Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Will Your Life Go Up in Smoke?
. . See Story Poge S*ver

$ Dispute Ends in Draw

A trimester-iong armistice on a
question of salaries was proclaim proclaimed
ed proclaimed yesterday between the student?
government treasurers office and
the Sepiinole, UF yearbook.
AN INTERNAL dispute between
publications officials and the
treasurers office ground slowly to
a halt with neither side the victor.
Treasurer Paul Hendrick, back backed
ed backed up by the Student Finance Law
prohibiting unauthorized creations
of salaries positions, has called
for a Legislative Council Budget
and Finance Committee study of
salaries under Student Government
jurisdiction. __
Rhodes Scholar
Applications
Now Available
Rhodes Scholarship applications
to Oxford University, estimated at
$2,100, are being ponsidered
through Oct. 20 ih 202 Anderson
Hall.
The Rhodes scholarship is con.
sidered the highest academic*
honor that an American student
can achieve according to John
J. Tige-rt, president emeritus of
UF.
THE IDEAL candidate, accord according
ing according to the selection committee, is
a n & all around student. He might
be conceived as a member of
Beta Kappa, Florida Blue
Key and the F Club.
Eligibility for the Rhodes
Scholarship, is open to male stu students
dents students with at least two years of
college education. Candidates
must be unmarried and between
18 and 24 on Oct. 1, 1982.
The Rhodes Scholarship Is the
eldest international scholarship
in the world. It was established
under the will of Cecil iihodes.
Rhodes established the scholarship
for students of the United States
and British Colonies in order to
foster a closer relation between
English speaking peoples.
PROFESLOR Albert A. Mur Murphree
phree Murphree is chairman of the
University Committee on Rhodes
Scholarships.

Seminole-Treasurer Conflict Resolved

THE SEMINOLE allegedly cre created
ated created unauthorized salaried posi positions
tions positions including sports and photo
copy editor.
Total budget for Seminole sal salaries
aries salaries for the 1962-63 three-trimes three-trimester
ter three-trimester is about $1,400, while last
years figure was close to *7OO.
According to Hendrick, Semin Seminole
ole Seminole salaries this .trimester will re remain
main remain the same, but the amounts
for the second and succeeding
trimesters will on Council
action.
JIM HICKLAND, chairman of
the Councils Budget and Finance
Committee, is expected to have a
salary feasibility report for Coun Council
cil Council study by early January.
I could have vetoed any spe specific
cific specific salaries or the full Seminole
budget, Hendrick said, but I
didn't want to jeopardize the Sem Seminole
inole Seminole operation this trimester.

Results on the winners of the Gator Growl skit
competition were not available early today. But
sorority lovelies such as the ones below, and frater-

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Graves Boots Ace Gridder Skelly
...See Story: Page 16
Vol. 55, No. 17, University of Florida, Gainesville, Thrusday, October 11, 1962
-n
3 Students Lodge
Election Protests

By BEN GARRETT
Gator City Editor
At least three letters of protest
if not more have been filed
With Student Government over the
way last Thursdays Legislative
Council election was handled.
The protests arose over a change
in the election of off-campus rep-

IN ADDITION to specific ref references
erences references to the Seminole salary
question, Hicklands report is also
expected to include feasibility stu studies
dies studies on all pay checks connected
with student government work.
The main problem, Hendrick
said last night, is that many of
these salaries are out of propor proportion
tion proportion insofar as the relative re responsibility
sponsibility responsibility of the position.
A recently passed Legislative
Council budgets include SIOO,OOO for
salaries out of a $500,000 total bud budget,
get, budget,
We discovered the present sit situation
uation situation this Monday, Hendrick
said, when requisitions for Sem Seminole
inole Seminole salaries came through a
week after salaries were approved
by the Legislative Council.
Meurlott and Seminole Editor
Bill Dowling were not immediate immediately
ly immediately available for comment last
night.

Oh ... Let the Gator Growl in 1962

resentatives. Previously, the elec election
tion election of these representatives in involved
volved involved voting for one candidate
and the proper number of candi candidates
dates candidates with the most votes were
elected.
UNDER TIIE new procedure, as
set down in the Student Body Con.
stitution, students vote on 10 can candidates,
didates, candidates, instead of only one.
Student Body President Bill Tric Trickel
kel Trickel said last night ho is personal personally
ly personally dictating replies to the protest
letters and will make his feeling
known later today.
The president said that as far
as he knew none cf the protests
met the 48-hour time limit set
in the constitution for protesting
an election,
ONLY ONE protesting candidate
Warren SpiUer was availablo
for comment last night.
Since the change in election
rules took place after the last fall
election, Spiller said, It ap appears
pears appears logical that a special effort
should have been made to publi publicize
cize publicize it in some way.
Spiller said an explanatory ar article
ticle article or a pre-election meeting
would have satisfied h:Vn. One
of these methods have always boen
used in the past, he said.
AS A CANDIDATE, and with without
out without knowledge o! the new proced procedural
ural procedural change, I distributed approx approximately
imately approximately 200 letters to off-campus

ity men garbed fn often ridiculous outfits kept hundreds
of spectators in good spirits last night. Complete round
up of skit activity will be In Fridby morning's edition
of the Florida Alligator.

votes, Spiller said. "In this let let(ter
(ter let(ter I explained the election pro procedure
cedure procedure ns I understood it, I lejt
that this distribution of misinfor misinformation
mation misinformation seriously hindered, rathci
than furthered, my cause."
I w'as available every after afternoon
noon afternoon at least four days a week to
answer any questions in so far a*
the election procedure -was con concerned,"
cerned," concerned," Joel Sachs, secretary of
the interior, said. "Several people
did come by and get copies of the
Constitution and ask -question*
about the process of the election."
SACHS SAID thero were also
copies of the new election rules
available in the Treasurers office,
where candidates registered.
The new election rules were in included
cluded included In the Constitutional revis revisions
ions revisions passed last March by the Leg Legislative
islative Legislative Council and ratified by the
entire student body.
DONT think it should bt
necessary for me to look at the
Constitution before the election,
Spiller said. "There is no question,
however, that if I had won 1
would have read it."
Sachs said he believed "that r
person is running for a re
sponsible office should have th.
interest to find out the mechanisn
by which the student governmen
operates."



Page 2

The Florida Alligator Thursday, October 11, 1962

Tax Income
Drops Off

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (UPI)
Conip.i oiler Ray E. Green said
Wednesday a two per cent drop
:n ta.\ collections Isst month
might be an indication Florida's
economy is leveling off after rath rather
er rather spectacular gains in the past.
Green said he hoped the drop,
caused by a decline in statewide
gross sales, would be teimporary.
"We may have reached a level leveling
ing leveling off point in our economy and
perhaps need some new element
to provide the fuel, for a basic
drive upward, Green said.
"Perhaps the heavy spendings
in f 1 loritl a and at Cape Canaveral
in connection with the moon proj project
ect project and furtherance of the pro program
gram program will provide that fuel.
Green said the state economy
has been on the go for the
past 12 years. If we have reach reached
ed reached a leveling off point, it will be
t
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only for short duration, he said.
The comptroller said that a re recent
cent recent report by the development
commission that new industry and
plant expansions hit the years
high in September was encourag encouraging.
ing. encouraging. He said new industry brought
new payrolls which meant new
dollars to the state treasury.
TISE&Z 13 I*o doubt that the
Eastern Airlines strike hurt sum summer
mer summer tourist business, Green said,
but there arc ether factors in
the picture which appear to re reflect
flect reflect conditions nationally. We
must keep in mind at all times
t' r*t Florida's economy is geared
to the national economy through
tourism and agriculture."
Green said sales tax collections
for the July-Septembcr quarter ot
this year totaled $13,832,724, a
6.88 per cent increase over the
same period last year. During the
same period, 53 out of 81 types
of businesses showed drops in
sales tax collections under the
April June quarter. However,
compared with July September
last year, the same businesses
showed increases.
We have been malting prog progress
ress progress during the part year but un unfortunately
fortunately unfortunately the rate of increase
anticipated failed to continue
through the pn.,t quaiter, Green
said.

E33 newswire

Injunction Issued
Against Dockmen
NEW YORK (UPI) Federal
Judge John F. X. McGohey
signed an order today for an 89-
day cooling off period in the dis dispute
pute dispute betv/een 145 Atlantic and
Gulf coast shipping and
93.CC0 longshoremen.
McGohey acted under the Taft-
Hv.tc-y law which was invoked
by President Kennedy last week.
Tr.e injunction against the strike
was retroactive to last Thursday
when McGohey signed a tempo temporary
rary temporary restraining order against the
strikers.
The longshoremen seek a six sixhour
hour sixhour day with hourly wages
raised to provide the same
amount now earned in eight
hours. Employers have offered a
nine-cent hourly wage hike for
each year of the three-year con contract
tract contract under negotiation.
1 ;
War on Crime
Brings in Results
WASHINGTON (UPI) Presi Presi
Presi dent Kennedy Wednesday praised
federal attorneys for waging an
extraordinary wav agrinst crim
which he said is bringing results,
particularly in big time gambling.
Kennedy addressed 83 U. S. at attorneys
torneys attorneys who have been holding a
two day conference at the Justice
Department.
The President rattled off statis statistics
tics statistics showing that betting on sports
had dropped "20 per cent from
what it was." He also said the
major race wire services have
been pretty well closed down,
and quoted the chief of the Cana Canadian
dian Canadian Mounted police as saying that
many racketeers had turned up in
Canada because of the pressure
were putting on them."
In a lighter vein, Kennedy said
he had read in a magazine (Sports
Illustrated) that one of the gamb gamblers
lers gamblers now under pressure had said
He hoped wed be as firm in
Berlin as wc were in Las Vegas.
Then Kennedy added with a
smile: We intend to be.
Exiles Clai m
Raid on Cuba
NEW YORK (UPl)The Alpha
66 Cu'cr.n exile group said Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday commandos carried out a
surprise raid on a Russian in instaalien
staalien instaalien in Cuba last Monday
night and inflicted more than 20
casualties.
The organization, which carried
out a hit-run torpedo boat attack
on Cuban ports* several weeks
ago, identified its latest target as
the port of Isabela de Sagup, on
Cubas north coast.
The raiders dynamited a rail railway
way railway switch yard, {military a v sen.
al and commissary and other
strategic points and captured
Russian arms and flags, a
statement said.

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iVW/i Arro Do^r b s s hw r n xford the Gord n
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lid Y&M 1
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tk
Maryanne Awtrey
Seems like everybody lot
of fun criticizing the Kennedy
Klan and the Gators.
Maybe things could be switched
taround a little and the Ken Kennedys
nedys Kennedys could play the Agjgies
Saturday and Gators could go to
Washington.
Kennedy showed he could sub subdue
due subdue an entire college town in
Mississippi, think what The Bro Brothers
thers Brothers Three could do on the grid gridiron
iron gridiron with a little Democratic back backing.
ing. backing.
In the right of the line they
could play Floridas Senator Hol Holland,
land, Holland, Virginia's Byrd, Oklahomas.
Kerr (hes coming for Homecom Homecoming
ing Homecoming anyhow), and Missouris East Eastland.
land. Eastland.
Humphree, Symington and Man Manfield
field Manfield could start from the left
and Claude Pepper might want to
get in a little more game exper experience.
ience. experience.
THEY COULD RUN a few plays
with Governor Ro.ss Barnett as.
lonesome end.
Jackie could ski across the field
at half-time. Or the Kennedy
wives could lead cheers.
One-Two-Three-Four . What*-
cha gonna run for?
President! President! President!
Don't think they ought to take
a chance and play L.B.J. in this
< ne. Texans are notoriously home homestatish,
statish, homestatish, but he might like to lead
the band- *. or direct the card
section.
Pierre Salinger could take ov over
er over for Jimmy Gay, and the Pres President's
ident's President's Cabinet replace the coach coaching
ing coaching staff. McNamara ought to
make passable substitute for Ray
Graves. As for the Gators in the
White Hos.se, theres all that
lawn for scrimmage.
It might all work out, just so
long as the Gators come back for
Homecoming. Its a pretty sure'
bet that 40.000 plus people want
to see the Gators, play Vanderbilt
. or lose.
Red Forces
Flex on Baltic
WARSAW (UPltPolish, So Soviet
viet Soviet and East German troops have
been carrying out large-scale
maneuvers on the Baltic coast,
the official news agency PAP re reported
ported reported Wednesday. The maneu maneuvers,
vers, maneuvers, held under the Warsaw Pact
frame-work, were under command
of Polish Defense Minister Gen.
Marian Spychalski.

Asks Stop
on Cuban
Exchange
WASHINGTON (UPI) a Re Republican
publican Republican Florida Congressman
asked President Kennedy Wednes.
day to stop the negotiations for
the release of Cuban prisoners
captured in the Bay of Pig s j n
vasion.
Rep. William C. Cramer, r.
Fla., in a telegram to the Presi President,
dent, President, asked an end to what he
called super-scret negotiations
before irreparable damage to
United States prestige is done.'
The negotiations have bee n con conducted
ducted conducted by New York attorney
James'D. Donovan and the Cuban
government. Donova n is the Do Domocratic
mocratic Domocratic Senate candidate in New
York.
North Viet Troops
Remain in Laos
WASHINGTON (UPI) The"
State Department called Wednes Wednesday
day Wednesday for formal investigation of
-several thousand Communist
North Vietnamese troops presum presumed
ed presumed to be in Laos in violation < f
Geneva agreements.
Spokesman Lincoln White said
the apparent refusal of North Viet
Nam to remove all it forces from
Laos should be investigated by the
Indian Canadian Polish interna international
tional international Control' Commission iICCi
The group was sat up to supervise
peace in the area.
He said the United States will
turn over to the ICC what evi evidence
dence evidence it has of the suspected
violation.
Under a 14-nat:on agreement
signed at Geneva July 23, all for foreign
eign foreign troops were supposed to be
removed from Laos, by last Sun Sunday.
day. Sunday. White said the United States
complied.
He declined to estimate how
many Reds remain. Other offic officials
ials officials said it is probably several
thousand.
New Blue Law
Is Prepared
FORT LAUDERDALE Fin.
< UPI)A bill being readied for
the 1963 legislature to close all
non-essential businesses on Sun Sunday
day Sunday won the backing Tuesday of
the Florida Retailers Association.
K. D. Rippey of Tampa, head
of a committee drawing up the
proposal, said the feeling by sup supporters
porters supporters twas that Sunday is a
family day and should be a
holiday from non-essential busi businesses.
nesses. businesses. He said the proposal was
net based on religious convictions.
Rippey, v/ho was elected presi president
dent president of the association, said
liquor retail stores would be left
out of the bill, since they are
already under strict regulation by
state and local laws.
James E. Gorman, general
manager of the association, said
state Atty. Gen. Richard Ervin
has approved the proposal.



