Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
The Florida
Alligator

Vol. 55/ No. 58 University of Florida, Gainesville Tuesday, January 8, 1963

City Says 'No Deal'
To Co-op Housing

BY GLORIA GALL
Staff Writer
A $ 1.5 million
cooperative apartment
primarily for UF students
and personnel will not be
built in the northwest
section.
Gainesville City
Commission defeated the
planned project Tuesday
night after months of
controversial discussion.
The proposed co cooperative
operative cooperative was to be built
between Lake Meta and
Northwest 21 Avenue and
midway between
Northwest Sixth and 13th
Street.
The original plan
presented to the
commission five weeks
ago was to build a co cooperative
operative cooperative of a majority
of efficiency units. This
was changed in the final
proposal (which was
defeated) to one and two
bedroom apartments.
Gainesville realtor John
Merrill represented the
backers of the co cooperative
operative cooperative development at
the commission meeting.
The change to one and
two-bedroom apartments
resulted after university
officials advised Merrill
that efficiencies were not

I
GEORGE LINCOLN ROCKWELL
January 1, IM3 I
Editor
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isSSto2r2aTa^ ~, n

in demand.
Although the change
would have meant a higher
income bracket clientel,
residents in the
surrounding area voiced
objections at all of the
public hearings.
One of the main
problems facing the
commission, was paving
of streets adjacent to the
proposed cooperative and
access to main routes
to business districts.
Financing of the paving
would have been done by
assessing property
Class Total
About Same
A total of 11,784 UF
students have completed
registration at last re reports
ports reports for the second tri trimester
mester trimester according to Re Registrar
gistrar Registrar Richard S.
Johnson.
The figure compares
with 11,711 who had com completed
pleted completed registration at the
end of the first week of
second semester re registration
gistration registration last year.
Late registration, which
continues through Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday and no one will
be allowed to start late
registration after 3 p.m.
on that day, Johnson said.

owners of the narrow
residential streets
surrounding the cooper cooperative.
ative. cooperative.
This area was developed
before the land became
part of Gainesville and
thus many houses border
on what would have been
right-of-way needed for
the paving.

New Peel Delayed;
Slim Staff Blamed

The New Orange Peels
arrival on campus has
been delayed, at least
until the end of February,
according to Peel
editor-in-chief Marcello
Truzzi.
Truzzi explained the
reason behind the delay
was the Board of Student
Publications has not
selected the four section
editors who will work with
him on the magazine.
I can recommend who

JFK Win Seen
WASHINGTON (UPI)
Speaker John W. McCor McCormack,
mack, McCormack, D-Mass., Monday
predicted victory for
President Kennedy in his
battles for a 1963 tax cut
and a House Rules Com Committee
mittee Committee favorable to the
administrations legis legislative
lative legislative program*
Allied Policy
WASHINGTON (UPI)
London newspapers
touched off a new contro controversy
versy controversy over Allied nuclear
defense policy and the
Skybolt program
yesterday by reporting
that British jet bombers
recently penetrated U.S.
air defenses in a mock
H-bomb attack*
Official U.S. and British
spokesmen denied the

A.W
m. __
: " 'A .'
*.
Threes a Crowd
...in the Pridgen household. Santa and the stork
teamed up to bring triplet-trouble to Flavet I with
baby girls Valerie, Vanessa and Vivienne (not nec necessarily
essarily necessarily left to right above.)
See Page 4

I would like to have as
editors, but it is only a
recommendation, Truzzi
said. I have to wait until
the Board of Student
Publications choses my
editors.
Truzzi said the Board
of Student Publications
attempted to select the
editors twice last tri trimester,
mester, trimester, but a quorum was
not present.
The selection will
probably take place this

NEW'S IN BRIEF

report. They said the last
time British bombers en engaged
gaged engaged in such an exercise
was in Operation
Skyshield 11 on Oct, 14,
1961.
Meredith Drop
OXFORD, Miss. (UPI)
Negro James Meredith,
under increasing
pressure from slipping
grades and shooting
incidents involving his
family, said yesterday
that unless definite and
positive changes are
madehe will not register
for the next semester at
the University of
Mississippi.
The statementby
Meredith, whose entry
onto the campus last Sept,
30 caused rioting that
killed two persons and

week, according to
Truzzi.
I can't put out a
magazine when I dont
have a staff, he said.
Trufzi said the first
edition of the New Orange
Peel would have 40 per
cent humor and the rest
would be political satire,
feature articles and
campus literary works.
Anyone interested in
working on the magazine
should contact me,
Truzzi said.

injured hundreds,brought
an immediate appeal from
U.S. Atty. Gen. Robert
F. Kennedy that state and
university officials meet
the conditions.
Congo Advance
LEOPOLDVILLE, The
Congo (UPI) Swedish
troops of the United
Nations Congo forces
have swept 115 miles north
of the U.N. Kamina Air
Base to seize more terri territory
tory territory of the secessionist
province
U.N. Undersecretary
General Ralph Bunche,
refusing even to talk with
Katanga President Moise
Tshombe, continued his
military discussions in
Elisabethville with the
ranking U.N. officers in
the Congo.





