Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Trie Florida Cos C Knocks
i,-Iy'. ...
Alligator Discount Plan

Vol. 55, No. 59 University of Florida, Gainesville Wednesday, Jan. 9, 1963

Sigma Nu Jumps
As Action Begins

BY DAVE WILKINSON
Staff Writer
Three campus
fraternities have
officially broken political
ties with the Student
Party, marking the
foreseeable birth of a
new political party on
campus.
Representatives of
Sigma Nu, Phi Kappa Tau
and Phi Gampia Delta
along with remnents of the
defunct United Party were
expected to hold a caucus
last night to discuss the

Nazi Column Begins
Inside Gator Today
Today, as a part of the Alligators expanding
services to its readers, the paper presents the first
of several articles written by America Nazi Party
leader George Lincoln Rockwell.
The first installment of the Rockwell Report*
received Monday by the Alligator is reprinted on
the editorial page (page six).
Hard-hitting and aimed as a counterblow to a
recent New York Times article by British writer
H. R. Trevor-Roper, the Report was received
by the Alligator along with a letter written by
National Socialist Party leader Rockwell.
Trevor-Roper says the Nazi Party is dead and
Rockwell Cant Be A Hitler In Todays World.
Rockwell says he can.
The article is definitely not an expression of
Alligator opinion, but is intended to present all
sides to the question.
We hope you see our point.

JFK Meets Red
WASHINGTON (UPI)
President Kennedy is
scheduled to meet Soviet
Deputy Foreign Minister
Vasily V. Kuznetsov late
today for talks expected
to include the issue of
Russian combat troops in
Cuba.
Congress Opens
WASHINGTON (UPI)
The Democratic
controlled 88th Congress
opens today with Presi President
dent President Kennedy apparently
assured of victory in his
first test of strength-a
battle for control of the
powerful House Rules
Committee.

formation of a new party.
But it is speculated that
a n additional political
party will again return to
campus. Student Body
Pres. Bill Trickel,titular
leader of the Student
Party, viewed the two twoparty
party twoparty system on campus
as healthy.
These groups are
interested in changing
their political allignment,
but it is too early to
determine the final status
of political parties,
Trickel said.

NEW'S IN BRIEF

At a pre-opening party
caucus, House Democrats
overwhelmingly endorsed
the Presidents request
that the committee be kept
at 15 members. This would
assure the administration
enough votes to block any
committee attempt to
pigeon-hole Kennedy
legislation.
Tshombe Bows
UNITED NATIONS, N.Y.
(UPI) Katanga President
Moise Tshombe bowed
yesterdayto secretary
General Thants
ultimatum to restore
peace in the Congo, high
diplomatic sources
reported.
The ultimatum of Dec.

Sigma Nu President Dave
McFadden said the
groups are not satisfied
with the present Student
Partys political plan in
the upcoming spring
elections that will decide
Student Government
leaders.
We are preparing to
approve a political party
that is able to provide
the student body with the
most practical and most
representative form of
student government,
McFadden said.
The withdrawl of the
three Orange League
fraternities nipped the
edge of the present
Student Party block voting
majority. Sigma Nu
political representative
Monty Trainer speculated
the Student Party no
longer would have the
tremendous advantage
in the block vote when
a new party is formed.
As yet unnamed, the
party has no platform and
no candidates. But
possible contenders
include Jim Graham, Dick
Gober, Mac Melvin,Paul
Hendrick, Ron LaFace,
and Monty Trainer.

31 gave Tshombe two
weeks to negotiate
Katangas return to the
Congo as a defeated power
or face further U.N.
military action.
Reapportionment
TALLAHASSEE (UPI)
Gov. Farris Bryant said
yesterday the outlook was
hopeful for legislative
agreement on a proposed
42-senator, 144-repre 144-representative
sentative 144-representative reappor reapportionment
tionment reapportionment plan.
Bryant, who has been
polling legislators by
telephone for com commitments
mitments commitments upon which to
base an early special
session call.



By DAVID LAWRENCE, JR.
Editor-In-Chief
A proposed student
discount program with
downtown merchants
apparently has more than
slightly ruffled the
feathers of the
Gainesville Chamber of
Commerce.
The chamber, however,
is chicken. It wont
fight the plan.
Thats the word from
A s s i s ta n t Chamber
Manager Richard
Pahalek, who says,We
do not consider it a sound
business practice.
Were not going to
stop them, Pahalek said
yesterday, because we
like to consider ourselves
the champions of free
enterprise.
The merchants
division of the chamber
and the chamber itself
have gone on record as
being opposed to the
program, which is
backed by UF student
government leaders.
Currently putting out
brochures on the plan is
Secretary of Student
Activities Don Denson,
who plans to put the
program into operation
within the next few weeks.
The plan offers varied
discounts to UF students
shopping at cooperating
stores.

