Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
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Vol .55 N 0.20 University of Florida, Gainesville Tuesday, October 16, 1962

I
B Page Two
HCs Sweetheart
Page Ten
o

Need Money For Education?
>
. . See Page Two



The Florida Alligator Tuesday, October 16, 1962

Page 2

Graduate Fellowship Season Opens

Hunting for a post-graduate scholarship? The
next few weeks may provide you with the oppor opportunity
tunity opportunity to go to Oxford, Harvard or any school of
your choice.
This is the first part of a two part series listing
and giving information about the scholarships avail available
able available to graduate students at the UF and other in institutions
stitutions institutions of higher education. This article will deal
with the scholarships which must be applied for
within the next two weeks. The second article will
deal with scholarships with later deadlines.
In order to co-ordinate work and disseminate in information
formation information concerning fellowships, scholarships and
grants available to graduate students, UF PRESIDENT
J. Wayne Reitz recently created the Graduate Study
Awards Committee.
This committee will coordinate the work of the
various representatives of national foundations on
the UF campus.
The UF is putting a great deal of emphasis on grad-

SELECTED FELLOWSHIPS AND
GRANTS
This is an up-to-date, highly se selected
lected selected list of major graduate level
fellowship opportunities and finan financial
cial financial aids available for graduate
work in American and foreign uni universities.
versities. universities. All major graduate fields
f
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are included, and the number of
awards varies. The applicant can
obtain information concerinng the
number and other pertenent details
from the local representatives of
the Foundations or from the Grad Graduate
uate Graduate School Office, 235 Tigert Hall.
(See especially the Graduate
Schools listing No. I, dated Sept.
13, 1962, which contains details of
certain awards described below).
For larger, more inclusive listings
of a vast number of scholarships
and fellowship awards, the bibliog bibliography
raphy bibliography at the end of this listing will
be helpful.
FULBRIGHT SC HOLARSHIPS
The Fulbright scholarships
are competitive U. S. Government
grants, applications for which are
processed by the University of
Florida. College seniors and grad graduate
uate graduate students are eligible to apply.

uate study and has had as many fellows elected for
further study as any state in this region according
to committee chairman Dr. Alton Morris
In others the UF has not placed as many students
as desired, he said.
Members of the Committee are: chairman, Dr.
Morris, Dr. John Harrison, Dr. John Hall, Dr.
Frederick Hartmann, Dr. E. Ruffin Jones, Dr. R.
L. Lassiter, Dr." A. A. Murphree, Dr. A. G.
Smith, Dr, N. C. Starr, and Dr. H. S. Wolfe.
In order to be eligible for graduate school a stu student
dent student should normally have a 3.0 average for his jun junior
ior junior and senior years, make satisfactory grades on
the Graduate Record Exam (G RE) and be accepted
in the department in which he wishes to do his grad graduate
uate graduate work.
A Student with the above qualifications, who is in interested
terested interested in securing some type of financial aid should
see a member of the Graduate Study Awards Com Committee.
mittee. Committee.

Scholarships are available for
many of the countries of Western
Europe and the Far and Near
East. Related grants cover Latin
America. Grants include transpor transportation,
tation, transportation, books, maintenance, tuition,
and foreign orientation allowances.
Applications are due by Oct. 20
and should be directed to Mr. W.
W. Young, Advisor to Foreign Stu Students,
dents, Students, Building AE. Applicants are
initially processed by the local Ful Fulbright
bright Fulbright Scholarship Committee
Professor Frederick H. Hartmann,
Chairman, 6 Peabody Hall. Stu Students
dents Students interested in studying in
Germany should also consult the
available German Government
Scholarship awards by writing the
German Embassy, Washington, D.
C., for information.
DANFORTH GRADUATE
FELLOWSHIPS (MEN)
The purpose of this foundation's
awards is to recruit for college
teaching those students of superior
academic standing vyho have a
genuine interest in the philosophi philosophical
cal philosophical and theological aspects of re religion.
ligion. religion. Danforth Fellows may study
in any field of specialization at
any recognized school of the stu students
dents students choice. Graduate Record Ex Examination
amination Examination scores in Verbal, Quan Quantitative,
titative, Quantitative, and Advanced tests are
required. Financial assistance
would depend upon need of the in individual
dividual individual for the year, beginning at
$1,500 plus tuition fees and running
to a much higher figure. Renew Renewable
able Renewable fellowship leading to the Ph.
D. degree is possible. Applications
must be made by Oct. 20. Nomina Nominations
tions Nominations are made through Professor
E. Ruffin Jones, 128 Flint Hall.
WOODROW WILSON
FELLOWSHIPS
Fellowships are available for
first-year graduate work leading
to a career in college teaching.

ALFODOC Tower House
** K.V D Restaurant
*
210 E. University Avenue
Lunches 65c Dinners 85c
STEAKS
Sirloin Fillet Mignon T-Bones
Priced SI.OO, $1.35, $1.40 and .95
CHICKEN
/ -95 cVi -11.35 Whole Chicken hr hr, 52.50
Georgia Country Ham
I TOLD MR. ALFORD...
te look for us often for I sever ktve tasted .. .... ..
EVE rrr.vy and GEORGIA COUNTRY HAM STEAK ui?hfi.* h u S R *? D
C\bU hurt Just as ho *ay: GOOD EATIN* POONEJl.****** *****
At The TOWER HOUSE

Nominations may be made by any
member of the academic profes profession
sion profession prior to Oct. 31. Fields of
graduate study: Humanities, So Social
cial Social Sciences, Natural Sciences,
Mathematics. Graduate Record
Examination scores are not re required
quired required but are strongly recom recommended
mended recommended as supporting evidence of
academic standing. Fellowship is
awarded for one year. Stipend of
$1,500 plus tuition in graduate
school of students choice, plus
dependency allowances. University
of Florida representative: Profes Professor
sor Professor Alton C. Morris, 208 Anderson
Hall.
RHODES SCHOLARSHIPS (MEN)
Applicants must be unmarried,
male citizens of the United States,
of at least junior standing, and be between
tween between the ages of 18 and 25. Ten Tenure:
ure: Tenure: two to three years at Oxford
University, England. Value: ap approximately
proximately approximately $2,100. Nominations
should be made not later than Oct.
20 to the local Rhodes Scholarship
Professor A. A. Murphree, Chair Chairman,
man, Chairman, 202 Anderson Hall.
MARSHALL SCHOLARSHIPS
Given in the sciences, humani humanities
ties humanities and other fields for study at
a British University. Open to
American graduates, men and wo women,
men, women, under 26. Stipend is 550
pounds per year plus fares and
tuition fees. Write to British In Information
formation Information Services, 45 Rockefeller
Plaza, New York 20, New York, by
Oct. 22.

COVER GIRL

Duchess I
Convalescent Cat,l
Jungles Royalty I
'Rules Ivy Halls I
By ANN LEONE 1
Duchess the lion is the undisput-B
ed queen of the Health Center B
basement. I
Her lair is a cage and her jun-H
gle is tile, floor. a
Duchess is sort of a displaced
lion, for she was sent to 1h eB
Health Center because of her >ick-B
ly condition. She couldnt waik
wouldnt eat and was suffering
from an undiagnosed disease. I
HER BROTHER CAME to the I
UF with Duchess, but he is dead*
now. I
Thanks to the tender care of*
the pediatric and orthopedic de-B
partments of the Health Center,*
Duchess has regained her health.*
Now 14 months, she eats, walks*
and weighs 130 pounds. I
Doctors have diagnosed her ill- 1
ness a der. I
Duchess best human friend!
and caretaker is 90-pound Mary!
Haviland, who feeds, plays with!
and cares for the lioness. I
WHEN SHE WAS little I us- 1
ed to turn her loose in the hall I
(in the Health Center basemcntil
and play with her, said Mary. I
But shes too big now and!
Im not allowed to do that any- 1
more since she might play tool
rough.
Mary explained that she still I
gets in the cage and plays with I
her now and then.
I used to wear rubber boots to I
keep her from biting my logs ac-l
cidentally. One day she grabbed I
a boot and chewed it up. Bu 11
shes not afraid of rubber boots I
.anymore, so the bluff docsntl
work now, said Mary.
EVEN THOUGH the lion .should
be kept in the outdoors, the Health I
Center officials are reluctant to
allow this because they are fear*
ful of another Albert the alliga alligator
tor alligator episode. (Albert was the vic victim
tim victim of several harmful harrass harrassments.)
ments.) harrassments.)
Duchess is a striking animal,
except that she has a deformed
foot. She is also dwarfed in sta
ture.
WUFT To Begin
Classics Series
WUFT, the UFs educational tel television,
evision, television, will begin its drama w wival
ival wival Friday at 9 pma.
showing of Jean Anouilh's modern
treatment of the Greek A
Antigone.
The shows which have bcm
duced especially for telex i.-*
will be aired every Friday fi fining
ning fining throughout the fall-
In weeks to come, K c
Ibsens A Dolls House, ShaK
speares A Midsummer Nig
Dream, Oscar Wildes A n
an of No Importance and m 1
Turgenevs A Month in the c 11 {
try, will be shown as a P al
the National Educational Tele';
sions "F estival of the A:
series.



Tlxe Florida
Alligator

Council to Receive
Commie Question

By EM ARY ANN WALKER
(Gator (Staff Writer
Student Body opinion on invit*
ing a Communist speaker to the
UF campus will be heard at the
Legislative Council meeting to tonight
night tonight at 7:3o_iiL_JFlonda Union
324.
Student Body Bill
Trickd asked the Council to ex express

Election Protests Called Invalid
Tossed Out by Election Board

No election or constitutional vio violation
lation violation existed in the Legislative
Council election Oct. 4, the Stu Student
dent Student Government Election Board
ruled yesterday.
Five complaints were filed,
charging important changes in
election were poorly publicized.
Complaints were lodged by Eric
B. Smith, Butch Wooten, Thomas
E. ODeli and Warren Spiller
and the offices of freshman coun council.
cil. council.
Spiller was the only complaint complaintant
ant complaintant present at yesterdays meet meeting.
ing. meeting.
The election board took note of
the criticism and recommended
some changes, according to Stu Student
dent Student Body President Bill Trickel.
Members of the board are the
president of the Student Body.

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press express its views and to hear stu student
dent student views as a result of an AKii AKiigator
gator AKiigator story last-week.
It is hoped that the students
will go to the Legislative Council
members and express their feel feelings
ings feelings on this issue, said Barry
Sinoff, secretary of legislative
affairs.
THE ALLIGATOR reported the

president of Florida Blue Key,
president of Mortar Board, chan chancellor
cellor chancellor of the Honor Court, a mem member
ber member of the Legislative Council.
Scholarships
Awarded
Fifteen students in the School of
Journalism and Communications
at the UF have been awarded
scholarships totaling $1,500.
The awards were made from
the Grantland Rice Memorial
Scholarship Fund, made available
by the Sunshine Park Racing As Association
sociation Association at Oldsmar.

HC '62 Countdown Begins,
As Gators Pace Space Race

By DAVID WEST
Gator Managing Editor
Reprinted from
THE FLORIDA ALUMNUS
October 19th and 20th, 1962.
Two Big Days!
But behind these two days, with
all their tinsel, hoopla, fireworks
skits and parties, will lie a half
year of coffee-sustained hour* of
planning and knuckle-busting
work. The success of Homecom Homecoming,
ing, Homecoming, 1962 is almost directly pro proportional
portional proportional to the tired feet and sore
thumbs of at least 3,000 students
and nearly all of the VF's 180

Communist Party has requested
to come to the UF for lectures
and debates. UF officials said
at that time they would be op opposed
posed opposed to such a visit.
The story received national at attention,
tention, attention, being picked up by the
wire services, NBC radio and
several state papers.
According to Sinoflf, this meet meeting
ing meeting will be the first time that
Legislative Counci members have
received an agenda and informa information
tion information on topics to be discussed'pri discussed'prior
or discussed'prior to the actual time of the
meeting. This will be a regular
practice in the future.
BY RECEIVING information
before hand council members will
be able to discuss issues with the
students actually involved, said
Sinoflf, and the council will be
more truly representative.
In the past there have been
complaints that the people in the
dorms did not know what was
going on until after the meetings
took place.
The Legislative Council may
also consider changes in proced procedures
ures procedures at this meeting. A Leg is
lative Council secretary parlia parliamentarian
mentarian parliamentarian will be elected.
Space Swimmers
Spacecapades 1962 will be
presented in the University pool
on Oct. 19, 4-5 p.m. and Oct. 20,
10-11:30 p.m.
The swimeapades will have a
seven act program with a cast oi
45 swimmers from the Swimfinns
and Aquagators.

organizations.
It all began last March, when
the books of last years Homecom Homecoming
ing Homecoming (the year the Gators appeared
on the New Frontier) were still
open, and members of Florida
Blue Key, sponsors of Homecom Homecoming,
ing, Homecoming, huddled to find a man to
chair the weekend. Before long,
Jackson Brownlee, their president,
emerged with Jack Bierley, a
junior law student from West
Palm Beaeh as the man to spear spearhead
head spearhead the welcome back days.
Personnel appointed . .speak .speakers
ers .speakers rolicited ideas formulated. .

Tuesday/ October 16, 1962 The Florida Alligator

Two UF Profs
Hint City Race

Two UF professors said this week
they may be interested in seeking
Gainesville City Commission posts.
Hugh Cunningham, journalism
professor, said, I am considering
being a candidate for the City
Commission, depending upon what
other candidates present them themselves,
selves, themselves, if I see that my personal
employment situation will give me
time.
John De Grove, UF political sci science
ence science professor, said he is interest interested
ed interested in running, but hopes he doesnt
have to because hes tied up on a
research project.
De Grove said he would give his
full support ot A1 Southerland, pre president
sident president of the Civic Action Associa Association
tion Association (CAA) and Ed Turlington, a
Gainesville High School teacher.
De Grove said he isnt removing
himself from the list of possible
candidates in case something unex unexpected
pected unexpected turns up that would prevent
Turlington and Sutherland from
running.
University personnel were pro
vented from holding government
offices until the State Board of
Control amended, its policy last
year.
Weekend Accident
Kills UF Junior
Mis s Pamela Jean Hyde, 3AS,
of Ft. Lauderdale, wag killed in an
auto accident early' Saturday on
US 27 on her way home.
Miss Hyde was the passenger in
a car driven by Lloyd T. Frarrey,
22, also a UF student, which
slammed into the rear of a truck
trailer at 2:30 a.m. Frarrey rec received
eived received multiple injuries but is re reportered
portered reportered in satisfactory condition
at Holy Cross Hospital in Ft.
Lauderdale.
Services were held yesterday at
the Baird-Case N. Federal High Highway
way Highway Chapel.

dates set. . reports studied. .
and when Spring exams Were
turned in, the staff went home,
fearful of the work that waited
back on campus during the hot
summer months.
THE PROJECT BEGAN to take
form when the Slogan Contest!
began. Judges were solicited.
prizes gathered. .posters design designed.
ed. designed. .and slogans poured in.
Firework#. .transportation.
bands. .bids issued. .banquet
\
See Homecoming Page 12

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CUNNINGHAM
Explosives
Found By
UF Society
Four cases of dynamite and oth other
er other explosives discovered in a cave
south of Newberry Saturday by
UF Speological Society members
appeared last night to be only
stores of the Gainesville Army Re Reserve
serve Reserve Training Center.
Jim Fisher, along with other
members of the caving society,
made, the. unusual find while ex exploring
ploring exploring Saturday. Military investi investigators
gators investigators were called in Sunday.
The Alachua County Sheriffs of office
fice office first reported the explosives
appeared to be stolen, but a mili military
tary military spokesman said last night
they were only field training stores
used by the Training center here.
The spokesman said the area of
the find is government property
and under government control.