The Florida Alligator Tuesday January 8, 1963

2

Top Classroom Profs to Be Honored By SG

Outstanding professors
at the UF will be selected
by student ballots to
receive recognition at a
student-faculty assembly,
Jan. 16, 7:30-8:30 p.m.
According to Secretary

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of Academic Affairs John
Young, eight professors
will be chosen, for the
first time, for a Student
Body Merit Award foi
Excellence in Classroom
Teaching.*

The awards, based on
vote totals taken from
blue ballot boxes placed
around camDUS and in
residence halls, will only
be given to University
College and lower

division professors.
Director of Higher
Education Dr. Winslow S.
Hatch, Washington, D.C.,
will keynote the assembly
in University Auditorium
with an address on New
Frontiers in Education:

Minister Predicts
South Victor

CHICAGO (UPI) p The
race problem may be
solved in the South before
it is in the North.
Dr. Dow Kirkpatrick,
pastor of First Methodist
Church in suburban
Evanston, writing in the
February issue of
Together, a Methodist
magazine,said, southern
people have a warm,
person-to-p e r s o n rela relationship
tionship relationship with Negroes that
is not found in the North. *
Kirkpatrick said he
heard more snide
remarks about the Negro
and the Jew in a few
weeks in the North than he
heard during the 17 years

The Pursuit 0 f
Excellence. 1
To date, Young said*
1,100 ballots have been
received and the blue
boxes are still comine
in.

he lived in Georgia.*
The real agony of the
South** is to preserve this
warmth for Negroes while
shifting it out of the
traditional master masterservant
servant masterservant context and into a
normal pattern of human
relationship,** he said.
Kirkpatrick said
Southern ministers
generally have moved at
a rate they felt was con consistent
sistent consistent with steady
progress.
As a group, they have
been as liberal on the race
question as Northern
ministers would have
been in those same
pulpits,** he said.
However, Southern
politicians have shown a
tragic default of leader leadership,**
ship,** leadership,** and that the
Southern public has been
deliberately deceived and
grossly misled.** The
solution will come, he
said, # when the public
becomes aware of this and
uses the power of the
ballot to change
leadership.
Car Decals
Ready Now
Parking decals should
now be on the lower right
of the windshield of all
student and faculty cars
UF Police report.
New students and faculty
may obtain decals from
the UF Police anytime
between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.
this week. Cars already
having decals need not
be re-registered unless
there is a change of
address, police said.
Students eligible to have
cars on campus include
upper classmen, graduate
students and others with
a medical reason.
Gville Group
Seeks UF Actors
UF students are invited
to the tryouts at 8 p.m.
tonight for the Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville Little Theater
production of Tiger at
the Gates.**
Tryouts will be held
at the Playhouse on
Northwest 16th Street
"ear the Milhopper Road.



Prof's Freedom,
Trimester, Negroes
Lead Fall News

BY BEN GARRETT
Acting Managing Editor
The trimester system
topped the UF newscene
during the fall trimester,
with the academic
freedom hassle and
integration running a
close second and third.
With the beginning of
the academic year in
September, the UF
switched to year-round
operation under the tri trimester.
mester. trimester. Some said it was
the answer to the growing
problem of too many
students and too few
classrooms. And some
said it was designed to
torment the Weary student
and the overburdened
professors.
UF administration last
week quashed rumors that
dropouts were fantastic
during the first trimester.
The registrars office
reported 912 dropouts or
one per cent less than
during the previous two
academic years under the
semester system.
The same time UF
Pres. J. Wayne Reitz was
making the dropout
announcement, Dean of
Academic Affairs Robert
Mautz announced the UF
is planning soon to
release a detailed study
on the trimester systems
effects.
The academic freedom
controversy was stirred
by the Johns Committee
investigation at the Uni University
versity University of South Florida
and the suspension of USF
Prof. Sheldon Grebstein
for allegedly presenting
4 4 obj ectionable material
in his classrooms.
Alter much controversy
and investigation, with the
American Association of
University Professors
(AAUP) under the presi presidency
dency presidency of UF Prof .Seymour
Block taking the lead
Grebstein was restored to
his USF post.
Professors and state
university officials were
apparently pleasedor at
least pacifiedwith the
early December State
Board of Control passage
of a less stringent
directive dealing with
communism and
homosexuality on state
university campuses.
Integration came peace peacefully
fully peacefully to UF housing and
undergraduate division as
seven Florida Negroes
completed registration in
September. The three
boys and two girls
generally found a warm
reception from the UF.
The graduate division
had previously been
integrated and law student