IN THE WIND J^K

With the jumping of
Sigma Nu, Phi Gamma
Delta and Phi Kappa Tau
into the ranks of the old
United Party* the poli political
tical political situation on campus
has changed consider considerably.
ably. considerably.
It is considered that
the Sigma Nus will have
several, orientation and
Blue Key Speakers
Bureau positions, as well
as a possible top five
position for jumping
behind the apparent
candidacy of Paul
Hendrick.
The Phi Gamma Deltas
jump early yesterday
morning brought amaze amazement,
ment, amazement, not as much from
the Student Party as from
the number one Fiji Bill
Trickel.
The Phi Kappa Taus
jump at the same time
was more interesting than
anything else. It has been
reasoned this was done
for a chip off the block.
But these jumps have
severly hurt Student

More than 20 downtown
merchants have signed up
for the program.
The profit structure
and the present markets
are doing what the con consumer
sumer consumer can bear, Pahalek
said. The prices might
have to be jacked up by
the participating
merchants in order to
give students the
discounts, so it might not
be such a saving after
all, he added.
I was a student at
the university not so long
ago, he added, and we*re
not against just student
discounts.*
Were against all such
programs.
Denson, however, denied
the Chamber allegations.
There are many
students at the UF,**
Denson said, who have
financial problems but
deserving of an education
and since scholarship
funds are limited, the
merchants participating
in the discount program
are giving the students a
break.
And we definitely
have first-class
merchants in the plan,
Denson said, including
Lewis Jewelry Co., Pat
Parker Shops and
Tropical Shirt Laundry.
According to Denson,
the increased volume in
downtown stores will
offset a profit loss.

Party which, as it stands
now, will go into the
elections with a block vote
deficit of something over
400 votes.
Not only does Student
Party have the problem
of the block vote deficit
but they also have the
problem of finding a
candidate who will be able
to give a feeling
of assurance to beat the
popular tall independent
Hendrick.
Names for the probable
Student Party pick are
independents Dick Gober,
Honor Court clerk; and
Jim Graham, prominent
member of Legislative
Council.
Fraternity men
considered for the job of
running for the presidency
are; Hugh McArthur,
current SG Vice-
President; Danny
OConnel, SG Secretary
of organizations, and Ken
Kennedy, former Uni University
versity University Religious
Association president.



Page 2

The Florida Alligator Wednesday, January 9, 1963

CD Course
Given on TV
A Civil Defense course
leading to a credit
certificate is being
offered over WUFT-TV,
Ch. 5, each Tuesday and
Thursday at 8:30 p.m.
Thursday night will be
a repeat for those missing
the Tuesday broadcast.
Specially prepared
booklets for the course
may be picked up at the
Florida Union Infor Information
mation Information Desk. Upon taking
a final at the end of the
12-hour course, a credit
certificate will be
awarded.
Civil Defense officials
urge all UF faculty and
staff members to take
the course via the
convenience of television,
as it is to be required
of all state employees.

Flay "Crazy Questions
(Based on the hilarious book "The Question Man.")
50 CASH AWARDS A MONTH. ENTER NOW. HERE'S HOW: I -|
First, think of an answer. Any answer. Then come up with RULES: Th Reuben H. Donnelley Corp. will judge entries on the beels of
humor (up to %), clarity and freshness (up to *s) and appropriateness (up
a nutty, surprising question for it, and you ve done a to and their decisions will be final. Duplicate prizes will be awarded
Crazy Question. Its the easy new way for students to ln the event of ti#s Entries must be the or| ginai works of the entrants and
, , must be submitted in the entrant's own name. There will be 50 awards
maKe loot. Study the examples below, then do your own. every month, October through April. Entries received during each month
Send them, with your name, address, college and class, be consldered tar .that month's awards. Any entry received after April
r'CT i i irvv d C 4C ui w . u .... 30. 1963, will not be eligible, pnd all become the property of The American
tO Vat I LUv/laT, BOX 04r, Mt. Vernon lu, IN. Y. Winning Tobacco Company. Any college student may enter the contest, except em ementries
entries ementries will be awarded $25.00. Winning entries sub- ploy* of The American Tobacco Company, its advertising agencies and
... .. .. . e ~ Reuben H. Donnelley, and relatives of the said employees. Winners will be
mitted On the inside Os a Lucky Strike wrapper Will get a notified by mail. Contest subject to all federal, state, and local regulations.
$25.00 bonus. Enter as often as you like. Start right now!
THE ANSWER: I THE ANSWER: I THE ANSWER:
I SWiHa PiJS i *>"'* G.V* up | FIRST
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| THE ANSWER: j THE ANSWER: I THE ANSWER: j
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THE ANSWER IS:
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THE QUESTION IS: How does one discover fine-tobacco taste in a cigarette? /
Well, that was easy enough. Luckies are famous for taste. Its the reason why we / ml
say: Lucky smokers stay Lucky smokers. (Why dont you say it a few timel?) L c G4 c rr g 5 4j
Find out for yourself wfi7Lucky Strike is the most popular regular-size cigarette *V7
among college students. Pick up a pack today!
qa.t.c*. Product of c %6veeo- is our middle *****

Education Meet Upcoming

TALLAHASSEE (UPI)
Recommendations for
$350 million worth of
projects, all aimed at
making Florida a national
leader in higher education
are expected at the
second Governors
on Education
here Jan. 17
One of the projects
discussed is sure to be
a multi-million-dollar
space institute. But it is
unlikely all of the
recommendations will be
put into effect at one time.
Gainesville is one of
the Florida cities prom prominently
inently prominently mentioned for the
space institute.
The conference, which
will bring together some
70 leaders of various
agencies such as the
Council of 100, the
Community Impact

Committee of the Cape
Canaveral area and key
legislators, will be
chiefly for the purpose of
organizing views on the
states higher education
needs and means of
financing them.
One financing plan
suggested already by the
Council of 100, and backed
by Gov. Farris Bryant is
issuing revenue bond
issues to pay for projects
which are badly needed
but for which state funds
are not in sight. This
would be similar to
Bryants $25 million bond
issue to pay for science
buildings at present
universities.
There have been reports
Bryant will recommend
an educational bond issue
of some SIOO million to
the coming Legislature,

but Bryant has said the
figure will not be this
high.
The State Board of
Control, however, will
seek $145.6 million from

classified

LAMBRETTA 1956 2-
seater, 150 LD model.
Excellent condition. Best
offer. FR 2-5898. (58-
st-c).
GRADUATE STUDENT
wanted to share 2-bed 2-bedroom
room 2-bedroom duplex, 825 NE Bth
Ave. Your share, SSO
month. Marvin Moss,
Room 230 D, Eng. Bldg,
FR 6-2365. (58-st-c).
1953 CHEVROLET 2-
door, automatic trans transmission,
mission, transmission, radio, heater,
dependable transporta transportation.
tion. transportation. $250. Phone FR 6-
2094 after 5. (58-3 t-c).

the coming session to
operate existing state
universities and another
$103.5 million for
buildings at these insti institutions.
tutions. institutions.

