Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
The Florida
A iligator

Vol. 55 No. 9 University of Florida, Gainesville, Sunday, September 30, 1962

£' : x*fe W *sg& >' # :*&W>>2j&-. : >sfcv.ivl*^BM; : THffiMHflMffil I
f ft *HE pm pHp*
51 :*s&s W%& -*Bw illPm| ; w, jfc# :SBBPSM l §|? :, Jl B BWBBE^B
Jlfr $> T > w B |
y: :: | :: | ->: | --- |^| : | ; w V ,'"; 1 %"' .?. ;> > ;.,Wk£> ... Hr||3& jflp Xv^xiV4 ltfgm^'
PpP* ; pH ; B*
:SyS VHHK Z V jP
: ls?vx >#&s&# A .'//>
>^y>xi-^ij^S^^Sffi%v: : >%< tt % ' >£ *; : : >v^'
|b
1
BBB JBB ugj %. ...
ai, EB Ji | A
<*&& w'lJ^t^^^^^^^nl£l^S^^^Si^^KE&^EM£B&l^^BKn^sis
W .&.'.-/2te.s&- M j 5
.-,:?%&'? ,::::<'.. -: a. v 3 '7"?^''' msn£KSSK_ jljIIMl / ;
:iiosM> :,: n y>x>fea>.-;-. ;
: j>f:' v*

Tech Wrecks Sloppy Gators ,17-11

Pentagon Alerts
Army for Possible
Ole Miss Maneuvers
o
. . See Page Four



flpp.
*jHk |m y,
w |gl|p lijligi^M
W:'- ... ||P- '
- : x'i-x'^>^
WM#Mi
IPWB|| J| B1&
Jnf ' WB
\ JBt I BB
BIMMt, jHf I i BL akMl BMW
-
HEP**" %
Hfe-' v v % maKmhmm^
8&&M :v a. 13&, IMMwBBmi^MIIBBMBHBHW
A J^Jp^v ; Xv.::
Jr k B Sr
jjj&: . /:. xx:;::;;;v jBF flB
Ssx.,
I JF B * Bffli
H
fjjf ji B
I I
< - H m
I
By. I
iJWlhtes* fl
'isiH X
s' S
*§|i w
;y A\X\v:y, V '*'' '' V £ss |
i*iiiisii > 8888 jpg;

Surveying The Well-Dressed College Man...

He's the young man of today.. .his outlook is authoritative,
imaginative and energetic... He takes pride in his scholastic achievements
and campus activities. He knows that correctly styled clothes
can help to give him a feeling of confidence and personal satisfaction.
Stock's understands the young man's point of view as you'll see
at oilce in our selection of natural shoulder suits. They are e*citinqly
new and interesting, yet youthfully mature.. .The subtle new X
colors and classic lines are emphasized. The styles have a long-ranqe point
of view to give them lasting leadership.. .away from changing fads
Come in soon.
Authentic self-vested suits \
V- from 69.50
BIQEIB dQBQ
6 South Main Street
- "' .

WE FEATURE LONDON FOG CORBIN TROUSERS LORD JEFF SWEATERS



The Florida

x^H
fl^H^Bg\XS ; -' 'Y .': : *'j§^v s 'raMpilillll
jH f xSg&v / >>: : ~xSgjJs <
' i|§jg|L

JOHN McCARTY
.. .warns of apathy
John McCarty
Raps Apathy
Os Electorate
By CAROL BILLER
Assistant City Editor
Apathy on the part of the vot voting
ing voting citizen is a black eye in
Florida politics, politician John
McCarty itold a UF audience
Thursday night.
McCarty, speaking under the
auspices of the Florida Union For Forums
ums Forums Committee, estimated 25 per
cent of the voters in Florida will
go to the polls on the issue of
reapportionment.
THE EX GUBERNATORIAL
candidate said, Unless some pop popular
ular popular senator starts a slam-bang
campaign to defeat it, reappor reapportionment
tionment reapportionment should pass for three
reasons.
1. The people of the state are
sick and tired of hearing about
reapportionment and the average
person does not even understand
it.
2. Since the federal court ap approved
proved approved the plan, and it is of 50
states to be approved, people
think it must be all right.
3. The public is apathetic.
Not pnany will vote.
McCarty said the apportionment
problem in Florida was far from
being solved and that it was un unfortunate
fortunate unfortunate the federal Court
had to do it.
A POLITICIAN, said McCarty
must operate with a clear con conscious
scious conscious and with his hands free.
Nothing is politically right that
is morally wrong,. McCarty said,
and urged the grouyt as students
and community leaders to stand
up, fight and be heard.

State AAUP Studying Johns Probe Committee

A study of Charley Johns
Legislative Investigating
Committee is underway by
the American Association of
University Professors (AA
UP).
State AAUP President
Seymour Block reported he
has delegated a Committee
on Academic Freedom to re-

Vol. 55 No. 9 University of Florida, Gainesville

Officials Postpone
Revisions* Balloting

By DAVID LAWRENCE JR.
Gator Managing Editor
A time shortage, report reportedly
edly reportedly brought about by the
UFs switch to the trimester
system, has forced a two-to two-tothree-week
three-week two-tothree-week delay in ballot balloting
ing balloting on proposed student body
constitutional changes.
Student government (SG)
leaders this weekend decid decided
ed decided to postpone the balloting,
originally sc h e d u 1e d for
Thursday, after learning they
could not meet a constitution constitutional
al constitutional deadline concerning the
amending process.
According to the present
constitution, any proposed
amendments must be publish published
ed published in the Alligator not less
than one week or more than

1 Isl I I I
;mm w IH jfw
. Hi ~f M \\l
mm \\

Eire Escapes Replace Knotted Sheets

Murphree Area residents will no long longer
er longer have to knot sheets to escape from
dorm fires. Fire escapes, above, will soon
be installed outside all 38 sections of

view the Johns Investigations
and the Board of Control re report.
port. report.
Block said he did not know
of the actions of the AAUP
at the University of South
Florida, where Johns last in investigated,
vestigated, investigated, but Johns him himself
self himself has said AAUP members
were most helpful.