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Page 4

The Florida Alligator Tuesday, October 16, 1962

Church May Ease
Rule on Marriage

VATICAN CITY (UPI) The
Icumenical Council may ease
cme of the restrictions applying
v) Roman Catholics who mtirry
non-Catholics, informed sources
lid Monday. But the sources
aid it Was unlikely the restrict restrictions
ions restrictions would be abolished alto altoether.
ether. altoether.
The development was reported
s Augustin Cardinal Bea, head
f the secretariat for promoting
hristian unity, invited Protestan
nd other ncn-Catholic observers
ere to state their positive criti critiism
ism critiism for Catholic practices to
elp promote Christian unity.
Nationall delegations to the
ouncil, after three days of work,
bmitted revised electoral lists
or the 10 key commissions which
vill debate church policy. The re revisions
visions revisions was aimed at eliminating
objections to the preponderance
f Italians slated for top posts.
Voting Begins 'Tuesday
Voting on the commission mem memhers
hers memhers is to begin at Tuesdays

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i I ! Mother always j
I I S ,OUr I i told me to I
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in the long run. Head for your nearest Keds dealer. Get that
Keds look, that Keds fit... GET THAT GREAT KEDS FEELING!
Both U.S. K*d and tM bill* label are recistered trademarks of
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.second general working session.
The voting was to have started
Saturday but a snag developed
when a group led by Achille Car Cardinal
dinal Cardinal Lfienart, archbishop of
Lille, Prance, objected to the
procedure.
The 10 commissions of 24 mem members
bers members each will study an agenda
of 70 subjects, including a draft
on mixed marriages between
Catholics and non-Catholics.
Under present church law a
special dispensation is required
for such marriages and it can be
granted only if there is 1 grave
cause, 2, a written promise of
the non-Catholic not to interfere
wath the religion of the Catholic
and of both parties to have &11
children baptized and educated as
Catholics and 3 "moral certainty
that the promises will be ful fulfilled.
filled. fulfilled.
-Several other items on the ten tentative
tative tentative agenda are connected with
the drive by Pope John XXHI to
improve relations with Protest Protestants
ants Protestants ans orthodox denominations.

m J
mm
PIEI *tC FA?." uTTINI VI
Cardinal Bea
Master of the possible.
Hurricane
'Ella May
Hit Coast
MIAMI, (UPI) Tropical Strom
Ella, fifth of the season, formed
in the Atlantic Monday with 45
mile an hour winds.
The storm kicked up high seas
against the Bahamas eastern out
islands and the weather bureau
said it would bring fresh winds
close to the U. S. South Atlantic
Coast Tuesday.
Hurricane hunter planes found
the storms center at 5 p.m. EST
about 485 miles due east of Miami
near latitude 25.8 North, longi longitude
tude longitude 72.4 West. The storm was
moving generally in a northerly
direction about six MPH, the
weather bureau said.
In its first advisory, the weath weather
er weather bureau said occasional gale
winds in squalls extended outward
350 miles to the north of the
center and 65 miles to the south.
The storm will continue to in intensify
tensify intensify slowly during the next 24
hours but remain poorly or organized,
ganized, organized, the weather bureau
said.
It predicted slow movement,
generally in a northerly direction
Monday night, turning to the
northwest thereafter.
Because of the large size of the
storm, the weather bureau add added,
ed, added, "winds will become fresh
close to the U. s. South Atlantic
coast by late Tuesday.
/Tww/s /
/Sf/WTy aox At
' smisis. [ft
Edna Cox Doris Moore
Nancy McMillan, owner /
932 W. Univ. /
Short Walk from Campus /
NOTICE
Attention all faculty and
staff members, and depart department
ment department or area heads:
Any news information or
feature material you may
have available for the
faculty-staff section of
The Alligator should be
moiled to:
Richard Mathews
Board of Student
. Publications
Florida Union Building
University of Florida

Red Leaders
Visit Berlin

By EDWARD SHIELDS
l'nited Press International
BERLIN (UPI) The East Ger German
man German regime Monday turned out
thousands of workers and school
children to welcome polish Com Communist
munist Communist party chief Wladyslaw Go*
mulka.
Gomulka is the first high-rank high-ranking
ing high-ranking foreign Communist to come to
Berlin since the anti-refugee Wall
went up more than a year ago.
East German authorities be bedecked
decked bedecked the route of the official
motorcade with flags and banners
and lined thousands of factory
workers and school children along
the streets. But Western observers
said the crowd displayed a
marked lack of Spontaneous en enthusiasm.
thusiasm. enthusiasm.
The eyewitnesses said the'spec :
tators applauded dutifully when
the motorcade passed. There
were a few scattered cheers.
Parade Avoids Wall
The motorcade did not go near
the anti refugee wall erected
through Berlin by the East Ger German
man German Communists in August of
1961.
No mention of the wall was

Cubans Questioned
On Pre-Dawn Raid

MIAMI (UPI) Federal officers
Monday were reported questioning
six Cuban exiles about a pre-dawn
sea raid on Cuba Saturday in
which they sank a Castro gun gunboat
boat gunboat and took prisoner two wound wounded
ed wounded militia crewmen.
Newsmen were barred from the
nearby OPA-Locka immigration
detention camp outside Miami
where the six men are held.
U.S. authorities declined to iden identify
tify identify the men held, but exile
sources said they were Manolo
Quiza, Manola Casanova, Juan
Espinosa, Jorge Rodriguez Ro Roberto
berto Roberto Parson and Eddie Moore.
All are of Cuban nationality.
The two wounded militiamen
whom the raiders plucked from
the sea when their patrol boat
sank were undergoing treatment
in Miami's Jackson Memorial
Hospital. They were identified as
Sgt. Filiberto Suarez Lima and
Cpl. Miguel Cao Mandino. Authori Authorities
ties Authorities said Suarez asked for political
asylum.
Cao was reported severely in injured
jured injured and unable to talk. Both suf.
sered bullet wounds in the lees
and feet.
Although the Castro regime in
an official statement on the clash
the "pirate raiders" of
firing on an unarmed "pleasure
craft," Suarez confirmed it actual actually
ly actually wa s a government patrol boat
on a reconnaissance sweep.
The raid took place early Satur Saturday.
day. Saturday. The raiders, apparently us using
ing using a World War 11-built torpedo torpedoboat,
boat, torpedoboat, managed to reach Cayo Sal
a small British-owned islet 45
miles off Cubas north coast. The
British radioed for aid in gettin*
them off the island.
A U.S. Coast Guard boat took
the raiding party from Cayo Sal
to Key West, Fla. The wounded
men were flown, here for emer emergency
gency emergency treatment.
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made either by Gomulka or East
German chief of state Walter T].
biicht in the exchange of formal
speeches.
Gomulka, Polish premier Josef
Cyrankiewicz and other party and
Polish government officials ar arrived
rived arrived i n East Berlin for an offi official
cial official one-week visit.
In his welcoming speech, ut
bricht stressed that a German
peace treaty t which would end
Western allied rights in Berlin
"must not be put off any longer,
Gomulka Fellows Lino
Gomulka, i n reply, reiterated
the Communist line that West
Berlin must be made a "free
city" without Allied troops. But
he did not say such a change
wa s urgent.
uibricht reminded Gomulka and
the Polish delegation that Fast
Germany has recognized Polands
permanent occupation of German
territories east of the Oder-Nelsse
line.
The Allied jx>V/ers and West
Germany imaintain these territo territories
ries territories are only under Polish ad administration
ministration administration pending a peace
treaty settlement.

The six exiles said they were
members of a 50-man anti-Castro
group not affiliated with any other
exile organization. Previous sea
raids against Cuba have been
carried out by the Montecristi or organization,
ganization, organization, the Student Revolu Revolutionary
tionary Revolutionary Directorate and the so socalled
called socalled Alpha 66 group.
State Politicos
Stop Up Pace
TALLAHASSEE (UPI) With
the adjournment of Congress
and approach of the Nov. 6 elec election,
tion, election, the tempo of political cam campaigning
paigning campaigning will pick up in Florida
during the coming three weeks.
The congressional delegation,
nine of whom have opposition in
bids for re-election, was delayed
on over-time session in Washing Washington
ton Washington until final adjournment last
Saturday. Now they are back
home and ready to swing into ac*
tion, along with candidates for
four new seats created this year
because of population growth.
U. S. Sen. John Tower of Tex Texas,
as, Texas, only Republican Senator ever
elected by popular vote from any
of the former Confederate states
and the first from Texas in 100
years, will lead a plane-load of
GOP officials into Florida this
week.
Tower will touch down briefly in
each of the 10 districts where Re Republicans
publicans Republicans are running for Con Congress.
gress. Congress. His first stop is at Pensa Pensacola
cola Pensacola Saturday to plug for M. M.
Woolley, Fort Walton Beach.
Tower, a leading conservative,
took the seat vacated last year by
Vice President Lyndon Johnson.
The lack of hard campaigning
up to now was reflected in fi financial
nancial financial reports filed Monday by
Rupert and U. S. Sen. George
Smathers covering last weeks ac activities.
tivities. activities.
Smathers reported expenditure*
of $5,942, mostly for travel ex expenses
penses expenses of staff members and con-
tributions of $2,275, including S6OO
each from John G. Searle, Chica Chicago,
go, Chicago, Elliott H. Stein, St. Louis.
Herbert J. Frank, Clearwater and
Chester H. Ferguson, Tampa.
Rupert said he spent only $195
and collected :it2o7, all in small
amounts.



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Page 6

The Florida Alligator Tuesday, October 16, 1962

alligator
an anachronism
Sundays Alligator carried a story about WSAs inten intention
tion intention to send out questionnaires to parents to determine
under what conditions parents will allow their daughters to
visit male students living quarters off campus. They will
also consider granting individual permission to visit apart apartments
ments apartments to those girls who have their parents permission.
The apartment rule as it stands today, satisfies osten ostensibly
sibly ostensibly the Universitys obligation to protect its female char charges.
ges. charges. It is, however, as most people are aware, a frequently
broken rule. It is extremely difficult to enforce because it
requires a degree of omniscience that the university does
not possess.
* *
THE RULE, moreover, represents an anachronistic code
that attempts to dictate modes of behavior. For the most
part, this rule appears to be contrary to the mores of stu students.
dents. students. Most college students, wrongly or rightly, feel that
they have attained a sufficient level of maturity to permit
themselves to determine where they shall and shall not go,
In the final analysis, the decision must rest with the in individual.
dividual. individual.
* *
THE UNIVERSITY can attempt to restrict what is con considered
sidered considered misconduct, but it can do little to correct a pattern
that was established well before a student entered the uni university.
versity. university. Personal conduct and personal values can be dic dictated,
tated, dictated, but obedience to them in a free society requires that
they be agreed with.
DJI.
relax, its legal
The following editorial is reprinted from the Florida
Flambeau, the FSU student newspaper. Parties off campus
which have been registered with the University are per permitted
mitted permitted at FSU:
ONLY THREE weeks old, the new provision for private
parties is already a resounding success. Students have
taken advantage of the new rule every weekend since it
was published, and this weekend six private parties were
registered.
Certainly six parties is not many considering the size
of the student body, but it is quite a few in relation to the
newness of the rule. There seems to be # every indication
that more and more students will register their parties.
To those students who still suspect that legal par parties
ties parties will be cased by the administration, we say relax.
Administrators have better things to do than inspect the
social affairs of a student body which has already proved
itself to be mature and responsible. The deans are yielding
responsibility to the students.
It is up to the students to accept the opportunity and
the responsibilities that go with it.

Tin l^loridia
Alligator

Editor-In-Chief Rill Currv
Managing Editors ......,....;,,.,, Jack. Horan,
David Lawrence Jr., David West
f
Business Manager Cary Burke
Sports Editor Jared Lebow
.
City Editor , *,.. Ben Garrett
.* Fr*d Schneider
Wire Editor ~. '. Maryanne Awtrey
Assistant to the Editor *..*...* Sandy Sweitxet'
Coed Life Editor mi.mmi.m....,.,*. Becky Oulnn
£S$? n i t f"**?* 5 M*nooer Jay Fountain
Editorial Assistants ... ,w,.... Corole Sardelle (AMigoier-on.-the-Air).
Carol Bulled (NewsT* David Hamilton (Editorials), Phil Krug (Photo*!
. Staff Writers
5 0nn ' Goodman, Tovo Levine. David Wilkinson, Bcb Dixon. Mary
vEki* wSlf-oSrilf l!* r 'i A r *ynn Auerbach. Gerald Jones,
J aX Lt 'Ch*"V. Mark Fronkel, Richard Levine.
Noncy Spiegel. Rick Nihlen, Allen Hastings. Carl Skadowski.
Sports Staff .. Robert Green, Mike Gore,
Billy .Belote. Marc. Weinstein, Roger Levine, Ron Spencer, John Wl Wl---lick,
--lick, Wl---lick, Ned Clovton, George Gardner, David Bertowitzv.
Business Staff ...... Jane Godbee. Office Manager
Sharon Smith, ftiblic RelotiOns and Personnel.
- CIRC -ATI ON Tom Neff, *Circ ,*.lat ion Manager.
Kort*., Pot Patterson. Jim Neff and David Piche.
JVCnTISING .... William Epperheimer, Advertising Maneger,
Robert Hatton, Corole Powers, and Trevor Huston.
AtJ.ICATOW b tN student newspaper wf the t'nlversKy Os
£*'l%. aaa is poUUhed Sally except Monday and Saturday. TUB KI.OKJHA At.U
ertaredao errand cass Matter at the VnUrd State* f*t Offtre at Caines'
£Ue. y*rU. OtlH*t are located In Rooms. *. li and IS in the Florida Office Rultdin*
*?ZS*P-2***!m ***** ** M, . end request other'
editorial office or hyelncu office. ..
Opinions voiced in personal columns no this. pace opinions of the oditor*. Only editorials are the oMM ia! x"T at iKe p.pcr,

Pleeeeeze
Double Check,
EDITOR:
I was very surprised last Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday to hear my bell ringing
and the Alligators reporter com coming
ing coming for an interview without any
previous appointment just when
I was ready to leave. Two days
later the photographer came and
gave me five minutes to gel
dressed and comb my hair just
when I was back from the pool.
After such a quick interview
several mistakes appeared in the
article that you published.
FIRST OF all, I did not say
that the rules were too strict
for me. Resident Assistants are
not submitted to the procedure
of signing in and out and have
no curfew. When the reporter
asked me how I liked my new
job I explained to her that it
was difficult for me to learn
all the regulations in order to
apply them to the students.
Since I was a graduate student
I was living off campus before;
therefore was not familiar with
any kind of rules; but I do think
that they are useful when there
are so many young women living
in a community away from home
for the first time.
I also said that last year I had
a graduate assistantship in the
Bureau of Business and Economic
Research. By that time I did
not think that I would have been
a good Resident Assistant because
one of the requirements for that
jcb is to share an apartment w'ith
another Resident Assistant, and I
was really concerned by pros prospective
pective prospective problems of co-habitation.
Nevertheless, I tried that real
American experience off campus
during the second semester, and
I must say that the result was
oretty successful; now my life
vith my American roommate u
< real pleasure.
I WOULD also like to mention
hat I have been traveling since
t was fifteen years old. I made
my first trip to Austria not Aus Ausralia
ralia Ausralia I probably said Austria
with a French accent which made
the word sound like Australia
you see when I said that my
accent is not good enough yet!
May I suggest that for any
>ther interview, chiefly with for foreign
eign foreign students, you submit the in inrerviewee
rerviewee inrerviewee the article in order to
be sure that everything is really
what he had in mind?
Laurence Chauvin-Desfleurs. 7BA