FEBRUARY trip to
Nassau for coeds. Phone
FR 2-0707. (58-3 t-c).
1962 AUSTIN-HE ALY
Sprite roadster. Less
than 3,000 miles. Ex Excellent
cellent Excellent condition. Heater
and tonneau cover. Very
reasonable. Call FR 2-
6331 or FR 2-3874. (57-
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EUROPE -- DISCOVER
this bargain! Europe,
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EXPERIMENT WITH
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MENS INTERNATIONAL
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Phone FR 6-1186. (59
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before Friday (59-2 t-c).
HELP WANTED--beauti WANTED--beautician.
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Religion Week Features Ivy Prof

Keynoting with What
it means to be a Human,
Dr. George A. Buttrick
of Harvard University
will kick off the 14th
Annual Religion in Life
Week on Monday, Jan. 20,
at 7:30 p.m., in University
Auditorium.
The theme of the Week,
scheduled for Jan. 20-25,
will be Our Search for
Meaning, and according
to Religion-in-Life
Chairman Mike Crews,
will involve finding a
real direction in the busy
circle of modern life.*
Buttrick, heading a list
o f four principal
speakers, will also
deliver the convocation
address in the Florida
Gymnasium the following
Tuesday at 10:55 a.m.
Other speakers are
William Muehl of the Yale
University Divinity
School, W. Waldo Beach,
of the Duke University
Divinity School and
Sylvan D. Schwartzman
of the Hebrew Union
College.
The Religion-in-Life
Committee feels that in
the confusion and com complexity
plexity complexity of this modern
world, man tends to lose
direction ana any real

'You Name it Well Solve it
Congressional Session Theme

WASHINGTON (UPI)
The main issues
confronting the 88th
Congress when it
convenes today are:
TAXES President
Kennedy will ask for an
across-the-board cut in
individual and corporation
income taxes. He wants
Congress to offset part
of the revenue loss by
closing some existing tax
/loopholes. Congress Congressional
ional Congressional conservatives argue
spending should be cut
first, so tax reduction
wont throw the
government deep into the
red.
MEDICARE The
administration will wage
an all out campaign
for approval of its
controversial plan to
provide health insurance
for the aged under Social
Security. The biggest
hurdle will be getting the
biU to the House floor
over the vigorous
opposition pf Republicans
and some conservative
Democrats on the House
Ways & Means
Committee.
RULES COMMITTEE-
Administration support supporters
ers supporters wiU seek to enlarge
the House Rules
Committee. Without more
Kennedy Democrats, it
will be dominated by a

meaning for his life,
Crews said.
Were asking these
men to expound on that

wL Hr
d u jjl|;
GEORGE A. BUTTRICK
.. .headlines speakers for upcoming Religion-ln-Life*
Week program.

conservative coalition of
Republicans and Southern
Democrats hostile to
many administration
programs.
AID TO EDUCATION-
Kennedy is expected to
repeat his request for aid
to public elementary and
secondary schools. But
this program apparently
is foredoomed unless the

NEED
A
JOB ?
FINDING YOURSELF WITH A LOT OF
EXTRA TIME ON YOUR HANDS BECAUSE OF
THE NEW TRIMESTER SYSTEM? IF SO, THERE
IS A WIDE VARIETY OF JOB OPENINGS ON
THE STAFF OF THE SEMINOLE, THE NATION'S
ONLY TRIMESTER YEARBOOK. IF YOU ARE
INTERESTED IN JOINING OUR STAFF, MAKE
IT DOWN TO ROOM 9 OF THE FLORIDA
UNION SOMETIME AFTER 2 p.m., JANUARY
9 (Wednesday) THROUGH JANUARY 11 (Friday).

problem from their
various fields, he said.
Buttrick, besides being
professor and Preacher

administration can find
some way to resolve the
religious controversy
over inclusion of
parochial schools.
FARM POLICY The
administration is putting
together a new farm plan
aimed at permanently
curbing the nations
chronic surpluses of feed
grains.