Alligator

three weeks before such elec election.
tion. election.
SG OFFICIALS REPORT REPORTED
ED REPORTED they could not have the
proposed articles ready for
Alligator publication by the
one-week-minimum stipula stipulation.
tion. stipulation.
Because of the shortage
of time, especially with the
trimester system, nnd the in intricacy
tricacy intricacy of the revisions, Sec Secretary
retary Secretary of Legislative Affairs
Barry Sinoff said, it was
impossible to meet the requir required
ed required deadline.
The only fair thing we
could do, Sinoff added, was
to move up the proposed rati ratification
fication ratification so that legal publi publication
cation publication would be possible.
According to Sinoff, no

After reviewing the mater material
ial material from the investigation
and Board of Control, the
committee will make a re report
port report to the executive com committee
mittee committee of the state AAUP.
The state AAUP will then
either take action or issue a
statement, Block said.
OK. CHARLES WILLIAM

Sunday, September 30, 1962, 32 Pages This Edition

-definite date has been set
but balloting will take place
in two-to-three weeks.
STUDENTGOVERNMENT
officials originally had
planned to include a yes-no
constitutional revisions
Choice on voting machines
Thursday in addition to bal bal-lot
-lot bal-lot in g for 30 Legislative
Council seats up for grabs.
The voting for 30 Council
seats will be Thursday as
scheduled.
A motion is expected to be
proposed Tuesday night at a
regularly scheduled Council
meeting calling for voting on
the revisions to be handled
by paper ballot.
If this passes, Sinoff
said, it will avoid the cost costly
ly costly expense of renting voting
machines.

Fletcher, Sledd, Buckmun, Murphree and
Thomas Halls. (Story continued on Page
Four.)

MORRIS, head of the Com Committee
mittee Committee on Academic Freedom
and UF philosophy professor,
declined comment as to who
the committee members were
or what specific details they
would review.
The AA UP is a political
pressure group pushing for
the wants of university pro-

VIKTOR FRANKL
.. .background, Page 8
Viktor Frankl
Talks Monday
On 'Psychiatry'
Viktor Frankl, Viennese
psychiatrist, will speak on
Psychiatry an d Man s
Search for Meaning at 7:30
p.m. Monday in University
Auditorium.
Frankls speech will open
the Religion In Life program
for the year.
Frankl is attributed with
developing the Third Vien Viennese
nese Viennese School of Psychiatry
after Freud an d Adler.
Frankl is a leader of what
Adler calls the most signifi significant
cant significant psychological movement
of our day.
Coming to the UF campus
directly from Vienna, he will
speak on Search For Meaning
in four open meetings.
Basic Concepts of Logo Logotherapy
therapy Logotherapy will be the subject
of Frankls address Tuesday
at 4:30 p.m. in the Johnson
Lounge of the Florida Union.
Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. in
the Wesley Foundation he
will discuss his book, From
Death Camp to Existential Existentialism.
ism. Existentialism. Frankl will give a
luncheon speech on Thursday
in the Blue Room of the Stu Student
dent Student Service Center entitled
Existential Dynamics and
Mental Health. Reservations
should be made through Dr.
Austin B. Creel of the Relig Religion
ion Religion Department by Tuesday.

fessors. The national organi organization
zation organization puts out an annually
journal in which is included
a blacklist of universities
with conditions unfavorable
to professors.
If a college is put on the
blacklist, professors would be
discouraged from applying
there for jobs, Block said.



Page 4

The Florida Alligator Sunday, September 30, 1962

Showdown Nears At'Ole Miss'

mam
903 araLTEST sth lead
Sir SIM IOQG
Halted Press International
MSaUJQTOU DPI Presi President
dent President Kennedy early Sunday put
tie Mississippi national Quart
tfder federal control and ordered
the Defense Department to send
nllltaxy police to the states
harder.
. But the White House insisted
that M at the present time it is
not contemplated that the mili military
tary military police would he sent -in to
ftxroe the entry of a Begro Into
the state university.
Kennedy issued a proclamation
aonnanding a halt to all M ob obstructions
structions obstructions of Justice in* the sta*
-the final legal step necessary
'Before sending federal troops into
%
Mississippi.
Kennedy, moving with dra dranatic
natic dranatic suddenness, signed an
3ecutive order authorizing De Defense
fense Defense Secretary Bohert S. ifc-
Hunara .to call the 7,100 Missis Mississippi
sippi Mississippi guardsaen into active serv service
ice service and use any other measures
-including regular any troops
ie felt necessary to enforce the
oourt orders.

By HARRY FERGUSON
NEW ORLEANS (UPI-A fed federal
eral federal appeals court yesterday found
Lt. Gov. Paul B. Johnson of
Mississippi guilty of contempt for
barring Negro James Meredith
from the state university.
Unless he complies with the
order to admit James H. Mere Meredith
dith Meredith to the university by 11 a.m.
Tuesday, he will be fined $5,000
a day.
Johnson got off easier than Miss Mississippi
issippi Mississippi Gov. Ross Barnett did
Friday. The court held the gov governor
ernor governor in contempt and said unless
he complied with its order by
11 a.m. Tuesday, he would be
arrested and fined SIO,OOO a day.
SATURDAY'S RULING specified
if Johnson became governor or
acting governor, he would be sub subject
ject subject to the same penalties that
were laid against Barnett.
The ruling apparently anticipat anticipated
ed anticipated the possibility that Barnett
might go to prison and that John Johnson
son Johnson would be left in charge of the
executive affairs of the state.
THE PROFESSIONAL Organ Organization
ization Organization which accredits schools in
the South has threatened to su suspend
spend suspend approval of all institutions
of higher learning in Mississippi
unless political interference in
school affairs is halted.
The executive council of the
Commission on Colleges, said the
Mississippi State College Board
violated a regulation prohibiting
"political manipulation" when it
allowed Gov. Ross Barnett to be become
come become acting registrar last week.
Barnett assumed the registrar's
role to block enrollment of Negro
James H. Meredith in the all allwhite
white allwhite school.
THE COUNCIL SAID unless it
received assurances from Barnett
and the College Board that such
actions would be halted, it would
recommend .in November that
accreditation of all colleges and
universities in* the Mate be su suspended.
spended. suspended.
Dr. Henry King Stanford, chair-.
man of the group and president
of the University of Miami, said
a letter from the governor and the
state College Board assuring them
there would be no further in interference
terference interference would be sufficient to
lift the threatened suspension.
FORMER Arkansas Rep. Brooks
Hays has said he believed most
Southerners will support the fed federal
eral federal government in its attempt to
enroll a Negro at the University of
Mississippi.
Hays in now a special assistant
to President Kennedy.
Those opposing the
integration, Hays said, are a
"few who I'ant seem to adapt
themselves to changing condi conditions.
tions. conditions.

63 Measure 9-29 ts
JACKSQff, Miss. UPI 2he
iississlppi legislature has passed
a measure which apparently
WDuU mai lt possible for the
state to pay Gov. Boss Barnetts
SLO,OOO-a-day contempt of federal
oourt.
Bbe hill, passed Friday with
cnly two dissenters, provides that
ay state officer acting to pre preserve
serve preserve school segregation is act acting
ing acting as the state rather than as
.aa individual.
67 Vandiver 9-29 ts
MIAMI DPI Georgia Gov.
Bhaest Vandiver said Saturday
light that Mississippis defiance
of federal court integration or orders
ders orders will damage the state to

aach. an extent that *it can never
completely recover.