L&ttm
'Where The
Girls Are
The Squarest
EDITOR:
Congratulations to the Coeds of
UF. For years men have suffered
under the misapprehension that
they were the controllers of their
own destinies. And women have
kept well the secrets of how they l
were able to control men by
feminine wiles.
OUR UF coeds have not only
stepped down from their pedes pedestals,
tals, pedestals, they have even dchned
shirts and pants that they might
best meet more equally the Flor Florida
ida Florida man on his own, already
shaky ground.
TIME AND again they hav
proven themselves worthy of the
name Florida Men. Whether
drinking, smoking, necking, or
telling lewd stories, they have
often been victorious over their
male counterparts.
And a note of appreciation to
those men who, realizing their
own inferiority, had the courage,
to step aside and let the women
pass. But imore than these let us
thank those men. who recognize
the supremacy of women by don donning
ning donning sockless tennis shoes and
T-shirts, elevating women by their
own self-degradation.
WERE IT not for these men
and others like them, the Florida
coed might still be just another
sweet, innocent ball of fluff, mold molding
ing molding men s minds and freezing
mens hearts with a flutter of
their eyelashes.
Perhaps as the movement
grows stronger, some of the more
aggressive female Florida Men
might be willing to assist our
football team.
L.T.
READERS:
Please sign all letters.
We will withold your
name upon request...
Thank you
The Editors

Boom, Boom I
Boom, Boom I
EDITOR: 1
Saturday I attended the foot*
ball game and thoroughly enl
joyed it. I had hoped to be abl<*
to sit back and enjoy the half*
time show just as well, but wo
rudely disappoined. 1
I only hope that when th crowning of the Horn com in*
queen is planned for next year
that someone will show a httl more consideration toward Un
student body than was done thi
year. Maybe someone had th
delusion that the biggest drun
in Dixie is transparent or maybJ
my eyes just arent strong enough!
but I do know that I would lik
to have seen who was crowne!
before the morning papers cam I
out die next day. I
WHY SHOULD the fans on th|
other side of the stadium see thl
queen crowned while the studenl
body was kept guessing? 1
Im sure that it would be aJ
predated next year, if for oncJ
soneone would show a little coni
sideration for the students in theil
planning. j
GEORGE DRUMMOND, 2Ud
Editors note; We agree; bJ
the incident with the drum wa
the result of unintentional fault;
footwork,
11
I (stoeXU
.*



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thin gaseous cloud, it narrates the
story of creation, the formation of
the stars, the origin of our solar
system and of our Earth, the
evolution of life and man as
reconstructed by the most modern
scientific thinking. Ulus. Pub. at
$4.95.
Sale $l
28. Jane Austens THE WAT WATSONS.
SONS. WATSONS. This justly famed, charm charming
ing charming fragment of English life is
here skillfully and tastefully com completed
pleted completed by John Coates, a modern
writer of rare taste and talent.
Pub. at $4.00.
Sale $1
29. TIDES OF CRISIS, by A.
A. Berle, Jr. The well-known di diplomat
plomat diplomat discusses U.S. foreign re relations
lations relations in the worlds trouble spots,
particularly Latin America. "A
penetrating analysis of Americas
place in a revolutionary world.
A. Srhlesinger, Jr. Pub. at $4.00
Sale $1
30. A MOON FOR THE MIS MISBEGOTTEN,
BEGOTTEN, MISBEGOTTEN, by Eugene O'Neill
An autobiographical four-act
drama of sin and guilt by Amer Americas
icas Americas greatest playwright. Pub.
at $2.75.
Sale SI
31. NAPOLEON IN LOVE, by R.
F. Delderfield. The man-sized
.story of the Emperor's boudoir
forays. In addition to the well wellknown
known wellknown conquests of Josephine,
Marie Louise, Mademoiselle
George and Marie Walewska.
some fcuiteen other women
all young, attractive and ex extremely
tremely extremely eager to pleaseare fully
accounted for, Ulus. Pub. at $5.00.
Sale $1
32. THE TERRORISTS Tile
Slory of the Forerunners of Sla Slalin,
lin, Slalin, by Robert Payne. A savagely
authentic portrait of four pre-Bol pre-Bolshevik
shevik pre-Bolshevik terrorists and their fana fanatically
tically fanatically idealistic band of Nihilists
their attempts to destroy the
despotic brutality of Czarist Rus Russia,
sia, Russia, and their significant influ influence
ence influence upon modern communism.
Ulus. Pub. at $5.00.
33. FORM IN CIVILIZATION,
by VV. R. Lethaby. Fwd. by Lewis
Mumford. Collected papers on art
and society which have profound profoundly
ly profoundly influenced modern architecture
and the allied arts. Pub. at $2.75.
Sale $1
34. GODS IMAGE AND MANS
IMAGINATION, by Erdman Har Harris.
ris. Harris. An intelligent, witty and re reverent
verent reverent survey of the various and
curious ways man has imagin imagined
ed imagined God, from Yahweh to the
"Man Upstairs Pub. at $3.50.
Sale $1
35. John OHu m s SWEET .AND
SOUR. Comments on books and
people -salty, savage, controver controversial.
sial. controversial. oa everything from critics,
classics and contemporaries (Hem (Hemingway,
ingway, (Hemingway, Aldous Huxley, Wolcott
Gibbs) to plagiarism and book
awards. Pub. at $3.00.
Sale $1
36. MAN: His Life, His Educa Education,
tion, Education, His Happiness, by A. da Sil Silva
va Silva Mello. One of Brazil's outstand outstanding
ing outstanding thinkers presents a systema systematic
tic systematic critique of modern mans soul soulsickness
sickness soulsickness and inability to confront
reality. Its 729 pages delve deeply
into contemporary philosophy, psy psychology,
chology, psychology, religion, etc. Pub. at
$6.00.
Sale $l
37. KCKUTAI NO HONG I,
trans, by J. O. Gauntletto The
Japanese counterpart of Mein
Kampf propounds the mystical
nationalist propaganda that led
to Pearl Harbor and dreams of
world conquest. Pub. at SI.OO.
Sale sl.
38. The Truth About Cancer
THE LONG SEARCH, by Mark
Boeseh. Hard-hitting, document documented
ed documented history of cancer research,
giving evidence of the virus na nature

ture nature of the disease and describing
the great work of Coley, Doyen,
Schmidt, Scctt, Glover, Deaken
and others. Pub. at $4.95.
Sale $1
39. DARWIN AND BUTLER
. Two Versions of Evolution, by Ba Basil
sil Basil Willey. Witty, analytical es essays
says essays on Darwins Origin of Spec Species,
ies, Species, its impact oh the Victor Victorian
ian Victorian mind, pre-Darwinian theories
of evolution, Samuel Butlers
views on Darwin and religion.
Pub. at $3.50.
Sale sl.
40. THE POOR MANS GUIDE
TO EUROPE, by David Dodge.
Money-saving travel tricks thou-
sands thousands of tips and miserly know knowhow
how knowhow by an expert with a hilari hilarious
ous hilarious sense of humor; outlines all
you need know from pate de fo foie
ie foie gras to Viennese villas 1959
ed. Ulus. Pub. at $3.50.
Sale sl.
41 Pamela Hansford Johnsons
PROUST RECAPTURED. The six
highly praised BBC radio plays
by this noted Proustian scholar,
consisting of projections into sig significant
nificant significant contemporary situations
of the major characters of
Proust's great novel. Remem Remembrance
brance Remembrance of Things Past. Pub. at
$4.00.
Sale $1
42. SHORT STORY 111. 20 mar marvelous
velous marvelous stories of magic, mur murder,
der, murder, life and love, by four fresh
new talentsBurton Raffel, Mat Matthew
thew Matthew Carney. Joseph Slotkin, and
Robert Creeley. Pub. at $4.50.
Sale $1
43. SIMONE WEIL, by E.
W. F. Tomlin. Critical assess assessment
ment assessment of her thought in relations
to modern philosophy and theol theology.
ogy. theology. The ar.hor considers her to
be the finest product of the French
resistance and the possessor of
a keener, more profound insight
than Jean-Paul Sartre. Pub. at
$2.50.
Sale sl.
44. THE POLLSTERS IN
VOI R OPINION, by J. M. Fenton,
Gallup Poll editor. A frank, in inside
side inside view of polls, politics and the
American people from 1945 to 1960.
Analyzes voting patterns, public
opinion trends, the 1948 debacle,
why youve never been interview interviewed.
ed. interviewed. etc. Pub. at $3.95.
Sale $1
45. LORD DUNSANY: King of
Dreams, by Hazel Littlefield.
The first full-length study of this
giant of English letters lays bare
his multi-faceted personality as
flashing humorist, ecentric, and
prophet, with 40 personal letters,
photos. Pub. at $5.00.
Sale $1
46. Liberty or DeathWll Y
DEMOCRACY?, by Prof. Alf Ross.
Democracys turbulent history
and meaning are brilliantly illu illumined
mined illumined by a man who has lost and
found freedom. Pub. at $4.50.
Sale $1
47. SOCIALISM AND THE IN INDIVIDUAL,
DIVIDUAL, INDIVIDUAL, by W. A. Sinclair.
Fascinating testimony of a sold soldier-philosopher-politician
ier-philosopher-politician soldier-philosopher-politician w h/o
left the British Conservatives for.
the Labour party. Discusses soc socialism
ialism socialism in general and modern pol politics
itics politics in particular. Pub. at $2.50.
Sale $1
48. Savonarola A CROWN OF
FIRE. Pierre Van Paasscn's ex exciting
citing exciting recreation of the fiery
monks life and times, from his
call to Renaissance Florence by
Lorenzo the Magnificent to his
trial, torture, and burning at the
stake. Pub. at $4.95.
Sale $1
49. WYNDHAM LEWIS Pr Pr-trait
trait Pr-trait of the Artist as the Enemy,
by Geoffrey Wagner. An objective
study of the accomplished art artist,
ist, artist, author and political critic. Pub
at $5.00.
Sale $1
50. AFRICAA Handbook tor
Travelers, by C. R, Joy. Every Everything
thing Everything you need to know about pass passports,
ports, passports, exchange rates, customs
climate.; plus information on plac places
es places of interest, hotels and trans transportation
portation transportation in every country. Pub
at $3.50.
Sale $i
51. HENDERSON THE RAIN RAINKING.
KING. RAINKING. Saul Bellow* lightning-pac lightning-paced
ed lightning-paced novel about the adventures of
a fantastic American hero in Dark Darkest
est Darkest Africa. One of the most widely
discussed books in years. Origi-

nal hardbound edition. Pub. at
$4.50.
Sale $1
52. BROOKS ADAMS by Arthur
F. Beringause. The brilliant bio biography
graphy biography of the noted American
theorist and historian whose poli political
tical political and economic concepts re remain
main remain vital today. Pub. at $6.00.
Sale sl.
53. Mediterranean Magic THE
EXPANDING EYE, by Peter
Green. Sensuous impressions of
Florence. Naples, Capri, the is islands.
lands. islands. hills, villages, peoplein
antiquity and today. Sheer en enchantment.
chantment. enchantment. Photos. Pub. at $4.00.
Sale $1
54 U. S. MILITARY DOC DOCTRINE,
TRINE, DOCTRINE, by Dale O. Smith, USAF.
Fwd. by Gen. Carl Spaatz. An
examination of military policy
and national defense in the air airatomic
atomic airatomic age. Analyzes the fight fighting
ing fighting philosophies and tactics of
such famous military leaders as
Washington, Napolean, Frederick
the Great and Billy Mitchell. Pub.
at $3.50.
Sale sl.
55. Fodors Travel Guide to
FRANCE. Scores of photos, ev everything
erything everything you need to know sites
and night life, where to stay, eat
and shop in Paris, on the Rivi Riviera,
era, Riviera, etc. Pub. at $4.95. 1959
1960 ed.
Sale $1
56. Fodors Travel Guide to
BRITAIN AND IRELAND, Scot Scotland
land Scotland and Wales. 425 pages, scor scores
es scores of photossightseeing, page pageantry,
antry, pageantry, sports, hotels, resatur resaturants,
ants, resaturants, clubs and best buys in
each country. Traditions and man manners.
ners. manners. 1959-1960 ed. Pub. at $4.95.
Sale $1
57. STEPHEN BENTON ELK ELKINS,
INS, ELKINS, by O. D. Lambert. The Un Union
ion Union officer who fought the bloody
Quantrell, Secretary of War un under
der under Harrison, and U.S. Senator
from 1895 to 1911, Elkins was a
key figure in the transformation
of America from a frontier socie society
ty society to an industrial state. Fascin Fascinating
ating Fascinating and authoritative history.
Ulus. Pub. at $6.00.
Sale $1
58. American Eccentrics THE
SQUARE PEGS, by Irving Wal Wallace.
lace. Wallace. Uninhibited accounts of nine
notable American non-eonform non-eonformistsVictoria
istsVictoria non-eonformistsVictoria Woodhull, the pros prostitute
titute prostitute who ran for President;
the man who WAS Phileas Fogg;
Emperor Norton I, and others.
Pub. at $5.00.
Sale $1
59. WINSTON CHURCHILL, by
Emrys Hughes, MP. Candidly
controversial biography of Win Winnie
nie Winnie by his mast outspoken cri critic
tic critic in the House of Commons. Pub.
at $5.00.
Sale sl.
60 THE SATYRICON OF PE PETRUNKS
TRUNKS PETRUNKS ARBITER. Trans,
ascribed to Oscar Wilde. The clas classic
sic classic adventures of two rapacall rapacallions,
ions, rapacallions, living on their wits, depict depicting
ing depicting the actual life of Rome under
Nero: its wickedness, degener degeneracy
acy degeneracy debaucheries and enormit enormities.
ies. enormities. Pub. at $3.00.
Sale $1
61. THE REDISCOVERY OF
MAX, by Waldo Frank Drawing
on all phases of existence, one of
the leading writers of our time
provides an intellectual memoir
and analysis of the creative forces
that make up the modern world.
Pub. at $6.95.
Sale sl.