Wednesday, January 9, 1963 The Florida Alligator

to the University at
Harvard, has taught at
various theological
seminaries, has lectured
abroad and is the author
of numerous books on
religious topics.
Muehl, a Religion-in-
Life speaker at the UF
in 1956 and 1958, studied
law at the University of
Michigan. He has arbi arbitrated
trated arbitrated labor-management
disputes and is the author
of Politics for
Christians and Mixing
Religion and Politics.
He is Professor of
Practical Theology at
Yale.
Professor of Christian
Ethics and Director of
Graduate Studies in
Religion at Duke, Beach
is a member of the
editorial board of
Christianity and
Chrisis* and is the author

mid-winter 4tfr w:;
CLEARANCE
LONG-SLEEVED i
Sport
shirts 'flu/
INCLUDING
ARROW, 1
VAN HEUSEN
AND (EXCLUSIVELY \
YOURS AT WILSON'S) \ '
McGREGOR* Tha styles that ar.
sure to register"
on campus oro horo
NOW 2.99 3.9?
ALL SHIRTS ARE FROM CURRENT STOCK
Men's Shop, w

of Conscience on
Campus.*
Rabbi Schwartzman is
Professor of Jewish
Religious Education at
Hebrew Union College. A
1962 Religion -in Life
Week speaker here, he
is the co-author of
Meeting Your Life
Problems.**
The Religion-in-Life
Committee is a branch
of the University
religious Association
(URA) and is composed
of Crews, Carven Angel,
Vernon Swartsel, Tish
Bates, Cathy Pierce, Lee
Sharp, and University
religious Association
President Buddy Jacobs.
URA Advisor is Assist Assistant
ant Assistant Professor of Religion
Dr. Austin Creel.
Money for Religion-in-
Life Week comes from
student government
funds.

Page 3



Page 4

The Florida Alligator Wednesday, January 9, 1963

finmtii
{*&
plough & uon|.
-'Otwd to be i '9UUOW
(wA* 7 t* is that tt. 4*l liqnt
V 4A AAA D, y DU I,IC ** fUI
to .'"moru urgeu W I II II I
\ IZjUUU You, Mr. Merchant
/ 1 ti/tlme would be i-qw* OWJO mu l
/ / viewing applican-ioq bt taJn \ IJI
/ / applicative group of high achr I H
/ / applicant* are drawn. I'TT.!*!? I I
I / He aiso au? iaw*<>>g eefenoc 'ill
1 / to seek the courwfl uo JAas I I
/ \ versiUes and othwad luuompp 111
//i A t\ tt" l v-OTPwd P* y ,*/ / I
// / / ln-state student ;X9 J w**b 1 J'
111 \ I
'Mr -m m >
-')V
m I
a


1 [
IF YOU CAN REACH HIMf
. V
't- . .
University of Florida students spend more than ONE MILLION DOLLARS A MONTH for goods
and services ranging from prepared meals (85% spend an average of $39.53 a month each) to
newspapers and magazines (71% spend an average of $1.65 a month each).
REACH HIM
(and his gal)
THROUGH THE MOST WIDELY CIRCULATED AND BEST READ
MEDIUM ON CAMPUS:
+
The Alligator
| Phone 6-3261, Ext. 2832 Ask for Advertising
l V-'. . r A
* U.F. Marketing Class Survey, 1961. Complete chart of expenditures upon request.



Theater Bans Sex
As Midnighters Cut

Sex apparently has reared its ugly head for the
last time on Gainesville movie screens.
The State Theatre has abolished the midnight
flick.
Interviews with UF students, administrators and
town peopl-e indicated any dubious repute of the
theatre was due to the midnight movie, said temporary
Manager John G. Meehan.
He explained while all Hollywood pictures use
some sex, no more pictures will be shown at the
State with solely that theme. The theatre will offer
a variety of pictures, not just current releases.
Scheduled during this trimester are favorite old
American films, operettas and the American Heritage
Series.
The new policy should attract more women viewers
to the theatre which in the past has attracted mostly
men, Meehan said.
A $30,000 remodeling job begun in December
has been completed at the theatre except for a
few details which are still being added. All seats
in the theatre were rebuilt, a new concession stand
was added and the lobby has been enlarged.
The whole building was repainted.

Life Saving
Course Begins
On Thursday
Life-saving techniques
for the treatment of auto
crash victims and other
multiple injury
emergency patients will
be the subject of a surgery
seminar for Florida
physicians here Thursday
through Saturday.
Four visiting surgical
specialists including
Dr. W. A. Altemeier,
chairman of the Depart Department
ment Department of Surgery at the
University of Cincinnati
College of Medicine
will join members of the
UF College of Me die in e
faculty in presenting the
program.
The Seminar is part of
the colleges postgraduate
education programfor
Florida physicians. It will
include lectures on
techniques by members of
the faculty and dis discussions
cussions discussions of specific
cases.
Sessions get under way
with registration at 8:30
a.m. Thursday and run
through Saturday
afternoon.
Final Exams Set
Easter Weekend
Final exams for the
winter trimester are
scheduled to begin
Thursday, April 11, and
will continue through
Easter weekend.
Dean Robert Mautz of
Academic Affairs said
last night aUF committee
was working on the
problem but refused
further comment.

UF Prof Predicts
Ceremony Death

The high school student
of 1985 wont have a
graduation day predicts
UF educator Kimball
Wiles.
And, the American
high school program of
tomorrow will bear little
resemblance to that of
today if the education
system keeps abreast of
technological advances
and awakens to the needs
of society, he said.
Deleted from the high
school of 1985 in addition
to graduation days, he
predicts, will be teachers
with less than a masters
degree and the unit of
credit system for courses
as we know it.
Wiles, a nationally
recognized authority on
secondary education,
made his projections on
the high school of
tomorrow in a book just
released by Prentice-
Hall entitled The
Changing Curriculum of
the American High
School. He is professor
and chairman of curri curriculum
culum curriculum and instruction in
the UFs College of
Education, and president presidentelect
elect presidentelect of the national
Association for
Supervision and Curricu-

_ fom STARTS TOMORROW
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11 DORIS STEPHEN JIMMY MARTHA k
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IV
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SERAFINO ROMUALDI
...noted labor leader
will speak Thursday at
Bp.m. in Motherly
Auditorium on "Labor
Movements."