Council
Begins
Today
VATICAN CITY (UPI) Pope
John XXIII opens a long-awaited
Ecumenical Council today with
a plea to non-Catholic observers
for unity. It is the first such
council in nearly a century and
only the 21st since the start of
the Christian era.
The council is the largest re religious
ligious religious gathering in 20 centuries
of church history and brings to together
gether together all the cardinals, bishops
and heads of religious orders ordersalmost
almost ordersalmost 3,ooowho are able to
come.
Pope John has said the most
immediate objective of the meet meeting
ing meeting of Roman Catholic church
leaders is to bring the church
into step with modern times,
that is, revising rules and regula regulations
tions regulations governing the action of all
Catholics. No major dogma, is
expected to be pronounced. The
long-range aim of the council is
to unify all Christian religions.
THE POPE S OPENING speech
at the three-and-a-balf hour first
day ceremonies in St. Peters
Basilica is expected to stress that
all Christians are brothers and
must come toge ther.
Some bishops are behind the Iron
Curtain and were not allowed
to come to the Vatican. The In International
ternational International Pontifical Marian Aca Academy
demy Academy held a special Mass Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday for this church of si silence.
lence. silence. Juan Landazuri Cardinal
Ricketts, archbishop of Lima, Pe Peru,
ru, Peru, offered prayers for them.
Representatives from Poland,
Hungary and Communist Yugo Yugoslavia
slavia Yugoslavia attended Wednesdays sol solemn
emn solemn ceremony with a number of
refugees who have fled the Iron
Curtain countries.
In addition to Roman Catholic
delegates there are a number of
observers from non-Catholic Chris Christian
tian Christian faiths that have a following
of more than a quarter of a bil billion.
lion. billion.
The basilica, largest in Chris Christendom,
tendom, Christendom, was in all its glory for
the splendor and pageantry of the
council ever to be held
th?re. A special council hall in
led, gold and green tapestried
baconies and loges has been
built inside the basilica. The en en\
\ en\ r-urch lias been refurbished,
tv. v a to gilding the angels
V- je.
State Dairy Men
Working on Law
TALLAHASSEE, (UPI)
Representatives of the dairy in industry
dustry industry worked Wednesday on a
proposed law to tighten inspection
of dairy farms outside the state
which sell milk to Florida dis distributors.
tributors. distributors.
WANTED
150 MEN
Who are desirous
of saving $8.50 to
$12.00 in the 15
minutes it takes to
buy a suit*
See Our Ad,
Page 11
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Thursday, October 11, 1962 The Florida Alligator

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Page 3



Page 4

The Florida Alligator Thursday, October 11, 1962

Architecture Arts Series Opens

A public lecture series on the
effects of environment and tech*
Jology upon architectural design
begin-s today sponsored by the UP
College of Architecture and Fine
Arts.
Entitled 4 Environment, Techno*
logy and Architecture,*' the three*
part series will begin with a lun*
eheon lecture, an afternoon pan*
1 discussion and an evening ad*
dress.
PHILLIP N, YOUTZ, dean of'
the College 'of Architecture .and
Design at the University of Mich*

GAINESVILLE
.. toM &ooGb6corv6 s>4aj !v/^
FR 6-3642 109 N. MAIN ST.

vW ;
Were
m orwarc

We li be on the campus on the dates listed below, ready to
give engineering and science seniors information on space spaceage
age spaceage careers in a dynamic industry.
If you are looking for a company offering assignments on
programs of unique interest and career potential, youll be
Interested In the advantages Boeing can offer you.
Boeing, for instance, is a major contractor on such ad advanced
vanced advanced programs as the Saturn S-IC first-stage rocket
booster, the X-20 Dyna-Soar manned space glider, the
solid-fuel Minuteman ICBM, and the Bomarc defense mis missile
sile missile system. Boeing is also the worlds foremost designer
and builder of multi-jet aircraft, including the eight-jet
B-52H missile bomber, the KC-135 tanker-transport, the
C-135 cargo-jet, and the famous Boeing 707, 720 and 727
jetliners. In addition, Boeings Vertol Division is one of

igan, will discuss "Sources and
Resources* at a 12:30 p. m.* lun luncheon
cheon luncheon meeting in the Student Ser ServiceCenter.
viceCenter. ServiceCenter.
Joseph Watterson, editor of the
American Institute of Archi Architects
tects Architects Journal, and a fellow in the
A.1.A., will deliver an address on
the same topic Thursday evening
at 8 p. m. in McCarty Audi Auditorium.
torium. Auditorium.
PARTICIPATING IN the panel
discussions at 2:30 p. m. in Mc-
Carty Auditorium, will be Walter Walteraon,
aon, Walteraon, and three University of Flor Florida

ida Florida faculty members: Mrs. Ade Adelaide
laide Adelaide Bullen. Florida State Muse Museum
um Museum anthropologist, Dr. Guy Om Omer,
er, Omer, Jr., physics professor, and
E. M. Feamey, associate profes professor
sor professor in the Department of Archi-
Union Displaying
Calligraphic Art
A study of calligraphy, the art
of beautiful handwriting, is on
display in Bryan Lounge of the
Florida Union by the Japan
Society.
The pictures were made avail available
able available for use in the United States
by the Society for International
cultural Relations (Kokusai
Bunka Shinokai) of Tokyo.
They include poems written in
traditional forms by Chinese
scribes during the Han Dynasty;
17 syllable poems written in a
free disordered style; quotation?
written in a free design 'nn k
writings of moods of thought a.id
feeling; and several abstract
characters comparable to modern
art.

Americas leading designers and builders of helicopters.
Research projects at Boeing are under way in such advanced
fields as celestial mechanics, solid state physics, nuclear and
plasma physics, flight sciences, space flight and propulsion.
Expanding Boeing programs offer exceptional opportuni opportunities
ties opportunities to holders of 8.5., M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in aeronauti aeronauti
- aeronauti cal, mechanical, civil, electrical-electronic and industrial
engineering, and in engineering mechanics, engineering
physics as well as in mathematics and physics. At Boeing
youll work in a small group where individual ability and
initiative get plenty of visibility. Youll enjoy many other
advantages, including an opportunity to take graduate
studies at company expense to help you get ahead faster.
Drop in to your Placement Office and arrange for an
interview. We re looking forward to meeting you!
Wednesday, Thursday and FridayOctober 17,18 and 19
Divisions: Aero-Space Military Aircraft Systems Transport Vertol
Industrial Products also Booing Scientific Research Laboratories

tecture, who will serve as irfoder*
ator. ~
The son of a Cleveland archi architect,
tect, architect, Watterson taught architec architecture
ture architecture and art in New York and
practiced architecture at Long In Inland,
land, Inland, N. Y., for 20 years. He is
author of Architecture 5,000
Years of Building," a popular
history of architecture. .He be became
came became editor of the A.I.A. Journ Journal
al Journal in 1957.
DEAN YOUTZ is'also, a Fel Fellow
low Fellow in the A.I.A. He invented the
time-saving lift slab method of
construction, initiated the in intern"
tern" intern" training program for mus museum
eum museum personnel and is author of a
number of architectural works. He
is a member of several honorary
fraternities, including Phi Beta
Kappa,scholastic honorary socie society
ty society and tau Delta SigbiaTarchitec SigbiaTarchitectural
tural SigbiaTarchitectural honorary^//
Part two of the series, P ro rograms
grams rograms and Plans will be held on
Feb. 14, The final symposium,
Technics and Techniques will
conclude the series on March 34,
1963.

Off-Campus
Plan Answer
To Eng'ring ?
A short-term answer to th
many" engineering schools p ro
blem may lie in the UF off-cam.
pus graduate engineering pro
gram.
The program is designed f OP
employees of space-age industry
who seek to obtain a Master of En.
gineering degree in other areas
of the state.
Presently, 502 students are at attending
tending attending engineering classes this
trimester in five different areas
in the state. Postgraduate engi.
neering instruction is being
taught in West Palm Beach, st.
Petersburg, Orlando, Fort Lau*.
derdale and Patrick Air Force
Base.
In order for the UF to set up
these off campus graduate pro programs
grams programs certain requirements must
be met:
1) There must be a local educa educational
tional educational need indicated.
2) There, must be a sufficient
number of qualified students
available.
3) There must be adequate in instructional
structional instructional facilities available.
4) There must be an adequate
library available.
Currently, UFg off-campus en engineering
gineering engineering program is attempting
to satisfy industrys plea for grad graduate
uate graduate engineers, according to Dean
Joseph Weil of the UF College of
Engineering.
This program has not been
set up to attract new industry
to our state only to keep the old
ons 3 happy, Weil commented.
Both industry and students seem
to be satisfied with the pro program.
gram. program.
Student Dropouts-
An Integral Part
Os UF Education ?
One student out of 14 will ret
finish the trimester.
Early in the trimester
write home about studyhr; hr rd
and making good marks, but
when the final exam time rolls
around an estimated seven per
cent of the .student body will
have dropped cut.
To date, only .9 per cent of the
13,326 students enrolled have with withdrawn.
drawn. withdrawn. According to Asst Regis Registrar
trar Registrar Jack Guistwhite, this is a
relatively small number and most
of-these students were forced to
drop out for personal reasons.
FOR THE FIRST semester of
the academic year 1961-62, there
were 960 withdrawals. The last
month of the semester there were
365 students withdrawing which is
more than one-third of the total
withdrawals. ..
Guistwhite said, When pro progress
gress progress tests begin to pick up along
with other course grades, students
in academic trouble will begin
withdrawing, but most will bang
on until final exams begin and
then drop rather than flunk out,"
Guistwhite said.
The largest percentage of stu students
dents students withdrawing will be from
the freshman class.
BASED ON the drop figures for
the school year 1961-62 approxi approximately
mately approximately 41 per cent of the drops
for this semester will be from the
freshman class.
The percentage of drop-outs is
decreasing, said Guistwhite, be because
cause because entrance requirements are
increasing. A student now needs
a s*core of 300 out of 495 on the
placement test, and 95 per cent of
the students enrolled have a score
of 300 or better.
A student is not admitted on
test scores along, there also is an
evaluation of his high school rec record.
ord. record.
DROP-OUTS at the UF are no
higher than any other institution
of its type (state school). The
UF cannot be as selective as a
private school.



Two In
Berlin
Escape
BURLIN (UPI) East German
Ccmrirmist police Wednesday cap.
tured three refugees trying to
swim a border river to West Ber Berlin.
lin. Berlin. In another venture, .two 15-
year-old East German boys es escaped
caped escaped through the barbed wire
along the border.
The Communists fired 60 shots
from submc clrincguns near the
frontier in the pre-dawn darkness.
Their target was not determined.
Western sources reported, mean meanwhile,
while, meanwhile, that the Soviets have shift shifted
ed shifted some of thsiL new supersonic
delta-wing jet fighters .to bases
along the Frankfurt Berlin air cod codridor,
ridor, codridor, one of the 20 mile wide
strips used by the Allies for air
* access to Berlin.
PILOTS AND passengers could
see the new planes clearly on the
apron of the Soviet sr vf ield at
Zerhst, about 60 miles southwest
of Berlin. One air expert reported
/spotting one high over Eerlin re reticently.
ticently. reticently.
m The sources said the new planes
Tappear to be the twin-jet Hi g E166
lor flipper as NATO calls it.
jj|This plane recently claimed a
yvorld speed record of I.CDS piiles
Fan hour. But they also could have
|been the older and slower delta deltawing
wing deltawing Mig 23 or fishbsd, capable
of speeds of about twice that of
sound.'
The fact that the jets were lined
up in clear view of Western planes
indicated -the Soviets expected
them to be seen. Western sources
said the Russians were reminding
the Allies of their power to har harass
ass harass Western air traffic to Berlin.
WEST BERLIN police said the
three refugees caught by the East
Germans were trying to swim the
Spree River, near the ruins of the
old Reichstag Building. A patrol
boat raced after them at full
throttle and the Communists haul hauled
ed hauled them aboard. There were no
shots. The refugees were arrested
and taken to an undisclosed lo location.
cation. location. They .face prison terms
for attempted Mght.
The two boys were not detected
as they crawled through several
strands of barbed wire on West
Berlin's border with East Ger Germany.
many. Germany. They chose an isolated
spot on the citys northern limits
and fled in darkness.
U.S. Denies
Red Charge
MOSCOW (UPI) The United
States* charged Wednesday in a
formal note of protest that a U.S.
assistant naval attache expelled
by the Soviet Union was physi physically
cally physically assaulted. It also denied
be was engaged in espionage.
U.S. Embassy sources said the
expulsion of 41-year old Lt. Cmdr.
Raymond Smith looks very
much like an outright reprisal op operation
eration operation for the ouster of two So Soviet
viet Soviet United Nations diplomats last
month on similar charges.
The Soviets did the same sort
of things with Smith as they
claimed were done against their
two citizens, the sources said.
But the outstanding difference
was that the two Soviets in New
York were involved in purchasing
documents.
The Russians, Yevgeny Prokho Prokhorov
rov Prokhorov and Ivan Vydrodov, were ex expelled
pelled expelled for allegedly buying de defense
fense defense secrets frepa U.S. sailor
Nelson C. Drummond, who has
denied complicity. The Soviet Un Union
ion Union charged at the time that the
diplomats were manhandled.
The sources confirmed Soviet
charges that Smith was carrying
binoculars, a miniature camera,
and a tape recorder when ar arrested
rested arrested in Leningrad Oct. 2 but
called this normal practice for
military attaches and denied the
equipment was being used for es espionage.
pionage. espionage.