62. THE SAGE OF SEX: Have Havelock
lock Havelock Ellis, by A. Calder- Mar Marshall.
shall. Marshall. A definitive biography of the
legendary man who most influ influenced
enced influenced 20th century sexual atti attitudes.
tudes. attitudes. Pierces the enigma of the
shy scholarly Ellis who suffered
the tortures of sexual impotency
and deviation, yet emerged a
-worldwide authority on sex. A su superb
perb superb study enhanced by hereto un unpublished
published unpublished journals and letters.
1 hotos. Pub. at $5.00.
Sale sl.
*? SOCIETY- AND MEW MEW
MEW \ ed by Ia Ids ton, M.
, Collection of N.Y. Academy
l dlcinc essays ranging from
the biology of ethics to chang changmg
mg changmg concepts of child care. Contri Contributors
butors Contributors include Gerard, Liddell.
Senn, others: Pub. at $3.00.
4. DELUSION AND MASsI
Jr A.
M- D. How individuals and groups

subordinate logical tv
ed. ty Robert o. 1:.,,-, s
ms.de story. by , w
lessors, on what largo? X f !
lower entrance '-ts.B'
ay oath.,.
American higher er1,,,.*,- e
at -$3.50. tCiUcatl n. Pub.Bn Pub.Bn-66.
-66. Pub.Bn-66. Words and TIIF rvn!' J W n
of MEANING, t v s m o #'
minating studv of i n SS
how words have the and
they do. Pub. at $3.75 meanin
69. Maxim Gorky F n M , T
OORDEYEV. Magnificent
of the fight of a man against the 1 1
hard-drinking, loose-living, unscru
pulous mercantile society of th
Volga at the turn of the cento Iv
Pub. at $3.00. r
Sale si
70. BHOWNSON ON DEMOrlr
RACY AND THE TREND TO I y
WARD byLawrela
Roemer. A fascinating work reli
vealing the radical political piin l f
ciples of a 19th century Yankee (
Catholic thinker who formula 1
ed the conclusions of communism;
more than a decade before Karl ]
Marx. Pub. at $3.75. Sale sl
$1.49 EACH 1
71. SELECTED WRITINGS OF :
JOHN JAY CHAPMAN, ed. by 1
Jacques Barzun. One of Ameri
cas most original and eccentric
critics on Whitman, Emerson
William James, Shakespeare, the 1
Negro question, and many other
aspects of literature and society
Pub. at $5.00. I
Sale sl.4
72. THE CONSTITUTIONS OF
ABRAHAM LINCOLN & JEFF
ERSON DAVIS, by Russell Hoe
ver Quynn. A Southerner's con
troversial end historical stud
in contrasts., Lincoln is put of
his pedestal, the author writes
Davis is given a truer light an
the real causes of the war ar
shown. Pub. at $3.25. 1
Sale sl.4
73. SHAKESPEARE FOR|
YOUNG ACTORS, ed. by Eleano
Patmore Young. Distilling all th
beauty and excitement of th
bard's six most popular play.
these adaptations are perfect f
the student and a must for bud
ding thesbians. Arranged, wit
lucid commentary, for study an
performance. Pub. at $4.50.
Sale sl.4
71. BAYONETS TO LHA S
by Peter Fleming. The first full
account of the British invasio
of Tibet in 1904. Conceived by Lor
Curzon, Viceroy to India, an
carried out by Colonel Fianci
Younghusband, it was one of th
most swashbuckling, exotic and i
trigue-laden campaigns in his
torv. Photos. Maps. Pub. at $4.95
Sale sl4
75. Red ChinaTHE SERPE*
AND THE TORTOISE, by Ed
gar Faure, ex-Prime Ministei <
France. Based on his recent v
sits to China and the USSR,
Faure analyzes the critical ei on<
my and politics of China, t
clash between Mao Tse Tung an
Khrushchev, and the West s jj r
realistic position, on Red
na's entry to the UN, etc. Pub Pubs4.so.
s4.so. Pubs4.so. ,
Sale sl-4
76. ART: THE TORCH
LIFE, by Mary Harris. Ess
jn art appreciation by a
guished Australian critic,
analyses of the work of m
ters and Australian arti.'-s arti.'-s---t'pped
--t'pped arti.'-s---t'pped in color plates.
Special Import s!<
77. HISTORICAL
Papers' read to the seconc
Conference of Historians, >
chael Oakeshott, Michael
erts, T. Desmond willianls Vorl
others, on Irish history,
War 11, English Reform
etc. Pub. at $2.50. gaie $u
78. HISTORICAL STO**
11. Papers read to tne
Conference of Irish H 1
by Denys Hay, Asa Pi
McCracken and others on
.pacy. Kilkenny, ChartJ&n >
Economic Ideas of Pal"'
more. Pub. at $3.00.
79. HISTORICAL
HI. Papers read to the
ish Conference of
Alfred Cobban. Brian n ' j ir
11. Walsh and others. <>n



MPUS BOOK STORE'S
f BOOKS

Hh of scientific history, the influ-
m n ,,. of The Times, illicit Irish
Kvhiskev, and more. Pub. at $3.00.
I Sale $1.49
I SO MAN IN HIS RELATION RELATIONSHIPS,
SHIPS, RELATIONSHIPS, ed. by H. Westmann. 10
Kt art ling essays on the most cru-
Kial question of our atomic times
the need for face-to-face com communi
muni communi cation between practioners of
increasingly specialized scientific
Kind moral fields of study. Ulus,
pub. at $3.00.
S Sale $1.49
+ si. Alexis de Tocqueville
(JOURNEYS TO ENGLAND AND
(lIiELAND, ed. by J. P. Mayer.
The impressions that Tocqueville
recorded from these visits des des
des tribe the social, economic and po po
po litieal problems of Reform Age
England with incomparable per per
per tinence and prophetic insight.
Pub. at $4.50.
Sale $1.49
I 82. Red China TEN YEARS
OF STORM, by Chow Ching-wen.
Fwd. by Lin Yutang. The inside
story of what really goes on be-
I hind the Bamboo Curtain, by a
I former official of both the gov gov
gov ernment and the Party. The com-
I munes, Mao Tse-tung, the wolf wolf(and
(and wolf(and fox" diplomacy are thorough thorough-9
-9 thorough-9 lv covered. Pub. at $6.00.
I Sale $1.49
83 LAKOUSSE FRENCH T
I ENGLISH, ENGLISH FRENCH
I DICTIONARY, by L. Chaffurin.
1 Standard desk dictionary, indis indis-1
-1 indis-1 pensable for every student, teach teach-1
-1 teach-1 er and businessman who uses
I French. Includes special sections
lon grammar, pronunciation,
names and idiomatic phrases. 768
I PP-
Special $1.49
| 84 IHE VICTORIAN CON 80-
I ENCE, by C. R. Decker. Authori Authori-1
-1 Authori-1 tative and highly readable account
I of the impact of Balzac, Flaubert,
I Zola, Baudelaire, Ibsen and the
I other Continental realists on the
I English mind. Illustrated with
I contemporary caricatures. Pub. at
I $3.00.
Sale $1.49
85. Greenwich Village in Its
Heyday THE IMPROPER 80-lIEMIANS,
IIEMIANS, by Allen Churchill. Vi Vivid
vid Vivid re creation of Americas Left
J Bank in the great years of Eu-
J gene O'Neill, Edna St. Vincent
Millay, John Reed and Maxwell
Bodenheim. Ulus. Pub. at $5.00.
Sale $1.49
86. THE KEATS CIRCLE: More
Letters and Poems, ed. by H. E.
Rollins, Harvard University. 43
hitherto unpublished letters re recently
cently recently acquired by Harvards John
Keats collection shed surprising
i new light on the poet, his sister,
their talentless, but attractive bro brother,
ther, brother, and John Reynolds, the poets
mast intimate friend. Pub. at
$3.00.
Sale $1.49
87. AMERICAN DEMOCRACY
AND MILITARY POWER, by
Louis Smith. Comprehensive, im important,
portant, important, study of the democratic
theory, constitutional law, and ad administrative
ministrative administrative practices that guide
the civilian control of our military
organization. Pub. at $6.00.
Sale $1.49
88. CROZCO His Life and Art,
by Alma Reed. An intimate por portiait
tiait portiait of the great Mexican paint painter,
er, painter, Jose Clemento Orozco. Fea Features
tures Features his life in New York, friend friendships
ships friendships with Frank Lloyd Wright,
Edward Weston, many others. 32
personal photos and reproductions
of his best work.- Pub. at $6.00.
Sale $1.49
89. South Africa BACK BACKGROUND
GROUND BACKGROUND TO BITTERNESS, by
Henry Gibbs. The story of South
Africa from the first Dutch set set
set tlement, the Great Trek, the Boer
V\ar down to the storm-filled
present. Pub. at $4.75.
Sale $1.49
90. TAINES NOTES OF ENG ENGLAND
LAND ENGLAND A Gallic View of Vie Vielorian
lorian Vielorian Morality, by Hipp oly t e
Taine. The whole panorama of
19th Century British life is illumi illuminated
nated illuminated in these commentaries
which constitute both important
social history and an entertaining
expose. Pub. at $6.00.
Sale $1.49
91. Founders of the Confeder Confederacy:
acy: Confederacy: THEY TOOK THEIR
MAND, by M. W. Wellman. The
first rousing months of the Con Confederacy
federacy Confederacy seen through the figures
of Edmund Ruffin. Mary Chest Chestnut.
nut. Chestnut. Stopewall Jackson, Beaure Beauregard

gard Beauregard and Lee. Pub. at $4.50.
Sale $1.49
sl-98 EACH
92. New England Abolitionists
THE HOLD BRAHMANS, bv
Lawrence Lader. Exciting history
of New Englands men and women
who fought so desperately with
words and weapons against slav slavery
ery slavery William Lloyd Garrison.
John Brown, John Quincy Adams,
Daniel Webster, Harriet Beecher
Stowe, etc. Photos. Pub. at $5.00.
Sale $1.98
94. SMALLER SLANG DIC DICTIONARY,
TIONARY, DICTIONARY, by Eric Partridge. 5,-
400 entries in this excellent collect collection
ion collection of 20th century slang, written
specially for the general public.
Includes Americanisms, catch
phrases, service slang, early per period
iod period survivals, abbreviation and
sign list, etc. Pub. at $6.00.
Sale $1.98
95. SWINBURNE: A SELECT SELECTION,
ION, SELECTION, by Dame Edith Sitwell. An
anthology of the controvers ia 1
poets finest work "A Ballad
of Life, A Ballad of Death,"
"Madonna Mia, "Lives from
Anactoria, Atlanta in Calydon,
"Laus Veneris, and others
with a critical discussion by the
distinguished contemporary poet.
Pub. at $5.95.
Sale $1.98
96. Anatomy of a Scream
THE FROG POND, by Joyce
Maclver. The true, terrifying, as astonishingly
tonishingly astonishingly frank confessional of
a young woman whose strange
compulsion drove her from lover
to lover and from analyst to ana analyst.
lyst. analyst. Abounding with weird wo women,
men, women, Madavenue men, exhibition exhibitionist
ist exhibitionist sex, fascinating encounters encountersand
and encountersand devastating exposes of psy psychoanalysts
choanalysts psychoanalysts who dwell in fantasy
worlds even more startling than
those of their patients. Pub. at
$4.95.
Sale $1.98
97. The Borzoi Book of FRENCH
FOLK TALES, ed. by Paul De Delarue.
larue. Delarue. Illus. by Warren Chappell.
54 masterpieces authentically pre presented
sented presented with the full humor, pun pungency
gency pungency and poetry of Gallic village
story telling. Included is a lively
version of the Bluebeard Story,
an earthy interpretation of Little
Red Riding Hood, etc. Complete Completewith
with Completewith sources and comments. Pub.
at $5.00.
Sale $1.98
98. Edmund Wilsons APOLO APOLOGIES
GIES APOLOGIES TO THE IROQUOIS. With
a study of The Mohawks in High
Steel by Joseph Mitchell. Two of
the New Yorkers most brilliant
writers examine the present sit situation
uation situation of Americas most advanc advanced
ed advanced Indians on their threatened re reservations
servations reservations in upper New York
State and in their Brooklyn col colony
ony colony in the North Gowanus neigh neighborhood.
borhood. neighborhood. Illus. Pub. at $4.95.
Sale $1.98
99. ROBERT BURNS, by John
Lindsey. A fully rounded biogra biography
phy biography of the great Scottish poet and
lover, revolutionary and philan philanderer,
derer, philanderer, from ploughman to Edin Edinburgh
burgh Edinburgh drawingroom, from tavern
rhymer to world poet. Illus. Pub.
at $3.95.
Sale-$1.98
100. TITIAN, by John Ernest &
Dennis Gilbert. 12 glorious mas mastorworks
torworks mastorworks in full color, including
Sacred and Profane Love, Ad Adoration
oration Adoration of the Magi, The Edu Education
cation Education of Cupid. Plates are tip tipped
ped tipped on separate pages suitable for
framing.- Introductory test with
notes for each painting. 11 xls
Printed in Italy.
Special Import $1.98
101. SEEDS OF TIME: The
Background of Southern Thinking,
by Henry Savage. Jr. A pene penetrating
trating penetrating study of slavery and King
Cotton, the Civil War and re reconstruction.
construction. reconstruction. the Klan and the
NAACP. Bilbo and Thomas Wolfe
the vast panorama behind the
Southern mind today. Pub. at $4.50.
Sale $1.98
102 John Dewey: DICTION DICTIONARY
ARY DICTIONARY OF EDUCATION. The basic
thoughts of the great American
philosopher and educator, arrang arranged
ed arranged for ready reference. Pub. at
* 3 ,s Sale $l9B
103. LINCOLN AND THE PAR PARTY
TY PARTY DIVIDED, by W. F. Zornow.
The whole exciting story of how
Lincoln recouped the political and
military failures of the North in
the election of 1864 and saved the
union from disintegration. Bibliog.,
index. Pub. at $4.00.
Sale $1.98

WEDNESDAY THRU FRIDAY, 9 A.M. TO 4:30 P.M.
IN FRONT OF THE STUDENT SERVICE CENTER

104. THE SEXUAL RELATIONS
OF MANKIND, by P. Marvtegaz Marvtegazza.
za. Marvtegazza. The great Italian anthropolo anthropologist's
gist's anthropologist's definitive account of strange
and curious sexual customs. First
complete and unexpurgated Eng English
lish English edition. Pub. at $6.00.
Sale $1.98
103 A HISTORY OF THE AM
ERICAN PEOPLE SINCE 1865,
by H. J. Carman & H. C. Syrett.
both of Columbia University. The
whole sweep of our history from
the Civil War to the Cold War.
with special emphasis on econo economic
mic economic and social history. Scores of
illustrations, documents, etc., and
.an annotated bibliography that has
been called the best available for
all aspects of our national life.
Over 800 pp. Pub. at $6.75.
Sale $1.98
106. THE THIRD ROSE Ger Gertrude
trude Gertrude Stein & Her World, by
John Malcolm Brinnin. A warm
and knowledgable portrait of Miss
Stein from Radcliffe to Paris, back
to America and the final years in
France. All the famous friend friendships
ships friendships and influences are judici judiciously
ously judiciously evaluated, and the story
moves with the pace of a novel.
Illus. Pub. at $6.00.
Sale $1.98.
107. SIX STUDIES IN QUAR QUARRELLING
RELLING QUARRELLING by Vincent Brome. Wit
and wisdom abound in these en entertaining
tertaining entertaining and instructive ring ringside
side ringside studies of famous literary
quarrels between such figures as:
George Bernard Shaw, H. G.
Wells, G. K. Chesterton, Hillaire
Bellock. Dr. Coulton and Henry
James, Pub. at $4.25.
Sale $1.98
108. BOTTICELLI, by Bernard
Gay. Twelve masterpieces
color. The Adoration of the Ma Magi,"
gi," Magi," Spring, The Birth of Ve Venus,
nus, Venus, The Mystic Nativity, etc.
Reproductions are tipped on in individual
dividual individual pages suitable for fram framing.
ing. framing. Introductory text, plus notes
for each painting. Ilxl5, printed
in Italy.
Special Import $1.98
109. ART UNDER A DICTA DICTATORSHIP,
TORSHIP, DICTATORSHIP, by Hellmut Lehmann-
Haupt. The sinister story of the
perversion of painting, architec architecture,
ture, architecture, printing and other arts to
propaganda in Nazi Germany, Sta Stalinist
linist Stalinist Russia, and post-war tyran tyrannies.
nies. tyrannies. The artists who co-operated,
what happened to those who did
not, and the effect on the public.
45 plates. Pub. at $5.50.
Sale $1.93
110. THE COLLEGE YEARS
A Treasury of College Life and
Laughter, ed. by A. C. Spector Spectorsky.
sky. Spectorsky. College life in all its aspects,
reflected brilliantly in writings by
Chaucer, Swift, Mencken, Thurber
and many others. Illustrated with
photos, drawings and cartoons.
Pub. at $7.95.
Sale $1.98
111. OXFORD LIFE, by Dacre
Balsdon. A fascinating and au authoritative
thoritative authoritative account of the day-to day-today
day day-today life of the great English uni university,
versity, university, throughout its history to
the present. The full page illustra illustrations
tions illustrations by Rawlandson, Cruickshank
and the best modern photograph- :
ers are an integral part of the
book. Pub. at $4.00.
Sale $1.98
112. RAPHAEL, by Edward
Lucie Smith. Twelve masterpie masterpieces
ces masterpieces in full color, including the
Don! portraits, The Veiled La Lady,"
dy," Lady," The Madonna with the
Goldfinch and The Marriage of
the Virgin. Reproductions are
tipped on individual pages suitable
for framing. Introductory text,
plus notes for each painting. 11
xls", printed in Italy.
Special Import $1.98
113. THE MEANING OF HU HUMAN
MAN HUMAN EXISTENCE, by Leslie
Paul. A plea for the affirmation
of tite life of the spirit and a
sympathetic yet critical study of
Kiekegaard, Berdayev, Peguy and
Buber. Pub. at $5.00.
Sale $1.98
114. BROCCACCIO, by Francis
Mat-Manux. An exuberant portrait
of this brilliant 14th century Ro Romantic
mantic Romantic storyteller who lived
through Renaissance Paganism
in Italy, lush fidelity with an adult adultrcss,
rcss, adultrcss, medieval piety and report reported
ed reported in the Decameron the
horrors and madness caused by
the Black Death as it slashed
through Italy and Europe. Illus.
Pub. at $3.20.
Sale $1.98