Escapes

Two major fire.s in the area last
>ear touched off an editorial cam campaign
paign campaign in the Alligator tor escapes.
THESE SECONDARY exits
will consist of a steel platform con constructed
structed constructed outside of each dorm
floor s bathroom window connec connected
ted connected by a ladder leading to the
ground.
Larger easements in the bath bathroom
room bathroom windows will also b e in installed
stalled installed to aid students not wish wishing
ing wishing to rcenain in .section in case of
fire.
Although, the fire escapes are
two fires late, they will provide
for a greater measure of protec protection
tion protection for the old one-wav-out resi resident
dent resident Falls.

(Continued From Page 3)

TWO MAJOR FIRES, which oc occurred
curred occurred in Sledd and Fletcher R
last year, ignited the need tor
fire escapes. These were thought
to be the first serious fires in
the area's history, according
to Harold Hiker, director of hous housing.
ing. housing.
The fires showed the potential
danger of no escape after -one
student- was forced to. exit via
knotted sheets.
The cries of the Alligator and
others prompted a committee to
be formed to investigate the prob problem.
lem. problem.
'
The committee reported its find findings
ings findings to the Board of Control who
in turn recommended the fire es escapes
capes escapes be installed this year.
/



Cow College Concept Now Dead

The status of land grant institu institutions
tions institutions has changed from cow col colleges
leges colleges to great universities in
100 years, Cong. D. R. (Billy 1
Matthews said Friday.
Matthews, speaking to leading
Florida farmers at the Stu Student
dent Student Service Center, said land
grant research contributions ex exceed
ceed exceed by many multiples the
total amount expended on the
colleges since they came into
being.
Research contributions through

Hungry
for flovar?
Tareylon's
got it!

"Tareyton's Dual Filter in duas partes divisa est!*
says Ursus (Bear Foot) Sulla, popular Coliseum bear lighter.
We animal wrestlers fight tooth and Claudius to get to that
first post-fight Tareyton, says Bear Foot. TYy a couple of
pax and enjoy flavor- de gustibus you never thought you'd
get from any filter cigarette!

land grant backing, according to
Matthews, include the discovery
of streptomycin for the treat treatment
ment treatment and control of tuberculosis,
development of the television
tube, production of pure uranium
and development of the tranr.
ONE OF THE most effective
weapons we have against com communism,
munism, communism, Matthews added, is
our agricultural production. The
land grant college concept is one
of the most valuable things Am America

Sunday, September 30, 1962 The Florida Alligator

erica America has for exportation, he
said.
According to Matthews, one of
the primary phases of the exporta exportation
tion exportation idea is the foreign scholars
assigned to land grant institutions
to study farming.
More than 100 are at the UF.
Todays farmer must be a
knowledgeable man, Matthews
said, and his land grant univer university
sity university has equipped him for this
role.
Matthews is one of a series of

Tareyton

UF speakers this year commemo commemorating
rating commemorating the centennial of the }862
land grant Merrill Act.
Doctors Confer
State doctors ended ft three
day conference here yesterday on
crippling childrens diseases of
the brain and nervous system.
Moderator of the seminar was
Dr. Melvin Greer.

Page 5



Page 6

The Florida Alligator Sunday, September 30, 1962

look away

Sinda Brower answers a long distance telephone call
at the Kappa Kappa Delta house in Oxford, Miss.
oinda editor-in-chief of the Daily Mississippian, stu stu-ole
-ole stu-ole M is s sums it: U P by saying,
I rankly, Bill, I am caught between the devil and the
deep blue sea.
. Sinda has not commented editorially upon the current
integration crisis at her university. Before classes began,
she did run articles praising her fellow students for
being relatively mature in the face of crisis.
Im from Tennessee, she says. You have to be here
in Mississippi to really understand.
I did write one editorial protesting press coverage by
the Jackson, Miss., newspapers. They made it look as
though the students were wildly protesting the integration.
1 hey sensatmnalized the student role in blocking Meredith.
W e did have a pamphlet going around supporting the Gov Governor,
ernor, Governor, but it was the work of only a few, and it called for
non-violent backing of the state.
the da vdllmrV s A, re^ l ion or iteration which control
ine daydreams of Ole Miss students. Frankly thev are
! i f e a afi-dd e 'that ,e th frai aie all aid that they will lose their credits or that th*
school will lose accreditation. They are afraid that the
afiaid that
a fewestutlenTs have twnsfered*' Saj S thflt ( uite
.she A sa\-s ol ih h ,t 'the S' ha< time for her own classes,
ne saj s that the professors are mum on the situation.
* * Jjt
4
s ARTICLE in the current Harpers Magazine may
bring the situation into better focus. Written before the
Ole Miss incident, the article is entitled, The Unreported
Crisis in the Southern College. Its author is C; Vann
Woodward, Sterling professor of history at Yale. Hewas
born in Arkansas.
After referring to the University of Florida and the
Johns investigations, Woodward turns to Ole Miss:
whiMrS 0 "! the diversity of Mississippi,
been harassment by politicians, have
one recent two-year period nearly
a fourth of the faculty resigned. Undeterred by this tow
erful members of the State Senate undertook more SEE
a year ago to make an object lesson of William P Mumhv
£** 0 E m "* m 1 ?- mb ? r of the Law School faculty.
''membership m the American Civil Liberties Union
and an openly professed opinion that Supreme Court de decisions
cisions decisions are the law of the land. After an extended leave
of absence that probably avoided outright dismissal, Prot
' ds S ewhereT hy recently resiirned to a desirable job
t l . i .i" e^ less J to com lent on the upon a state
that allows its educational system to become so weakened.
But the real tragedy is its effect on current students at
Ole Miss. An article in Saturdays Miami Herald quotes
students who could speak a little stronger and anonomous anonomously
ly anonomously than the school s editor:
* *

cblUegcfc-fcoa* editoiia.ls

THE GOVERNOR..

