with
a bit of state aid, could easily meet the demands
of the area and do it with an outlay of money
considerably lower than that necessary to build
a new institution from the ground up.
In addition, we dont believe that the state should
create a school that will operate in direct
competition with existing private schools. This is
especially true when the private schools could be
expanded to meet the current and future needs
of the area.
As for the USF, we favor the continuation of
the present 3-2 program. In this program, the
prospective engineering student spends his basic
study time of 3 years at USF and then moves to
the UF for 2 years of specialized training.
In addition to allowing a Tampa area student
to live at home during his first years in college,
the 3-2 program reduces the load on the UF. IT
allows the UF to not have to cope with the large
number of pre-engineering students who change
their minds about an engineering career during
the first or second years.
Even though the expansion of the UF and
reorganization of the state system of higher education
as outlined above may not suit the citizens in
the Orlando-Canaveral area, we feel that it is,
nonetheless, a good plan and one that, if effected,
would solve the systems current growing pains.
The Florida Alligator
Editor-In-Chief David Lawrence Jr.
Managing Editors Maryanne Awtrey, Ben Garrett
Acting Managing Editor David West
Business Manage* Jay Fountain
THE .FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is thr official stuuont new >pupvr of the
University of Florid* and is publisheJ daily except S.iturJuv and Sundae.
* v '"TWE *FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is entered as sea nJ class matter at the
United States Post Offic** at Gainesville. Fhrida. Offices are located in
dooms 8, 10, and 15 in the Florida Union BuilJinc Basement Telephone
yaiversity of Florida, FR 6-3261. Ext. 2832. and request either editorial
o ffi Opinions voiced in personal columns on this page do not necessarily
fleet the opu, lons 0 f the editors. Only editorials are the official voice
of the P*!* 1

don addis
- ft 7h£

LETTERS:
Old Peel 'Not Muzzled

EDITOR:
In lieu of recent news coverage
by your paper giving free publicity
to the so-called Old Orange Peel
(after advertising in it was denied),
it might be in order for some
comment to be made about the
position of the New Orange Peel
on this matter.
First, since the Old Orange
Peel is an off-campus business
and not a University venture, we
are essentially indifferent to their
success or failure. We are not
in competition. Our periodical is
a publication for the student body
with funds from the students. Their
magazine is run by a non-student
and relies largely on materials
obtained from non-UF sources.
Our magazine is essentially an
outlet for student work for
presentation of such work to other
fellow students. Ours is not a
business; we are not trying to
make money on the basis of a
magazine name now in the popular
domain.
Dorm Study
Impossible
EDITOR:
Study and/or sleep is impossible
in University Housing.
All my attempts to study or
sleep without interruption with the
exception of a couple of hours early
in the morning has completely
failed this semester.
A look at a few facts will explain
my case.
1. One Sunday afternoon our
hall was turned into a drag strip
for an honor bike. A few students
poured water over about half the
hall and then timed each other
as they rode the bike through
the hall.
2. It is not uncommon for these
children to get drunk and come
to the dorm to squeal the ROTC
drill commands well after
midnight.
3. Last night we had a water
fight. Not just in the hall, but
also on the ledge outside my
window.
4. Tonight the losers of the water
fight broke into the room of the
winner and filled it with newspaper.
They have been having real fun
since about nine o'clock and it
is now after one.
Our Section Adviser has talked
to this group and so has another
man. But this has not done any
good.
I have not been able to sleep
or study for the past four hours.
When I talked to the students
about the noise, I was told you
get a room and a bed and that
is all. Where do I go from
here? I curse the day that I ever
signed a contract to live in
University Housing.
James B. Cut chi ns Jr.
2UC, Hume Hall

Second, ours is a GENERAL
outlet for student work. Our sole
publication is not of humor, but
also of opinion, features, and
literary work. We are attempting
a balanced presentation, with
quality as our only criteria.
Third, we must erase the absurd
notion of muzzling. The only reason
the Old Orange Peel was denied
advertising was due to the
questions which have arisen about
their methods in selling
advertising in their magazine'that
is, not making it absolutely clear
that they had no connection with
the now defunct Orange Peel). As
a matter of fact, they had already
run five days of classified ads
in the Alligator.
Finally, lets get some things
straight. The New Orange Peel
is not censored except by its
Cliff Landers

Pro-Reds To Run Chile In 64?