115. CHARACTER AND THE
1 XCLNSCIOt S: A Critical expo,
sition of the Psychology of Freud
and of Jung, by J. H. van der
Hocp. The brilliant result of nine
years intensive study shows you
how to understand psychology and
the fundamental differences of,
prevalent psychological view viewpoints.
points. viewpoints. Includes the origins of psy psychoanalysis,
choanalysis, psychoanalysis, emotional and sexual
development, conscious and the
unconcious, much more. Pub. at
$4.20.
Sale $1.98
117. CARAVAGGIO, by Trewin
Copplestone. 12 magnificent paint paintings
ings paintings in full color, including The
Martyrdom of St. Matthew, Cu Cupid
pid Cupid Victorious. The Beheading
of John the Baptist, etc., tipped
on individual pages suitable for
framing. Introductory text and
notes for each painting. 11x15".
Printed in Italy. Special import
$1.98
118. MARCEL PROUST: Letters
to His Mother, ed. by G. D. Paint Painter,
er, Painter, with an essay by Pamela Hans Hansford
ford Hansford Johnson. An intimate record
of the daily life of the author of
Remembrance of Things Past
and his mother, perhaps the only
person he ever really loved. Pro Provides
vides Provides insight into the glittering
social, political and artistic world
which he made the setting of his
great novel. Pub. at $4.25.
Sale $1.98
119. THE DANCE From Rit Ritual
ual Ritual to Rock and Roll, by Joust
A. Meerloo. Illustrated with 100
exotic photos, paintings and draw drawings
ings drawings from various cultures and
epochs. A noted psychiatrists
startling, sometimes shocking his history
tory history of the dance and dance con contagions
tagions contagions throughout history and
what this form of frenzied self selfexpression
expression selfexpression signifies. Pub. at $4.95.
Sale $1.98
120. Concise Dictionary of AM AMERICAN
ERICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE, cd. by
R. Richards. Thousands of fas fascinating
cinating fascinating alphabetically arranged
entries on the lives and works of
Melville, Mark Twain, Sandburg
Hemingway, OHara, et al. Illus.
Pub. at $5.00.
Sale $1.98
121. OSCAR WILDE and the
Yellow Nineties, by Frances Win Win'.vnr.
'.vnr. Win'.vnr. The color, exoticism and ex excitement
citement excitement of the close of the nine nineteenth
teenth nineteenth century brought to life
through its most bizarre central
figure, including his sensational
trial for homosexuality. The era
of the lost generation of Bau Baudelaire,
delaire, Baudelaire, Verlaine, Rimbaud and
Huy.xmans reflected through Wil Wilde's
de's Wilde's scintillating and decadent
personality. Pub. at $5.00.
Sale $1.98
122. Chinese Decumeron
FLOWER SHADOWS BEHIND
THE CURTAIN. A new, master masterful
ful masterful translation by Franz Kuhn
cf the I2t tale of rascals, corrupt officials,
strange" nuns and priest*. Nar Narrated
rated Narrated with realism and relish,
richly descriptive of Buddhist and
Taoist temple cults. Pub. at $6.00.
Sale $1.98
123. CONCISE DICTIONARY
OF THE AMERICAN LANGU LANGUAGE.
AGE. LANGUAGE. by A. Waldhorn. Here is the
book that tells where our Am Americanisms
ericanisms Americanisms come from. For alt
who work with words. Pub. at
$4.50.
Sale $1.98
124. W. B. YEATS AND TRADI TRADITION,
TION, TRADITION, by F. A. C. Wilson. A de detailed
tailed detailed analysis of the poet's last
plays in relation to Platonism, The
Kabbala, Buddhism and Celtic
folklore. Mr. Wilson has thrown.
a considerable beam of light on
some very dark places In Yeats
work. Times Literary Suple Suplement.
ment. Suplement. Pub. at $5.00.
Sale $1.98
125. OTTO RANK A Biogra Biographical
phical Biographical Study, by Jessie Taft.
The first definite account of the
life and work* of the great psy psychoanalyst,
choanalyst, psychoanalyst, his theories of the
creative personality and his break
with the Freudians. Pub. at $6.50.
Sale $1.98
126. THE DARK SUN: A study
of D. N. Lawrence, by Graham
Hough. A critical evaluation of,
Lady Chatterlys Lover, Sons
and Lovers," other major novels,
stories and poems, with special
emphasis on his mystique.
Pub. at $4.50.
Sale $1.98
127. AMERICA'S LITERARY
REVOLT, by M. Yalron. A com comparative
parative comparative study of Edgar Lee Mas Masters.
ters. Masters. Vachcl Lindsay and Carl

Sandburg, showing their common
opposition to the growth of mono monopoly,
poly, monopoly, imperialism, political corrup corruption.
tion. corruption. materialism and cultural
decadence. Pub. at $4.50.
Sale $1.98
128. ADVENT! RES IN 810-
G KAPIIY, by Willard Coqnely.
The renowned biographer of Wy Wycherley.
cherley. Wycherley. Steele. Beau Brummell
and Louis Sullivan describes his
rewarding adventures in tracking
down his subjects. Among those
we meet in person or legend are
Yeats. R. L. Stevenson. Lord
Chesterfield. Margaret Fuller and
Augustus John. Illus. Pub at $4.00.
Sale SI 98
129. Drugs and Dreams
TIIEOPHILK GAUTIER: His Life
and Times, by Joanna Richard Richardson
son Richardson The first major study of this
scathing herald of the Romantic
movement. Gautier reflected both
the virtues and shocking faults of
the 19th century, an amazing
transitional figure who was a poet,
painter, user of hashish, critic,
eccentric and intimate of Hugo.
Baudelaire, Flaubert, Manet, oth others.
ers. others. Illus. Pub. ,at $7.50.
Sale $1.98
130. Civil War Desperadoes
BEEFSTEAK RAID, by Edward
Boykin. The shocking documented
story of a hunger and despera desperation
tion desperation that brought about the great greatest
est greatest but last successful raid the
Gray Commandos" ever struck
against Grants Army at Rich Richmond.
mond. Richmond. Illus. Tub. at $4.95.
Sale $1.98
131. THE POST SYMBOLIST
PERIOD, by K. Cornell. Reviews
the work and reputation of such
men as Appollinalre. Claudel, Pe Peguy,
guy, Peguy, Valery, and others, in terms
of the critical thought of their own
time as well as that of ours. Orig.
$4.00.
Sale '51.98
132. AMERICAN WRITING TO TODAY
DAY TODAY ed. by Allan Angoff. An ex exhaustive
haustive exhaustive study of the U.S. liter literary
ary literary scene. Over 50 articles by
leading authorities from W. H.
Auden to John Dewey cover all
phases: Books, radio, TV, press,
film, theater; authors, poets, cri critics,
tics, critics, audiences, etc. Pub. at $4.50.
Sale $1.98
$2.98 EACH
133. A HISTORY OF RUSSIAN
MUSIC, hv R. A. Leonard. Rus Russian
sian Russian music from the chant of the
medieval Russian Church to the
controlled art of the Soviet Un Union
ion Union today. Discusses the lives, in individual
dividual individual personalities and work of
Musorgsky. Borodin, Rimsky
Korsakov, Tchaikovsky, Scriabin,
Stravinsky, Prokofiev, Schostako*
vlch, many others. Illus. Pub. at
$6.00.
Sale $2.98
134. THE NEW BORZOI BOOK
OF BALLETS, by Rosalyn Krok Krokover.
over. Krokover. Describes and discusses 57
ballet* in the repertoires of the
Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo. Bal Ballet
let Ballet Theatre, New York City Ballet
and other companies performing
in the U.S. their stoiies, his history,
tory, history, music, choreography, casts,
s ets, costumes, and performances.
32 photos. Pub. at $6.75.
Sale $2.98
135. A HISTORY OF MILITA MILITARISM.
RISM. MILITARISM. by Alfred Vagts. Impor Important.
tant. Important. definitive work on the or organization
ganization organization and maintenance of
military establishments for power
and conquest, from feudal times
to the hot and cold wars of the
present. Traces the development
of the military caste system in all
countries, discusses all the classic
theories of warfare, and traces
the Influence of militarism on so social
cial social and political life throughout
history. Illus. Over 500 pages,
bibliog, and Index, Pub. at $7.50.
Sale $2.98
136. The Essence of Wonder-
ROME, NAPLES AND FLOR FLORENCE,
ENCE, FLORENCE, by Stendhal. The great
literatures incredibly rich tapes tapestry
try tapestry of post Napoleonic Italy dur during
ing during her golden age of travel."
Stendhals keen reportial eye re reveals
veals reveals the essential, vibrant spir spirit
it spirit of this enigmatic land, captur capturing
ing capturing the very life's blood of its in ingenious,
genious, ingenious, provocative women, men
and arts. The writers superb wit
and pen probes the status of Italian
women, La Scala, tyranny, cos costumes,
tumes, costumes, beauty, music, philosophy,
genius, Kings, courtiers and
many others; with an index of over
800 concise biographies. Pub. at
$7.30.
Sale $2.98

141 DICTIONARY OF PHILO PHILOSOPHY,
SOPHY, PHILOSOPHY, ed. by Dagobert D.
Runes. Every term, idea and sys system
tem system of thought clearly and au authoritatively
thoritatively authoritatively defined; with, full
biographical information on im important
portant important thinkers from the beginn beginnings
ings beginnings to existentialism and Zen.
Pub. at $6.00.
Sale $2.98
139. THEODORE ROOSEVELT:
The Formative Years, by Carle Carleton
ton Carleton Putnam. Over 600 pages of
exciting reading about the first
twenty eight years (1858-1886) of
the liveliest of our presidents.
Here is the complete story of his
childhood battle for health, his
Harvard career, his first politi political
cal political forays, and the most complete
account of his thrilling adventures
out West. Illus. Pub. at SIO.OO.
Sale $2.98
140. 1,000 YEARS OF HUNG HUNGARY,
ARY, HUNGARY, by Emil Lengyel. A short
but definitive history by a noted
authority. Gives the background
not only of their bloody and vali valiant
ant valiant 1956 struggle against the Rus Russian
sian Russian army but their rugged Mag Magyar
yar Magyar origins, their conflicts with
the Tartars, Turks and Habsburgs,
their perennial internal problems,
languages, traditions; Kossuth,
Karolyi, Horthy, Nagy, Kadar, et
al. Pub. at $5.00.
Sale $2.98
137. THE MARVELOUS LIFE
OF THE M'DDHA, by Maurice
Perchcron. Combining the known
facts of the Buddhas existence
and his teaching with the beauti beautiful
ful beautiful myths he has inspired, this is
the story of Guatamas miracu miraculous
lous miraculous birth, his princely youth, the
winning of his bride, the voluptu voluptuous
ous voluptuous magnificence of their life .to .together,
gether, .together, and the day of the Great
Departure, when he set forth on
his search for Truth. Pub. at $5.75.
' Sale $2.n B j
138. AUTOMATION AND HOC
IETY, ed. by H. B. Jacobson k
J. S. Roucek. The challenge of au automation
tomation automation is answered by 32 ex experts
perts experts studying the impact of this
perplexing development and its
profound economic, social and po political
litical political implications. Includes a
Russian authored chapter on au automation'
tomation' automation' in the USSR, a list of
terms and 37 studies of U.S. and
Canadian automation. Pub. at $lO.-
00.
Sale $2.98
160 THE PAST WE SHARE:
An Illustrated History of the Bri British
tish British and American Peoples, ed by
Peter Quennel k Alan Hodge, with
611 rare illustrations, 23 in full
color. Spans nine centuries, from
the battle of Hastings through the
World Wars the heritage of the
English speaking peoples in the
arts, politics, science; the greats"
from Cromv/ell to Churchill,
Washington to Eisenhower. BH>x
11V. Pub. at $12.50.
Sale $5.88
tt. Arthur Schopenhauers
THE WORLD AS WILL AND RE REPRESENTATION.
PRESENTATION. REPRESENTATION. Trans, by E. F.
J. Payne. A new, unabridged two twovolunio
volunio twovolunio translation from the Ger German
man German of Schopenhauers great phil philosophical
osophical philosophical work, first to appear In
over 70 years. For scholar and
general reader alike, it brings an
accurate feeling of the powerful
and trenchant style of one of the
worlds original thinkers fore forerunner
runner forerunner of psycho analysis, the
out look of the psychological
novel, and the essence of depth
psychology. Here is Schopenhau Schopenhauers
ers Schopenhauers final exposition of his phlloso phllosophy
phy phllosophy the will and passion, the
primacy of the will, and the meta
physics of sexual love. Everything
lie published In later life ,{iKtght
be called a commentary to this,
his main work. Complete Index.
Over 1200 pages. Pub. at $17.50.
Sale $6.98 the set
169. Macmillans Famous Ev Everjrmaits
erjrmaits Everjrmaits 12 VOLUME ENCY ENCYCLOPEDIA
CLOPEDIA ENCYCLOPEDIA *
This is the NEW 4th Edition of the
distinguished encyclopedia. There
are 50,000 articles, 9 million words.
9.272 pages and 2.500 illustrations
In 12 cloth-bound, easy-to-handle
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aulhoritlve information in every
field of knowledge, the Macmillan
Everymans Encyclopedia is the
ideal reference for- the college
student, the office, every home. Ar.
Ideal gift, a permanent possession.
The $59.95 set.
Special $19.95



Page 10

' ''.' ''