of rebS vpn^ nERSIT w f Mlsslssl PPi is not a solid mass
studem i"! Sl T? rt !!l GOV Ross Barnett Talk to the
snml k oul l fincl that man y of them including
KeLrro b Tanip an M lai^l m i M Ssi3sippi ~ would rather see
closed md hIL^ ere ? dmitted thaa see their institution
said ne \Vp 1 Spi n ? d \ e are the most directly involved/
to consult n J Se ever ything but nobody bothers
care lesiSf aSk h T We feel about Meredith. I couldn't
%VoU ld here> And 1 think only a handful
no Studv m! ih the unive J; s t y close/ There was virtually
lines acres tv,- 6 Can I PUS Bldda y as the case made head headwe
we headwe were readv Untl T* Jt sas if the finals are over or
said Fvpvv rii v.f fu b ? me f r Christmas/ one student
i be dorms are noisy with arguments
is no-one rf What will reall > v ha PP en The trouble
Ino one kno s The^ worst part is the waiting/
nation for SJ ud nts tbe faculty, the South, and the
South and the t,Jt- ie } he students > the faculty, the
and the nation meet setbacks.
ernor haVlbaekpd 1 is interesting to note that the gov*
Brvant wasonpnll R SS Barnett > s tand Although Gov.
sad that he would" t s f gr^ at ionist in his campaign, it is
support of Mk integrated and * because Florida has peacefully
peac! d SUCh comme nts would undermine that
But. out of the world of politics, we can only hope for
the students of Ole Miss, as Dixieland looks awav,
B.C.
good-bye sheets
someone P in area can be ba that
necessary in the future l kes you Should it become
dorm, it wont be dtffi to lf esca ? e from a burning
escapes have been S dlfflcult as it used to be. Fire
Wto/commid/te the Alii Aliisimply
simply Aliisimply because the ail s i fety 13 assured,
ever, it certainlvis an ?mr,5 SCapes ave 1)6611 added. How Howout-the-window
out-the-window Howout-the-window method Ver the old bed shect3



Educator Says C-Courses Good 'Compromise"

By W. W. TULLIS
Look to the left, look to
the right, only one of you
will graduate, said the dean
to the freshman class in the
fall of 6l. Why will these
people fail to graduate?
Further, in spite of increas increasing
ing increasing entrance requirements,
many undergraduates of high
ability become the proverbial
rudderless ships and drift
from major to major.
Both of these groups have
feelings of vague frustration
and lack direction in their
studies. Such indecision may
ultimately so discourage a
student that he may surren surrender
der surrender himself to failure. Each
day sees these frustrated
students seeking advice at
Tigert or from their fellows,
who can at best speak in gen generalities.
eralities. generalities.

************************
EDITOR:
It has been reported in the Alli Alligator
gator Alligator that numerous Florida legis legislators
lators legislators and Cabinet members were
to have been on campus for the
Georgia Tech football game. Os Ostensibly,
tensibly, Ostensibly, their purpose was to
find out the University's acade academic
mic academic needs rather than the mat matter
ter matter of athletic excellence.
At the same time it is hoped
that Floridas legislators have
been informed of out-of state co coverage
verage coverage being given the activities
of one of their number. At a time
when UF politicians are talking
space, publicity brought about by
the activities of State Senator
Charles Johns has been most un unhelpful.
helpful. unhelpful.
THE LATEST Metropolitan
daily and opinion leader to re report
port report on the Johns Committee is
the Washington Post Which de--
voted .7 inches of editorial space
to the subject September 24. The
Post noted that the University of
South Florida, gave promise of
becoming a first-rate academic in-

The Florida
Alligator

Editor-in Chief Bill Curry
Managing Editors Jack Horan,
David Lawrence Jr., David West
Business Manager Cary Burke
Sports Editor Jared Lebow
* "
City Editor Ben Garrett
Features Editor Fred Schneider
Wire Editor Maryanne Awtrey
Assistant to the Editor .Sandy Sweitzer
Coed Life Editor Becky Quinn
Assistant Business Manager . F un a n
Editorial Assistants Carole Bardella (Alligator-on-the-Air),
Carol Butler (News), David Hamilton
(Editorials), Phil Krug (Photos)

MANY STUDENTS dislike
having to waste time in
general education courses.
Educators, .teachers, admin administrators
istrators administrators an d, frequently,
parents, have also been con concerned
cerned concerned with the emphasis on
general education as opposed
to specialized courses of
study.
Dr. Carroll V. Newsom,
President of New York Uni University,
versity, University, appears to have an
answer. In a remarkably com comprehensive
prehensive comprehensive but brief work,
A University President
'Speaks Out, Dr. Newsom
forthrightly states bis can candid
did candid and somewhat outspoken
views of general education.-
He critically reviews present
American counselling proced procedures,
ures, procedures, students' academic
problems, the position and re-

stitution -if it is not thwarted by
legislative meddling.
AFTER RECITING the ven venture
ture venture of the Johns Committee in into
to into the complaints of those who are
unable to distinguish between a
university and a high school, the
Post noted that the Board of Con Control
trol Control had asserted its right to in investigate
vestigate investigate complaints against state
educational institutions.
ATTACKS OF this kind do
grave damage. They underline
confidence in higher education and
they tend to intimidate teachers.
Education is a profession which
cannot be subject to this kind of
reckless interference by self-ap self-appointed
pointed self-appointed campus cops.-
THE BEST that can be hoped
for from this Florida incident is
that it may serve as an object les lesson
son lesson to other legislatures in how

LeITERS:

Sunday, September 30, 1962 The Florida Alligator

sponsibilities of the faculty,
administrators and parents,
'and the responsibility of a
'university to a free society.
! Dr. Newsom sees the con conflict
flict conflict between general educa education
tion education and specialization as a
fictitious problem. Newsom
'outlines, as an ideal program,
'a system that has great simi similarities
larities similarities to our present Uni University
versity University College and its honors
program.
TH E UNIVERSITY of
Floridas University College,
corresponding to Newsoms
ideal of the general educa education
tion education program, attempts to
develop the truly educated
man. Unless opportunities ex exist
ist exist throughout the under undergraduate
graduate undergraduate program for some
specialization. Newsom be-

NOT to handle a university, the
Post said.
THE UF was not mentioned by
name in the article. All efforts
of UF publicists to the contrary,
there are no doubt already those
in other parts of the nation who
have mistaken the USF for UF.
THOSE PERSONS in and out
of the legislature who hope that
the UF can achieve top academ academic
ic academic excellence in the U. S. rather
than in the South alone, not a
very high goal to shoot atmay
well ponder the reverberations
caused by the latest adventures
of the Senator from next door,
Starke.
NEALE J. PEARSON, 7AS

rWRIDA ALLIGATOR Is the official student newspaper of the University
dal,y except Monday and Saturday beginning Sept.
ALLIGATOR is entered es second class matter at the
Office at Gainesville, Florida. Offices are located in Rooms I, 10
5 /LJ? h *irida Union Building Basement. Telephone University of Florida.
* R Jt 3 2 1 Ext 2832> and request either editorial office or business office.
Opinions voiced in personal columns on this page do not necessarily reflect the
opinions of the editors. Only editorials are the official voice of th* paper.
Staff Writers Ronnie Sue Goodman, Ken Keyes. Tova
Levine, Pete Supove, David Wilkinson,
Bofcf Dixon, Mary Anne Walker, Sandy
Taylor
Sports Staff Robert Green, Mike Gora
Billy Belote, Marc Weinstein, Roger Levine, Ron Spencer, John Wal Wallick,
lick, Wallick, Ned Clayton,- George Gardner, David, Beriowitz
Business Staff Jay Fountain (Assistant Business Manager),
Jane Godbee (Office Manager), Tom
Neff (Circulation), Sharon Smith (Pub (Public
lic (Public Relations, and. Personnel), Carol
Powers, TrdVor Huston, Bob Hatton
(Advertising Sales), and William Ep Epperheimer
perheimer Epperheimer (Advertising Manoger)

lieves that potentially out outstanding
standing outstanding student talents may
be lost to society. Our Honors
Program and elective provis provisions
ions provisions partially satisfy this
need for specialization.
Th a t Floridas existing
methods of undergraduate
education are comparable to
Newsoms liberal educational
thinking is a tribute to the
foresight and wisdom of our
administration and faculty.
Students who possess
enough intellectual curiosity
to visit the library will derive
benefit and a more thorough
understanding of why they
are here and where they are
going by reading A Uni University
versity University President Speak s
Out.