George Allen became the
first Negro UF graduate
in December.
Big stories coming out
of Student Government
(SG) during the trimester
were the Honor Courts
invalidation of con constitutional
stitutional constitutional revisions and
the demise of the United
Party.
The Honor Court
justices invalidated the
revisions, charging the
election was incon inconsistent
sistent inconsistent with the traditional
notion of a properly
conducted election.
Election officials had
taken the ballot box
to several fraternity
houses in an effort to
obtain the needed 25 per
cent majority for
passage.
The invalidated
revisions will again go up
for student bodyvote
during the spring,
The United Party, the
U F senior political
organization, folded in
September. The party
called it quits when
Uniteds fraternity and
independent leaders could
not find a clear-cut party
leader who would accept
the job for the fall
elections, according to
Mac Melvin who resigned
as party chairman.
But rumors that the
party may be about ready
to reorganize circulated
about campus last week as
spring election time
draws nearer.
Also, the Legislative
Council backed the UF
administrationinits
denial of a Communist
Party plea to send a
speaker to campus.
Student Body Pres. Bill
Trickel,as an alternative,
sent a letter to the
Communist Party, U.S.A.
challenging them to
answer several questions
he posed. The Com Communists
munists Communists answers
appeared in Sundays
Alligator.
Highlighting the UF
sportscene was the
Fightin Gators 17 -7 romp
over Big 10 Penn State
in the Gator Bowl Dec. 29.
Other big victories were
the Gators 42-7 Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming win'over
Vanderbilt and the 20-7
whipping of Florida State.
On a more somber note,
the UF and the city were
stunned by the Cuban
Crisis and even more
stunned when they learned
how lacking their Civil
Defense program was.
Officials rushed to
complete CD plans and to
designate certain .UF
buildings as fallout
shelters.

Watch for Wonder Warthog Sunday

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Tuesday, January 8, 1963 The Florida Alligator

3



4

The Florida Alligator Tuesday, January 8, 1963

Seniors Can
'Late Date'
Senior coeds can now
take late permits until
12:30 a.m.
Only classified seniors
in the Registrars office
will be eligible for the
extended curfew on
Monday through Thursday
nights.
Womens Student
Association (WSA)
created the 4 senior L.
P.s for all senior
women living in sorrority
or residence halls. There
is no limit to number of
L.P.s that can be taken.

r"NOW
viiiuui i
HOLDEN p i
"HOMDIIF
CAPiINE |
BTy JA 'i
Stephen! I r*.
J JIMMY DURANTE Utf
A MARTHA RAYE ER

I WE'RI GOING TO CELEBRATE THE
I GRAND OPENING
I m Luxuriously-soft new seats
I Completely remodeled
I x Modernized for your
I COMPLETELY REMODELED
I
1 with this outstanding f.rst-run picture showing in
Gainesville for the first time* Don't miss it'

I CONTINUOUS PERFORMANCES
I Ip.m. -4:30p.m. 8:00p,m.
I |B1C AS BEN HUR-lf NOT BIGGJERj |
I SAMUEL .MONCTON Atsre I I
I lIA loboi
, x??\r >
I **'*" *1 AVIO AT

Cops Flush Mouse in Broward
A little gray mouse scurrying around the room
of a Broward Hall resident resulted in a call to
campus police for help recently.
When Patrolman Cecil Goad arrived the mouse took
refuge inside the refrigerator and the girl decided
on a prolonged visit to the room of her neighbor.
Now Ive answered all kinds of calls, Goad says.
Were a little concerned about this one though.
Theres a ruling about males lurking in womens
dormitories and we didnt get a good look at that
mouse.
No accidents, fires or burglaries disturbed the
Christmas holiday quiet on the UF campus, according
to Campus Police Chief A. L. Shuler.. Only problems
arising were those of doors found unlocked in empty
buildings.

Triple Trouble Hits UF Couple

Its triple trouble
Dec. 20 for Frank and
Denisha Pridgen of Flavet
I. The stork visited them
recently three times,
bringing triplet girls:
Valerie, Vanessaand
Vivienne.
Today the babies are 19
days old. They are
already using about 420
diapers a week, and
drinking milk by the case.
They have cost Mama
and Papa over SI,OOO, and
because of tight feeding
schedules, give them no
more than four hours of
sleep a night.
Its a wonderful
I HEELS put on in 5 minutes
1 SPIES put on in 15 minutes 1
I modern'shoel
REPAIR SHOP
Bocross From Ist notional bonk |

experience, though, said
Frank and Denisha, both
22.
Frank, who lacks only
6 hours for a degree in
psychology, met his wife
on a blind date in 1959.
They were married in
1960.
The infants weighed 4
lbs. 1/2 oz., 5 lbs. 1/2
oz. and 5 lbs. 3 1/2 oz.
at birth. Tiny, 98 pound
Denisha wonders how she
did it.
Ive lost 32 lbs. since
Dec. 20. she said.
The Pridgens wanted a
family of three children,
and they got it within
45 minutes. It has not
been determined yet if
the triplets are identical,
and even if they are, each
is already developing a
personality of her own.
Vivienne, who is the
smallest, wasnt allowed
home until last Saturday.
She cries and is awake the
most. Vanessa, the biggest
and the first baby to come
home, has the worst
temper and eats the most.
Valerie, who was born
first, is a mixture of the
other two, except for the
fact that she eats the
fastest.
We argue over who is
going to feed Valerie,

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US, USSR to Join
Hands in Space