To most United States citizens
who bother to think about Latin
American, 19.64 may seem like a
long way off, the way Latin
governments have of rising and
falling almost overnight. But in
a very real sense, 1964 looms as
a crisis year for both this country
and Latin America as a whole.
CICTy CUFF LANDERS
Jf American
\ Jy Viewpoint.
Chile, a nation which visiting
professor Alfredo Pareja-
Diezcanseco has characterized as
being among the most democratic
and politically advanced in Latin
America, has a rather strange
electoral system which gives the
Reds a tremendous advantage.
Whereas in most nations of this
hemisphere at least 33% of the
popular vote is needed to win the
presidency, in Chile the figure is a
mere 25%.
But in Chile the situation is
radically different. As stated, it is
among the most democratic of
Latin American nations. In the
elections of 1946, 1952 and 1958 the
winner was, though a member of
the opposition, allowed to assume
the six-year term which he had
gained through an honest election.
A tradition of constitutional gov government
ernment government has grown up In Chile.
Furthermore, the military seems
adjusted to civilian dominance in
government; this is a prerequisite
for a continuing democratic rule
in Latin America. (Costa Rica,
at one extreme, is also highly
democratic, and has NO standing
army.)
The danger in Chile lies in a
political group called tne FRAP
(Popular Front). To quote
Salvador de Madariaga in LATIN
AMERICA BETWEEN THE EAGLE

own staff. Since the Old Orange
Peel must contend with obscenity
laws and the mails, et£., there
is nothing, to my knowledge, that
they can publish we cannot. The
only differences between our
magazines is that they devote more
space to straight humor, are not
University or student-sponsored,
are a business and not a student
organization, and are attempting
to represent themselves as
muzzled.
The March issue of the New
Orange Peel is already being
printed (for circulation probably
next week), but if they would like
to purchase an ad in the second
(April) issue, we would be glad
to oblige.
Marcello Truzzi
Editor-in-Chief
The New Orange Peel

AND THE BEAR, the FRAP is
an uneasy alliance of socialists
and communists, the first led by
Dr. Salvador Allende, the latter
by Contreras Labarca.
In Chile, Madariaga feels, the
dispossessed peasantry is
persuaded tha|, only the FRAP
will keep its promise to carry
out long-needed agrarian reforms.
These peasants are a potent force
in the Chilean political picture,
where literacy requirements are
far less stringent than in the U.S.
As a result, Allende would have
won the last presidential election
if the other three major parties
(all more or less Tightest) had
not also run a demagogic ex-priest
who drew over 40,000 votes from
the FRAP candidate.
The winner, therefore, was
Jorge Allesandri by a handful of
votes. But as Madariaga states,
A communist-socialist candidate
to the presidency of Chile is not
. . to be excluded in 1964.
This is not to say that Allende
is necessarily a Red. But his
radical leanings are apparent and
pro-communist is not too strong
an epithet for his philosophy, as
se§n by many observers. A
coalition government headed by
Allende could conceivably become
communist-dominated, as was the
Arbenz regime in Guatemalaprior
to his overthrow by Castillo
Armas.
The U.S. would find itself in
an uneasy position should the FRAP
win next years elections, and the
propaganda value for Latin
American communists would be
immeasurable.
If Allende were to be elected,
as seems a distinct possibility
unless the opposition parties call
a truce in their squabbling and
evolve a modus Qperandl for
counteracting the effective
organization and propaganda of
the FRAP, what would be the
position of the United States? We
would find ourselves in a novel
dilemma.