EDITOR:
I think j ;>ur editorial on fo al fo You state, Either the public
school system in the 50 states can
refuse federal aid. . .or it can ac accept
cept accept federal aid and take the risk
of greater federal control. Os
course, these could be token stan standards,
dards, standards, such as loyalty oaths, ap approved
proved approved study materials, and the
proper proportion of minori t y
groups.
YOU APPARENTLY have the
opinion that federal funds come
fmn Washington. They conic
from the people. Close examina examination
tion examination will show that each U. S.
taxpayer is also the resident of a
state. From our right pocket we
take $1.50, discard $.50 for admin administrative
istrative administrative expenses, put the remain remaining
ing remaining dollar in our left pocket and
are thankful that wo only have
to surrender our academic
freedom to keep it.
The answer lies not in tying ed education
ucation education to the federal govern government,
ment, government, but in convincing our state
leaders that we are willing to priy
higher taxes for higher education.
Lee Robinson, lEG

Page 7



The Florida Alligator Sunday, September 30, 1962

Page 8

Married Students, Faculty, Staff
Take One
Home
to Mama /s\
The
Flopida Alligator

Psychiatrist 'Searches tor Meaning

By MARY ANNE WALKER
Gator Staff Writer
Sex is secondarymeaning is
mans basic motivation, accord according
ing according to Viktor Frankl, Viennese
psychologist here to speak at Re Religion
ligion Religion In Life ceremonies Mon Monday.
day. Monday.
Contesting Freuds theories on
Pleasure Principle, Frankl has
opened new doors to create a
third school of Viennese psychi psychiatry.
atry. psychiatry.
His theories are so important,
according to a recent article in
Motive Magazine, because they
challenge some of the most basic
presuppositions of orthodox psy psychoanalysis.
choanalysis. psychoanalysis.

FRANKLS VIEW OF man is
that man seeks primarily neither
pleasure as Freud assumed nor
power as stressed by Adler, but
meaning.
The implication for therapy is
that any therapeutic approach
which does not take into account
mans search for meaning is not
adequate to meet mans needs,
Frankl contends.
He is convinced the neurotic
problems of our age are more
concerned with a life orientation
than with the more familiar de defense
fense defense mechanisms developed by
the psychoanalytic approach.
Frankls major criticism of ex existentialism
istentialism existentialism as a philosophy is
that, whereas it rightfully stres-

ses mans subjective experience!
in the midst of life, it tends to I
ignore the objective reality of va I
lues.
Whereas Jean Paul Sartre I
stresses mans freedom from the
circumstance of life, Frankl
would add a responsibility to the
world of objective value.
FRANKL WAS BORN in VierJ
na in 1905. From 1942 to 1945 he
was imprisoned in the concentra concentration
tion concentration camps* of Auschwitz and Da Dachau.
chau. Dachau. During this time he refin refined
ed refined his theory of psychoanalysis.
Frankl is currently professor of
neurology and psychiatry at the
University of Vienna, chief of the
neurological department at i'olik i'oliklinik
linik i'oliklinik Hospital in Vienna and pre president
sident president of the Austrian Medical So Society.
ciety. Society.

Duke Tilt Buses!
Tickets on Sale
Chartered commercial buses I
will take student football fans to |
Jacksonville for the Duke game |
Saturday.
The buses will leave at 11 a. m.
Saturday and will return to cam campus
pus campus immediately following the
game. Cost for the round trip tick ticket
et ticket is $3.50.
Tickets will be sold in front of
the library and Peabody Hall as
long as necessary, according to
Tom Gibson, administrative as assistant
sistant assistant to Student Body President
Bill Trickel.
Gibson said the buses had to be
charted in advance, so tickets will
be sold to fill the buses.
The exact number of buses is
hot yet known.
Gibson said UF buses could
have been chartered for less cost,
but Student Government felt the
comfort of the 70-mile trip was
more important on (more modern
buses.
Convocation
Better understanding, will be
the keynote of this years Student
Government Convocation.
The convocation is tentatively
scheduled for the first w r e e k
of classes during second trimester.
It will be run entirely by student
leaders.
The purpose of the convocation
is a move toward better under understandiing
standiing understandiing between students and
faculty.
According to Secretary of Acad Academic
emic Academic Affairs John Young, it is also
hoped that through this convoca convocation
tion convocation the students will come to
understand the functions of student
government better.
It is expected that this will
become a yearly event/' he said.
The first scheduled speaker is
Dr. Winslow Hatch, Director oi
Clearing House on Studies
Higher Education. Washing'a
D. C.



*
MOSLEY'S
NEW HOURS
6 30 A. M. to Midnight
CHAR-BROILED STEAKS and Sandwiches
0
BREAKFAST special
Every Morning Served All Day
* 2 Eggs Scrambled or Fried
Q 0
* 2 Strips of Bacon J IJ
* Buttered Grits Toast and Jelly
2nd. Cup of Coffee on US
L Across from the University City Bank
^ < _ ^


Sunday/ September 30/ 1962 The Florida Alligator

Page 9



Page 10

The Florida Alligator Sunday, September 30, 1962

[ By CAROLYN MELoItIM
Features Writer
When the honeymoon is over,
| we'll go back," joked Dean of En En|
| En| gineering Joseph Weil when he
and his wife arrived here in 1921.
The honeymoon is still going
on.
Weils original plans were to
return to a position with Westing-
HEELS put on in 5 minutes
SOLES put on in 15 minutes }
MODERN SHOE
REPAIR SHOP
ocross from Ist national bonk
r"
\ tSCOOyO.'fsl
l FIGHT L
IPICTURESyI
What Really Happened?
See The Knock-out Blows
The Ty Cameras Missed.
The Biggest Fight Shock
Os All Times.
SEE THE HIGHLIGHTS IN
StfIWMOTjON/
PLUS feature attraction!
THEY BLOW THE FUSE I
IN THE BIG HOUSE!
Convicts!
ITAMUNt
BEN 9TUANT ano SAMMY
GAZZARA WHITMAN DAVIS, jr