BY JOSEPH L. MYLER
WASHINGTON (UPI)
In 1963 man should learn
more about the earth,
moon, planets, sun and
himself than he ever knew
before.
The United States plans
this year to launch two
geophysical observa observatories
tories observatories to study the earth
from space, three mobn
probes to take the first
closeup television
pictures of the lunar
surface, two orbiting
observatories to inves-

said Denis ha, who
admitted in the same
breath that she cant tell
which one is Valerie until
she looks at her bracelet.
The triplets are remark remarkably
ably remarkably healthy for their size
according to Dr. Carl
Herbert, who delivered
them. They also have
healthy appetites. Their
nurse at Alachua General
Hospital called them
three little pigs
because they ate so much.
So far Frank and
Denisha have had, no help
with the babies. They been
going around the
clock with them, feeding
them every three hours.
They plan on full time help
later on.

classified

1962 AUSTIN-HE ALY
Sprite roadster. Less
than 3,060 miles. Ex Excellent
cellent Excellent condition. Heater
and tonneau cover. Very
reasonable. Call FR 2-
6331 or FR 2-3874. (57-
ts-c).
1953 Packard, 4 door,
radio, heater. Best offer.
Fred Bennett, 18 NW 17th
St., FR 2-9371. (57-2 t-c).

tigate solar eruptions and
many a scientific satellite
to glean more knowledge
about space near the
earth.
This year also will see
the first cooperative
space ventures by Russia
and the United States.
Scientists all over the
world, meanwhile, are
pushing efforts to crack
the genetic code of life,
to harness H bomb
reactions for peacetime
power, to put a strange
new kind of light to work
i n communications and
industry, and to solve the
the remaining mysteries
of photosynthesis, the
process by which nature
manufactures food and
fiber from sunlight,
carbon dioxide, water,
and soil.
Spacecraft already aloft
should provide some
answers to the question
whether life can exist on
Venus, what Mars looks
like to spaceborne
television cameras flying
by, and what hazard, if
any, is posed to mans
space machines by the
tiny bits of cosmic dust
and debris which swarm
in the solar system.
Americas Mariner 2,
the 447-pound spacecraft
which flew past Venus
last Dec. 14, has reported
more information than
was oyer available before
about the brilliant planet.

FEBRUARY trip ,to
Nassau for coeds. Phone
FR 2-0707. (58-3 t-c).
MALE HELP: Student to
live on premises and de devote
vote devote spare time to TV
repair. For more in information
formation information phone FR 6-
3012. (58-4 t-c).
LAMBRETTA 1956 2-
seater, 150 LD model.
Excellent condition. Best
offer. FR 2-5898. (58-
st-c).
GRADUATE STUDENT
wanted to share 2-bed 2-bedroom
room 2-bedroom duplex, 825 NE Bth
Ave. Your share, SSO
month. Marvin Moss,
Room 230 D, Eng. Bldg,
FR 6-2365. (58-st-c).
1953 CHEVROLET 2-
door, automatic trans transmission,
mission, transmission, radio, heater,
dependable transporta transportation.
tion. transportation. $250. Phone FR 6-
2094 after 5. (58-3 t-c).
FOR RENT By day,
week or month only, my
comfortable guest room
across from campus.
Apply 321 SW 13th St.
(58-lt-c).



Seminole
To Go Out
The first trimester
Seminole will be
distributed through
Wednesday 1-5 p.m.
at Gate 4 of the Stadium.
According to Seminole
editor Bill Dowling, the
book arrived late on
campus because of
printing difficulties
For the first time in
many years, the winter
Seminole to be
distributed in Aprilwill
include all undergraduate
students as well as
seniors, Dowling
announced.
This is something that
we feel will not only be
appreciated by the under undergraduates,
graduates, undergraduates, but will make
the new Seminole far
more valuable in later
years,* Dowling said.
All students wishing
their pictures taken
should make an appoint appointment
ment appointment so as not to have to
wait in line. Under Underclassmen
classmen Underclassmen can sign up for
appointments in their
dorms from 2 to 5 p.m.
Jan. 14-18 or at Florida
Union 14.
Seniors may sign up
for appointments at the
main office of their
respective colleges.
Deadline for all appoint appointments
ments appointments is Jan. 14.
Orders are being taken
now for winter trimester
Seminoles at the Student
Service Center (Hub) and
Stadium.
Defense Loans
Forms Ready
General Scholarship and
N ational Defense Loan
applications for the
academic year beginning
September 1963 will be
accepted until Jan. 31.
Awards for the entire
year will be based on
applications filed during
this period.
Information and appli application
cation application forms are
available in Tigert 128.