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Thursday, October 11, 1962 The Florida Alligator

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Page 5



Page 6

The Florida Alligator Thursday/ October 11, 1962

Now hear this, now hear this.
The land you see off starboard is
the southern tip of Cuba. We Will
dock in one hour.
At these words I rushed to the
rail of the U.S.S. Thomas and
peered into the early morning
mist. Rising slowly through the
fog was part of the beautiful
green island that was to be my
home for the next four years.
SINCE MY father was a Navy
officer X was a veteran traveler
but the sight of a new land never
failed to accelerate my heart to
a rapid staccato.
Minutes later Guantanamo Na.
val Base came into view.
First I saw a beach with black
not white sand. That turned out
to be Windmill Beach. There is
no logical reason to call it Wind Windmill
mill Windmill Beach, but they do.
NEXT, A little farther around
the point came Philips Park. This
looked from a distance like sev several
eral several large, Covered patios and a
few volleyball courts and a base baseball
ball baseball diamond, where large parties
could be given where everyone
had fun. It was and we did. Next
came several bright beach um umbrellas
brellas umbrellas standing around a large
swimming pool (One of S on the
base). Then a large outdoor mov movie
ie movie screen (One of 7 on the base).
Very apparent were many
large Naval ships, aircraft carri carriers,
ers, carriers, battleships, destroyers, sub submarines,
marines, submarines, tankers, and cargo car carriers.
riers. carriers. Some were docked side by
side in long lines.
White plastic coverings protect protected
ed protected doors, guns, and instruments
as these ships were not in use.
THIS WAS the Carribb ea n
Mothball Fleet. One fleet of
many scattered throughout ,the
world, silent, unmoving, waiting
to be called into action at any
time.

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* itriij|

'Gitmo A Base, a Life and the

*
. .- _J ;
'Gitmo' Was Calmer Then

. Gator Staff Writer Karl
Skadowski tells of His own ex experiences
periences experiences at famed Guantan Guantanamo

<3IM

Small pleasure boats dotted the
Bay itself. Several of the off-hour
fisherman waved to us as we
neared the dock.
Back on the left I could see row
after row of jet fighters on the
Leeward Point airfield and as I
watched one took off screaming,
belching fire and smoke. Over our
heads it flew and disappeared over
the horizon in a few minutes.
A QUARTER of an hour later
we bumped against the dock and
stopped. Stepping onto the ce cement
ment cement from the gangplank, I felt
my last pang of regret at being
out of the States. From then on,
only pleasant thoughts came to
me.
Standing there I noticed for the
first time the beautiful green
mountains that ran down one side
of the base in an log ridge. Over
those mountains I soon would ride
on my own horse. One could
check out a horse from Special
Services for sls a month, which
I did every summer for 3 months
every year I was at Gitmo.

amo Guantanamo Naval Base before and
during the rise of Fidel Costro
to power in Cuba.

ABOUT 5,000 Cuban civilians
worked on the base in every sort
or job from carpenters to truck
drivers to shoe shine boys to bar barbers.
bers. barbers. I became friends with many
of them and found most of them
to be friendly, .jovial people.
Gitmo City lay not too far frcpi
the base and I went there sever several
al several times on looking and shopping
expeditions. Wed catch the Caim Caimanera
anera Caimanera ferryboat from Naval sta station
tion station landing. Then at Caima Caimanera
nera Caimanera we boarded a 1912 vin vintage
tage vintage train that bumped us along
in our rickety hard wooden seats
at the breakneck speed of 25 mph
all the way to Gitmo City. It would
have been a pleasant, scenic trip
if we didnt have to stop at 18
different milk (goat milk) stops
along the 12 mile route.
GITMO CITY (as well as the
base) lies in Oriente Province. It
is not a clean city as is Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville but i 3 very dusty when it
doesntrain and very muddy and
wet when it does.
Then, everyone owned his own

fa
_
'cot
SKADOWSKI

store and worked (to use the
term whimsically) from about 9
to 12 when they closed for the 2-
hour Siesta period. Even the
police quit walking their beats
during Siesta.
This wasnt scandalous since
thieves and vandals rested too.
Everyone ate lunch and rested.
Around 2 p. m. the thin tall store
doors would clatter open again
for another three or four hours
business.
ABOUT THEN wed finish, if
we could, our cup of case con le leche
che leche (coffee and milk) which was
in reality Vi coffee, & milk, and
Vi sugar. You say that there is
something mathematically wrong
there?
All you must do to see my point
is drink a cup once. If yo& knock
your tiny cup over, dont worry,
you ca n still right it again before
any could spill out.
Then about 6 p. m. wed make
the return trip to the base and
home, dead tired but happy after
a days walking around that won wonderfully
derfully wonderfully curious city.
IN THE mountains around Git Gitmo
mo Gitmo was a young upstart rebel
named Fidel Castro.
Everyone knew of himhe was
against Batista and against the
Americans and against large land
holders and for the people.
If you didnt believe it, just ask
him.
H-.s brother Raul helped him
with a few score rebels hidden
out in the lush jungle growth
covering the hills. They would per periodically
iodically periodically announce, then execute,
the burning of a' sugar cane field
or two.
ONCE THE maid in the officers
house next door to us on Marina
Point was hanged by Batista as a
spy for Castro. This threw' fear in into
to into the hearts of the Cubans on the
base -for about three days. Su Sugar
gar Sugar cane fields still burned and
more rebels joined Fidel in the
hills.
One dull (the only one I re remember)
member) remember) Saturday night, three
of my school.mates, all very good
friends of mine, slapped one an another
other another on the back and said Lets
steal a boat and go join Castro!
Everyone laughed . till the next
morning when the three were no nowhere
where nowhere to be found. Theyd done
just as theyd said and were in
the hills with Castro.
A JIONTH later one canie back.
Life was fun but too hard work
for him. A few weeks laterano lateranother.
ther. lateranother. Both boys were severly pun punished
ished punished and they and their families
sent back to the states. Newspa Newspapers
pers Newspapers blared the incident.
The third member of the troop
stuck it out with Fidel. He was the
oldest, 21, and since he was of
age his U. S. citizenship was re revoked
voked revoked for joining a foreign army.
LAST YEAR he came back on
the base with a forged permit un under
der under a false name. A very good
friend of mine happened to be
down at the base visiting his dad,
and saw the third man and talk talked
ed talked with him.

Rebel

He wore a white suit and Stet Stetson
son Stetson and Colt 45 strapped to his
leg, a fat wallet and a $lO cigar
in his teeth. He was then ana I
suppose is now, the head of the
G-2 Intelligence corps of Castro Castrothe
the Castrothe thought police. He is the lone
American to make good in t h e
Communist army in Havana.
ONE CUBAN told me, Since
Fidel took over in 1959, on the
sixth anniversary of his 26th of
July movement, hes ousted the
dictator Batista, foiled the imper imperialistic,
ialistic, imperialistic, opportunistic Americans
and given Cuba back to the Cub Cuban
an Cuban people.
Another said in reply, You
mean he's switched dictators: i
admit he hasnt had as many ex executions
ecutions executions of his own countrymen
as Batista had, but then he hasn't
been in power a fraction of the
time Batista was.
*IDEL CONFISCATED and
laid waste to much of American
and Cuban plantations and com companies,
panies, companies, thus destroying thous thousands
ands thousands of needed jobs for Cub Cuban
an Cuban workers. Much of this land now
lies bare, trampled over by hun hungry
gry hungry Cuban militia troops.-
Still another added, He (Fidel >
has given us things we never
dreamed of before: a police state
where a single treacherous word
or thought, if related to the G G-2,
-2, G-2, brings quick death, hunger the
likes of which we never had be before
fore before with the imperialist Ameri Americans
cans Americans to feed us, we work many
more gruelling hours of drill
with a riflewith no siesta and
a free vote: for Castro or for Cas Casdock
dock Casdock
.. .as the base
THE CALM cool green island
I came to in 1952 is not the same
as the angry Red fortress in the
Carribbean it is now.
On board ship back to the states
in late 1956, I sincerely regretted
that I had to leave that base. De Dependents
pendents Dependents arent allowed on the
base anymore and many of the
sights and sounds of the old base
are no more.
HOUSES AND recreational fa facilities
cilities facilities are closed and extra de defenses
fenses defenses are everywhere. At the
main gate, the only opening in the
barbed wire fence surrounding
the base, are ipany U, S. Marines
backed by automatic weapons
and tanks.
The border fence is constantly
patrolled by jeeps carrying Mar Marines
ines Marines with automatic weapons.
No one is relaxing anymore.
Everyone is tense.
At any time shooting may start
if the base is attacked.
Then well have to reply with
hundreds of fighters and bomb bombers
ers bombers from Leeward Point, ships*
guns that can shoot 20 miles, thou thousands
sands thousands of Marines and Army
troops, trucks and artillery, which
all get their ammunition from the
hollowed out mountains on the
base which are ammunit ion
storehouses.
Guantanamo Naval Base can
not be taken by anything less than
the Red Army or fusion bombs,
which are steadily becoming a
threat. It is not a place one would
want to go to now.



e e?

By CAROL BULLER
Asst City 'Editor
Go ahead light up! But that cigarette may be tick ticking
ing ticking minutes off your life.
UF medical specialists agree: there is no longer any
doubt that cigarette smokers have a higher death rate
than non-smokers. Statistics prove that if you smoke two
packs a day for 20 years, chances of lung cancer are over overwhelming.
whelming. overwhelming.
! PREDICTED lung cancer deaths in Florida for 1962 are 1,500, ac*
cording to figures based on population plus figures from the U.S.
Bureau of Vital Statistics. Accordingly, 25 of these should occur in
Alachua County.
Yet lung cancer is a preventable disease, says lung specialist
Harvey Fleet, medical advisor to the Alachua County Tuberculosis
and Health Association. Either dont smoke at all, or switch to pipe.;
and cigars without inhaling.
Besides, pipe tobacco is cheaper. Improve your health and save
your money, suggests one UF chest specialist!
IT HAS been estimated by the American Cancer Society that 05
per cent of all lung cancer could be eliminated if there were no
cigarette smoking and that millions of todays childrens smokers
will eventually become lung cancer victims. Statistics show that al almost
most almost half of all high school students are smoking at the time of
graduation.
Men are getting lung cancer earlier than ever before, said Dr.
Fleet; not or 60 years of age but in their 40.s and even late
30s. He estimated that 95 per cent of lung cancer victims treated at
the UF hospital were heavy smokers.
BITT LUNG cancer is not the only health risk brought about by
smoking. Chronic bronchitis, emphysemia (stiff lungs), heart attacks,
strokes, circulatory diseases and ulcers are related to smoking. A
man with an ulcer who continues to smoke has very little chance of
cure due to acid secreted in the stomach.
ARE FILTERTIP cigarettes less hazardous? Not so, according to
Dr. Fleet.
Filter cigarettes are practically a farce. You are still smoking
tobacco. A filter cigarette is longer and about an equal amount of
tobacco is inhaled, he said.
The amount that it helps has been tremendously overrated.
DR. FLEET does not see smoking as a moral issue except in the
sense that doctors have a moral obligation to see that people get
the facts about it. Most people do not realize the facts are so over overwhelming.
whelming. overwhelming.
With teenagers the obligation is even greater.
Last December a questionnaire was sent to 181 doctors in Alachua
County in order to furnish students accurate information on what
l *
\

By BEN GARRETT
Gator City Editor
Air conditioning powered by the
suns rays may soon be a realty
in American homes than Us to the
work of a UP graduate student.
Louis Lopez, working on his
masters in mechanical engineer engineering,
ing, engineering, has completed under the su supervision
pervision supervision of Prof. Frank Flani Flanigan
gan Flanigan and Dr. Erich Farber of
m
ty. I

jy \\
I *' *'"** - __

Air Conditioning Plus Sun A Cool Idea

Mechanical Engineering, a work working
ing working model of a three-ton cooling
unit powered by sunshine.
Eighteen-months in the making,
the engineers are now working the
' bugs out of the unit before a
final test, Flanigan said. Now op operating
erating operating at only a fraction of its
capacity the cooler is expected
to live up to its 32,000 B.T.U. de design
sign design with a few minor adjust adjustments.
ments. adjustments.
THE INITIAL cost of the unit
for homes will be at least two
times greater than a gas or elec electrical
trical electrical unit of equal capacity, but
the buyers pocketbook will save
in the long run. The cost of oper operation
ation operation is expected to be only 10 to
15 per cent the cost of electricity
and only 10 per cent the cost of
gas.
While solar energy is in com commercial
mercial commercial use for hot water heaters,
this is the first time a working
model for solar air conditioning
has been developed big enough to
cool an entire average size home.
Engineers expect the -solar-cool -solar-coolcr
cr -solar-coolcr to be in commercial use within
five years. Several manufacturing
firms have already expressed in interest,

I
1 \

m m

terest, interest, Flanigan said.
THE OPERATION is based on
the use of flat sheets of copper
covered with glass, which act as
an absorber of the suns rays.
Each of these 40 square feet
sheets act as a natural thermostat.
On hot sunny days the unit pro produces
duces produces more than on cooler cloudy
days when it ig needed less.
These sheets would be installed
on the roof of a house and cover