'The Endless Honeymoon

house Coip. after a year's time.
He changed his mind.
STILL IIEItE II years later,
Weil, director of the Engineering
and Industrial Experiment Sta Station,
tion, Station, professor of electrical engi engineering,
neering, engineering, and College of Engineer Engineering
ing Engineering Doan, considers the interven intervening
ing intervening changes in the egineering
field to be explosive.

mm

Weil Florida, the de department,
partment, department, under .the huge tar y
control of the Engineering and
Industrial Experiment Station,
conducts research projects.
We have the Cinderella met met_Todgy_Thru
_Todgy_Thru met_Todgy_Thru Wednesday
M WINNER
In of 3
Ml ACADEMY
HI AWARDS!
iffml ALL CRITICS
if ml AGREE...
Jm m THERE HAS
m NEVER BEEN A
rIR HI motion
Ilf Hi PICTURE
If 11 LIKE THE
W jjljl RED SHOES!"
NUDNWNHDQK
MAMUSGGHNG MORASKAiIII
__ *ALSQ*
|P%* *
jP&jf Surprise Treat of the Year! J
W ALEC 6UINNESS
: STRATFORD ADVENTURE I
SHAKESPEAREAN FESTIVAL J
2 In Glorious Technicolor
-NO-
Under New Ownership
& Pol icy

| Engineer in g
has given us our
present technol technological
ogical technological civilization
and is creating
the industry of
tomorrow.
With an eye to
the industry-of
tom orrow" dn

als of tomorrow, he said.
Metallurgists are studying the
behavior and use of metals such
as hafnuim, zirconium and titani titanium
um titanium in view of Florida's lack of
iron and copper.
DEVELOPMENTS IN connec connection
tion connection with nuclear power are pur pursued
sued pursued because Florida has a shor shortage
tage shortage of energy in the form on wa water
ter water power arid fossil fuels.
The Coastal Engineering Labo Laboratory
ratory Laboratory studies storm tides and
beach profiles. A current prob problem
lem problem concerns the ocean erosion
of Floridas beaches.
The work of the electrical engi engineering
neering engineering division in the past led
to the use of radar and the begin beginning
ning beginning of storm forecasting.
CHEMICAL ENGINEERS cur currently
rently currently are studying the Florida
scrub oak and its utilization in
paper pulp. Studies may lead to
a process involving continuous
pulping of which would re revolutionize
volutionize revolutionize the paper industry.
Sanitary engineering research
is of great economic importance
because of tourism. Its progress
often leads to improved health
and market savings.
In the past we were a tour tourist
ist tourist and agricultural state, Weil
said. Few recognize that the val value
ue value of manufacturing in Florida
exceeds that of agriculture and
tourism."
The UF college of engineering
is one of the outstanding such
schools in the nation, a position
secured in spite of meagre finan financial
cial financial support from the state.
fcmesnud
I 3ftivr.l*r THKATxr
Sun. Mon. Tues.
GERONIMO
Chuck Connors
also
JESSICA
Angie Dickinson
Starts Wed.
IVANHOE
Liz Taylor
and
KNIGHTS OF THE
ROUND TABLE
Robert Taylor

Sl|l
: if-

Somethings Fishy
Is it Mullet or Lisa]

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) The
once -lowly Florida mullet, with
a new ncuie and a fancy package,
was a big success with sophistic sophisticated
ated sophisticated New Yorkers during its debut
appearance at the Florida show showcase
case showcase in Rockefeller Center.
Some 2.000 daily visitors to the
showcase were served samples of
the canned fish, re-named Lisa,
by pretty hostesses"at show,
case last week.
Where can we buy it? was
the immediate reaction, according
to the Southeastern (Fisheries As Association
sociation Association which had a 300-can test
pack of the product shipped to
New York for the occasion.
Canned Lisa won't be available
in the retail market for some
weeks yet, although the state
board of conservation is distribut distributing
ing distributing test packs at state institu institutions.
tions. institutions.
We are tremendously pleased
with the reception," said John
Salvador, president of the fisher fisheries
ies fisheries group.
The new product is aimed at
solving a serious economic prob problem
lem problem that has plagued the Florida
commercial fishing industry. Mul Mullet,
let, Mullet, i< loridas number one seafood
harvest with 40 imillion pounds poundstaken
taken poundstaken annually, was bringing only
a small return.
It seems the name mullet was
a handicap. This is what -a num numbei
bei numbei of trash fish in the north are
called. Its cheap price was also
a drawback.

hri Sun.
Mon.
2 Color-N-Scope Hits!
Jim Hutton-Paula Prentiss
NORC^Umi
LIEUTENANT
-plus- Glenn Ford
Torpedo Run



New Pronunciation Guide Needed*

You say tomahto and I say
tomaytolets call the whole
thing off!
Pronunciation has long plag plagued
ued plagued the broadcasting industry
and Gerald Flannery, a journal journalism
ism journalism graduate student, has decid decided
ed decided the solution is not calling the
whole thing off.
Flannery announced recently
that he has undertaken the com compilation
pilation compilation of a guide toward pro pronunciation
nunciation pronunciation for all Florida towns,
cities, rivers, lakes and historic historical
al historical landmarks.
FLANNERY HAS SENT re requests
quests requests for assistance in the pro project
ject project to all radio and television
stations in th e state since the
booklet will be designed for the
industry.

IBM
WILL
INTERVIEW
OCTOBER
3-4

He asked all stations to phone phoneticize
ticize phoneticize places in their areas for
comparison with information al already
ready already in his files.
The information, he says, has
been gathered at no expense
from students, faculty, wandering
minstrels and other sundry colla collaborators.
borators. collaborators.
If those individual stations con contacted
tacted contacted fail to pick up the true pro pronunciation,
nunciation, pronunciation, Flannery plans to
send requests to mayors and
chambers of commerce in the
areas.
Although tannery considers
it a grubby little job, the guide
is expected to be useful in all ar areas
eas areas of communication when it is
completed.
CBS and NBC recently made
use of similar studies conducted
in Kentucky, Missouri, lowa and
Illinois.