'm ~a£* m W&m
I w^m/TvJm
GOING AFTER
the ball is Willie Mitchell for Jupiter against
Florida High in morning action during yesterday's high
school basketball tourney in Florida Gymnasium.
Florida High Wins

Smooth-working Florida High of
Tallahassee established a quick
lead over Jupiter yesterday and
shot its way into the Class B
semifinals with 72-55 first round
victory in the state high school
basketball tournament in Florida
Gymnasium.
Jupiter, playing with Willie
Mitchell, the first Negro ever to
play in the tourney, couldnt catch
up with the fast-breaking Florida
five after falling behind early in
the game.
Mitchell, the teams second best
scorer, got only 9 points. Louie
Yohe led Jupiter with 17. Eddie
Hayes 2G points topped the
winners.
Gracevilles ball-stealing gave
them a 59-53 decision over
Wildwood in the final Class B game
last night.
After being 12 points back, the
Graceville pressing defense came
to life and the victors passed
Wildwood in the third period.
Jeff Williams with 22 points
and Jarrett Miller with 18 paced
Graceville. Wildwoods top scorer
was Gerald Bramblett with 17
points.
Baldwin, led by the 27-point
production of forward Steve
Adams, applied steady pressure
to Ocoee and won a 56-4-1 first
round win in the first night game.
Jay High School used its superior

North Marion Tops Havana

Floyd McCoy heaved in a long longone
one longone .hander with one second left
to give North Marion a 49-47
win over Havana High last night
and put them in the Class C
semi-finals of the state high
school basketball tourney in
Florida Gym.
Center Pay Johns, however, was
the sparkplug of the North Marion
attack, collecting 18 points and
controlling the backboards for
most of the game.
McCoy got only four points the
whole game.
Sopchoppy easily disposed of
St. Patricks of Miami Beach 71-
43 in morning action.
John Strickland led the winners
in scoring with 15 points but the
whole Sopchoppy starting team hit
in double figures. Sophomore
Oliver Stallings led St. Patricks
with 21 points.
Poplar Springs came from four
points behind at the half to eli eliminate
minate eliminate Oviedo 60-47, outscoring
the leaders 16-6 in the third period
in an afternoon game.
Oviedo led 24-20 at intermission
but Springs 6-4 center, Hiram
Bell, began hitting and led his team
from behind. He ended with 18
points.
Danny Kirkland led the losers

height advantage to eliminate
Mulberry 64-53 in an afternoon
game.
Mulberrys Jerry Hagan, a 6-2,
220-pound junior center, kept the
losers ahead for most of the first
half but fouled out after Mulberry
began falling behind in the final
half.

Apopka Starts Title Defense

Defending State Champion
Apopka poured it on from every everywhere
where everywhere on the floor to-crush
newcomer Gulf High of New Port
Richey 66-28 last night in the first
round of Class A competition.
Larey Beasley paced the Apopka
five with 10 field goals and 23
points. Chris Bateman hit for 15
and Bill Goding scored 12 for the
Blue Darters. Jim Hawkins, Tim
Durden and Mike Park scored 6
each for the losers.
Dunedins Falcons waited until
the last minute to pour on the fast
break and knock Taylor County
High of Perry out of the tournament
51 44 and enter todays
semi finals.
Dunedins potent attack was led
by Paul Cross with 12 points and
Wray Weisler with 11 points.
Perrys big gun was Walt Lan.b
with 25 points.

with 11 points.
Hilliard High school moved into
the semi finals today with a 59-
44 win over Laelle. Hilliard
meets North Marion in a semi
final game.

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Hollins Wins First Game

Dixie Hollins stepped oft on the
right foot last night in its conquest
for a third class AA championship
in a row by beating old rival
Pensacola Escambia 60-40 and
gained a semi-final position today
against Plant of Tampa.
Jeff Ramsey and John
Bloodworth battered the panhandle
five for 20 points each. Mike
Campbell scored 15 for Escambia.
Plant High of Tampa bowed into
the Class AA tournament with a
smashing 64-43 win over West
Palm Beach Forest Hills. The
Panthers led by the shooting of
Ken Doyle. 20, Lee Canter, 16,
and Terry Lanier, 13, warmed up
late but got hot quick.
Forest Hills never warmed up
and early in the second half the
Falcons were already deep in the
hole. Leading the Falcons scoring
was Tom Coburn with 8.
Pompano Beach fought tooth and
claw with Jacksonville Paxon for
27 minutes and then with a slight
advantage busted the game loose
for a 70-53 win over the Golden
Eagles.
Pompano Beaches scoring
leader was Pete McKinnon with 25
points and Gary Pajcic lead Paxon
with 15 points. The win put Pompano
Beach in today's semifinal against
Miami High.
Miami High used a balanced
attack and ball stealing to down
Orlando Boone 66-52 and became
the first Miami team in three