Thursday, October 11, 1962 The Florida Alligator

their doctors think of teenage smoking. Ninety-four per cent said they
did not think teenagers should smoke. Ninety-one per cent said they
believed with reasonable medical certainty that smoking is harmful to
a persons health.
YET THE survey revealed that half the doctors in the county arc
smokers themselves.
Therein lies the problem, says Dr. Fleet. It is hard to say con convincingly
vincingly convincingly do as I say, not as I do.
Still the doctors agree that any anti-smoking campaign should be
directed to young people. Smoking two packs a day. at 30 years your
life expectancy is eight years less.
DR. OSCAR AUERBACH, senior medical advisor at the East Or Orange
ange Orange (NJ ) Veterans Administration Hospital, recently said the
amount of abnormalities in cell structures was directly related to
the length of time and amount of smoking.
He noted that it pays to give up smoking and said an eight-year
study of the lung tissues from 42.000 dead persons .showed that the
number of abnormal cells drops back to almost the level of non nonsmokers
smokers nonsmokers after five years of non-smoking.
A SCREENING project to discover early cases of lung cancer is
planned for Alachua County in the next few months. Free of charge,
the service is similar to the tuberculosis healthmobile and will be
sponsored by the Alachua County Health Department and the Tubei*
culosis Society.
The doctors do not approve of commercial products used to help
stop smoking. Dr. Samuel Martin, Medical Center Provost, says
the best way is the cold turkey method just stop cold. One chest
specialist says there is no such thing as cutting down or stopping
tomorrow.
GREAT BRITAIN has come out strongest against the effects of
cigarette smoking. In Britain it is unlawful to advertise tobacco. A
similar resolutions against cigarette smoking is currently being con considered
sidered considered by the American Medical Association, according to a UF
doctor.
Meanwhile, UF chest and lung specialists can agree that the in inhalation
halation inhalation of tobacco smoke produces harmful effects and shortens the
life span. The simplest way to avoid the worst of these consequences
is to stop smoking entirely. But one can avoid the most serious of
them by smoking a pipe or cigars instead of cigarettes, a trend
noticed today among doctors, according to Dr. Martin.
WOMEN, according to Auerbach, are not yet affected as much
by smoking, probably because they start later and Inhale less
deeply.
An individual who chooses to smoke, however, can minimize the
risks by restricting his consumption and by not inhaling.

about one-half the roof surface
of an average size home.
THE EXPERIMENTAL unit is
deliberately large for testing pur purposes,
poses, purposes, Flanigan said, but its de designers
signers designers predict it will eventually
be made smaller and lighter.
The only moving part in the unit

is a small one-quarUr horsepower
motor used to circulate water and
refrigerant through the system.
Lopez, a polio victim, is writing
his thesis on the research he has
done on the solar-cooler. He ex expects
pects expects to receive his degree from
the UF in December and then go
to Rice University where he has
a scholarship for doctorlal w'ork.

Page 7



The Florida Alligator Thursday, October 11, 1962
- -.

Page 8

alligator
editorisils
cant wear diploma
Under the present trhnestir system, seniors are re required
quired required to pay a. graduation foe that covers the cost of
renting caps and gowns and printing diplomas. Under the
present system, only one graduation ceremony is held; and
many- students who graduate during One of the preceding
trimesters are either unwilling or unable to make a special
.trip to Gainesville to attend the ceremony. In spite of this
they are still- required to pay the graduation* fee.
'**
EACH OF the various colleges in the University are
considering holding their own graduation ceremonies. Since
this is the case, it seems reasonable that the fees should
be paid directly to the individual colleges and that pay payment
ment payment be optional. Students who desire to receive their
diploma but do not intend to attend the graduation cere-,
mony should only have to pay for the diploma;
The peculiar difficulties created by having only one
graduation ceremony for three trimesters makes the op optional
tional optional plan more attractive from the students viewpoint.
D. H.
no turkey!
THE FOLLOWING editorial is reprinted in toto from
FSUs student newspaper, The Florida Flambeau. Because
of the difficulty in scheduling a full trimester between
Labor Day and Christmas, FSU students were deprived of!
one day of their Thanksgiving vacation. This prompted
professors to threaten the double-cut penalty to prevent
students from leaving for the vacation a day early. This
action in turn prompted the following editorial comment.
. UF students were spared the inconvenience of having
their vacation shortened by laudible foresight on the part
of the Administration. Classes were begun a day early in
order to allow UF students the full vacation period. Never Nevertheless,
theless, Nevertheless, UF students can sympathize with FSU students
complaints about the facultys use of the double-cut pen penalty,
alty, penalty, since this is a favorite device of many UF professors
to prevent campus from turning into a ghost town the
day before a vacation.
How many students plan to sacrifice their only Fall
trimester vacation, Thanksgiving, in order to attend one
or two classes on the Friday following the holiday? Prob-
ably not many.
Students, having a set of values which sometimes dif differs
fers differs with that of the faculty, were generally willing to take
the cut and. go home to their families just once before
final examinations. At least, they were willing to buy
the holiday with a cut until several professors announced
their intention to horse-collar the weekend.
THE HORSE-COLLAR which was banned by the Uni University
versity University administration several years ago, is a technique
used by faculty members to keep students from leaving
campus early for vacations. A cut in the last class meet meeting
ing meeting before the holiday is recorded as two or even three
cuts, thereby weighing that session so heavily a3 to keep
students .on campus.
Actually, there seems to be no real University regula regulation
tion regulation determining what number constitutes excessive
cuts. Neither the Pow Wow nor the Faculty Hand Handbook
book Handbook lists any such figure, but many instructors still
refer to the three-cut limit and base their grading
practices on it. In this case, the horse-collar can be ex extremely
tremely extremely important in terms of the students final grade
for the course.
IF THE THANKSGIVING horse-collar were an an announced
nounced announced University policy, student leaders could lobby
deans and try to seek a solution for the problem.
IF A DEPARTMENT intends to inforce attendance on
the day after Thanksgiving, the policy should be clearly
stated. What effect would a double cut have on a stu students
dents students grade? Will such a policy be in general effect
throughout the department or will individual instructors
be privileged to make their own rules?
If the latter is true, the departments could at least
request that students be informed. A long weekend at
home has a definite value in the eyes of college students,
and they should be told exactly what the price is before
they are called upon to risk quality points.
THIS RED TAPE could be avoided if one of two al alternatives
ternatives alternatives were followed. First, classes for the day could
simply be cancelled. If trimester condensation prohibits
this, one day of Saturday classes could.be held at some
other time during the term. Students would be willing to
swap one Saturday for a four-day holiday, especially when
that holiday is the only one ih the trimester.

/jw ]
I II J
I m 1 I
i
* \ev oomV have to coeac ir bot voo
PD HAVE TO PrtV Foe IT*.
spirit and spunk
With numerous letters about school spirit finding their
way to the editorial page of the Florida Alligator we think
.that these finds from the editorial pages of ancient
Alligators should prove enlightening:
THE REAL SPIRIT (Oct. 15, 1915)
The football team has returned from its first trip,
and taking it from all sides,, it was certainly a success.
We succeeded in holding that Auburn bunch down to the
.last ditch and they had to fight to cross that one. And
that on their own ground, too.
But fellows, tho those boys are happy over the record
whjch they set up in their first game, they are a great
deal more happy over the warm welcome they received
on their return. A happy smile was on the face of every
one of them when they saw the crowd that was on hand
to welcome them.
They know that you believe in them, they understand
that, lose or win, you will always stand up for them so
long as they go into the game and give their best efforts
to their school.
* By one who. knows, it has been said that every man
was in that Auburn contest from the start until the whistle
blew. Lets keep up the good work. That good old Gator
fighting spirit will pull many a game out of the fire, and
we know that there is nothing which will give to our fel fellows
lows fellows greater encouragement or lend them greater strength
than a. rousing cheer for old Florida. Lets give them
one at every opportunity.
Times do not change very much do they? The follow following
ing following editorial commented:
If the ladies of the town who so kindly donated the
blankets to the team had seen thte sensation which they
stirred in the camp of the enemy, they feel amply repaid
for their efforts to keep the Gators warm.
In the fair city of Auburn, rats and old men, lined
both sides of the street several deep as the gridiron war*
riors from Florida went by, and many were the remarks
of admiration which these beautiful, as well as useful, cov coverings
erings coverings called forth.
Especially did the Alligators in each corner attract
notice and more than one fair Auburn damsel looked at the
real Gator which these blankets were covering as though
she would like to make friends. The team can not bestow
enough thanks on the kind donors of these gifts.
MEANWHILE IN 1916 (Nov. 21)
The Gators have just completed the remarkable per performance
formance performance of going thru a very successful football season
without winning a single game, without scoring, all told,
more than three points during the season. Our opponents
scored 95 points as against three points made by us, and
still we are glad we had the schedule. We won a great
deal more than we lost.
Florida for the first time in her history played a
schedule composed entirely of teams of the first rank...
We have heard many complaints from alumni and friends
*of the University because we were not winning games.
The persons making the criticism do not realize that we
-have been playing schools many times as old as we are
and with the student bodies several times as large as ours.
Here is the comparison :
Florida, Established 1905, Enrollment 486;. Georgia
(1785) 941; Alabama (1820) 745; Tennessee, (1794) 1010;
Indiana (1820) 2644.
Excuses, excuses, excuses.

Reader Asks '%m t
The Honor i n the*-
EDITOR: I
Is there any honor involved h B th
the Honor System? Is the student hi r
deluding himself in thinking there B* lc
is a real Honor System at Work ? tiftn
Is the Honor System just a li B U
gimmick to control a difficult d w
problem under the guise of hones.
ty and truthfulness? ewisi
AT AN exam, a student does C W
not have only one proctor watch. B.* 1
ing him, but rather is surrounded a ffr
* by perhaps SO or more students,
all obligated to report any indica* I
tion of cheating. Obviously, the incidence of copying will be de. Bl
creased, but primarily because
the guilty student is more like., 'w
ly to be discovered and punish. Ws
ed. ¥
This may be an effective means M
of eliminating wrong doing, but (Bf
where is the Honor? B
AT THE library, employees Ml
check each book that leaves the
building. Apparently, the Univer. pKI?
sity feels that to do otherwise slci
would result in a serious loss of el
books. Mh
However, if students were as*
sumed to be honorable, wouldn't
the mere presentation of a stu
'dent I. D. card be sufficient evl* I ]
dence of honesty? Under an Ho- pl
nor System, should students be- tolsi
subjected to what amounts to a \v i
search of their personal belong* stile
ings? Ik
tit
Even the signs, Honor Sys* hk:
- stem Apples, which we see on pi!
campus, clearly illustrate that alu
someone feels that students olth
must be reminded of the Hon* ol
or System or we would all be fil
cheating ten cents worth. Would*
nt a sign simply stating, Apples L,
lO cents *be sufficient? | r)
WHAT THEN has the Honor 1
System accomplished? It ha s t
transferred the enforcement of n n
regulations from the individual in* n
sfructor to the generally more n ndemanding
demanding ndemanding and severe Honor y
Court. so
Does this mean that the best 1 {
deterrent is strict punishment?
It has forced on each student
the tremendous dilemma of whe* 3,
* ther or not to publicly accuse his |;1 e
fellow student, with all the social c
and academic consequences. Is
this system giving the student c
a distorted view of the concept of tit n
honor?
BHifi jy|
HBPJii i Xial *
By*-
W, 3SL.,. mmj
Editor-in-Chief
Managing Editors
David Lc
0
Business Manager
Sports Editor
City Editor o
Features Editor *: '"
Wire Editor
Assistant to the .Editor "**
Coed Life Editor
Assistant Business Manager y v
. 'Editorial Assistants ....; Co
Carol Builei* (News!. Davuj Hamiltc
Ronnie Sue Goodman, Tovo Levine. Da
; Anne Walker. Sandy Taylcr, Ann Leon
Vickie Smith, Rich Mathews. Joy Lee Che
Noocy Spiegel. Rick Nihlen, Allen Hastu
Sports Stotf ..* /
Billy Bclote. Marc Weinstein,
. Ikk. Ned Clayton, George Gardne
Business Staff V
Sharon Smith. Public Relations
CIRC .ATtON
' ice Kort*., Pot Patterson. J"V
JVEuTISING William ti
. Robert Hatton. Corole Powers.
TIIP. FLORIDA ALLIGATOR t* Mands
Florid* and is published daily eaeept f
GATOR is entered m seeoud c*ass "V* M *1
iUe. Florid*. Offices are located to
Raaemeitt. Telephone University of *.-* rHI
editorial office or business office.
Opinions voiced in personal column*
pinions ol the editors, Oply diiori> ,rc



I's
stem?
informer held in. much
steem than the cheater? ,<
a true Honor System func funche
he funche midst of our competi- 4
versity society? Are stu*
fused with the highly, im im-3
-3 im-3 of superior grades to the
i of personal integrity?
practical considerations
ed to be more important
nor? Are we living under
>r System or are we per perg
g perg a hoax upon ourselves?
RALD RAVNITZKY, 7AS
at Ever S
opened to
mge Peel?
.
RT
happened to the Orange
Lfter all the publicity and
:nts from Tamany. Tig Tigresults.
results. Tigresults.
ler the name has been
1 or not, lets have our
le back.
i JOYED the Orange
id was very disappointed
that the administration
easily able to strangle the
press.
)range Peel was one of the
itionally known collegiate
nes. I have met many peo peoio,
io, peoio, though knowing little
lie University,' have heard
Orange Peel. Lets not let
;t student entertainment or orbullied
bullied orbullied into oblivia.
THER THERE be a re reion
ion reion of the dead or the birth
rt r lets have some life,
students in existence so
e administration may be
.intained, or is the administra administran
n administran in existance so that the stu stunts
nts stunts may be maintained?
Vas the Orange Peel printed
Tigerts approval or the stu stuit
it stuit bodys?
Surely if a magazine doesnt
?et with ITS publics approval
cant maintain circulation:
JERRY W. HARDIN
DITORS NOTE: Good ques quesa!)
a!) quesa!)
mm... Bill Curry
HtI.MH.MM.IM Jack. Horan,
owrence Jr., David West
Cary Burke
"niim.i.H'Mi. Jared Lebow
mm. Ben Garrett
. Fred Schneider
Maryinne Awtrey
** m %", Sandy Sweitzer'
imiimi Becky Quinn
** Jay Fountain
>le Bordeila (AlligotQr-on.-the-Air).
|pn (Editorials), Phil Krug (Photos)
iters
Wilkinson, Bob Dixon. Mary
oe. Lynn Auerbach. Gerald Jones,
'5 rr V, Mark Fronkel, Richard Levine,
t,n 9s. Carl Skadowski.
Robert Green, Mike Gora.
er Levine. Ron Spencer. John Wat Wat,er.
,er. Wat,er. David Berfowitzv.
. Jane Godbee, Office Manager
Personnel.
jom Neff, 'Circ .tlation Manager.
Neff ar >d David Piche.
tpperheimer, Advertising Mancgcr,
and Trevor Huston.
tluii.nt newspaper of vlor fniversky of
Saturday. TIIB FIXMtIOA AI.IJ-
I l nited States post Office at Caines*
10 and IS In the Florida Office Building'
rK *3211 Ext ¥ 2SX2, and requrM rkhcr
.l* 1 oot necessarily reflect On
* official Yuire Os the paper.