BmemcM]
r naxrv 1
NOW SHOWING
Tonight thru Wed.
ADVISE
and
CONSENT
Charles Laughton
PLUS
ADVENTURES OF
ROADRUNNER
Starting Thursday
HATARI
Starring
JOHN WAYNE
l'

MEN'S PRESIDENTSCOUNCIL
|
Tickets on Sale .it Information Booth Across from The Huh
I Saturday, Octolx r 20, SqO pm 1 he Huh Tickets S2.SO per Couple*

The Florida Alligator Tuesday, October 16, 1962

-.v.-.vaw.v .V. . v.v.v. ; :w: :
tlrl G!9i W n f ,e fn J< f n ? 6 Notoris Sharon Tess y Linda Lovell, Susan Skinner,
tebb.e Young, Pnsc.l a Sanborn, Mary Ann Wilder, Karen Roberts, Carol Weisbaum,
%<*? T ld r a Webb ( 2nd row) Susan Gainsford, Jo Ann Morris, Lynell Glass,
Wesley Middendorf, Joy Graham, Beth Meadows, Jo Beth Hart, Gail McCaleb
Susan Helman, Linda Love, (3rd row, from left) Nancy Estes, Susan Ensign, Barbara
Demmmg fcrbara Du Parc, Joyce Bleidner, IGayle Bauer, (3rd row, from right)
Susan Hilliker, Rhode Jacobs, Virginia Jasper, Bonnie Kirkland, Kim Lassiter, and
Jane Lightcap.

iiii
II theYcame 111
I TO COBDURA ||j
<

HC Sweetheart Janes
Grades r Not Hurtina

I know its hard to
believe,* said Jane Light Lightcap,
cap, Lightcap, UF Homecoming Sw Sweetheart,
eetheart, Sweetheart, but Ithink Pm
making the best grades I
have ever made at Florida
this semester.*
With all the trips, off official
icial official functions, and my job,
I dont have much time to
studybut when I sit down
to studyl really work!*
Brunette Jane, a senior
was named the Homecom Homecoming
ing Homecoming Sweetheart Saturday du during
ring during the halftime festivit festivities
ies festivities of the Florida-Texas
HEELS put on in 5 minutes
SOLES put on in 15 minutes
modern~shoe
REPAIR SHOP
across from Ist national bonk

(f TECHNICOLOR*
*
NOW Lady and the Tramp" | "Almost Angels* | I

A & M football game.
She is majoring in En English
glish English and minoring in psy psychology
chology psychology and advertising.
Shes carrying 15 hours
this semester.
Her overall grade av average
erage average is a 2.7.
The daughter of an At Atlanta
lanta Atlanta insurance man, Jane
said that one aspect of the
Contest she has most en enjoyed
joyed enjoyed has been the oppor opportunity
tunity opportunity to see more of Fl Florida.
orida. Florida. She has lived in
Atlanta for the last eight
years and had been to Mi Miami
ami Miami only once.
This is the most thrill thrilling
ing thrilling thing that has ever hap happened
pened happened to me, without a dou doubt,
bt, doubt, she said. lll remem remember
ber remember this even longer than
some of the other wonderful

experiences Pve had at the
UF.
Has she noticed any change
in the attitude of her class classmates
mates classmates since she was an announced
nounced announced Sweetheart?
No, but I did have one ex
perience in class this mor morning.
ning. morning.
In Psychology, the pro professor
fessor professor called role and ask asked
ed asked if Miss Lightcap was
present. He made me raise
my hand and than said that
he understood that I was
Homecoming Sweetheart.
Then he asked me if I
would be in class on Friday,
1 answered that I would be.
Then he said lf Miss
Lightcap can make it, Pm
sure everyone else can.
Commented Jane, Pm
just sure the other kids in
the class just love me for
thatthe class is over at
noon.
Homecoming will be a busy
weekend for Jane and her
2 princesses, Sharon Tes Testy
ty Testy and Joyce Bleidner. They
arent sure yet as to their
exact schedule, but do know
that they will be at the Flor Florida
ida Florida Blue Key Smoker as
hostesses, will appear in
the Parade, at Gator Growl,
the John Marshall Bar As
sociation skits, the Legis Legislative
lative Legislative Wives Dinner, the
Vanderbilt game, and the
Homecoming Ball at the
Hub.



WSJm b^ l
; Xs£y*C; x-f JR-. wvw., /
; >x ; .<: ; ;X; ; ;- >^;': ; > : -S< ?
: ';i? $! :
&,. WSfF :>U RjL V
Willis Bodine
CAMPtjS
COMfASS
By BECKY CHALKER
Organizations Editor
TUESDAY OCTOBER 16
ALPHA CHI SIGMA: FU 12
7:00-8:30 p.m.
DELTA SIGMA PI: FU 220
7:00-8:30 p.m.
ALPHA PI OMEGA: FU 218
8:30-11:00 p.m.
U R A : FU 200 2:00-5:00 p.m.
ALPHA SIGMA CHI: FU John Johnson
son Johnson Lounge 8:00-10:00 p.m.
BRIDGE LESSONS: FU Oak
Room 7:00 p.m.
THE COLLEGIUN MUSICUM:
Music of the Renaissance, Univ.
Aud. 8:15 p.m.
FLORIDA PLAYERS: Ticket
Sales The Lark, Service Booth,
3-5 p.m. M, T, W, Th.
WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 17
DESERET CLUB: FU 116, 118,
123, 210, 220, and Johnson Lounge
7:00-8:30 p.m.
ORDER OF ATHENA: FU 121
7:00-8:30 p.m.
FLA. SPELEOLOGICAL SOC SOCIETY:
IETY: SOCIETY: FU 114 7:00-8:00 p.m.
HISTORY SEMINAR: Oak room
FU 8:00-10:00 p.m.
LATIN AMERICAN CLUB: FU
218 7.30-9:30 p.m.
A.1.A.: FU 212 7:30-9:30 p.m.
ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA: FU
208 4:30-3:30 p.m.
ADVANCED DANCE LES LESSONS:
SONS: LESSONS: FU Social Room 7:00 p.m.
THURSDAY OCTOBER 18
SPORTS CAR CLUB: FU 12
7:00-8:30 p.m.
DELTA SIGMA PI: FU 220
7:00-8:30 p.m.
YOUNG REPUBLICANS: FU
218 8:30-11:00 p.m.
MURPHREE AREA COUNCIL:
FU 116 10:00-11:00 p.m.
FLORIDA CHRISTIAN FEL FELLOWSHP:
LOWSHP: FELLOWSHP: FU 218 7:00-8:30 p.m.
ALPHA KAPPA DELTA: FU
Johnson Lounge, & 223 Kit 8:30-
11:00 p.m.
UF ANTHROPOLOGY CLUB:
FU 324 8:30 p.m.
ART LESSONS: FU Oak Room
7:00-11:00 p.m.
SUNDAY OCTOBER 21
DUPLICATE BRIDGE: FU
2:00 p.m.
SIMCHAS TORAH DANCE: Hill Hillel
el Hillel Foundation 7:30 p.m.
MONDAY OCTOBER 22
FILMS COMMITTEE: FU 118
7:30-8:30 p.m.
PROGRAM OFFICE: FU Oak
Room 4:00-5:00 p.m.
GERMAN CLUB: FU 121.8:30-
11:00 p.m.
KAPPA PSI: FU 212 7:00-8:30
p.m.
W S A: FU 210 7:00-8:30 p.m.;
FU 212 8:30-mflK) p.m.
REAL ESTATE CLUB: FU 215
7:00-8:30 p.m.
BEGINNING DANCE LES LESSONS:
SONS: LESSONS: FU Social Room .7:00 p.m.
Summer Fee Up
An increase in student activity
fees for the summer trimester has
been predicted by Paul Hendrick,
Student Body Treasurer.
In past years students attending
the summer session paid $5.45 but
the fee will be raised to $14.50
this summer trimester.

Bodine Plays Bach Tonight ... 8:15

THE MUSICAL SCENE
By REID POOLE ~
Department of Music
University of Florida
Willis Bodine, University Organ Organist.
ist. Organist. will present the third program
in his currently projected series
of concerts covering the complete
organ works of Johan n Sebastian
Bach, tonight at 8:15 in the Uni University
versity University Auditorium. Mr. Bodine
will plav on the Universitys An Anderson
derson Anderson Memorial Organ, one of
the largest and finest organs in

Attention, all witty, urbane college students:
HB JB RR
Hj I like to for I ||
ENTER LUCKY STRIKES ZANY NEW
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50 CASH AWARDS A MONTH. ENTER NOW. HERE'S HOW:
First, think of an answer. Any answer. Then come up with
a nutty, surprising question for it, and youve done a
Crazy Question. Its the easy new way for students to
make loot. Study the examples below, then do your own.
Send them, with your name, address, college and class,
to GET LUCKY, Box 64F, Mt. Vernon 10, N. Y. Winning
entries will be awarded $25.00. Winning entries sub submitted
mitted submitted on the inside of a Lucky Strike wrapper will get a
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| THE ANSWER:
I mmw
\ mi mm
j MUMMIES
£uajpi;ip ueqdA33
luapue paspj oqM :NOLLS3n6 3 Hi
j THE ANSWER:
j TWAIN
i
e uo sunM }etjM Nousanb 3hi
I

The answer is:
the taste to start with... the taste to stay with iUrmU I
The question is: WHAT IS THE SLOGAN OF THE FAVORITE REGULAR CIGA- / if
RETTE OF TODAY'S COLLEGE STUDENTS? If you missed that one, go to the # |/
rear of the class. Everyone should know that fine-tobacco taste is the best I c IGA ** rTes $i
reason to start with Luckies, and that taste is the big reason Lucky smokers mimMj
stay Lucky smokers. Prove it to yourself. Get Lucky today.
/
Product of c A& c Jv&uoccy is our middle name
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ihe southeast. The instruments
was built in 1025 by the Skinner
Organ Company.
BODINE WILL PRESENT the
Prelude in C major, the great
Prelude and Fugue in B minor,
the Pastorale in F major, and the
overwhelming Toccata in F ma major.
jor. major. He will also include a group
of four chorale preludes from the
Little Orga n Book and a group
of three large choral preludes.
The large-scale organ works
written during Bachs mature

THE ANSWER:
WCHAILS
OIL
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THE ANSWER:
James
Joyce
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Suqje*s qjoq auieu sjjiS e pue auieu
s,Aoq e OA|B noX ueo :NOIIS3n& 3Hi

Tuesday, October 16, 1962 The Florida Alligator

year in Leipzig reflect increasing increasingly
ly increasingly the colorful tonal resources
available jn the magnificent or organs
gans organs being constructed at that
time. The brilliant Prelude in B
minor is one of these composi compositions
tions compositions and shows a definite Italian
influence, virtually outlining the
Vivaldi concerto with its towering
ritornellos and fugal concertinos
clearly in evidence. The follow following
ing following majestic B minor Fugue is
in three sections: the first a
lengthy double exposition, the sec-

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Art Appreciation j
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THE ANSWER:
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Across the river
and into the trees

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ond episodic and without pedal
and the third reaching 1 a grer
climax with a new count ersirbjec
After an introductory, almost pr
gramatie movement, modelled o
the Italian "pifferari traditioi
three movements are appended i
short dance and aria form#: (Pit
ferari, are. literally, shepherd'
pipe players.) A planned ke
succession, moving through th
major and minor dominants, aid
in establishing the essential unit;
of the four movements.

Page 11



I he. Florida Alligator Tuesday, October 16, 1962

Page 12

Homecoming f 62 Only Two Days / But...

Continued From Page I
lists compiled. .speakers solic solicited.
ited. solicited. talent was hunted and
summer school ended. As this
magazine goes to press piepaia piepaiatiop
tiop piepaiatiop are well underway. But let's
project into" the fair. .Using the
past as a guide.
When the summer was over the
campus once again filled with
orientation groups and rush par parties,
ties, parties, and Homecoming was in the
home stretch. The general chair chairman
man chairman bought his books still won wondering
dering wondering if there will be a Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming and hopeful that the would
f!nd time to read the purchased
books. Tthe Gator Growl chair chairman
man chairman started hi. And the banquet chairman plan planned
ned planned the head table.
things solidified. But v/hat about
the color of Homecoming the
floats and house decorations?
Will they go up in time? be became
came became the question mark in the
minds of 3,200 Greeks. And when
they are being built, the pledges
will wonder if they will become
sophomores after the all-night,
chores of stuffing crepe paper in into
to into the chicken wire skeletons ts>
form graven images of Vandys
Commodores.
WILL THE COEDS be able to
fill the estimated 75 pounds of sta stationery,
tionery, stationery, which is used each Home Homecoming.
coming. Homecoming. And will it rain during
Growl?

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Will the swimming pool for the
swimeapades have too much
chlorine . will the barbecue
arrive on time . .and will it rain
during Growl?
If all these calamities have not
occurred, will the general chair chairman
man chairman flunk out of school? Well,
for the sake of argument every everything
thing everything works out and the weekend
approaches. The speakers send
their prepared texts and the
growl of excitement and expecta expectation
tion expectation has turned into a full fullthroated
throated fullthroated roar as the press releases
say the day is at hand.
ITS FRIDAY, October 19. 1962
and the whole town pitches in.
The Mayor Welcomes the Gov Governor
ernor Governor and the students have had
enough coffee to bolster sagging
spirits and rubbery legs as they
welcome their dates.
The banquet speaker arrives
and the delegation meets him at
the airport with a car (begeed
from a local car dealer.)
, And it will be 12:15 time for
the parade to start . the 109
units will be lined up on the drill
field waiting to travel east down
University Avenue where the
fraternity houses are still being
dressed in lumber and chicken
wire.
1 MEANWHILE, the G rovv 1
Chairman will be wondering what
master of ceremonies, Fuller

/
Vyyy J j J 4 A / / ,1 J

Warren, is doing, and what be
will do if it rains.
The parade will start after
word has bee n received that the
12:15 southbound train has
passed and the 3:10 northbound
is a little late. All the cars and
floats will receive their final
touches and checks will be mado
to see if all the dignitaries are
riding in the right cars with the
proper identification. . accord according
ing according to rank . and a marching
unit is not behind a herd of horses.
The parade will end.
The pledges will scurry to the
stadium to explain to the early
birds that alniost the entire west
stands are reserved for Alumni
and guests of Florida Blue Key.
ALSO SCURRYING that way
will be some 1,200 who wall arrive
in the basement of the gym for
toothy similes and backslapping as
the Florida Blue Key Smoker
begins. Through the latter half,
cries will be heard from Banquet
Chairman Blair Culpepper, for former
mer former gridiron captain, urging the
guests to move upstairs to eat the
meal which was prepared that
morning and is getting cold.
' NOW COMES the time for Secre Secretary
tary Secretary of State Tom Adams
Say Sue
Let's slip up and
sip a SLUSH $
at the q
CORN CABIN
102 N.W. 13th St,

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serving as toastmaster to de decide
cide decide who are the proper people to
introduce and worry, if the up upcoming
coming upcoming legislator will be intro introduced
duced introduced for a few reimarks and de decide
cide decide that he has an interesting
point to make which will be fol followed
lowed followed by another . .and Growl
Will be missed.
And now Gator Growl.
FULLER WARREN, with his
silvery hair reflecting iigftt, wd l
step on the stage at 8:15 and
Growd will be underway.
The television cameras will be
set up and ready to operate if the
pre-Growl Bands have not sliced
up any section of the more than
twenty miles of cables.
After the skits and talent,
which will have been screened by
three committees, are presented
and after a quick prayer and
check of the insurance policy (re (regarding
garding (regarding the likelihood of a stray
spark of a fireworks display land landing
ing landing in the crowd) r the final act of
the largest all-student show in the
world goes on. During the fire fireworks
works fireworks display, if one looks closely
he will see Coach Ray Graves
examining the turf and defying
any spectator to trample the once
well nursed green.
Growl will be over at 10 p.m.
. . providing it wasnt ended
sooner by rain.
NOW THE Homecoming com committee
mittee committee faces it s hardest task
How to persuade their neglected
dates to be congenial for tbe
evenings party.
Up in the morning and off to
the law school breakfasts where
the speakers will attempt to make
their points while waitresses scur scurry
ry scurry about the tomato luice and
aspirin . while the legislators"
practice for forcing a smile when

notice is given to them at the
John Marshall Bar Association
skits, where the pent-up refjec
tions of the future barristers shine
forth on the state government be before
fore before 2,000 bale f u 11 y watching
statesmen and their wives.
And the swimcapades, where
after a month of practice, the
clowns and coeds entertain and
splash the spectators while wait waiting
ing waiting for the Alumni-Legislative
AND THE BARBECUE, where
the legislators meet their educated
constituents and hope the Food
Service has had a chance to clean
off the 1,200 places at the pre previous
vious previous evenings banquet in time
to prepare the pre-game meal for
the 4,000 strong.
And the game. It#starts and
ends (hopefully with a Florida
win.)
If not the Homecoming Bail,
the alumni can meet their frater fraternity
nity fraternity brothers . and hear the
plans for the new house and soli
citations.
COME SUNDAY afternoon and
the last bag is being packed at an
easily found and inexpensive
motel, the flash effect will die.
The homeward trek . It was
a good -weekend, but things have
changed. Next year, Ill be
back. they say and they will.
But the work of Florida Blue
Key and the committee continues.
Reports written . financial
, statement evaluation committees
. . thank you . press follow
ups . and while this is taking
place the members of Florida
Blue Key, sponsors of Homecom Homecoming,
ing, Homecoming, will huddle together to find
a man to head the next feature
w-eekend.