Welcome Back, Students
YA'U COME AND EAT
Phone 376-6472 JT
Corner NW 13th St and 3rd Ave

'EI Cid Not Just Spectacular

BY JUDY BARNES
Movie Reviewer
Unlike the usual corny
spectacular** movie,
El Cid,** now playing at
the newly redecorated-
State Theater, is really
spectacular.
Charlton Heston as El
Ci d plays a part that
classifies him as a truly
great actor. He plays the
simple man who becomes
Spains greatesthero with
dignity and feeling.
Sophia Loren, because
she is not her usual over oversexy
sexy oversexy self, plays a serious
part that conveys the
emotions it takes to be
the wife of El Cid. She
plays the part of a
sensitive, often demure
woman.
The story takes place
in the year lOSO*. El Cid
defends Spain against the
Moors, and often against
itself. El Cid falls in and

Show Will Go On
For C-5 Students

Students in C-52 will
listen to Odysseus and
Woman,** a reading play
written by humanities
professor Dr. Dieder
Graeffe this week.
During each C -52 lecture
session, one scene from
the six scene comedy will
be read by three Florida
PlayersMichael Doyle,
Michael Bloom and
Joanna Helming.
The entirecomedy
Thursday night will be
read in the Florida Union
Auditorium at Bp.m.Each
scene portrays a different
man and woman to be
read by Bloom and
Helming.
In one scene read by
Doyle, Bloom will become
a man transformed into a
pig by Odysseus. The
change occurs only in the
reading as the words
become the only action
of the play.
Graeffe has attempted
to take scientific facts
of history and show how
Odysseus is impelled to
transform these facts into

RTVifcWD

out of glory with his
peers, but never out of
glory of the audience.
The photography, in
color, is splendid. The
night battle scenes by the
sea are fantastic.
Speaking of the battle
scenes, they are all
excellent. Each battle is
different, and each is
credible. They are
credible because thehero
Genevieve Page, as the
Queen of Spain, plays a
part that is worth note.
In her own way, she is
every bit as sexy
as Sophia Loren. She
plays a bitter, cynical
part, but it is a good one.
El Cid is a movie for
everyone. It is not too

tall tales.**
Odysseus and Woman**
is the first comedy
Graeffe has written. He
previously has written
three religious reading
plays which were
presented in connection
with Religion-in-L if e
Week.

*' 11 i i 11 ' *' l 1 *
RING A
ORDERS IV
NOW BEING TAKEN AT
THE HUB
Your official University of Florida class ring,
fgr juniors, seniors and graduate students, is
available only through the Campus Shop and
Bookstore (the hub).
ORDERS WILL BE
TAKEN THROUGH FOR A COMPLETE LINE
FEBRUARY Bth. OF FINISHES AND STONES,
RINGS ORDERED A FACTORY REPRESENTATIVE
BY THAT DATE WILL WILL BE AT THE HUB FEB. 6,
BE DELIVERED BEFORE 7, AND 8 TO ASSIST YOU IN
GRADUATION. MAKING YOUR SELECTION

J 1
Tuesday/ January 8, 1963 The Florida Alligator

bloody* for children,
and it is not too simple
for adults. It is a power powerful,
ful, powerful, exciting movie, truly
worth seeing.
Speaking of family
movies, note should be
made of one that is
definitely NOT a family
movie. During the
Christmas holidays the
Florida Theater played
What Ever Happened to
Baby Jane?** This movie
is only for people who
have had a few
tranquillizer pills.
Although the plot, acting
and photography are
excellent, the story is
unnecessarily cruel and
sadistic.
Osterbind
Promoted
Dr. Carter C. Osterbind
has been named director
of the Bureau of Economic
and Business Research at
the UF.
He has served on the
bureau staff since 1950
and last February became
acting director when Dr.
George B. Hugg moved
into fulltime teaching
after serving as bureau
director for 14 years.
Osterbind has under undertaken
taken undertaken research studies on
various aspects of state
and national economic
problems.

Drop, Add,
Change Dates
Slated Soon
Deadline for adding a
course or changing course
sections is Wednesday, at
5 p.m.
Deadline for dropping a
course without receiving
an E** is Friday, Jan. 18,
at 5 p.m.
All applications for
adding, changing or
dropping courses must be
made by the student to
the dean or head of the
department and signed
approval presented to the
registrars office in
Room 33 Tigert Hall.
Seniors graduating at
the end of the winter tri trimester
mester trimester must make degree
applications by noon of
Feb. 4 in Room 34 of
Tigert Hall.
Students planning to
take the Feb. 9 law school
admission test must apply
before Jan. 26.
Enroll Your Children at...
NANCY JANE
Nursery School
522 N. Main St.
Phone FR 2-2589