Lettew to- Hie EdMX
Presto! Editorial, Too,
Called Instant Mediocrity*

EDITOR;
I would like to say a few words
in reference to the -editorial.
"Instant Mediocrity October 7,
by D. H. (whoever he or she may
be)
The first thing that came to my
mind after reading D. H.s article
was its very appropriate title,
as mediocre seems to describe the
thought content very will.
I REALIZE that Floridas major
institutions of higher learning are
in dire need of funds and also
that the junior colleges do not
seem to tow the academic mark
very well, but FSU and the UF
could not possibly absorb all of
Floridas younsters desiring col college.
lege. college.
vocates allowing the junior col colleges
leges colleges to deteriorate to lower depths
just when they are beginning to
, make real strides in education and
pouring all state funds into our
two major colleges which have
the potential' of absorbing only
a small fraction of Florida's col-

Student Offers Compromise
For Space Age Education

EDITOR:
In reference to the concern over
whether or not' the USF should
have an engineering school, I
have neither the time not the
motivation to check into the pre present
sent present status of engineering courses
at USF, but I prepos 2 the follow following
ing following ideal? agreement between
the State of Florida and the two
schools involved.
1) THAT both the right and duty
of postgraduate engineering stud studies
ies studies be reserved to the University
of Florida School of Engineering
and its existing or future regional
and ether branches for at least the
next ten years.

Reader Asks Alligator
Not to Mix News, Views

EDITOR}
* Recently appearing to the Alli Alligator
gator Alligator was an article concerning
the dress on campus of both Flor Florida
ida Florida men and women* Xt appeared
to he Just an article describing
the attire of students on various
paths, presumbably. on their way
to classes.
BUT I believe that this article
was an excellent example of part*
isaned news reporting or per perchance
chance perchance it was supposed to be an
editorial.
In any case, I feel that the
article was not placed in proper
coverajje.
Now, if you ask me if I feel
I have been greatly injured by a
violation of my no trespassing
unconscious, I would promptly
answer with an emphatic, No.
What, then, is the purpose of
this letter? Merely to urge you
to Refrain from posting editorials
or highly opinionated articles all
over the Alligator, to keep the
editorials .in their section, the
reportage in another.
I realize that opinion free
reporting is about as difficult to
obtain as a molecule-free vacuum,
but unlike vacuums, nature does
not abohr good reporting but
rather adores it.

lege bouftd high schoolers.
AS FOR the USF having an
engineering school, Im all for it.
Florida hias one of the
finest engineering schools in the
country; but with the tremendous
shortage of engineers, the
opportunity to have another such
school in the state should be wel-
come. I see no reason why USF
could not have a good engineering
school in a few years and with its
might someday prove to be better
than UF..
SO D. H., I feel that Secretary
.of State Adams suggestion of
the junior college system is worth.
consideration. You harp on spe specialization
cialization specialization and with a junior, col-
lege system to provide a good,
background for technical endeavor
you would find a little more elbow
. room here at UF. This in turn
would create conditions suitable
for a good faculty, the best equip equipment
ment equipment and the necessary funds.
M. J. Hazouri 2UC

2) THAT course in engineering
be instituted at the USF and other.
universities under the control of
tthe state, such courses to be
strictly undergraduate in nature
and not to involve additional facil facilities
ities facilities costing more than $5 million
per school.
3) THAT after a period of five
years the engineering curriculum
of these universities (other than
the UF) be examined for the
feasibility of establishing major
departments at these universities.
Criticisms of the above will be
warmly welcomed, as my only
wish is to aid, not dictate.
CHARLES WM. DEMMICK, 7AS

P.S. Please keep up the rest of
your fine efforts and accomplish*
snents In the field of making our
campus a well-informed one.
MICHAEL NEGIN, BEO
(EDITOR'S NOTE : We agree that
the photo editorial should have
been labeled as such. As far as
Its positioning, It waa part of the
Coed Life section of Sundays
paper and should have been as associated
sociated associated with coeg features, not
news.)
Letters
TO THE EDITOR
Must be signed* Names
Will be withheld upon
requdtf.
We reserve the right to
. edit all letters. For best
results, limit them to a
reasonable length.

Thursday, October 11/ 1962 The Florida Alligator

Dont Bar Red Debate
Says British Student

EDITOR:
Dr. Reitzs refusal to allow the
expression of the views of the
Communist Party, even, it seems
Students Ask
Why Council
Sent Letter
Editor:
We would like to know where a
few people get the right to express
personal opinions for the UP stu student
dent student body. Twenty-seven mem members
bers members of the Legislative Council are
going to send a letter to Ole Miss
saying that the students of the
UP are appalled at the situation
there.
Where does Lee. Daniel get the
right to form a personal opinion
for 13,000 plus students? This is
surely a personal opinion, and
such a resolution should be put
before the student body in the
form of a vote before such a mea measure
sure measure is taken*
THE UF is In no .way concern concerned
ed concerned in this incident, and should
therefore tend to its own busi business.
ness. business. If the students of Ole Miss
want our opinion on the situation
there, they will surely ask us for
it. Otherwise it is none of our af affair.
fair. affair.
WHETHER OR not a person be believes
lieves believes in integration or segrega segregation
tion segregation is purely a personal opinion,
and should be treated as such. No
Individual, or small group of indl*
viduals should express their opin opinions
ions opinions as the opinion of a- large
group such as our student body.

DANIEL HOPES to get na national
tional national publicity. It seems that pub publicity
licity publicity is an important issue here,
and probably personal publicity
for Daniel is the real goal. If we
want to be nationally recognized,
let it be an academio recognl recognlion.
ion. recognlion.
ONCE BEFORE three or so peo people
ple people spoke for the University of
Florida in endorsing the Free Freedom
dom Freedom Riders who passed through
Gainesville. Again, there were a
few people who expressed their
personal opinion as the opinion of
the student body.
THEREFORE, WE the under undersigned.
signed. undersigned. ask those students with
rational minds to let it be known
that we will form our own opin opinions,
ions, opinions, that we will not force these
on-unattentive ears, and that we
oppose the move passed by the
Legislative Council on October 2.
Whitney Lerer, 4FY
Jeff Lewis 4FY
William Byrd, 4FY
Gordon Spiatt, 4FY
R. T. Hughey, 4FY
, Terrel Green, 4FY
. D. O. Woolverton, SJXg
&. V.. Robinson 4EG

More Students
Ask the Same
EDITOR?
We, the undersigned, wish to
add our names to the list of those
opposing the move passed by the
Legislative Council on October 2.
We do not necessarily agree or
disagree with the contents of the
letter, but we feel that the mat matter
ter matter was handled improperly in re respect
spect respect to the opinions of the ma majority
jority majority of the oiwdent body,
TOM HORRELL, JOHN TEECH,
OMAR MURPraPJOS, BARRY
MCKNIGHT, JACK TARRANT.
CASEY WHEELER, MIKE
MAHER, SAMMY RODRIGUEZ,
TOM MAYO, DALE MAGNEERO,
BOBKARTZ, ROGER KBPPEL,
DRED JOHNSON, JAMIE QUINN,
CLARENCE LONG, MARV BOR BORGHEDff,
GHEDff, BORGHEDff, ROBERT BARON, PET PETER
ER PETER KAUFMANN, SAMMY SALT SALTONSTALL,
ONSTALL, SALTONSTALL, MARSHALL HICKS,
BOEBY BARRY, MAX HOGAN,
ED PETTLEY.

in on open debate, incensed me to
express my disdain for his posi position.
tion. position.
IN USING his power to protect
.democracy from sedition?
views he is in fact destroying
one of its basic tenets.
Freedom of speech Is a sine
quo non of democracy, as it wag
conceived by the founders of this
country and, incidentally, as it is
conceived in the evolved democ democracy
racy democracy of the United Kingdom, of
which I am increasingly proud
to remain a citiqpn. The whole
concept, of democracy In the
Anglo-Americian. context rests
upon the premise of the free inter interchange
change interchange of ideas; any ideas.
IN ENDING may I quote
Thomas Jefferson, one of your
most distinguished presidents!
In every country where man
is free to think and to speak,
differences of opinion will arise
from difference of perception and
the imperfection of reason; but
these difference when permitted,
as in this happy country, to
purify themselves by free discus discussion,
sion, discussion, are but as passing clouds
overspreading our land transient transiently
ly transiently and leaving our horizon more
bright and serene...
C. R. TAYLOR, 2UC
Thanks, But
No Thanks,
Idealistic
EDITOR:
After reading the letters to the
Editor on Oct. 7 edition of 'the A)
Ugator, I was quite disturbed to
see a college student (A sopho sophomore)
more) sophomore) appear so naive as The
Idealist whose column appeared
there.
She states: I personally feel
that a husband should have the
right to know that his wife is
Completely dedicated to him and
that /.he always will (be).
. THIS IS a fine as far as it goes,
but she further states: But above
all, that he is the only man to pos possess
sess possess her in such an intimate re relationship,
lationship, relationship,
Are we to infer from this that
only virgin women are worthy of
a mans love? And that divorcees,
for instance, should live the re remainder
mainder remainder of their lives in a cold,
unloving world? And that men are
to take a wife, and instead of lov loving
ing loving hor for her personality and
feminine charms, feel for her
only affection in that she is pure
like mama?
. PREMARITAL relations can
often determine whether a man
or woman is suitable for marri marriage,
age, marriage, and can strengthen love to
the extent that if both parties
are suitable or better. Insepar Inseparable
able Inseparable toward each other, can Indeed
maturoly plan for marriage.
Further, I believe, that the wo woman
man woman who establishes sexual rela relations
tions relations merely for the fear of lack
cl dates, is trying to achieve a
popularity which will not win
, her a wonderful place in a lu lucrative
crative lucrative business, but not in a
warm marriage.
I DO thank you for not keep keeping
ing keeping your view a secret, for it is
by communication that we all
learn. You obviously are trying to
achieve goodness in a field whezv
the lives of many are at stake.
I thank you.
Also Idealistic,
E. A. MARTIN, 2UC
poison tummy?
With reference to your pre preview
view preview last week of the delights of
Schneiders poison pen movie
reviewing, may I suggest that
' the trouble appears to be caus caused
ed caused by indigestion rather than poi poison.
son. poison.
DEREK BURCH, 7AG

Page 9



Page 10

The Florida Alligator Thursday, October 11, 1962

Tabernacle Feast
begins Friday Evening

ife By TOVA LEVINE i
Gator Staff Writer
The Jewish festival of Sukkoth
- : the Feast of Tabernacles will
egin Friday evening. The Hillel
Foundation will hold services at
7:30 with Dr. Don Halperin. as asifcfation
ifcfation asifcfation professor of Building
Construction as guest speaker.
In contrast to the festivals of
he High Holy Days, Sukkoth is a
very joyous holiday rather than
one marked by solemnity and
awe.
SI KKOTH IS a thanksgiving
holiday, lasting for nine daysj* and
am memorating the completion of
ic harvest and the dwelling 0 f
'he ancient Israelites in booths in
ie desert. The sukkah is a
imple wooden hut. with a roof
f green branches and leaves
1 rough which the stars may be
on.
mv\
/ Tww/s /
/s&u/ry bjx /A
| STYLISTS: VFj
I Edna Cox Doris Moore
Nancy McMillan, owner /
932 W. Univ. /
Short Walk from Campus /

MANNEQUIN DESIGN PATENT PENDING
>
iM fausid
A fresh scattering of leaves
of many kinds and shapes, all
turning celebrative colors in
honor of the season. The
fabric is in keeping .
perennial cotton as crisp, as
smooth and light as Autumn
~ leaves. The dress for all seasons
is, as always, the villager
shirtdress. Blue, Olive, Red.
Sizes 6 to 16.
DONIGANS

Traditional Jews live in these
booths for seven days according
to the Biblical commandment that
our descendants may know that
I made the Israelites live in
booths when I brought them out
of the land of Egypt. Thus the
idea of freedom is the theme of
the holiday.
All the special prayers for the
holiday deal with thanksgiving,
praise and rejoicing.
TWO OF THE holiday symbols
are the luar and the esrog.
The lulav in a group of palm
branches, myrtle boughs, and
water-willows tied together, while
the esrog is a sweet-smelling fruit
similar to the lemon.
There will be a Sukkah building
party all day Friday at the
Hillel Foundation from 9 a.m.
until 5 p.m. Refreshments will be
served during the day.
Hillel Will hold its annual Suk Sukkoth
koth Sukkoth dance Saturday night at the
Foundation. A live band will
furnish the music from 9:30-12:30,
The cost is 25 cents for members
and 50 cents for non-members.
Everyone is welcome.
SATURDAY MORNING services
begin at 9:30. Sunday morning
Oct. 14, Hillel will serve brunch
from 11-12:15.