lum Development.
According to Wiles,
students will be finishing
high school at their own
pace of achievement
instead of chronological
age, depending on when
they complete school
requirements, and course
credit will be distributed
equally in all subject
areas. He also says that
teacher training will be
revised.
Wiles predicts the school
program 25 years hence
will be divided into four
phasesanalysis of
experiences and values,
acquisition of funda fundamental
mental fundamental skills, exploration
of the cultural heritage
and specialization and
creativity.
Wiles also sees a
school plant equipped with
rooms of varying size
rather than uniform size
classrooms; school pro programs
grams programs supported from
federal ffinds and teacher
education drastically
revised. Some teachers
I HEELS put on in 5 minutes
jj SOLES put on in 15 minutes
I MODERNSHOEI
REPAIR SHOP
Botross From hi notional bonk |

Wednesday, January 9, 1963 The Florida Alligator

Love At First Sight
By MIKE DOYLE
Movie Reviewer
The Lion 1 at the Florida is a picturesque story
of a little girls love for a big lion,
Pamela Franklin as the girl does perhaps the
best acting job in the film .Raised on her stepfathers
East African game preserve, she is a worry-to
her mother, boredly portrayed by Capucine, who
fears for the childs social opportunities in the veld.
In an attemDt to rescue Little Worry from a blaah

life, Mom sends for her
former husband the girls
dad, William Holden. Then
a Hollywood love triangle
appears between mother,
her ex and her present
husband*.
Add to this the esoteric
problems of a bunch of
Masai warriors, that lion,
African scenery, you have
the kind of film you can
go to with the whole
family.

will be trained primarily
for lecture sessions while
others will be trained for
working with individuals.

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Page 5



Page 6

The Florida Alligator Wednesday, January 9, 1963

(
4.
Yhc Papers Aim; All the news with decency our only limit
if meredith flunks?
THE NEWS that James Meredith is apparently
flunking out of Ole Miss meets two reactions on
the part of those who supported his admission
into the University of Mississippi.
Strange as it may sound there seems to be a
feeling on the part of some that Meredith has somehow
let them down by having the nerve to be failing
his subjects. We could have at least picked an
intelligent guy. someone remarked a few days
ago. This attitude is obviously ridiculous and
hopefully such comments are made mostly in jest.
But there must be other things to make jokes about.
The other and most frequent response to the
news is a remark more or less to the effect that
it really isnt fair or an expressed feeling of
frustration that in addition to all that he has already
gone through, Meredith should have to suffer this
final indignity.
TO ANYONE looking at the situation rationally
it is clear that a person in Merediths position
would probably be failing. To expect anyone of even
the highest intelligence to work well under constant
harrassment from fellow students, obscene remarks
scrawled on the wall of his room, assassination
attempts, and a general atmosphere of hostility and
hate is unrealistic to sav the least.
IF, THEREFORE, Meredith does fail his subjects
it is hardly fair to consider his position a normal
one in the determination of whether he should be
asked to leave school. It would be blatant hypocrisy
for the administration suddenly to begin treating
Meredith as a normal student who somehow just
could not manage to make the required grade point.
IN CONSIDERING what to do if Meredith fails
to pass his courses the administration faces two
problems. If it chooses to allow him to remain
despite his failing average it will be open to charges
of partiality from those wtm are against Meredith.
On the other hand, it the university does expeHiim,
it Will a barrage of negative public opinion
from integrationists, charging Ole Miss with deli deliberate
berate deliberate collusion with the segregationists and a dis disregard
regard disregard of the realities of the situation.
IN A SENSE then, there is no solution to the
problem if looked at completely objectively. It is
true that a failing student should be expelled and it
is also true that Meredith has not been able to study
under normal conditions.
(Editors noteDue to the fact that it was yester yesterday
day yesterday learned that James Meredith was tentatively
planning not to enroll for the next semester at
Mississippi, we feel the above editorial reprinted in
part from the Friday, December 7 issue of the Michi Michigan
gan Michigan Daily and written by Jean Tenander is only
appropriate.)
The Florida Alligator
Egsgg-gBSMgggw--
Editor*ln*Chi#f. .David Lawrence Jr.
Managing Editor Dave West
Acting Managing Editors Maryanne Aw trey,
Ben Garrett
Business Manager Gary Burke
Sports Editor. Don PHd.
Executive Editor Mike Gora
Assistant Sports Editor Walker*Lundy
Assistant to the Editor Sandy Sweitzer
News Editor Judy Barnes
Editorial Page Editor Ron Spencer
Assistant Layout Editor George Moore
Copy Editors Carol Buller, Evy Buzzed
Editorial Assistant ..Howard Stonesifer
TIB FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is tbs afticUl stsdsat newspaper as the University
at Florida sod Is peillsbart dally except Monday sad Saturday. TUB FLORIDA
ALLIGATOR Is saOsrsd s aaooori class matter at the United States Post Office
St Gstsasvllls, Florida. Office j arc located Is Rooms 8,10, and 15 la the Florida
tMm MMtaf Basement. Telephone University of Florida.F6-5261, Ext. ansa,
sat reqsset either editorial office or hsslnese office.
qplilrm soloed In personal oolsmss os this page dff sot necessarily reflect
m* mtmotm at Iho edlfeona. Only editorials are the official solos of the paper

out.