;
jum jjlk jji
-yx It . y.v.v ys!sswv:v:

Candidates for Bachelors or Masters De Degrees
grees Degrees are invited to discuss opportunities in:
Science and Engineering
This is a unique opportunity to find out about
the many career opportunities at IBM. The
IBM representative can discuss with you typ typical
ical typical jobs, various training programs, chances
for advanced education, financial rewards,
and company benefitsall important factors
that affect your future.
SOME FACTS ABOUT IBM
An Unusual Growth Story: IBM has had one
of the exceptional growth rates in industry. It
has been a planned growth, based on ideas
and products having an almost infinite appli application
cation application in our modern economy.
Diverse and Important Products: IBM devel develops,
ops, develops, manufactures and markets a wide range
of products in the data processing field. IBM
computers and allied products play a vital
role in the operations of business, industry,
science, and government.
Across-the-Country Operations: Laboratory
and manufacturing facilities are located in

IBM

Sunday, September 30, 1962 The Florida Alligator

SHE SELLS SEA SHELL U^|||jL

Endicott, Kingston, Owego, Poughkeepsie,
Vestal, Yorktown, N. Y.; Burlington, Vermont;
Lexington, Ky.; San Jose, Calif.; Bethesda,
Md.; and Rochester, Minn. Headquarters is
located in New York City with sales and serv service
ice service offices in 180 major cities throughout the
United States.
The Accent is on the Individual: No matter
what type of work a person does at IBM, he
is given all the responsibility he is able to
handle, and all the support he needs to do
his job. Advancement is by merit.
The areas in which IBM is engaged have an
unlimited future. This is your opportunity to
find out what that future has to offer you. All
qualified applicants will be considered for
employment without regard to race, creed,
color or national origin.
Your placement officer can help you to learn
more about IBM. He can give you literature
describing the many career fields at IBM. He
will arrange an appointment for you with the
IBM representative. If you cannot attend an
interview, write or call the manager of the
nearest IBM office:
J. A. Rogers, Branch Manager
IBM Corporation,
1107 Myra Street
Jacksonville 4, Fla.
Phone: EL 5-3651

Page 11



S'dmAMAMjlv
University Clothes
W-

:
CTK^-
IBi-.^!
4Mj£v4#S jA-MK<-y>xl> AW..V \ s v
tWmmSmm H \ x
i-J|pw X

-dJwSSoAtA/ Uy AtuiMt clfitlAAfy

From our exclusive "Deansgate" natural shoulder
suits and sports clothing.. .to our vast stocks of
furnishings, outerwear, shoes and hats.. .you
will find every clothing item for the coming
chool year at Silverman's. v
AW
Our fine patterned and plain worsted and Dacron
worsted sui ts... from 55.00 (slightly higher with
vests).
A comfortable companion at a football game...
our natural shoulder sport coat, correctly
tailored for ease and comfort.. .from 29.95...
imported India Madras coats.. ,35.00

University Row shirts by Manhattan.. .button .buttondown
down .buttondown and tab collars.. .5.00
Zip-out pile lined raincoats.. .from 18.95
Fall sport shirts of denim, gingham, oxford, and
many other fabrics and patterns.. .from 5.00
Permanent crease worsted slacks.. .slim cut...
Ivy shades.. .from II .95... Dacron-cotton poplin
slacks.. .9.95
Wool, wool-blend and hi-bulk Orion sweaters
.. .from 9.95
Lakeland jackets,, ,Alligator rainwear
Puritan Banlon shirts... Bostonian genuine hand handsewn
sewn handsewn moccasins.
Free Parking on Ist Federal Bank Lot
Silvehnum'4.
In our 27th Year 225 W. Univ. Ave.

Sjk

Ask About Our
Special
UF Charge Plan

CAMPUS NEWS BRIEFS

Cape Safety Officer to Speak

Walter Weisman, communica communications
tions communications and rocket specialist and
right hand man to rocket expert
Wernher von Braun at Redstone
Arsenal, will speak here Monday.
Weisman is Human Communica Communication
tion Communication Adviser to the Civilian Per Personnel
sonnel Personnel Director of the U. S. Army
Missile Command at Redstone Ar Arsenal,
senal, Arsenal, Huntsville, Ala.
The widely known lecturer will
discuss Communications: Lead Leaderships
erships Leaderships Ultimate Test, at 8 p.
m., in the Medical Sciences Build Building
ing Building Auditorium.
The lecture, sponsored by the U

Forgot to Renew Your License?

Judge H. H. McDonald reported.
Licenses are renewed in McDon McDonald's
ald's McDonald's office in the Court House.
Under a system started last
year, drivers must renew their
licenses in the month of their
birth.

Data Systems Probed at Meet

National problems of recording
and reporting educational data
were discussed here at a three threeday
day threeday conference ending Friday.
Purpose of the three-day pro program
gram program was to devise and test sim simplified
plified simplified but adequate systems for
measuring and reporting finan financial
cial financial data, manpower, facilities and
research for colleges and univer universities.
sities. universities.

Sanitation Course Will Begin Tuesday

A second training course in
sanitation for Up Food Service
employes will begin Tuesday.
The six-week course includes
two one-hour sessions daily 9.
10 a. m. and from 2:30-3:30 p. m.

loveliness
lovelier"
RAME
HAIRSTYLIST
Introducing
Ginnie & Barbara
FREE HAIRCUT with
Shampoo & Set
..Reg. sls Perm. Wave-$lO
372-5549 319 W. Univ. Ave.
ample parking in rear

of F chapter of Alpha. Kappap.si
national professional business fra fraternity,
ternity, fraternity, will be open to the pub public.
lic. public.
A native of Germany, Weisman
first came t<> the United States in
3945 with a group of rocket spec specialists
ialists specialists led by Von Braun. Since
then he has held management
staff positions with the Ordnance
Missile Center and the Army Bal.
listic Missile Agency. He has de developed
veloped developed information programs re related
lated related to educational and manage management
ment management aspects* in missile and space
activities.

Students born in September will
get an extension of the drivers li license
cense license renewal deadline.
Because the last day of the
month falls on Saturday, no pen penally
ally penally will be charged drivers mak making
ing making renewals Monday, County

Attending the sessions were
representatives from two federal
agenciesthe National Institutes
of Health and the National Sci Science
ence Science Foundatiorh-and eight del delegates
egates delegates from universities includ including
ing including the UF, Arizona, Michigan
State, Pennsylvania, Renssler
Polytechnic Institute. St. Louis,
Texas A & M and Washington.

David Wolfe and James Nugent,
both connected with the Alachua
County Health Department, will
teach the course, which will be
held in the main cafeteria.

Court to Shoot
$5,000 Color Film
A new film explaining the role
of the Honor Court in UF life
will be produced this year for use
in orientation and high school
programs.
According to Honor Court offic officials,
ials, officials, the color film will be design designed
ed designed to hold students* attention more
than the routine lectures of past
years.
hope to finance the
$5,000 film by finding an insur insurance
ance insurance company or other corpora corporation
tion corporation which would like to use the
film for advertising.
Current plans call for the film
to be produced on campus with
student actors, but a professional
company may be used if the cost
isnt prohibitive.