Cheerers Rap Limp Spirit

Lack of pride and tradition are
the basic reasons for the lack of
spirit at UF football games, says
Head Cheerleader George
Sprinkle.
The UF is a large school. And
because of the lack of school
Hi
m. SHr
f
K

SG Given f Green Light 9
For FUND Filming Testing

FUND (Florida Universities
Need Dollars) now has the go gosignal
signal gosignal to begin production on a
film showing UF goals, programs
and needs.
The film will cost approximately
$5,700 and will be produced on
campus, according to fund chair chairman
man chairman John Young.
The student body will supply
$2,000 to pay for the project, while
the remaining $3,700 will come
from university concession funds.
THE FILM is expected to be
ready for distribution next tri trimester
mester trimester to alumni clubs, civic
clubs and other interested groups
throughout the state.
Young said he is hoping to
secure the services of the Florida

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traditions students would rather
yell for their fraternity than for
their football team, -he says. ~
According to sprinkle, part of
the reason it is so hard to get
people to cheer at football games
is that it has become Uncool
to cheer for your team.
LAST YEAR when I sat in the
students section and yelled for
the team, everyone would look, at
mo like I was some sort of a nut,
lie says.
The time to let the team know
that the students are really be behind
hind behind them is when they are
losing.
According to cheerleader, Sallie
Spencer, Its hard to get the stu students
dents students to yell when we are winning,
but when we are losing we cant
even interest thorn in the game.
Football players, say that its
depressing to be losing and not
hear any noise from the crowd,
she says.
(I IE ERL EAI>E It CELESTE
says. Florida always

Blue Key Speakers Bureau to co coordinate
ordinate coordinate the film.
A plan is also proposed to comb combine
ine combine the UF film with President
Kennedys Miami speech on higher
education in Florida for television
viewing throughout the state.
ACCORDING TO Young, FSU
has shown an interest in the film
and will lend support. FSU also
desires to distribute the film
around the state.
FUNDS film project along with
the work of Educational Analysis
Committee (EAC) and Student Ed Educational
ucational Educational Legislature Lobby
(SELL), is attempting to throw a
favorable spotlight on higher edu education
cation education in Florida.

tends to abandon the team when
they are down. At the first half of
the Duke game in Jacksonville
Jail weekend. the fans were really
cheering. But in the second half,
when the team needed the spirit,
the crowd just would not yell!
There are ten UF cheerleaders,
six coeds and four men.
I wish we could create some
pride in our Florida traditions,
sa d Sprinkle.
* It gets pretty* exasperating for
us to try to lead a student body
of thousands that doesnt have any
spirit, he said.
Shows
Photographs
Photographs of the works of
Antoni Gaudi, 1C 111 and 20th
century architect, are being dis displayed
played displayed in Building B.
Prepared and circulated by
Now Yorks Museum of Modern
Art, Gauais masterpieces will bo
exhibited daily until Oct. 28.

X could give an A for 40 per
cent correct answers, and still
have a completely fair test," said
Dr. Harold L. Knowles, head of
the .department of physical sci sciences.
ences. sciences.
In defending the C-21 (Fresh (Freshman
man (Freshman Physical Science) grading
system, where 25 right out of 50
questions is given a grade of A,.
he stated: The per cent score on
any test is completely meaning meaningless,
less, meaningless, unless you consider the
difficulty cf the test.
THE PAST performance of stu students
dents students taking C-21 has determined
the present grading standards, ac according
cording according to Knowles. The present
difficulty and length of the tests
are ample, he said. If the best
students cant answer all the
questions, and the worst can
answer a few, then the test is
all right.
Statistics compiled by the Board
of University Examiners show
that C-21 final grades. have had
a smaller percentage of As and
Bs and a larger percentage of
Ds and Es than the average of
all University College courses.
KNOWLES SAID that the dis distribution
tribution distribution of letter grades h as
stayed close to the ideal. The
average grade on C-21 tests has
been between 50 and 55 per cent,
he said, and the grades have
been well spread out. Therefore,
I feel the present grading stand standards
ards standards are correct."
Knowles, who prepares all C-21
progress tests and finals, said he
used fewer,, harder questions than
normal because he wanted the
students to reason' through them.
\7o arent leeki-g re re.v.'l
.v.'l re.v.'l cl specific fr-ei;.; \.o wav.t
i..ton-relation," he said.
Portrait Deadline
Today, Friday
Seminole Editor Bill Dowling
announced that today- and Friday
'Will be the last days for senior
and greek portrait pictures.
Anyone who has not yet had a
picture taken should come to the
basoment of the Florida Union
between the hours of 1 p.m. and
5 p.m., 7 p.m. and 11 p.m. on
Thursday; or 8 a.m. until 11:30
a.m.; and 1 p.m. until 5 p.m. on
Friday.
Dowling said that there will be
no chance for making up pictures
after Friday;



ocation a 'Blinder for UFs Eye-to- the-Sky

Although the UF possesses more
H $20,000 worth of telescopic
jpment, including an observa observa|B
|B observa|B and a planetarium, little ad*
||Bage can be taken of the equip*
t because of its poor location.
K. L. H. Roberts, of the physic
|Bsciences department said that
B location of the observatory,
Bacent to the campus police of*
B, is brightened by lights from
Bsides, preventing proper view-
Bof the skies at night.
IBghts from Jennings Hall spoil
Brcm the east, campus lights
Hi the north, Newell Drive
ouse Decorations
mm
Blean 15 Trophies
or Organizations
tallies will be awarded
H i:c:cr.ccoming house decora-
Hie this year.
fchere are four divisions hi com-
Hltion: Orange League Frater-
Hies; Bbee League Fraternities;
H?oritie&; and Campus Organ*
Britons and Mens and Womens
Hrms.
eccHHBS will be awarded
tlia first, second and third
BaiS3 vinnoris in the fraternity-
Brority divisions.
ln ithe csimpus organizations
ague (including Religious
Bouses, Off-Campus Living Co-
Beratives, Flavet Villages, Cony
Bid Schucht Villages, and Inde-
Bendent Organisations) there will
Be first and second place trophies.
Ba trcptiy for the winner in bcih
Bens and Womens dormitories
Bill also b 8 given.
B In addition this yerr there will
Be Most Beautiful and Mast
Brigin&l trophies awarded for
Bouse decorations in the over-
Bl competition. These will not
Be based on division boundaries.
I THERE WILL be 12 judges this
ear serving 'in groups of three
or each division.
I Judring wilil be Immediately
fter Gator Growl on Friday night
Bnd again on Saturday morning
It 8 a.m.
I All winners will be announced
Kurin" the half-time at the game
Saturday afternoon.
loeds Tapped by
UF JM Honorary
Eight women were tapped for
n ember ship in Theta Sigma Phi,
irofessional fraternity for women
n journalism, in classroom cere cerenonies
nonies cerenonies Tuesday and Wednesday.
The tappees were chosen on the
>asis of their academic stand standng,
ng, standng, ability and Interest in the
ield of journalism, and evidence
of intent to continue in journalism
careers.
Evelyn Allen, 3JM; Carol Bun*
er, 4JM; Faye Corbielle, 4JM;
Ann Groebe, 3JM; Pat Hogan,
3JM; Priscilla Meyer, SMDU;
Judy Lynn Prince, 2UC; and
Sandy Sweitzer, 4JM were given
pledge invitations during jour journalism
nalism journalism classes.
. Pledging ceremonies will be
held at 2:30 p.m., Sunday, in room
226 Stadium.
Pledges and members will
assist in registering School of
Journalism and Communications
alumni at the Plaza of the Am Americas
ericas Americas during Homecoming alumni
activities.
During the fall- and winter tri trimesters,
mesters, trimesters, Theta Sigs will hold an
open house and conduct tours of
the Journalism School and the
communications facilities.
Theta Sigma Phi officers are
Gigi Greathouse, president; Chris Christina
tina Christina Bledsoe, secretary; Mlary Mlaryanne
anne Mlaryanne Awtrey; treasurer; and
Demise Schuler, keeper of the
archives. '

lights from th e west, and Health
Center lights from the south.
THE OBSERVATORY is located
on a low piece of ground because
of the lack of a better place for
its construction, in 1956. According
to Roberts, this intensifies the
problem.
A movable roof, operated by wa water
ter water power, leaves the entire ob*
servatory open to the sky. Inside
is housed two telescopes, one val valued
ued valued at $20,000 and another less
valuable amateur telescope.
.The $20,000 telescope, which

Skit Pre-elimination
'Fair To All' Zorn

Pre-elimination of skits for
Gator Growl, rather than being
unfair, is just the opposite, ac according
cording according to Sam Zorn, Growl pro production
duction production chairman.
I have heard no complaints
about our new system from any
group, Zorn said. Both the In Inter-fraternity
ter-fraternity Inter-fraternity Council and the
productions staff of Gator Growl
felt that the pre-elimination would
benefit all concerned and was
therefore, very fair indeed.
IN PREVIOUS years, all skits
were put on for the judges and
five were selected to appear in
Gator Growl, The try-out were
performed complete with costumes

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shop .-
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jIMBBI We ave a f ne selection of fabrics in both solids and
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55.00 46.50

mm I PLEATED IVY
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short ii ;
long LiiliLl ILil-ILI
extra long I I I II 11 I I I 1 1 1 I*l

magnifies 600 times normal eye eyesight,
sight, eyesight, was given to the school in
1956 by a wealthy architect Rich Richard
ard Richard E. Schmidt.
Schmidt gave the telescope to
the school with the promise that
an observatory would be built to
house it. He built it for his per personal
sonal personal use after one of the largest
in the world it differs only in
size.
THE UF PLANETARIUM, locat located
ed located on the top floor of Benton Hall,
is also being put to poor use be because
cause because of its location. The room

and props. If a fraternity or
sorority did not get to appear in
Growl, they were put to an added
expense of. from s£s to SIOO,
needlessly, pin* lost time and
effort,
. With pre-faiarfiwtfcin, ail skits
were taped, and this tape plus &
.copy" of the sertpt, were turned
over to the production staff and
judges, who then chose the 14
that appeared Iri the Flax* of the
Americas last, night. Five will
appear in Growl and two will be
a part of the pre-Growl show.
PRE CENSORSHIP had nothing
to do with the switch over to a
new system, Zorn added.

Thursday, October 11, 1962 The Florida Alligator

in which it is located is too small,
according to Roberts, u
The planetarium consists of a
large black dome onto which a.
pattern of lights is projected, mak.
ing it resemble a starry sky. The
dome is so crowded in its small
room that very few students can
sit beneath it to observe the
star patterns.
If the dome were moved to a

ALFORD S Restaurant
210 E. University Avenue
A
Lunches 65c Dinners 85c
STEAKS
Sirloin * Fillet Mignon T-Bones
Priced SI.OO, $1.35, $1.40 and $ > .95
:
'/ 95 WfcoU CMclmn far twe $2.50
Georgia Country Ham
I TOLD MR* ALFORD...
i
to look lor us often for l sever have tasted anything so good as his RED
EVE srr.vy and GEORGIA COUNTRY HAM STEAK with these hot bts btseuita
euita btseuita and grtta. Just as he eays: GOOD SATIN' FODNBIt.
At The TOWER HOUSE

larger room many more student
would be able to observe Jt t
the same time. This would als
make it easier to accomodate its
2,000 yearly guests from the Gaii
esville elementary schools and th
Boy Scouts.
ROBERTS HAS applied to
National Science Foundation so
a grant to move the pl&netariitn

Page 11



Page 12

The Florida Alligator Thursday, October 11, 1962

Singing Sweethearts UFs Own- Personal Ambassadors Abroad

fe- 98 B
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one performance!
Ballet*

I WE NEVER CLOSE
B (OPEN 24 HOURS)
I CAUCO KITCHEN
I Relax.. .and be waited on Make eating
I a Pleasure
fca 10%
OFF
\£r
I Group
EXPRESS SHELLS
v 1
FULL CASE AN ADDITIONAL 10%
baikd.^
A ftaMurttfa CoMfUMff
*J|[fkEE FORKING ON TOWER LOT

Encores Galore For The Singing Sweethearts
. . Here, after their opening performance in Costa Rica the Sweethearts receive
ovation after ovation as the Costa Ricans welcome the UF Ambassadors to this South
American Country. The Sweethearts here are Patricia Bledsoe, Kathryn Brown, Fances
Cherry, Lucinda Goodrich, Linda Hairr (President), Audrey Jones, Marjorie Lakin,*
Carol Ann McDowal and Dor is Negri.

f HEELS put on in 5 minutes
I .SOLES put on in 15 minutes I
I modernTshoel
I REPAIR SHOP I
Igcross from Ist notional bank!
PATRONIZE
ALLIGATOR
ADVERTISERS
2 HITS!
JlMfe*
Love is a Many-Splendered
Thing William Holden I

|^MVA /.;Av.^yi^MH9^^Muw>u;. , .'.v.v.;.;-v^iM>y-^4M>Mo m&. < .'. .y.;,;A;.;.v.WA;.w.yv>svvA;v,> ..... A iji*WV^^>"l->\ i .'./;"A,;iJ^MWMWftWyy v lvl-' ''..... .;-<
1 iiumhii n l, **' *iithi %
te& -t^ja
wm m |BBBH|< yIHHHH BBJIBWg^^pJBg r w*
i^ r
;F g|t
PBtt§gw3P^Er
It^B' 1 i ''ii'i | i 'i' |i | 'i i'll'
" v'r v* $ : :
Tier # Upon Tier To The President
... Lou Ann Levinson does her rendition of a modern
dance number .called a "Jazz Ballet" in a rehearsal at the
Nationa ITheater in Costa Rica. The very top deck is
reserved for the President of Costa Rica and his party. Lou
Ann accompanied the Sweethearts throughout the whole trip.

NEW LOW PRICES
JAMES GARNER TONY RANDALL
showing
I
2-55 y\ £&f k &Momingstar udies
I * Irdgy.-ftMV.Wffii' FREE!