5



6

The Florida Alligator Tuesday^January 8, 1963

alligator
editorials
ilbe Paper's Aim; All the newg with decency our only limit
'a day of sorrow
With the UF now working under the trimester
system, certain periods usually set aside by the
administration for vacations have suddenly been
incorporated into the time allotted for 'classes.
This, in itself, is not at all unexpected or
revolutionary in scope. When a college university
makes the changeover from the semester system
to the trimester system, a certain amount of time timebudgeting
budgeting timebudgeting must necessarily be done. And, naturally
student holidays are hard hit by the changeover.
Thus, first trimester saw classes run continuously
from Sept. 3 to Dec. 22 with only one holiday"
sandwiched in between namely Thanksgiving. Under
the old semester plan Christmas, a two-week layoff
from classes, had been a part of the first semester.
Following this biggest of all vacations, the students
groggily but perhaps happily trudged back to classes
for about two or three weeks preceeding finals.
Following finals came usually a break" between
the first and second semesters. Then, during the
second semester, the Easter recess" became a
lollipop to which bookweary UF students could
gingerly look forward.
Now, under the trimester system, even the Easter
break is gone.
Yes, where once we could look forward to a three
or four-day recess for Easter, now we cannot.
Easter has been given the slight by the formulators
of the winter trimester schedule.
This year Easter Sunday falls on April 14 which
by some heretofore unexplained reason either by
coincidence or by plan turns up right in the middle
of winter trimester finals. So, where before the
UF student would have been enjoying a vacation,
now he will be instead taking a C-6 final on Thursday,
April 11 and a C-5 exam on Good Friday. Good Friday
has fallen prey to education.
Finals will be given on Saturday the 13th. and Monday
the 15th., leaving Sunday alone as the last remaining
vestig6 of an Easter holiday. Finals continue through
Friday, April 19.
There is sure to be much grumbling over finals
during Easter." Already criticisms have been voiced
by some students who have discovered the facts
from page 123 in the University Record (class
schedule of courses).
There is also the religious facet of this issue. On
Good Friday final examinations will be given in
EM 366, LY 201, MS 353, MS 354 and, as mentioned
earlier, in both C-51 and C-52.
This brings up the question of whether or not the
Administration has any feelings whatsoever toward
the religious practices observed by many UF
students. Traditionally, Good Friday has been an
observance of the deathof Christ----a day of sorrow.
Is it the plan of the Administration to compound this
feeling of sorrow by forcing students to take finals
on this day of mourning?
Many students will agree that perhaps it is not
too bad having to miss the traditional Easter break
due to the finals, since many students will have a
longer 4-month vacation greeting them after April
20. But, still is this a reason to schedule final
examinations on Good Friday? Does not Good Friday
to many people hold as much or more religious
significance as Sunday?
The Florida Alligator
Editor-In-Chief David Lawrence Jr.
Managing Editor Dave West
Acting Managing Editors Maryanne Awtrey,
Ben Garrett
Business Manager Gary Burke
Sports Editor Don Pride
TUB FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the offlcUl student newspaper d the University
of Florida end la published daily except Monday and Saturday. THE FLORIDA
ALLIGATOR la entered u eeoood claaa matter at the United States Post Office
at OsinearllU, Florida. Office 3 are located in Rooms 8.10, and 15 in the Florida
Union Building Basement. Telephone University of Florida, FR 6-5261, Ext. 2852,
and re qua at either editorial office or business office.
tfrlnlinna soloed In personal columns on this page do not necessarily reflect
the onlnlorta of the editors. Only editorials are the official voice of the paper.
/

~ "WEU,TH£aL.
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Los Angeles Opinion

BYU Student Riot Immature

Over 2000 students
staged a rally protest at
Brigham Young Uni University
versity University in early
December because of
administrative rejections
concerning a longer
Christmas vacation.
The rally started after
the student body was
unable to gain five extra
days of vacation time
beginning Dec. 14 instead
of the 19th to Jan. 3.
Rioters burned the
administration in effigy
and threw toilet paper
whirling through the air.
The leaders stated that
the reasons for wanting a
longer vacation as
economy and safety. One
compared vacation dates
from catalogs of 16 other
schools and found that
they averaged two days
longer. They said, we
are willing to accept a
compromise" and urged
the students to listen to
the administrations side
for the only rational
statement made by the
students during the rally.
If a student elects
not to attend classes, this
is his perogative. There
is nothing in institutional
regulations that makes
this attendancecom attendancecompulsory,"
pulsory," attendancecompulsory," said J. Elliot
Cameron, dean of
students.
The calendar for the
opening of school,vacation
breaks, and the closing of
school is prepared well
in advance so that each
prospective student
knows before registration
what the schedule will
be."
Because of this reason
I believe that a student
who protests a vacation
date knowing it well in
advance is acting fool foolishly.
ishly. foolishly. How important are
five days to a student?
Eventually, all the
colleges and universities
in the nation will have
much shorter vacation
periods than at present.
When the tri-semester
system or year-round

education begins the
Christmas holidays may
be cut to just one week.
I will agree that many
students on college
campuses throughout the
nation want a few more
days "for the celebration
of Christmas, but going
to such extremes as the
BYU students did is not
of the calibre of maturity.
A college student must
take in stride any dis disappointment

New Frontier Faces Dilemmas

When the 88th Congress
convenes Wednesday,
President John F .Kennedy
will find his New Frontier
perched upon the high
ground of a two-year old
stalemate.
Mike Gora
viewpoint.
f
After two congressional
sessions of frustrating
defeat on his domestic
legislation the Chief
Executive can look
forward to another
session faced with inter
and extra party
opposition.
The results of the mid midterm
term midterm elections will have
but a slight effect.
As the President and
congressmen await the
starting bell two main
stumbling blocks appear
ready to derail the New
Frontier Express.
The Southern Democrats
opposed to Kennedys
controversial domestic
program during the last
session of congress,
appear ready to once
again join with right-wing
Republicans to thwart the
Presidents progressive
plan.
Secondly, Kennedys
supporters plan to begin
the session with a
renewed fight in the
Senate to pass a new,
and more easily
enforcable cloture rule.

appointment disappointment that develops
because of extra days of
study maybe interfering
with his vacation.
* *
(Editors note. . This
editorial reprinted in part
above appeared originally
in the Dec. 11 issue of
the Los Angeles Collegian
and was written by George
Capps, Collegian
Executive Editor.)