Wslzm; SW& 9
Unusual Day
By JARED LEBOW
Gator Sports Editor
Saturday was a most unusual day in Florida Field.
Among the strange occurances was the fact that Flor Florida
ida Florida s fighting Gators played four w r hole quarters of foot football
ball football as the students yelled themselves hoarse while rooting
for, instead of against the Gators. There were no cries of
down with Graves and most unusual of all, quarterback
Larry Libertore was actually cheered when he came in on
offense.
All this goes to prove what Alexander said after con conquering
quering conquering the world still holds true, Its nice to win.
The afternoon was resplendent with bizarre highlights
both on and off the field.
Wierd Cheerleaders
One of the more interesting aspects of the day were the
three Texas A&M cheerleaders clad in khaki uniforms with
knee length boots. For the entire duration of the game
these three inarched up and down in front of the West
S the"r a hands 6PPing kii Wlerd motions
From my seat in the East stands I could not hear what
they were saying, but their motions resembled those of
three Diuid priests preparing for a burial ceremony If so
it was very appropriate, considering what was happening
to their team on the field.
I suggest that Blue Key sign up these three for Gator
Growl, they sure beat Indian dancers.
An incident which made the student body feel wanted
was the halftime show featuring the crowning of the 1962
Homecoming Sweetheart. I, along with 13,000 other stu students
dents students was shocked to learn that this years homecoming
queen will be-a big bass drum.
Winning .42-6 over a major college team, may provide
the spark the Orange and Blue have been missing all sea season.
son. season. Granted Texas A&M is not the greatest team in the
nation, but it should be remembered that vaunted LSU
only managed to beat the Aggies by 21 points.
Black Spot
Only one incident marred Floridas comeback, the dis dismissal
missal dismissal of halfback Dick Skelly. I have no argument with
the action Coach Graves took in connection with the inci incident,
dent, incident, what does bother me is the smoke screen laid down
by the athletic department.
No details were given as to why Skelly was dropped.
This secrecy has spawned a myriad of rumors.
>*
Tne athletic department argues that it does not have,
to give public reason for dismissing a player. They say that*
this is to protect the athlete who has been punished enough
by being dropped from the squad.
This secrecy leaves it to the fertile imagination of the
public to come up-with a reason. Listening to talk around
campus the past few days, it becomes clear that there is no
shortage of people who are ready to imagine and repeat the
worst about what really happened.
In the end these rumors may do more to hurt Skelly
than a public announcement by the Athletic Department
explaining exactly why he was dismissed.
Booters Meet FSU
The UP Soccer Club will finally play someone besides
the Ft. Stuart team. This Saturday the vaunted FSU soc soccer
cer soccer club will invade Gainesville for a match with the un unbeaten
beaten unbeaten Gators.
Florida booters boast a 85 game winning streak going
into Saturday's game. There main diversion this season has
been wreaking havoc with the Ft. Stuart team. The Gator's
have met the army squad twice this season, winning both
matches handily.
Last season the Seminole booters came to town sporting
an unbeaten record,When the final whistle blew, they were
on the short end of an 8-0 score.
That match was played in Florida Field. Saturday, it
will be held on Kerning Field, adjacent to the stadium,
with kickoff at 10:00 a,m. Bleachers have been erected
along the sidelines.
If you have nothing to do Saturday morning, the game
is something you should not miss. The Gator Soccer Club
plays a fast paced brand of ball sparked by several indivi individual
dual individual standouts.
The club has an international flavor, with most of the
members coming from Latin American countries, where the
sport is as popular as football is here.
. Fans attending Saturday's .match may get an added
treat If the FSU squad is of the same caliber of last year's
team the UP'S Cuban Comet, Fernando Gimenz, may see
some action,. ___

Florida Weaklings / Dont Despair,
UF PaPa of Tarzan-Building Club

By JOHN WALXJCK
Gator Sports Writer
You say youre afraid to take
your best girl to the beach be because
cause because someone closely resembling
Tarzan keeps kicking sand in your
face and calling you skinny?
Well, dont despair! Your answer
to revenge is right here on caim caimpus.
pus. caimpus.
The U. of F. is the proud papa
of a very fine body building club
open to any male fitness-consi fitness-consience
ence fitness-consience students. This program is di divided
vided divided into two sections, the bar barbell
bell barbell club and the weight lifting
team.
The -barbell club offers a sci scientific,
entific, scientific, supervised program of
body conditioning, fitted to the
abilities and potential of the in individual.
dividual. individual.
Having a location in the Hume
area and the gym cinder track,
both units are well equipped with
some three tons of weights and
devices resembling implements
from a dungeon torture chamber.
Membership can be obtained in
the weight lifting room by the
cinder track any day Monday

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Tuesday, October 16, 1962 The Florida Alligator

through Friday. Last years turn turnout
out turnout was over 800, with this year's
totals indicating a similar recur recurrence.
rence. recurrence.
The one and only blemish mar marring
ring marring an almost perfect set up is
the weight lifting room itself.
Members have long been appeal appealing
ing appealing for action on the dreadful
condition of the room. Besides be being
ing being drastically undersized, 50x18,
for such a large membership, the
room neatly converts into a swim swimming
ming swimming pool with every cloud burst.
This may be fine for the tank
team, but a great hazard for the
lifters.
Excelling members with the de desire
sire desire to put their skills into com competition
petition competition can find release in weight
lifting club. Having a member membership
ship membership of only 35. they are a very
select and effective group.
The club holds all of its train training
ing training sessions in the field house,
out by the baseball diamond, get getting
ting getting ready* for the various meets
they schedule with other Florida
schools. Meets held on campus can
be enjoyed in the recreation room
of the gym.

MuK. m
pT[ im
m M
m '
All outstanding team members
are sent to the National
championships, last year held in
Detroit. A respectable name has
already been made by the team,
who took second place in the State
last year, and captured the State
AAU crown in 1960. >
In the wind is a big invitational
meet to be scheduled here in Jan.
uary, when we can all see some
really big Gators in action.

Page 13



Page 14

TLe Florida Alligator Tuesday, October 16, 1962

Giants Win 5-2, Go For Broke Today

SAN FRIAiNOISCO (DPl)Little
Billy Pieic6 fired a brilliant three threehit
hit threehit no\v-or-never 5-2 victory for
the San Francisco Giants Monday
to square the World Series and
keep them alive for a seventh and
final game against the New York
Yankees.
Thfc 35-year-old Pierce, an
American League fugitive with a
squeaky voice and a fading fast
ball, handcuffed the mighty Yan Yankees
kees Yankees while his mates handed
Whitey Ford a record-tying fifth
World Secies defeat and evened
the classic at three victories
each.
It was a must" victory for
those Cinderella Giants and, as

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they had done jso often before this
longest of all seasons, they
bounced back from the brink of
extinction on one of the wierdest
days in series history.
The series had been postponed
three straight days because of a
gale-whipped storm and. before
they could go at it this time,
three helicopters hovered over
the soggy outfield in an attempt
to make it playable.
The Giants were accused^dur accused^during
ing accused^during the regular seasonof wetting
their basepaths against the Dog Dogers
ers Dogers to cut down on the running
speed of the Los Angelinos. And
the wet footing came to their aid
again Mondayeven if they didnt

order itas they sprayed the
spongy, deep-grassed outfield with
hits which the Yankee outfielders outfielderscouldnt
couldnt outfielderscouldnt cover.
But Pierce who had won 12
games in Candlestick Park this
season without absorbing a single
defeatwas their man of the
hour before a roaring crowd of
43,948 partisan fans, who
screamed for them to square up
thus series at three games each.
Obtained from the White Sox
''this year, and apparently well
over the baseball hill, Pierce had
that left-handed magic which had
beaten the Yankees 25 times dur during
ing during his 15 years in the Ameri American
can American League.

The Giants gave him three runs
n the fourth, an explosion de deonated
onated deonated on Fords Wn errant
ihrow on an attempted pickoff
play. And it wasnt until the fifth
that Pierce gave the Yankees
their first hit.
That one was a dandya tow towering
ering towering home run by slugging Rog Roger
er Roger Maris.
But the Giants got two more
back for Pierce in their half of
the fifth as a four-hit assault
routed Ford. And while Pierce
gave up those other two hits for
one run in the eighth, he went
all the way to force a seventh
vnd absolutely final game Tues Tuesday.
day.- Tuesday.
It was a pitching masterpiece
under tremendous pressure,
Pierce allowing only three hits
and two walks one of those in intentionaland
tentionaland intentionaland winding it up on
the final out of the game by
striking out Maris, the man who
had touched him for the home
run.
The Giants threatened to break
through in both the first and sec second
ond second innings but each time Ford
was bailed out by a double play.
But then in the fourth, Ford put
himself in a holethat wild pick pickoff
off pickoff throwas the Giants rang
up three runs.
One man was out when Felipe
Alou singled sharply off Cletis
Boyers outstretched glove. Wil Willie
lie Willie Mays walked and then, with

SEC Roundup

Billy Lamar Lothridgc, pride of
. Gainesville, Ga. f kept right on
rolling Saturday along what ap appears
pears appears to be a sure-fire all-Ameri all-America
ca all-America trail.
The Georgia Tech junior quar quarterback
terback quarterback continued, for the fourth
straight week, to be responsible
for all of his teams points as he
paced the Yellow Jackets to a
17-0 victory' over the Tennessee
Vols.
The Lothridge record Saturday:
one touckdown, set up himself on
a 41-yard run; one touchdown
pass, completion No. 5 in a string
of six passes on the drive; a 26-
yard field goal; two extra points;
and some booming punts.
The Lothridge record for the
season.* three touchdowns and
six touchdown passes, two field
goals and seven extra points.
Also, a league-leading 640 yards
in total offense at an average of
160 yards per game and a 40.5
punting average.
FOR TECH it Was victory No.
3 in four starts. For Tennessee, it
was the third straight Southeast Southeastern
ern Southeastern Conference loss and marked
the first time in history that the
Volunteers have ever lost their
first three games in a season.
The only other SEC grime this
past weekend was Mississippi
States surprisingly easy 35-6 vic victory
tory victory over Tulane.
Seven other SEC teams saw
action against outside foes and it
was a good weekend for the con conference
ference conference as all but hapless Van Vanderbilt
derbilt Vanderbilt racked up victories.
SECOND RANKED Alabama
exploited its great defense in a
14-3 victory over Houston; llth llthranked
ranked llthranked Louisiana State bid for the
top 10 with a solid 17-3 win over
14th ranked Miami; Auburn
slaughtered little Chattanooga,
54-6.
FLORIDA stunned Texas
A&M. 42-6; Georgia, with two
long touchdown passes by Larry
Rakestraw, up-set Clemson, 24-16;
and previously-winless Kentucky
cruised past Detroit, 27-8, with
Perky Bryant scoring three touch touchdowns.
downs. touchdowns.
Vanderbilt posted its 12th
- straight loss over the past two
seasons by bowing to, of all
teams. The Citadel, 21-6.
Mississippi, ranked first last
- week -and likely to move up as
the other leaders had rough
weekends, was idle.

Cepe cl a up, Ford wheeled and
tried to pick Alou off second.
The throve was 20 feet wide of the
bag and sailed into short right
field.
The Yankee outfielders were
playing deep on Cepeda and when
the wet grass stopped the ball,
Claris had to make a long run to
retrieve it. By the time he did,
Alou had raced all the way home
and Mays was on third.
Cepeda, who had been hitless in
12 trips to the plate before bounc bouncing
ing bouncing a single over Tony Kubeks
head in the second inning, really
broke out of his slump with a
double to right center which sent
Mays loping home. Jim Daven Davenport
port Davenport then singled to that grass grassclutching
clutching grassclutching outfield, Cepeda coming
home from second with the third
run.
Maris delivered his fourth
World Series homer and the first
hit off Pierce in the top of the
fifth, banging the ball high over
the right field fence.
But the Giants werent long get getting
ting getting it back, and with interest,
as they routed Ford in the fifth
with two more runs for a 5-1 lead.
Again there was one out when
Harvey Kuenn, hitless in 10 pre previous
vious previous appearances at bat, singled
to left. Chuck Hiller moved him
all the way to third on a grass grassstopped
stopped grassstopped single to center and Fe Felipe
lipe Felipe Alous single to center scored
Kuenn as Hiller pulled up at sec second.
ond. second.