By FBfib Schneider:
Features Editor
UF Ambassadors are we...
This is the theme of UFs Sing Singing
ing Singing Sweethearts as they travel
abroad entertaining the different
peoples in the countries they visit.
The Sweethearts hav, e just
completed their ninth, performing
tour, their latest being to Costa
Rica, Panama, and the Canal
Zone.
SINCE 1953 the Sweethearts
have been warming the hearts of
government heads in other lands.
They have traveled to Jamaica,
Nassau, The West Indies, Puerto
Rico, Cuba, countries in South
America.
The total number of miles trav travle.d
le.d travle.d in the last trip alone is 3500
miles and trip number one has
resulted in 100,000 people viewing
the Sweethearts.
The Sweethearts entertained the
President of Costa Rica on their
most recent tour with such hit
show tunes as Hey, Look Me
Over, from Wildcat and I En Enjoy
joy Enjoy Being A Girl, from Flower
Drum Song.
WHILE ALL this is festive and
the like, the Sweethearts take
their job quite seriously.
We are UF Ambassadors' and
we are also United States Ambas Ambassadors
sadors Ambassadors and all this is being done
while most students here dont
even realize we exist, said Dani
Negri,, one of the Sweethearts.
We would like to tell everyone
that we represent You and we
are interested in what You think
about our travels.
However, most students just
notice Us at Gator Growl and
never question why we are not
with the Choral Union or some something.
thing. something.
They just accept .us and forget
us and some realize that we use
student fees in our traveling, she
said.
ONE OF THE GREATEST
things that the Sweethearts do,
according to Dani, is cast a favor favorable
able favorable impression upon what good
things there are in the U. S. While
all is talk of war, communism,
and the like, the Sweethearts go
in Umd win the hearts of nations
through song.
We would like more people to
realize the important role of'
Sweethearts and how they are
connected to the UF, she said.
Campus Suffers
Blackout
The first campuswide power
failure in 10 years blacked out
UF buildings for an hour Monday
morning.
Plant and Grounds Director C.
C. Greene blamed the electrical
failure on a faulty fuse along the
main line onto campus.
No apparent damage was
caused by the failure.
Regrigeration units on campus
held their chill for several hours
and the medical center has aux auxiliary
iliary auxiliary power units to take care of
its needs.
The lights went out about 9 a.m.
after flickering on and off for
several iminutes. Electricity*to the
UF is furnished by Florida Power
and Light.
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MHpXvlvXO^^M^^g^
B^mIImnnaHMHVHiHHHiII^WvXv^MHH^^xVHK^RMIII
Three Cheers for the Catorettes
... Head Gatorette Rosalie Finley (3ED) From Jacksonville
lorida poses alongside the famous Gotor Drum with smiles
ind promises of ''Good Luck," to the Fight in' Gators.

fcniiMiimntHWnnmmifflHOTMW*mwnimuitiiiiniHimuniiitnniniiniiiiiinmiimnntnniiiinuPj|
I Homecoming Ball Offers j
I Variety, Returning Band (

This years semi-formal Home*
omming Ball sponsored by the
fens Presidents Council will slow
own the race-in-s pace to
latch the dreamy tempo of band
nusic by the Bucanneers.
I The Ball will be held from 8:30-
2:30 p.m. in the Hub and it has
Something for everyone.
| The Bucanneer band from Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville is playing a return eng engagement.
agement. engagement.
I THIS SIXTEEN-PIECE combo
reformed at last years Home*
Icoming Ball and has supplied
rhythm for the Jacksonville Deb Deblutantes
lutantes Deblutantes Ball, Revelers Ball
land the Mayors Birthday Ball
Accompanying the band will be
vocalist Mary Dee.
This band specializes in every everything,
thing, everything, says entertainment chair chairnan
nan chairnan Larry Rosen.
During the dance a bevy of on oncampus
campus oncampus talent will be presented
in an extended floor show on the
lubs ground floor. One of the
acts will be The Lonesome Trav Travelers
elers Travelers a group of folk singers
which have supplied music for
many local fraternity parties and
formerly starred at Club Rendez Rendezvous.
vous. Rendezvous.
ANOTHER POLK SINGER Bill
Thornton will also provide, enter entertainment
tainment entertainment along with freshman tal talent
ent talent night, winner Keith Rush
known for her singing similarity
to Joan Baez.
Religious Assn
Looks Ahead
The UP Religious Association
is launching a campaign to make
this the most succesfui year ever
enjoyed by the organization.
Buddy Jacobs is president and
Dr. Richard Hidrs, of the Depart Department
ment Department of Religion is Sponsor.
Application blanks for those in interested
terested interested in participating are avail available
able available at the Florida Union Desk.
Two of the events that URA
sponsors is Christmas on Cam Campus
pus Campus and Religion-in-Life Week.
The latter is now providing
speakers for all trimesters.
Other activites include World
University Service, and the Insti Institute
tute Institute of Human Relations. For
further information contact any anyone
one anyone in the religion office Rm. 207
of the Florida Union.

Tickets for the Ball are on sale
et $2.50 par couple 9:00 to 5:00 in
the Information Booth across from
the Hub.

NOW YOU KNOW
*-. t t
why more people smoke Winston than any other filter cigarette.
Flavor does it every timerich, golden tobaccos specially
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Bolshoi Ballet Without Strinas ?

By FRED SCHNEIDER
Features Editor
Com rads, tonight, The Bolshoi
Ballet, just for you but dont get-
Vise, the NKVD is vatching the
exits.
The Florida Theatre presents
the Bolshoi Ballet in Prokofievs
Cinderella Ballet.
The Bolshoi has often been crit*
ieized for the phenomenal feats
that the dancers do, supposedly
without strings.
WITH ALL THIS ASIDE, after
seeing Swan Lake by this group
of wandering borscht hounds, I
must heartily recommend Cin Cinderella.
derella. Cinderella.
This is not a Lyceum Product Production
ion Production so all the ID cards in the
world wont exempt you for pay paying
ing paying a feeat the usual advanced
prices, $1.25. How come the State
never has advanced Prices?
Also, this Friday the Florida is
bringing back that notable melo melodrama
drama melodrama of blood, sweat and tears
The Lady and the Tramp. If
you like cartoon features and you
are nine years old, or suffering
from chronic retardedness, youll
love this.
FOR THE INTELLECTUAL
element the Florida has a boys
choir to sing a trip around the
world the second feature, and
theyre from Austria to boot.
At the State the entertainment
fare is excellent. Marjorie Morn Morningstar
ingstar Morningstar starring Natalie Wood
will be one part of a two part
feature.

Thursday, October 11, 1962 The Florida Alligator

imiimiMiiiiiiiMiiiim.nl
IN THE DARK

_ Morningstar is a story about
a young girl who gets her first
taste of unsheltered life via a trip
to the Catskill (The Catskills are
known for its many varieties of
boiled chicken) Mountains in New
York.
THIS GRIPPING TALE has
been known to leave women sob-

*in /&***&
211 West University J
siii|§

bing and men wishing they had
gone to the pool room.
Accompanying this flick, in a
kind of a comedy-relief situation
is Boys Night Out which is
strictly for men and anyone wish wishing
ing wishing to laugh.
Take a group of bachelors, fiftd
them a sharp pad in NYC and
then add Kim Novakvoom!

Page 13



Page 14

The Florida Alligator Thursday, October 11, 1962

DGs, Tri Delts 'Didnt Ask for Beer

We feel sorry for the boys,
of course, but we didnt ask them
to buy the beer.'
This is the reaction of Delta
Gamma and Delta Delta Delta
sororities on the punishments giv given
en given tWD fraternities following their
joint beer socials,
file fraternities, S'gma Alpha

socially
speaking

The fraternities are planning
dance parties with bands to cele celebrate
brate celebrate the football weekend.
The ATOs will have the Mad Madhatters
hatters Madhatters Friday night for a party
at cthe house.
Friday afternoon the Kappa
Sigs will have a joint social with
the Phi Dehs, the AEPhis, and
the ZTAs. That night the Play Playboys
boys Playboys from Orlando will "provide
the music for a party with the
Phi Delts. Saturday night the
Phi Delts and Kappa will
again join for a party featuring
the Roadrunners from Orlando.

Get on the nations top
inertial guidance team with
ACs career
acceleration
program
Recent technical graduates coming into AC are offered a 32-week
career acceleration program which moves them rapidly into an actively
productive position. The two-phase program consists of;
phase I . EIGHT WEEKS OF FORMAL ENGINEERING CUSSES
IN THE AREAS OF; SERVO-MECHANISMS e SEMI-CONDUCTOR
TECHNOLOGY e THEORY OF INERTIAL GUIDANCE e REUTED
INERTIAL NAVIGATION TOPICS
phase 11... ACTUAL WORK IN THE ORGANIZATIONS THREE MAIN
TECHNICAL AREAS: ENGINEERING e RELIABILITY OPERATIONS
contact your College Placement Officer regarding a General Motors-
AC campus interview, and send for the informative brochure "At AC,
Navigation is Our Business" . send the form below to: Mr.
G. F. Raasch, Director of Scientific and Professional Employment,
Dept. 5753, AC Spark Plug Division, General Motors Corporation, Mil Milwaukee
waukee Milwaukee 1, Wisconsin.
On Campus Interviews Wed# & ThurS/ Oct. 17 & 18
AC SPARK PLUG THE ELECTRONICS DIVISION OF GBJERAL MOTORS
MILWAUKEE LOS ANGELES BOSTON
EpK m I vIM
<:
'
For more information regarding Field Service Engineering opportunities
with AC, send this form to:
j Mr. G. F. Raasch s
Dept. 5753, AC Spark. Mug Division
Milwaukee 1, Wisconsin J
j NAME J
| STREET |
I CITY AND STATE
j SCHOOL
I DEGREE- _AVAI LABILITY DATE- I
1 J

Epsilon and Tau Epsilon Phi,
were put on rocial restriction.
THE SORORITIES, however,
received no form of discipline
for their part in the function.
\~iki Smith, Tri-Delta presi president,
dent, president, said she felt the sororities
had done nothing to deserve dis-

Saturday night the Lambda
C his will party to the music of
the Combo Kings.
Saturday night the Sig Eps
will have a party featuring the
Madhatters.
The Tekes will party Saturday
night at the house. Music will be
. furnished by the Allegros from
Gainesville.
This weekend 'the Chi Phis and
their dates will have lunch at the
house and then go to the game.
After the game, dinner will be
served at the house. Later that
evening there will be a party.

ciplihe.
We dont ordinarily ask for a
menu when we go to a social and
we didn't know that beer was. be being
ing being served. Are we supposed to

Operation 'Phone-a-Daie Buzzing

Its all working out theyre
getting dates, says Tim Young
(lUC) from Largo, Fla.
In an unprecedented phone-a phone-a-date
date phone-a-date series of phone calls be between
tween between Fletcher and Reid Hall,
two students so far have managed
to come Out with dates for Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming and four more are look looking
ing looking pretty, sure;
HOW DID it get started?
I told this girl that Im dat dating
ing dating in Ried to call here if she
wanted to get a date for some someone
one someone and to ask for my room roommate,

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Saturday- October 20, 8.30 pm The Hub Tickets $2.50 per G>uplc

Some 'Drank Lemonode At Social

turn around and walk out when
we see that beer is being serv served?
ed? served?
MOST OF the girls-didnt have

mate, roommate, says Young.
By the time she called, she
had five girls on the line all
wanting dates for Homecoming.
The. first girl who wanted a
date decided that my roommate
was a little too young, so we
started knocking on doors, he
continued,
Finally, some guy called Ed
came to the phone,
ED WANTED a date for Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming but did not want to sound
overly anxious. He told the coed
at the other end of the line a tale

(anything to drink anyway.
Barry Kutu.n, TEP president,
said, We knew about the rules
and it was. our responsibility,
not the sorority's.
We were the hosts. The girls
didnt know that beer was be being
ing being served until they got over
here.
THEY DRANK it then, of
course, but mostly because we
didnt have anything also for
them t 0 drink.
Barbara Roman, Delta Gamma
president, said "We werent the
hosts and we didnt buy the beer.
We didnt know beer was being
served until we got to the so social.
cial. social.
A IT unsigned letter which asked
why the sorrorities hadnt receiv received
ed received the same discipline as the
fraternities was published in an
issue of the Alligator last week
MISS ROMAN commented or.
the letter, I feel that we are
innocent victims and don't de deserve
serve deserve the adverse publicity.
I dont drink and I saw only
a few girls drinking beer the
rest were drinking lemonade.
She said, We feel no moral,
social or legal responsibility for
the social.
Don Edington, SAE president,
said The girls shouldnt get in
trouble. They were our guests
and we knew what we were doing
when we bought the beer.

of lifes tribulations and problem
of getting a date for Homecoming.
In response to this talc, the
coed told him she was interested.
Time limits on phone calls in
the girls dorms ended the call
abruptly.
A few minutes later Ed call called
ed called the coed to confirm the date,
but rather than confirming it,
decided that it was just a big
hoax and called the whole thing
off.
In the meantime the girls, had
managed to place two calls to
Fletcher and were in the process
of getting dates for someone else.
ALL WAS chaos in the mens
dorms as students flew up and
down the stairs answering the
phone in hopes of finding a date
for Homecoming via Alexander
Graham Bell.
During the confusion that fol followed,
lowed, followed, Reid Hall phones were
Tinging and both coeds and young
men became dub s ous as to the
validity of making dates via tele telephone.
phone. telephone.
In a final gesture, one of the
coeds told a young man that there
were no dateless girls that she
knaw of left in the dorm, but that
she would call her sorority and
see if something coudht be
worked out there.
At last reports there are some
four students waiting to find out
if they can still find a date for
Homecoming.
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east si "GAINESVILLE'S FINEST
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fh^nostigags
Right Wrong:
Lebow .. 20 10
Solomon 15 15