In view of these two
major stumbling blocks,
JFK faces two dilemnas.
He must keep the split
in the Democratic ranks
at a minimum. To do this,
the Chief Executive is
faced with the possibility
of accepting compromise
on New Frontier Legis Legislation
lation Legislation which will make it
more palatable for- the
Democrats* southern
wing.
Secondly, the President
must decide whether or
not to remain mute or to
actively support his
backers in their fight for
a revised Senate cloture
plan and in their effort
to maintain an enlarged
rules committee.
Mr. Kennedy is faced
with the choice between
deserting his supporters
on these two issues or
taking the chanceof
making a strong stand on
issues that may be
defeated. If JFK takes an
active part in behalf of
his supporters and loses,
it may well be a telling
blow to his prestige which
will hamper his program
in the next two years.
In the next few weeks
President John
Fitzgerald Kennedy will
face problems, the
answers to whichmay
either set the stage for
the future success of his
progressive New
Frontier or destine his
program to become mired
in two more years cf
compromise and defeat.



Burly Tech
Paces SEC

By DAVID M. MOFFIT
United Press
International
Under the exterior of
burly and sometimes er erratic
ratic erratic Georgia Tech beats
the heart of a basketball
team and this heart, more
than any other one factor,
was responsible this week
for the Engineers being
the only major unbeaten
team in the South.
Georgia Tech has great
size and great depth. But
Tech has no exceptional
shooters and seldom
shows the offensive
finesse expected of an all allwinning
winning allwinning basketball team.
However, the shooting
and rebounding are more
than adequate the defense
is first-rate and the will
to win appears' to have
few peers.
This is the analysis after
Georgia Tech took an 86-
85 double overtime
victory over the 7th
ranked Kentucky Wildcats
at Lexington, Ky., for its
ninth straight triumph and
opens this week on top
of the Southeastern Con Conference
ference Conference heap.
Techs hard earned
victory was one of two
Saturday night surprises.
The other came at
Auburn, Ala., where de defending
fending defending champion Miss Mississippi
issippi Mississippi State whipped
previously unbeaten
Auburn 62-53 and set up
the Jan. 14 game at Stark Starkville
ville Starkville between State and
Tech as one of the most
important of the 1963
campaign.
Elsewhere in the SEC
Saturday night, Vand Vanderbilt
erbilt Vanderbilt overpowered Tenn Tennessee
essee Tennessee 68-50 on a 30-
point performance by
sophomore guard Roger
Schurig; Georgia topped
Tulane 77-69 with sopho sophomore
more sophomore guard Billy Rado
contributing 22 points;
Alabama outslugged Mis Mississippi
sissippi Mississippi 80-76 and Louis Louisiana
iana Louisiana State upset Florida
72-63.
Kentuckys Cotton Nash,
the SEC scoring leader,
played seldom and poor poorly
ly poorly in the Wildcats loss
to Georgia Tech. The
Engineers, paced by their
big front line, led by 10
points at one stage of the
first half but were ahead
only 40-39 at halftime.
The regulation game
ended in a 70-70 tie and
the first overtime in
a 76-76 tie. Tech free
throw shooting proved the
difference in the second
overtime. Kentucky is
now 7-4 but stull rated
an SEC title contender.
Mississippi State, now
9-2, played tenacious de defense
fense defense and hit 58 per cent

of its shots while handing
Auburn its first loss. Au Auburn,
burn, Auburn, which had been av averaging
eraging averaging 52 per cent, hit
only 35 per cent Saturday
night and was almost as
cold at the free throw
lane. R.D. Stroud was top
scorer with 19 points
while Leland Mitchell had
15 points and 13 rebounds
for the winners. Layton
Johns had 17 points and 17
rebounds for Auburn
which never looked
worse.
Schurig hit 14 of 17
shots from the floor as
Vanderbilt won its sixth
straight. The Commo Commodores,
dores, Commodores, now 8-2, were in
control all the way. The
lead in the Georgia Tu Tulane
lane Tulane game changed 26
times and the Bulldogs
didnt go ahead to stay
until four minutes from
the end. Tulanes Dale
Gott was high scorer with
26 points and Jim Kerwin
had 21 for the Green
Wave.