LSU all conference halfback
Jerry Stovall, another all-Ameri all-America
ca all-America candidate, broke open the
Bengals battle with previously
unbeaten Miami when he ripped
26 yards to a touchdown late in
the period.
Alabamas offense stuttered
against Houston. But that TUle
defense held the Cougars to a
total of minus four yards. Center
Lee Roy Jordan got Alabama's
first touchdown by recovering a
fumble in the Houston end zone.
Sophomore quarterback Jimmy
Sidle scored three touchdowns for
Auburn and passed for another.
Florida intercepted three Aggie
passes and recovered three fum fumbles.
bles. fumbles. Rakestraw completed only
five passes but gained 193 yards
as one was for 77 yards to Frank
Lankewicz and another for 74 to
Don Porterfield.
Mississippi State quarterback
Charlie Furlow passed for two
touchdowns and set up a third.
States Odie Burrell scored on a
90-yara run. Bryant led Kentucky
to its first victory with TD romps
of 1,7 and 3 yards.
Art Guepe Jr., son of the Van Vanderbilt
derbilt Vanderbilt coach, got the Commo Commodores
dores Commodores lone tally early in the
fourth period to cut the gap to
7-6, but The Citadel struck back
with two fourth-period touchdowns
to keep Vandy in the all-losing
column.
1
CLASSIFIED
RADIO-TV repairman, full or part
time, wanted. Salary open. II
you want to play, dont come
by. College Radio Shop, 817 W.
Univ. Ave, (20-lt-P).
KIDDIE KORT Child Care Center
open for Gator Growl and ball
game. Also every day, week or
month. Panned program, open
7 a.m. to 6:15 p.m. Old New Newberry
berry Newberry Rd.,- 26A, Phone 2-6667.
(12-alt-6t).
experienced piano player
needed for band. Call Bob Ger Germani,
mani, Germani, Williston, 528-2131.
(18-2 t-c).
COTTAGES for rent Homecoming
weekend, families preferred.
(18-2 t-ck



Soph Studded Cagers Open Practice

Floridas promising- basketball
team opens practice Monday for
what should be the most interest interesting
ing interesting season in Head Coach Norm
Sloans three years at Gatorland.
The team will workout once a
day in the Florida Gym in pre preparation
paration preparation for a 26 game schedule,
which begins Nov. 30 at Miami.
Floridas 1962 -63 basketball
team could very easily be the
finest in the schools athletic his history.
tory. history.
THATS A boastful statement,
considering the Gators lost their
top scorer of last year, Cliff
Luyk, but Head Coach Norman
Sloan has come up with a squad
loaded with potential.
Beginning his thired year as
Head Coach, the products of
Sloans recruiting will begin
showing results.
Facing the Gators is a top topflight
flight topflight 26 game schedule, including
games against the finest in the
Southeastern Conference, besides
Wake Forest, Texas Tech and
Miami.
However, these roadblocks do
not quell the optimism of Sloan,
who has had two fourth place SEC
teams* in his first two years at
Florida.
WELL HAVE a young ball
club, but we have plenty of po potential
tential potential and should have a success successful
ful successful season.
Sloan has four lettermen return returningseniors
ingseniors returningseniors Tom Barbee (6-4),
Carlos Morrison (6-3) Buddy Bales
(5-10) and junior Taylor Stokes
(6-4).
But What a crop of sophomores.
Guards Tom Baxley and Brooks
Henderson are two of the finest
back court men ever to wear the
Florida Orange and Blue.
Dick Tomlinson, 6-5 speedster,
ha s great promise and can shoot
amazingly well for a man his size.

Guards Tom Baxley and Brooks Henderson
1962-1953 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA BASKETBALL SCHEDULE

Date
Nov. 30
Dec. 3
Dec. 6
Dec. 8
Dec. 10
Dec. 15
Dec. 27-28
Jen. 5
Jon. 7
Jan. 10
Jon. 12
Jan. 14
Jan. 19
Jon. 23
Jan. 28
Jan. 30
Feb. 2
Feb. 4
Feb. 9
Feb. 11
Feb. 16
Feb. 18
Feb. 23
Feb. 25
Mar. 2

Opponent
University of Misrr.i
Jacksonville University
Florida State
Texos Tech
Tulsa
Wake Forest
Gator Bowl Tournament
Louisiana State
Tulane
University of Miami
Auburn
Alabama
Georgia
Florida State
The Citadel
West Virginia
Kentucky
Tennessee
Alabama
Auburn
Mississippi State
Mississippi
Vanderbilt
Georgia Tech
Georgia

He can play center or forward
and looks like a candidate for
conference honors.
THREE TREE-TOP tall new newcomerstwo
comerstwo newcomerstwo sophomores and a
junior college graduateare also
slated for heavy duty. The sopho sophomores
mores sophomores are 6-8 Bob Hoffman and
6-8 Bill Koss, while the j. c. grad
is 6-7 Mont Highly.
Another sophomore is 6-5
Richard Leibowitz, a rugged re rebounder
bounder rebounder who adds depth to the
team.
Barbee, Morrison and Stokes
scored well last year as the Gators
rallied in the second half of the
season to finish with a 12-11 re record,
cord, record, 8-6 in the SEC.
Morrison averaged 11.2 points
per game and hit 49.1 percent
of his shots from the floor.
BARBEE WAS deadly the last
three games of the season. He
Scored 19 against Vanderbilt, 26
against Georgia Tech and 32
against Georgia. His final scoring
average was 10.7.
Stokes missed the last three
games last year because of ill illness.
ness. illness. However, he averaged 8.9
points per game and showed pro promise
mise promise at times last year.
Bales is not a great shooter, but
he has plenty of speed and is an
asset to the team.
COACH SLOAN says the Gators
will have good team speed this
year, a big factor in any sport.
In Baxley Henderson, Flor Florida
ida Florida has two potential All-Amer All-Americans.
icans. All-Americans. Baxley led the nation in
freshman scoring in 1960-1961 at
Maryland. He averaged 32 points
per game.
Henderson is a flawless veteran
of four years of Air Force basket basketball
ball basketball and a year of freshman ball
at N.Y.U. There he averaged 2L
points per game.

Site
Miami Beach
Gainesville
Tallahassee
Lubbock, Tex.
Tulsa. Okla.
Gainesville
Jacksonville
Gainesville
Gainesville
Gainesville
Gainesville
Gainesville
Gainesville
Gair.cv i 'o
Gainesville
Charleston, West Va.
Lexington, Ky.
ICncxve, Tenn.
Tuscaioosa. Ala.
Auburn, Ala.
Gainesville
Gainesville
Noshville, Tenn.
Atlanta, Ga.
Athens, Ga.

I
Kr * JpjpK i
> sgg JRA.
/ **
(Left to right) Assistant Coach Perry Moore, Head Coach Norm Sloan, Freshman
Coach Jim McCachren.
Gator Basketball Record Book
r* M sa ;;
Buddy Bales 4 G 5'10 160 Berkley, W. Va. Sr. IIV.IaI 71 rsif tl
Tom Borbee 4 F 6'4 200 1 Weavcrville. N. C. Sr. r, r ;s* 71 w*ke Forest' ' 65
Tom Baxley G 5'10 180 Miomi So. 11?.%* 1} iZZ *; ll
Brooks Henderson G 6'2 175 Miomi So. Vi nllZu 7*
*" f J C F 6 7 230 Oklahoma City. Okla. Jr. F , 68 .... 63
dui > i^^ mann 240 Chicago, 111. So* Florida 69 V.P.I. 78
Bill Koss C-F 6'B" 215 Bridgeport, Ohio So. Florida 57 LSU 74
Richard Leibew.t* C-F 6'5 215 Jacksonville, Flo. So. F ,o r j d i 47 Tulone . .. 59
Donny Mason G 5 10 165 Bronx, N. Y. So. Florida 74 Mi'mi 62
Lonnv G V 10 I7rt Huntington, W. Va. Sr. Florida 43 Auburn .40
Taylor F 64 75 Gainesville So. Florid a 74 Alabamo 53
Zrv, t L 64 '75 Tampa, Flo, Jr. Florida 69 Kentucky 81
F 6'6 210 Wheeling, W. Va. So. Florida 92 Tennessee . 83
Head Cooch Norman Sloan. fMj! S 2 II
Assistant Cooch Perry Moore. Florida 45 Mitt State 67
Freshman Coach Jim McCachren. Florida 62 i
Train,, Jim Cunninahan,. £ || 6)
Home Gym:, Florida Gymnasium (capacity 7.000). Florida 78 Vandorhilt 6
Lettermen Returning: (4) Buddy Boles (4.0). Tom Barbee H 0.7), Florida 8 Go Teth 75
U"erJtZ usPTi'rcm 2 k S 'L CS i. 8 9 *' Florido 105 Georg,V , 78
Lettermen Lost. (3) Cltf Lu/k (21.3), Lou Merchant (10.9) and | _^___ a|aa| ______
Neil Cody (1.0). lIHIIMi 1
1962-63 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA FRESHMAN BASKETBALL ROSTER BhHI
NAME POS. HT. V/T. HOMETOWN UOH /'C
Larvc Boyd F-G 6'5 190 Gainesville, Fla.
James Clifford G 6'l 185 Mountain Lake. N. |.
Jerry Gates G 6'l 165 Blountstown. Flo. Mi.
Don Goolsby G 6' 175 Apopko, Fla. |Hjr.
Gary Keller F-C 6'9" 185 St. Petersburg, Fla. fflBE mi m f
J. R. Leech F 6'4 210 Sarasota. Fla. Xk 9|k
Bruce Moare C 5' 11 180 Akron, Ohio 7
r'j C^r? C 6'l 1" 210 Pensacola, Fla.
Ed Poors F 6'5 205 Knoxville, Tenn,
Normon Riggle G 6'3 185 Hollywood, Flo. U WM
Frank Wicker F-C 6'7 220 Hollywood, Fla. P
Freshman Coach Jim McCachren. J
INDIVIDUAL HIGHS FLORIDA PLAYERS
Tetol Points Scored: Luyk vs. Tennessee 2/5/62 4O
Field Goals Scored: Luyk vs. Tenn. Ga. 1 5.
Free Throws Scored: Luyk vs. Navy l2/28/61 l2. 'HH|
Free Throws Attempted:, Luyk v*. Novy l2/28/61 l9. v
Number of Rebounds: Luyk vs. Kentucky 2/2/62 26 jk' JP*
d Richard Tomlimon

' r t Ijj
H I H
Tom Barbee

Tuesday, October 16, 1962 The Florida Alligator

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Taylor Stokes

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Mont Highly

Page 15



The Florida Alligator Tuesday/ October 16/ 1962

Page 16

Hoover-Mover,Long-Gone Dupree
Run Wild Go On Spree

By RON SPENCER
Gator Sports Writer
Florida backs have made two
spectacular runs from scrimmage
in the past two games.
fullback Larry Dupree. 190-
pound sophomore speedster from
Macclenny, ripped off a 70-yard
sidelines sprint good for a touch touchdown
down touchdown in the second quarter of the
Gators 28-21 loss to Duke. That
long sprint vaulted Dupree into
second place last week in the
Southeastern Conference ground groundgaining
gaining groundgaining race.
Saturday, against Texas A & M,
Bob (The Mover) Hoover crashed
through the Aggie line, picked up
some key blocking and eluded sev several
eral several would-be A&M tacklers to
raqe 75 yards for the second Gator
touchdown in a 42-6 Gator victory
as 32,000 fans gaped in awe.
HOOVERS LONG run contribut contributed
ed contributed greatly to his games total of
84 yards rushing in five carries,
and boosted the 205-pound senior
halfback from Jacksonville back
into the SECs select corps of
groundgainers after a years ab absence.
sence. absence.
Hoover The Mover rushed for
more than 300 yards as a sopho sophomore
more sophomore and was named to the All-
SEC sophomore team. However,
last fall he failed to live up to the
pre-season press notices and total totaled
ed totaled less than 200 yards on the
ground for the entire season. It
may still be early, but it looks
like Hoover is out to make the
fans forget 6l and remember
19 S).
With four game.-* completed,
Long Gone" Dupree paces the

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In ON YOUR WASH \{/)
\ GIANT WASH \Y
\ LAUNDRYLAND Sj
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\ OPEN 24 HOURS J

Bob (The Mover) Hoover
Gators in the rushing department
with 187 in 30 carries, a 6.2 aver average.
age. average. Hoover has bolted into second
place on the team with 136 yards
in 19 carries', an average of 7.1
yards per rush. Just as remark remarkable
able remarkable as his sparkling average is
the fact that The Mover has yet to
be stopped short of the line of
scrimmage for a loss.
HOOVER S LONG sprint Satur Saturday
day Saturday went into the record book as
a tenth-place tie with Herb Me-
Anly on the all-time list of leading

- ;

\
_j
-
Lorry (LG) Dupree
runs from scrimmage by Florida
players. McAnley also holds the
all-time team record as well as
SEC record, with his 100-yard run
from scrimmage against Sewanee
(University of the South) in 1933.
Thats as long as you can run
from scrimmage.
Jimmy Dunn was the last Gator
to break the 75-yard barrier be before
fore before Hoover, with a 76-yard sprint
against Georgia in 1958.
Sophomore right half Jerry New Newcomer
comer Newcomer also soared into promin prominence
ence prominence by returning a punt 52 yards
in Saturdays Gator victory.

f
Gator Football Statistics
University of Florida Cumulative Statistics
* Through Four Games
GAME RECORD
Fla. PP PP-19
-19 PP-19 Mississippi State ~
0 Georgia Tech 1
21 Duke 28
42 Texas A& M 6
TEAM STATISTICS
Florida
82 Points
29 Ist Down, Run 32
17 Ist Down, Pass 25
1 Ist Down, Penalty 3
47 Total Ist downs 60
164 Runs from scrimmage 135
751 Gain from scrimmage 577
73 Lost from scrimmage ll6
Net gain scrimmage 467
Passes attempted 33
Passes completed 49
.1 Per cent completed 59.0
6 Passes had intercepted 6
352 Gain passing 505
1050 Net gain (Total) 972
26 Number of punts 23
969 Total yards kicked 857
37.2 Punting Average 37.2
1 Punts had blocked -1
10 Number punts returned 17
137 Yards punts returned 157
13.7 Average runt return 9.2
14 Number kickoffs returned 15
297 Yards kickoffs returned 273
21.2 Kickoff return average .18.2
17 Number of penalties : 15
135 Yards penalized 133
6 Fumbles lost 5
75 Longest run 24
33 Longest pass 33
52 Longest punt return 19
11 Longest interception return 15
9 Touchdowns running 5
2 Touchdowns passing 2
0 Touchdowns punt return 0
0 Touchdown intercepted pass 0
0 Touchdown kickoff return 0
1 Touchdowns blocked punt 0
11 Extra point attempted (kick) 5
8 Extra point made (kick) 4
0 Extra point attempted (pass) 1
0 Extra point made (pass) 1
1 Extra point attempted (run) 0
1 Extra point made (run) 1
0 Field goals attempted 6
0 Field goals made 4
0 Safeties for .: 0
PUNTING GAME
Kicks Yds. Blk. Avg.
Clarke 16 658 1 41.8
Bludworth 9 311 0 34.5
PUNT RETURNS
Rets. Yds. Avg. TDs
Newcomer 1 52 52.0 0
Hoover 4 51 12.7 0
Starling 1 22 22.0 0
Infante 1 6 6.0 0
Clarke 1 8 8.0 0
Shannon 2 5 2.5 0
Gregory '. 0 -3 1
OPP. FUMBLES RECOVERED BY
Culpepper, Holland, Newcomer, Pettee, Kelley.
INDIVIDUAL RUNNING
Runs Gain Lost Net Avg.
Dupree 30 191 4 187 6.2
Hoover 19 136 0 136 7.1
ODonnell 22 82 0 82 3.7
Mack 13 79 0 79 6.0
Tnfante 17 75 1 74 4.3
Libertore 16 63 17 46 2.8
Skelly 16 52 17 45 2.8
Clarke 6 26 0 26 4.3
Campbell 2 7 0 7 3.5
Stoner 2 4 0 4 2.0
Kelley 3 4 3 1
Batten 8 18 20 -2
Shannon 10 14 21 -7
SCORING
Conv. Atts. Conv. Made
TDs Throw Run Kick Catch Run Kick FG Total
Dupree 20000000 12
Mack 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 12
ODonnell 20000000 12
Hall 000 11 00808
Libertore 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6
Holland 1 0 0000006
Shannon 1.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6
Hoover 100000006
Brown 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6
Gregory 100000006
Batten 001001002