The Rockwell Report

'A Rockwell Can Be Hitler

The British writer, Mr.
H. R. Trevor-Roper, has
written, in a special
article for The New York
Times, headlined A
ROCKWELL CANT BE A
HITLER IN TODAYS
WORLD, that the
circumstances neededfor
a Nazi revival are not
and will not be present
in the foreseeable
futureand that, even if
such circumstances were
present, men like Colin
Jordan and myself are
such empty-h ead ed,
childish and slavish
imitations of Hitler that
we have no chance of
success with our
movement.
On Fingerprinting

Faculty Letter Expresses Satire

MARYANNE AWTREY
. . managing
editors note.
Just before vacation a
document circulated a among
mong among the faculty.
It read as follows:
Office of Public Educa Education
tion Education
Tallahassee
December 11, 1962
(Employee distribution
only)
MEMORANDUM
Upon completion of the
present program of fin fingerprinting
gerprinting fingerprinting all state
employees, the De Department
partment Department of Public Safety
has been instructed to be begin
gin begin the second phase of
the Employee Registra Registration
tion Registration Program. Equipment
has been obtained for
placing a small, subcut subcutaneous,
aneous, subcutaneous, indelible markon
the left arm of each em employee,
ployee, employee, using the
previously assigned em employee
ployee employee number. This sys system
tem system will correspond to
the current scheme for
capital goods inventory
enumeration. Female
employees may have the
option of having the mark
placed below the left sca scapula.
pula. scapula. Division heads have
been instructed to sche schedule
dule schedule their personnel for
minimal disruption to
their unit activities. The
details of this scheduling

There is a bare
possibility that Mr.
Trevor-Roper, in spite of
his numerous degrees and
presumed study of avail available
able available facts on which to base
his article, is simply
ignorant of the actual
ideological and soci sociological
ological sociological situation which
has led Colin Jordan and
me to stake our lives and
our careers on the belief
that the circumstances
ARE ripe for the
continuation (not the
revival) of the
fascist doctrine, and
that our movement, far
from being out-dated and
dead, is so keenly tuned
to the temper of the times

will be announced when
complete.
This phase of the Em Employee
ployee Employee Registration Pro Program
gram Program is in accord with
the directives, of the Go Governor
vernor Governor and the Board of
Control. It is believed
essential for continued
administrative efficiency
and to ensure the secur security
ity security of the State.
C.G. Salis, Director
Employee Registration
Program
Spurious though it
may be it demonstrates
the mixed emotions fac faculty
ulty faculty members had about
the fingerprinting pro program.
gram. program.
It is a credit to the
calibre of the UF facul faculty
ty faculty that they could take
a humorous position on
the added regimentation
of the academic commun community.
ity. community.
One of the most out outstanding
standing outstanding qualities of a
democratic society is the
existence of satirical
thought, and the outlet
for such thought.
In a society where a
record such as The
First Family* and inci incidental
dental incidental thoughts like the
above can flourish with without
out without suppression, a Castro
or a Khrushchev could not
survive.

that it cannot help but
succeed, in spite of the
campaign of intellectual
and physical terrorism
applied against it all over
the earth.
In fact, it is our
contention that the very
ferocity of the campaign
of lies, suppression,
illegal jailings and
violence employed
against us is clear proof
that our opponents do not
dare permit the doctrines
of National Socialism to
be placed fairly in the
market-p lace of ideas,
because they, too, are
certain that these
doctrines will prevail in
fair competition with both
Communism, and its
pimping little sister,
Liberal Democracy. We
are ALWAYS presented
in every medium of public
information as hood hoodlums
lums hoodlums and bullies without
an idea in our heads.
A perfect example of
this campaign of
suppression and violence
against the doctrines of
National Socialism to
prevent their fair
evaluation is provided by
the current instance. Mr.
Trevor-Ropers article
is given considerable
space in the influential
New York Timesto
belittle and even laugh at
the two of us, but past
experience indicates I
will be given no space at
all to reply to thecfe
unfair attacks and the
Times, published by the
Jewish Sulzburgers, will
continue to foist the
impression on the public
that we are hate hatemongers
mongers hatemongers *, lunatics
and political gangsters .
When we protest this
unfairness, the inevitable
answer of the suppres suppressors
sors suppressors and misrepresenters
is that we are Itoo
illiterate and crude to
b e heard by cultured
decent people.
(Editor's note Today,
in the first of several
installments, the
Alligator is reprinting in
full the text of a bulletin
entitled The Rockwell
Report, which was sent
to us from the American
Nazi Party.



UF Swim Champs
Ready for Georgia

UFs swimming Gators,
whove made other South Southeastern
eastern Southeastern Conference
swimming teams look like
a bunch of dog-paddlers
in recent years, open
their 1963 season against
the University of Geor Georgia
gia Georgia at Florida pool Thurs Thursday.
day. Thursday.
The varsity meet is at
4 p.m., following a clash
between the freshmen
teams of the SEC rivals
beginning at 3 p.m. #
The varsity Gators, SEC
champions for seven con consecutive
secutive consecutive years,f have
beaten the Bulldogs 31
times out of 38 meets.
The Florida Georgia ser series
ies series began in 1931.
Bill Harlan, beginning
his first year as Flori-
head swimming
coach, said Florida
should be favored in the
meet.
Looking at last sea seasons
sons seasons performance, 13
wins and one loss, we
should definitely be the
favorites, said Harlan.
The Gators have ten
lettermen returning to the
squad this season. Co Cocaptains
captains Cocaptains Terry Green and
Eddie Reese, and All-
American butterfly spec specialist
ialist specialist Jerry Liwingston,
figure as key point pointgetters
getters pointgetters in the Florida
drive for another SEC
title.
The Bulldogs lost only
two men from last years
team, and have a large
number of returning ex experienced
perienced experienced swimmers.
Green and Reese, sen seniors,
iors, seniors, hold five Florida
varsity records between