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Gators Host Miami U

Floridas Gators have a
couple of scores to settle
when they take on the tall
and talented Miami Hur Hurricanes
ricanes Hurricanes in Florida Gym
Thursday night.
First, the UF cagers
will be out to avenge the
double overtime 91-87
squeaker the Hurricanes
won in the season opener
at Miami last month.
Then, theyll be trying
to ease that awful pain
of the 17-15 football de defeat
feat defeat administered to the
Gators by the Hurricanes.
For UF students, many
of whom hail from the
Miami area and suffered
a thorough razzing over
the Holidays, this 8:15

ALLIGATOR SPORTS

Tuesday, January 8, 1963 The Florida Alligator

p.m. affair should be in interesting.
teresting. interesting.
Miami had a nine game
winning streak snapped by
LaSalle last Friday in a
game marked by confu confusion
sion confusion and the failure of the
Canes to make several
last minute free throws.
The loss was Miamis
first of the season.
Miami boasts height
and high scoring aver averages
ages averages in Mike McCoy, a7-
1 senior center from Fort
Wayne, Ind., and 6-7 for forward
ward forward Rick Barry. Barry
has been the big surprise
for the Hurricanes. The
sophomore is averaging
close to 20 points a game.
McCoy isnt far behind.
Miami will bring a

senior-dominated team to
face the Gators who have
been starting with four
sophomores and one jun junior.
ior. junior.
Tom Barbee, early
season starter, and Bud Buddy
dy Buddy Bales, both seniors,
have been hampered by
injuries. Barbee has been
out of the lineup since
Christmas and Bales has
seen only limited duty.
Tom Baxley and Brooks
Henderson lead the Ga Gators
tors Gators scoring with aver averages
ages averages close to 16 points
a game. Henderson has
hit well from the free
throw line hitting better
than 81 percent of his
shots. Brooks went 9 for
9 against LSU last Satur Saturday
day Saturday night.

7



Tire Florida Alligator Tuesday, January 8, 1963

8

Weeks Sports
BASKETBALL
LJF vs. Miami ....Thursday, 8:15 p.m.
UF vs. Auburn Saturday, 8:15 p.m.
SWIMMING
UF vs. Georgia Thursday, 4 p.m.

Peek Sparks Gator
Frosh Win, 82-54

Richard Peek and Bruce
Moore, both missing from
the pre-Christmas Flori Florida
da Florida freshman basketball
lineup, have returned for
action this trimester.
Richard Peek quickly
made, his 6-foot, 11-inch
presence known last night
when he returned to the
Baby Gator lineup and
dumped 27 points through
the nets in an 82-54 win
over Manatee Junior
College.
Back in action after
sitting out the last games
of the Fall trimester,
Peek also grabbed 24
rebounds off the boards.
Gary Keller, 6-9, and
Dan Goolsby, 5-11, each
chipped in with 19 as the
Baby Gators took their
second win in six games.

A SPECIAL MILL PURCHASE
WAMSUIH
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109 W. Univ. FR 2-2721

Peek sat out the final
pre holiday games to
concentrate on final ex exams.
ams. exams. Moore had to re return
turn return to Ohio due to a
death in the family.
Their return evidently
dispels rumors the frosh
were disintegrating. The
only yearling loss was 6-
7 forward Frank Wicker
who dropped out of school
prior to exams.
Golfers to Meet
Members of the UF golf
team will meet Wednes Wednesday
day Wednesday at 4 p.m. in room
224 of the Florida Gym.
All members must be
present to sign eligibility
forms.

Gators Trample
Greenies 109-74

By David Berkowitz
Gator Sports Writer
The clock and the record
book teamed up to stop
the Gators one point short
of an all-time UF record
as the Orange and Blue,
lead by Tom Baxley and
Brooks Henderson,
pounded Tulane 109-74,
last night.
Baxley hit the buckets
for 33 points, one short
of his season high.
Henderson followed close
behind with 27. Both
scored well from the
charity line, Baxley
hitting 9 of 10 and
Henderson making 11 of 12.
Midway through the
second half the crowd
began calling for 100 as
tjie Gators pulled away
t'rom Tulane. With two
minutes left reserve
guard Lanny Sommese, of
Gainesville, entered the
game and was im immediately
mediately immediately fouled.
Sommese came to the line
with 99 on the board for
Florida and scored the
first point of his varsity
career to put the Gators
over the century mark.
The Gators averaged
56.8 per cent from the
outside and 78.1 from the
line, in challenging the
all-time record and
setting a UF-SEC record.
Florida scored its highest
number of points against
Tampa in 1955, topping the
Spartans 110-62. The
score was a Florida Gym
record.
The Gators and the
Green Wave battled
evenly for 10 minutes.
Shortly after, the bottom
fell out under Tulane, as
the Gators egged on by
contested officiating calls
began running up the
score.

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TWO ON THE WAY
.. .guard Tom Baxley shows he means business as he starts
up for two of his 33 points last night against Tulane"s
Dale Gott (14) and Norm Delph (25).

Coach Norman Sloan
replaced his height with
speed which proved too
much for Tulane. Baxley
and Henderson left the
court at halftime with 15
points each and a Gator
lead of 51-37.
With 14 minutes
remaining and the UF
leading 71-49 the crowd
began calling for 100.
Baxley, Henderson,
Taylor Stokes and Bob

Hoffmann responded with
an all out effort.
Baxley scored 18,
Henderson 12, Stokes and
Hoffmann 8 in the second
half.
Bob Davidson and Jim
Kerwin managed to score
24 and 23 points
respectively, but the feat
was obscured hy the UFs
35 point victory. Stokes
scored 18 points for the
UF.