I By JARED LEBOW
Gator Sports Editor
I Both the Gators and I took It
I on the chin last week. I missed
I five games, proving that even a
1 genius can fail sometimes.
I Last Friday I found a list of
I predictions pinned to my door
I with the following note, The pre-
I dictions on this list were made by
I spinning a pointer on a board and
I seeing where it stops. The phan phan§
§ phan§ tom prognostigator picked seven
I out of ten right, better than eith-
E or Solomon or I did last week.
I People keep asking me why I
I persist in picking the Gators to
win. I look at it this way. If Wash Washington
ington Washington had given up on his troops
after Bunker Hill this would be a
rilgby column.
Florida students could take a tip
from old George. There are seven
games left in the season, and yet
most of the people on campus
seem to have already given up on
the Orange and Blue. One has
even gone so far as to write a
letter predicting that the Gators
will finish the season with a 1-9
record talk about school spirit!
This weeks predictions:
FLORIDA 28, TEXAS AAM
... To any wise guys who have
some funny cracks to make about
this pick, heres an explanation as
to how it came about: I spun
:i pointer on a board and .
MIAMI 21, LSU 14 . Miamis
genuine Indian Madras jersies will
stun the Tigers.
GEORGIA TECH 28, TENNES TENNESSEE
SEE TENNESSEE 13 . Joe Auer will coat his
fingers with glue this Saturday.
Bob Woodruff is an assistant coach
at Tennessee, need I say more.
NORTHWESTERN 21, MINNE MINNESOTA
SOTA MINNESOTA 7 . Wildcats could be
this years Big Ten champion.
DI KE 27, CALIFORNIA 14 .
If California can stop Dukes lone lonesome
some lonesome end offense, be thankful we
dont play California.
TEXAS 20, OKLAHOMA 14 .
The Longhorns are loaded this
year. Just goes to show you what
a little oil money can do for an
amateur team.
PENN. STATE 28, ARMY 14 .
Penn State is an'Eastern football
power, with an Eastern coach and
fantastic Eastern players,. The Ca Cadets
dets Cadets are coached by a southerner.
Are you happy now Eastern foot football
ball football fans?
MICHIGAN 14, MICHIGAN-
STATE 13. . Upset in the. auto
belt.
WISCONSIN 21, NOTRE DAME
This isnt the year for the
fighting Irish.
WEST VIRGINIA 27, PITT 7
. Even without the aid of Ron
Spencer the Mountaineers should
win this one,
Alabama Backs
Lead SEC
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (UPI*
I ullback Eddie Versprille and
quarterback Joe Naniath, .spark .sparkplugs
plugs .sparkplugs in unbeaten Alabamas of offense,
fense, offense, led the Southeastern Con Conference
ference Conference in rushing and passing
respectively, SEC statistics show showed
ed showed Monday.
In games through last weekend.
Versprille had picked up ICO yards
1,1 26 carries for a 7.3 average
u*iile Namath, a sophqmcre, had
ompleted 23 of 34 pass attempts
for 419 yards and seven touch touchdowns.
downs. touchdowns.
GEORGIA TECH quarterback
Billy Lothridge led the SEC in
total offense with a total of 503
yards including 128 by rushing
and 337 by passing. Glynn Griffing
of Mississippi was second with 05
yards rushing and 417 passing for
a total of 482.

By GEORGE SOLOMON
l F Sports Corro.spcnJef'i
As for Saturdays stunrirg loss
to Duke, the game can be bait
summed up in the famous words
of the Japanese anti-aircraft offi officer
cer officer after the attack on Hiroshima:
Guys, we got bombed.
Enough said of the Duke game.
Looking ahead, theres every
reason to believe the Gators can
beat Texas A & M, Vandy, Geor Georgia.
gia. Georgia. Auburn. Florida State and
possibly Miami. The LSU game
does not look too good right now.
As for Miami, the Hurricanes
had enough trouble beating those
glue-fingered boys from Florida
State.
This weeks predictions:
FLORIDA 27, TEXAS A & M 7
. . Who said Sports Publicity
men are not optimistic . How However,
ever, However, we must do better this week
in the second half.
LSU 27, MIAMI 14 . The
great George Mira will be lucky
if he is able to walk after Satur Saturday
day Saturday night . LSUs Chinese Ban Bandits
dits Bandits will make Chop Suey out of
the Miami line.
GEORGIA TECH 21, TENNES TENNESSEE
SEE TENNESSEE 7. . The Yellow Jacket al almost
most almost pulled the game out against
LSU last week , Tennessee
has lost its first two games, and
does not seem to be too tough
this season.
NORTHWESTERN 14, MINNE MINNESOTA
SOTA MINNESOTA 7 . Wildcats strong up
the middle this season.
DUKE 27, CALIFORNIA 8 .
That Duke lonesome End is a bad
guy.
TEXAS 20, OKLAHOMA 7- .
Rugged game in the Southwest.
PENN STATE 35, ARMY 0 .
Okay, Im convinced . Penn
State is not that bad.
MICHIGAN STATE 21, MU HI HIGAN
GAN HIGAN 10 Battle of the two twostate
state twostate rivals.
NOTRE DAME 13, WISC ONSIN
0 . The Irish will bounce back
this week and win.
WEST VIRGINIA 21, PITT 7 .
Pitt failed to impress me over
television.

guy.

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Twelfth Man Sparks Aggies

When the Texas Aggies tangle
with the University of Florida
Gator.<* on Oct. 13. the boys from
the Lone Star State will have a
definite advantage: the Aggies
have 12 men on their team.
The Twelfth Man at Texas A&M
College made his first appear appearance
ance appearance in January 1922 when tiny
but tough Centre College of Dam
ville, Ky. played A&M in a post postseason
season postseason Dixie Classic. Lead by two
all-Americans. Centre gave A&M
Miami, Mira
Prep for LSU
University of Miami, which has
managed to score only 10 points in
being soundly whipped three times
by Louisiana £\?ate University,
faces a herculean task this week
in getting its offense rolling
again.
After scoring 23 points on Pitts
burgh and 21 on Texas Christian,
the Hurricanes were able to mus muster
ter muster only seven points against fired
up Florida State last week. That
LSU scouts will be able to profit
from the Florida State alignments
which hobbled Miamis offense
goes without saving and Coach
Andy Gustafson and his aides will
be busy all week with counter
measures.
Although he was a target all
the way for the FSU defense.
George Mira again was the dif difference
ference difference in the ball game. For the
third successive game this year,
lie tossed at least one TD pass
and for the third time in as many
games, he passed for more than
100 yards. His touchdown pass
to Nick Spinelli for the only
touchdown of the game was his
fourth of 1962, 12th of his career.
The career record at Miami is
13 TD passes, held jointly by Fran
Curci and Jack Hackett.
TffasutAHfk
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& Spaghetti
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Next to Gainesville
FR 2-4690 Drive In

Thursday, October 11, 1962 The FI orida Alligator

t'UCh a battering that the bench
was emptied and. Coach Dana X.
Bible issued a call for volunteers.
A third-string quarterback
came out of the stands and suited
up and A&M -went on to upset
the Kentuckians 22-14.
Since that time, the entire
Corps of Cadets at A&M has
stood throughout ajthletie con contests
tests contests as they will At Gainesville
Qpt. 13.
More than a tradition, the
twefth Man is synonymous with
the spirit of friendliness and help helpfulness

Financial Aid Offered To
Z SENIOR and GRADUATE MEN STUDENTS
_ o
* WHO NEED SOME FINANCIAL HELP IN ORDER TO ;
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* Apply to STEVENS BEOS. FOUNDATION, INC.
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fulness helpfulness of the student body and
each mans willingness to do his
part when called upon. __
History of the .school offers im impressive
pressive impressive proof of this spirit* of
Aggieland: in 1917 and agaiir in
1941. the senior class volunteertil
en masse for military service.
9
In World War 11. more than a
division of Aggies 14.000 offic officers
ers officers and 6.000 enlisted men -
served on active duty. Thus was
more than from any other school
including West Point.

Page 15



The Florida Alligator Thursday/ October 11/ 1962

Page 16

Star Halfback Cut From Team

Skelly Dropped
By Graves
Richard Skelly, star UF half halfback,
back, halfback, has been dropped from the
fomball team by Coach Ray
Graves, it was learned late yes yesterday.
terday. yesterday.
Graves would give no details on
the matter and Skelly w*as un unavailable
available unavailable for comment at press
time.
Skelly is a 6-foot, 207 pounder
from Jacksonville Landon High
where the was an All-Southern
performer. He has been bothered
however, by a trick knee which
has kept him from ever complet completing
ing completing a full year of football work.
His knee was reinjured against
last week, and he was re reported
ported reported to be doubtful" for the
game this Saturday against Texas
A & M. He has been currently
playing with the two way unit
as the starting left halfback.
Skelly was ineligible to play last
year because of the famous alliga.
tor-chopping incident he was in involved
volved involved in. He received a years
probation for the incident.
Skelly was named to the Ali-
SEC freshman teaim in 1960 after
leading the Baby Gators to a 6-0
record. This year he had carried
the ball 16 times for 45 yards for
a 2.8. average and caught 3 passe?
for an additional 82 yards.
Vandy Ducats
* .Student tickets for the home homecoming
coming homecoming game with Vanderbilt
are being distributed this week.
Students may pick up their tick tickets
ets tickets between 2 and 4 >3O Monday
thru Friday.
Boat on Display
A North Carolina beat suggested
for possible use by a proposed
local sailing club will be on dis display
play display this weekend at Newnans
Lake at the end of East Univer University
sity University Avenue.
The club to be composed of UF
professors and local residents,
will inspect the boat at McGil McGilvarys
varys McGilvarys Fish camp Saturday and
Sunday.

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" pi I
Halfback Dick Skelly
Gators Gird for A&M
Shannon Will Start

By MARTIN EDWARDS
Gator Sports Writer
The Gator football ran through
a tough workout yesterday stress stressing
ing stressing pass defense and running of offense
fense offense and will stress the same
items in todays drill as. the Ga Gators
tors Gators prepare for Saturdays must
game against Texas A&M.
Tom Shannon rah the Blue
team again and looked sharp in
doing so. The 6-0,. 185 lb. left lefthanded
handed lefthanded quarterback ran off offguard
guard offguard and off-tackle slants and
short pitchout patterns.
Running in the Blue backfield
with Shannon were Bob Hoover
and Lindy Infante at halfbacks
and Jim ODonnell at fullback..
For Infante, it was the first full fullscale
scale fullscale workout since his injury
in the Georgia Tech game. He is
expected to play Saturday.
Ron Stoner will take over Dick
Skellys post on the Go-Gators
unit. Skelly was dropped from
the team yesterday. (See story
this page.)
Also moving up to the Go-Ga Go-Gators
tors Go-Gators was Tom Campbell at full fullman

back to replace the injured Lar Larry
ry Larry Dupree. .
Dupree, the Gators .leading
ground gainer with 148 yards in
19 carries, was listed as doubt doubtful"
ful" doubtful" for the game.
' Duprees 70 yard run against
Duke for a touchdown was
found to be the longest touch touch
touch down run from scrimmage since
1954 when Bobby Lance went 84
yards against Auburn.
After the workout, Coach Ray
Graves said, The Gators are
beginning to pick up in practice
and getting some sprit.
On the upcoming game he re remarked,
marked, remarked, We have reviewed pic pictures
tures pictures of the first three A&M
games and the boys are convinced
that the Aggies are a real good
football team. It will take a fine
effort by the Gators to win the
game.
A&M has a 1-2 record* but won
its last game, 7-3, against Texas
Tech on a 100-yard kickoff return
with. two seconds left to play by
halfback Dan Mclkhany.

Tresh Trumps
SFs Ace, 5-3

NEW YORK (UPI) Rookie
Tom Tresh, a young man born
to baseball, hit a three-run hom homer
er homer in the eighth inning Wednes Wednesday
day Wednesday to give the New York Yan Yankees
kees Yankees a 5-3 victory over the San
Francisco Giants in the fifth game
of the World Series^
A son of former White Sox
catcher Mike Tresh, young Tom
with one swing of a bat his weak weakhitting
hitting weakhitting old man couldnt have car carried
ried carried swept the Yankees into a
one-game lead, three games to
two, and broke the fighting heart
of Giant pitcher Jack Sanford.
But for every bitter loser
theres a gay and light-hearted
winner and the chief beneficiary
of Treshs wallop before 63,165
roaring fans was lean Ralph Ter Terry.
ry. Terry. The gentle Oklahoman had
lost four previous World Series
efforts but he took it on from
there to win my first one for
the new baby."
Old Mike sat in the stands as
his 24-year old son, already the
rookie of the year, proved his
undeniable right to those pin pinstripe
stripe pinstripe Yankee [flannels by p-oling a
home run into the right field
stands known as Ruthville.
Back in Lamed, Kans., just
home from the hospital with a
new five-day-odd on, Terrys pret pretty
ty pretty wife watched on television as
the young father twice was
brought from behind against those
rampaging Giants.
And sitting in the stands, too,
tears in their eyes as Sanford
gamely fought every bad break
in the hooks, his wife and
his mother.
Terry didnt find it easy, for
he has a penchant for firing home
run pitches * setting a Yankee
record in reverse this year with
40and he did it again this time
although in the end he avenged,
a 2-0 defeat Sanford pinned on
him in the second game of the
classic. And he gave up another,
one this time to Jose Pagan, a

man fullman who struck only seven all
season.
BUI TRESH MORE than even evened
ed evened it up for him with that big
three-run wallop when it was all
tied up in the eighth, even though
the Giants got one back in the
ninth.
It was a heart-breaking duel for
the chunky Sanford. Because until
Tresh knocked him out of the
game, he had pitched with his
heart as well as his arm to keep
those comeback Giants in the run runi.ing.
i.ing. runi.ing.
Twice the Giants had taken a
me-run lead and twice Sanford
>'aw it evaporate once on a
loop double and a wild pitch and
he second time on a topped in infield
field infield sngle and a passed ball.
But every time he hung in there,
pitching himself out of jams such
as in the first inning when he
battled those Yankees scoreless
despite a hiit and two errors be behind
hind behind him.
And up until the eighth inning,
when Tony Kubek and Bobby
Richardson delivered back to tack
singles with one out and Tresh
/blasted that game winning homer
Sanford in seven and one-third
innings 'had fanned 10 Yankee hit hitters
ters hitters and issued only one walk
and three hits.
The Giants -ran right back at
Terry in the ninth when Willie
McCovey opened with a single.
Big Ralph reared back and fan fanned
ned fanned Felipe Alou but then catcher
Tom Haller ripped a double to
leift /which scored McCovey and
cut Terrys lead to two runs.
Then he faced Pagan, the man
who put him in a hole with that
fifth inning home run and get
him to ground out.
The Gdarits sent up pinch hjtte.*
Ed Bailey but the big catcher,
representing the tying run, lofted
a shot to right field and Terry
finally had the one he wanted
for that little son born Friday
night.