Deland combined a brother
combination and accurate shooting
to eliminate Plant City from the
tournament 56-52 and gain a berth
in todays semi finals against Ft.
Lauderdale Aquinas.
Ken Pari in and DougParlin
teamed up to lead with 20 and 19
points Yiispectively. Mike Rollyson
City with 25 points.

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The Florida Alligator Friday, March 8, 1963

years to make it past the first
round.
Miami was led by Bart Gregory
with 14 points, Terry Aikens with
12 and Bob Gustarson with 14
points. Fred Lundquist paced
Boone with 19 points.
Todays Games
3 P.m.
AA Miami High vs. Pompano 3each
FI Jay vs. 3aldwln
Am- Aquinas vs. Deland
C Sopchoppy vs. Poplar Springs
7.*30 P."
AA DLxls Hollins
vs. Plant
B Florida High
vs. Graceville
9 p.m,
A- Dunedin vs. Apopka
C Hilliard vs. Forth Marlon
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Class AA
Dixie Hollins 60 Escambia 40
Miami High 66 Orlando Boone 92 i
Plant 64 Eorest Hills 45
Pompano Beach 70 Paxon 53
Class A
Apopka 66 K.P. Rlohey 26
Dunedin 51 Perry 44
Aquinas 58 Pensa, Tech 47
Deland Plant City 52
Class B
Baldwin sb Ocoee 44
Jay 64 Mulberry 53
Florida High 72 Jupiter 55
Graceville 59 Wildwood 53
Class C
No. Marlon 49 Lavana 47
Sopchc.py 71 St. Patrick's 43
Poplar Spr, 60 Oviedo 47
hilllard 59 Laelle 44

St. Thomas Aquinas used a height
advantage and heads up defense to
stop Pensacola Tech in the first
round, 58-47, and get a berth in
todays semi finals.
Frank Walker and Lee Freeman
paced the Raiders with 16 points
each. Techs Tommy Payne led
all scorers, hitting 29 points.

Weekend Sports
At A Glance
Friday--St ate high school
basketball tournament in
Florida Gymnasium, semi-final
games.
Saturday-State high school
basketball tournament in
Flor id a Gymnasium, final
games at 3 p.m. (Class C),
4:30 p.m. (Class B), 7:30 p.m.
(Class AV and 9 p.m. (Class
AAC Swim team vs. Florida
State in Florida Pool at 3 p.m.
Football team vs. intrasquad
scrimmage at Florida Field at
1 p.m. Gym Club vs. Georgia
Southern. Track team vs.
Atlantic Coast Conference meet
at Chapel Hill, N.C*. Tennis
team vs. Florida State at
Tallahassee.
1963 SUMMER SESSIONS ABROAD
University of San Francisco
GUADALAJARA, MeilcoJune 29 Auq 3
$240 00 includes tuition, board and
room, and activities
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Several plans to fit individual re requirements
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tuition board and room, activities,
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Several plans to fit individual re
quirements from S69S 00 includinq
tuition board and room, activities,
and ROUND TRIP BY PLANE NEW
YORK MADRID PALMA
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Page 7



Page 8

The Florida Alligator Friday, March 8, 1963

GATOR SPORTS

STUDYING LATE?
Open 'til 4a.m. Thur, Fri, Sat.
King Burger
303 N.W. 13th St. Ph. 2-0388^^^y
STAFF POSITIONS OPEN IN
JACKSONVILLE C.P.A. FIRM
For accounting major graduating in April. Also
staff opening for student graduating this summer.
Very little travel required. Write William H.
Carter Jr., P.O. Box 23, Jacksonville 1, Fla.,
or phone 356-7444, for us to arrange an inter interview
view interview on campus.