Halfback Critical

CHEYENNE, Wyo. (UPI)
-Dave Marion, a powerful
University of Wyoming
halfback and one of the
brightest football pros prospects
pects prospects in the Rockies, lay
motionless with a bullet
wound in his neck yes yesterday,
terday, yesterday, praying he will
not be paralyzed for life.
Doctors said the next
few days of the 20-year 20-yearold
old 20-yearold sophomores stay in
De Paid Hospital would
be critical, determin determining
ing determining whether the paralysis
that immobilized him be below
low below the neck will be per permanent.
manent. permanent.
Marion was struck in the
throat Sunday night by a
22-caliber bullet from an
automatic pistol fired ac acrTlNYTOT^n
rTlNYTOT^n acrTlNYTOT^n
I PLAY SCHOOL!
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1 24 S.E. Bth St. I

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them. Green, a grad graduate
uate graduate of Miami Jackson,
set varsity records last
year in three free-style
events.
Reese, of Daytona Beach,
holds records in the 200-
yard breaststroke and the
individual medley. He
also scored a first in the
200-yard backstroke for
a new record and is a
strong member of the
medley relay team.
Livingston, a junior and
a graduate of Jacksonville
Fletcher, ranked 6th in
the nation in the butter butterfly
fly butterfly in the NCAA meet in
New Haven, Conn., last
spring. His best time
for the event was :53.4
seconds.
Junior Gator Dick Far Farwell
well Farwell promises to be a
strong contender in the
backstroke event. He
holds the Florida record
in the 100-yard and the
200-yard backstroke. Al Also
so Also swimming backstroke,
a strong team feature ac according
cording according to Harlan, is let letterman
terman letterman Buddy Floyd.

cldentally by one of his
best friends, first-string
Wyoming halfback Mike
Walker, 20, of Detroit.
Walker was overcome
with grief and under sed sedation
ation sedation Monday.
Authorities said no cri criminal
minal criminal charge would be fil filed
ed filed because the shooting
was clearly an accident.
Walker, who had just re returned
turned returned from a rabbit hunt hunting
ing hunting trip, had taken the
cartridge clip from the
pistol and thought it was
empty. But one bullet was
left in the chamber.
PROPANE
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ON HIS MARK
.. .and ready to go in
Thrusday's opening swim
meet with Georgia Uni
versity is All-American
butterfly specialist Jerry
Livingston.

m
how any student may
get his picture in
the seminole
f
- A' ~
Underclassmen may sign up for picture appointments either in their
dorms or at the Florida Union. All men's and women's dormitories will
have desks set up in the lobbies from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m., January 14 to 18.
Appointments may also be made in room 14 of the Florida Union from
8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., January 14 to 18.
Seniors must sign up for an appointment time in the main office
of their colleges BEFORE JANUARY 14.
ALL STUDENTS SIGNING UP FOR A PICTURE AND PAYING THEIR
$1.50 SITTING FEE WILL BE GIVEN A DEFINITE APPOINTMENT TIME.
NO ONE WILL HAVE TO WAIT IN LINE OR WASTE TIME. IF YOU
ARE ON TIME YOU WILL BE ABLE TO FINISH QUICKLY AND PAINLESSLY.
Si'***'|
- - ....

Wednesday January 9, 1963 The Florida Alligator

gator
sports

Infante Will Sign
With Buffalo Bills

Lindy Infante, dandy
Gator halfback who sat
out the last five Flori Florida
da Florida games because of a
leg injury, will get ano another
ther another chance to play foot footbal
ball footbal with the profess professional
ional professional Buffalo Bills of the
American Football Lea League.
gue. League.
'Bama Upsets
Miss. State
By United Press Inter International
national International
Alabama tore up the dope
sheet in a surprising 77-
72 overtime basketball
victory over favored
Mississippi State Monday
night at Tuscaloosa, Ala.
The Crimson Tide led
into the final minute of the
game, but Doug Hutton of
Mississippi State sank a
goal with 58 seconds
remaining to knot the
score at 68-all and push
the game into overtime.

Infante said yesterday
hes agreed to play with
Buffalo but wont sign with
the pro club until June.
The delay will enable
him to remain on a UF
athletic scholarship
rather than change to an
assistantship during this
trimester.
Infante, a product* of
Miami Senior, was a
consistent ground-gainer
in the Gator backfield for
three years and was of often
ten often labeled the best all allround
round allround player on the squad
by Floridas coaches.
Enroll Your Children at...
NANCY JANE
Nursery School
522 N. Main St.
Phone FR 2-2589

Page 7



Page 8

The Florida Alligator Wednesday, January 9, 1963

UF Boosts
Scoring Pace

By Don Pride
Gator Sports Editor
UFs torrid scoring
pace in Mondays Tulane
game put the teams field
goal average at a solid
48 per cent, with four
Gators sinking more than
half of their shots.
Sophomore guard Tom
Baxley, already looking
like an all-time UF great,
raised his own game gamepoint
point gamepoint average by 1.7 points
to 17.7 with a dazzling 33-
point effort against the
Green Wave.
His partner in crime,
Brooks Henderson,
jumped from 15.6 to 16.8
by scoring 27 against
Tulane.
Henderson was brilliant
from the free throw line,
putting 11 of 12 through the
nets and running his

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overall free-throw mark
to 64 in 77 attemptsan
average of 83.1.
Baxley has hit 49.6 of
his field goal attempts,
Henderson 42.3.Bothhave
been brilliant as play playmakers
makers playmakers and defenders.
The four Gators hitting
more than 50 per cent of
their shots are Forwards
Dick Tomlinson (51.2),
Taylor Stokes (51.1), and
Tom Barbee (54.2), and
center Bob Hoffman
(52.8).
Stokes, the only
non-sophomore Gator in
the starting five, scored
18 Monday night,boosting
his average to 11.3.
Barbee (15.3) and
Tomlinson (10.6) round
out the players averaging
in double figures.
The Gator team has

1 jr**
y Isl
TOM BAXLEY
.. .averaging 17.7
averaged 77.2 per game
while winning six and
losing four. Opponents
have averaged 71.8.
As far as UF coach
Norman Sloan is
concerned, the upswing
in Gator scoring couldnt
come at a better time.
His team has a chance
to even the score with
powerful Miami
University, double doubleovertime
overtime doubleovertime winner over the
Gators in the opener, in
Thursdays 8:15 p.m.
battle at Florida Gym.

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111. Steaming
Toward Cinci

By TIM MORIARTY
UPI Sports Writer
Illinois is continuing to
pick up steam for its
head -on collision with
top ranked Cincinnati at
the Chicago Stadium Jan.
26.
Sparked by Tal Brody,
Bill Small and Dave Dow Downey-who
ney-who Downey-who totaled 66 points
between them-the mini
showed plenty of fight in
turning back Ohio State,
90-78, Monday night at
Champaign, 111.
Brody scored 23 points,
one more than Small, and
Downey added 21 as Il Illinois
linois Illinois ran its season re record
cord record to 10-1 and gained
revenge for a 102-79
clobbering by Ohio State
last season when the
Buckeyes ruled the col college
lege college basketball world.
Ohio State, which took
over the No. 5 spot in
this weeks UPI ratings,
led during most of the
first half and reached the
intermission with a 37-
36 advantage. Then Brody
and Small started clicking
for the third ranked
Hlini. Brody, an im import
port import from Trenton,N.J.,
scored 15 points and
Small added 16 after in intermission
termission intermission to hand Ohio

College Standings

NEW YORK (UPI)
-The United Press In International
ternational International major basket basketball
ball basketball ratings with first firstplace
place firstplace votes and won-lost
records in parentheses:
1. Cincinati 35 11-0
Points: 350
2. Loyola 111. 13-0
Points: 290
3. Illinois 9-1
Points: 219
4. Arizona State 12-1
Points: 177
5. Ohio State 9-1
Points: 159
6. Duke 10-2
Points: 147
7. Georgia Tech 9-0
Points: 106
8. Mississippi State 9-2
Points: 71
9. Wichita 9-3
Points: 70
10. UCLA 10-4

Fight Date Near

NEW YORK (UPI)
Announcement of the site
and date for the return
Sonny Liston-Floyd Pat Patterson
terson Patterson heavyweight title
fight is expected today,
now that the World Box Boxing
ing Boxing Association WBA has
unexpectedly approved it.
Emile Bruneau of New
Orleans, chairman of the
WBAs World Champion Championship
ship Championship Committee, an--

State its second defeat in
11 games. Gary Bradds
scored 33 points for the
Buckeyes but appeared to
tire in the second half,
hitting for only 13 in the
final 20 minutes.
FACES CONFERENCE
FOES
Illinois has two more
Big Ten Conference en engagements-against
gagements-against engagements-against Pur Purdue
due Purdue and Northwestern Northwesternbefore
before Northwesternbefore running into Cin Cincinnati
cinnati Cincinnati in what should be
the seasons top game.
Indiana kept pace with
the Hlini in the Big Ten
race by whipping Purdue,
85-71, Monday night at
Bloomington, Ind. Jimmy
Rayl scored 25 points for
the Hoosiers although he
sat out the last 10 min minutes
utes minutes of the first half af after
ter after Indiana raced to an
11-point lead.
Sophomore center Bill
Buntins 34 points led
Michigan to an 88-67 triu triumph
mph triumph over lowa in another
Big Ten game. B untin put
the Wolverines ahead to
stay with a lay-up shot
early in the second half
after they fell behind, 38-
36, at intermission. Don
Roach led lowa with 15
points.

Points: 64
Second 10 teams -11,
Oregon State, 50; 12,
North Carolina, 26; 13
tie, West Virginia and
Colorado State Univ., 23
each; 15, Kentucky, 19;
16, Auburn, 15; 17, Col Colorado,
orado, Colorado, 14; 18, St .Josephs
Pa., 12; 19 tie, Stan Stanford,
ford, Stanford, Wisconsin, Califor California
nia California and Utah State 8 each.
Others-DePaul, 7; St.
Louis and Niagara, 6
each; Bradley and Notre
Dame, 5 each Miami Fla.
and St. Bona venturi, 4
each; Kansas and Texas,
3 each; Bowling Green,
Pittsburgh, Oklahoma
State and Texas A and
M, 2 each; Kansas State,
Virginia Tech, NYU, Van Vanderbilt,
derbilt, Vanderbilt, Seattle, Prince Princeton
ton Princeton and Pennsylvania, 1
each.

nounced Monday night that
the WBAs ban against
the return bout has been
rescinded.
Ex champion Patter Patterson,
son, Patterson, who has the privilege
of choosing the site and
date under the turn-bout
contract, has been con considering
sidering considering four cities: Bal Baltimore,
timore, Baltimore, Miami Beach,
Cleveland and Las Vegas.
Nev.