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Tankers Duel FSU

By 808 THOMAS
Staff Writer
Florida swim coach Bill Harlan this week rapped
Florida State for intentionally scheduling their
second meeting with Florida as the last meet
of the year following the close of the regular
Southeastern Conference competition.
The Gators, 8-0, will try to close out their first

undefeated tank season
they play host to the Seminoles
here in Florida Pool at 3 p.m.
Harlan explained that in the
past years FSU has repeatedly
slated the event this late to give
them extra incentive and practice
time over the Gators.
It gives them a great advan advantage,
tage, advantage, he said, While our boys
are up swimming in the SEC
championship at Georgia we can
only swim 200-300 yards a day.
Meanwhile FSU is at home getting
in 2,000-3,000 yds. a day. That
makes quite a difference.
Harlan pointed out it also gives

since 1941 Saturday when
FSU a big psychological boost.
Theyll be up for us," said
Harlan, Theyre up for us every
year we win the conference. Its
a great incentive to try beating
the best in the South.
Harlan explained that next year
some changes would be made in
the scheduling.
We want our last meet of the
year to be a conference meet, he
said. Ive given their coach two
possible dates for the second meet
between us and if he doesnt want
to swim us then, well swim them
only once next year.

Gymnasts
AtGeorgia
Southern
The VF Gymnastic Club, in its
first year of competition, will
place an unbeaten record on the
line against Georgia Southern in
Statesboro. Georgia, Saturday.
The club has beaten the Citadel,
Florida State, and tied Georgia
Tech in its first thpee intercol intercollegiate
legiate intercollegiate meets.
The club joined the Southern
Intercollegiate Gymnastic League
(SIGL) this year. The league also
includes Georgia Tech, Georgia,
The Citadel, Georgia Southern,
and FSU.
Gymnastics coach Joseph Regna
called Georgia Southern the best
club in the league this year.
Three Clinics
Set for Preps
Clinics in judo, weight training,
soccer and isometric contraction
will be held Saturday morning in
conjunction with the state high
school basketball tournament.
Inaugurated by the College of
Physical Education and Health,
these clinics will be open to the
public and will be conducted by
professors of the departmeht.
Judo clinic will be held from
9-10:30 a.m. at the basketball court
in Florida Gym.
Latest information on the
application of weight training to
physical education and athletics
can be learned during the same
time in Florida Gym, room 216.
Scott will also direct a clinic
in isometric contraction from 10:1 5
-12:15 in the same room.
Alan Moore, coach of the UF
Soccer Club and an assistant pro professor
fessor professor of physical education, will
conduct a clinic on the basic
fundamentals, teaching hints,
strategy and team play aspects
of soccer.
This group will meet at the
basketball court at 10:45 a.m. and
proceed to the soccer field.
UF Cindermen
In ACCGames
UF track coach Percy Beard
announced yesterday that he will
take an 11-man squad to Chapel
Hill, N. C., for the 10th Annual
Atlantic Coast Conference Indoor
Games, Saturday.
Each year, Beard sets up quali qualifying
fying qualifying standards for making the
trip. The nine boys who went last
year finished third or better in
the meet. The Gators finished
second as a team behind a power powerful
ful powerful Furman squad.
The entries will include George
Leach of Tampa in the 60-yard
dash, Garry Ash of Gainesville
in the 70-yard low hurdles and
team captain Charlie Oates of
Daytona in both the 70-yard high
and low hurdles.
Allan Hoffman of Panama City
is entered in the 880-yard run.
Also in this event will be Jim
Brown of Gainesville.
Study in
Guadalajara, Mexico
The Guadalajara Summer School, a
fully accredited University of Arizona
program, conducted in cooperatidn
with professors from Stanford Uni University,
versity, University, University of California, and
Guadalajara, will offer July J to
Aug .11, art, folklore, geogra geography,
phy, geography, history, language and literature
courses. Tuition, board and room is
$240. Write Prof. Juan B. Rael,
P.O. Box 7227. Stanford. Calif.