Lashbrook Begins
New Debate System

By MARY ANNE WALKER
.Gator Staff Writer
A new debate program design designed
ed designed to include more students will
be instituted this year, according
to debate coach Brad Lashbrook.
The UofF has an outstanding
reputation nationally as far as de debate
bate debate is concerned,'' Lashbrook
said.
But in the past the program of
the debate squad has been sever-"
ely criticized for the small num number
ber number of students who participated."
The Legislative Council has cut
the funds allocated to debate due
to lack of support.
NEW PROCEDURES will be
inaugurated to build participation.
Activities will be provided for both
participants in debate.
For the first time this year it
will be possible to participate in
the forensic program on both a
full time and a parttime basis.
Participation will be limited to
only members of the debate soc society.
iety. society.

i
Debators Vie For Top Spots

First in a series of varsity de debates
bates debates to determine debaters Who
will go to the upcoming William
and Mary College Tournament
will be Tuesday night at 7:30 in
331 Tigert.
The affirmative side of the ques question
tion question will be upheld by Steve

3SS3 -1 LARRYS
/ 14 block off campus
tIWM> 1% 0,E 24 BOUK A
s' Top FASTEST SERVICE IN TOWN,
/J|3. \ NO MORE LONG WAITS
J
- EXTRA. SERVICE:
33 7s PERSONAL CHECK CASHED
tfJT// U& ) WITHOUT CHARGE
JiU-HfHm /1/[| rn _N Second cup of coffee or
MRY& y ,ass f ,c tea free
-sg^ J-tv 1225 W. University Ave.

Debate," Lashbrook said, is
an outlet for effective communi communication,
cation, communication, a place where skill can be
demonstrated, a vehicle tor Uni.
versity prestige and a training
ground for other areas."
A TENTATIVE SCHEDULE of
debate tournaments to be attend attended
ed attended this year includes meets with
Texas Christian University, Uni.
versity of South Carolina, Har Harvard,
vard, Harvard, Northwestern University,
William and Mary, University of
Pittsburgh, University of Kan Kansas
sas Kansas and the University of 'Mi 'Miami,
ami, 'Miami, The UF also sponsors a jun junior
ior junior college tournament.
The debate topic for this year
is "Resolved; That the non-Com non-Communist
munist non-Communist nations of the world should
form an economic community."
A new UF faculty member,
Lashbrook is at present working
on his Ph. D. through Michigan
State University. He received his
B. S. and M. A. Degrees frem the
University of Kansas, where he
was an undergraduate debater.

Katz and Rick Schuster. The neg negative
ative negative position will be supported
by John DeVault and Bill McCor McCormick.
mick. McCormick.
This year's national topic is
Resolved: That the non-Commu non-Communist
nist non-Communist nations of the world should
form an economic community."

Sunday, September 30, 1962 The Florida Alligator

Shotgun Killer
of Coed Gets Life

STARKE A 26-year-old UF graduate was found
guilty Thursday of first degree murder and given a life
sentence by the Bradford County Circuit Court for the
shdtgun slaying of a UF coed here last April 15.

Thomas Gill had pleaded in innocent
nocent innocent by reason of insanity to
the murder of Sandra Hopkins,
17, a freshman who was killed by
two blasts from a shotgun as she
talked with the accused in the
front yard of her mothers home.
The accused, a Jacksonville in insurance
surance insurance company employe, testifi testified
ed testified before Judge John A. Murph Murphree
ree Murphree Wednesday he did not remem remember
ber remember shooting the girl, although he
did reeall her mother shouting
at him.
IN CLOSING AUG IM K NTS,
Assistant State Atty. Mark Futch
told the jury there was no jus justifiable
tifiable justifiable case for mercy and Gill
should be convicted of first de degree
gree degree muder.
Defense Atty. S. L. Scruggs of
Gainesville said Gill was driven
to distraction by his unrequit unrequited
ed unrequited love for the teen-ager.
DEAN BREAKS' FOOT
Mrs. Ann Whittaker, adminis administrative
trative administrative assistant to Dean of Wo Women
men Women Mama V. Brady, is now na navigating
vigating navigating on crutches after walk walking
ing walking around on a broken foot for
two weeks.
Mrs. Whittaker, well known to
those who seek aid or informa information
tion information in the Deans office, says that
her doctor has called the injury
a marching fracture the typo
of break football players often get.

Talent needed Here
A rising demand for talent by
various social organizations on and
off campus has resulted in the
Office of Secretary of Labor stag staging
ing staging a Talent Round-up.
AH entertainment on campus
wishing to be listed in the Labor
Office are requested Ext. 25t7 or 2518 at the Florida
Union between 3 pm. Monday
through Friday.
Any organization needing enter entertainment
tainment entertainment should contact the off office
ice office of the Secretary of Labor.

ANSWER TO PUZZLE
liib h |i ij l In
A k> k. aJBr a wW A i
jl j_a rHit r All Ail
T* L kMc £ & l C
eTJa d
A A A JL jEJHHEi _p A. £ X_
_R A y E NA M £_ S_
F g o p E£.£ A s e
r E l p
she g|R T~ E s|Bm APS
e_a y elb a-r AA TL
_r _£ A iJHA A lijE A A i_

Page 13



Page 14

The Florida Alligator Sunday, September 30, 1962

Killer Epidemic Runs Its Course

JACKSONVILLE (UPI) The
encephalitis epidemic, which
caused 20 deaths In Florida dur.
ins the summer and brought tour tourism
ism tourism almost to a standstill in the
Tampa Bay area, has ended.
. w L Wright, acting state
health officer, has notified health

Oaverubeck
I'm in I Dancing Mood
Ray Gonniff
The Way You Look Tonight | Kg
Miles Davis iBMBHBWi
If I Wert i Bell
Duke Ellington H^Hlr
Pe,d < d ,y| AN!jgjj^
Paradiddle Joe gy
Roy Hamilton
Gerry Mulligan
W h *t Is 11'ce To 5.1/ ET ':;:
Everything's Coming Up Roses
Lambert,
cioudturu MWygi||| BE
Buddy Greco
The Ldy Is a Tramp Mil | H

Great new record offer (*3.98 value). .just *1 oo
when you buy Sheaffers back-to-school spedaP

the packaee thema w.. J rwnere Wn the back of
onty^hiif

officials across th e state by let letter^
ter^, letter^ telegrafn ' ,the current en encephalitis
cephalitis encephalitis outbreak is passed. ,
occasional suspect cases still ap appearing.
pearing. appearing. .intensive control oper operations
ations operations continuing.,. .restriction of
travel to area no longer consider considered
ed considered indicated.*

2
TJ

Political Group Picks Orlandoan

Robert Spence has been elect elected
ed elected president of the UF Political
Assembly.
The assembly, dormant for
the past two years, was formerly
the. Florida Citizenship Clearing
House. A' non-partisan organiza organization,
tion, organization, its purpose is to promote
better politics.

STAFFER'S BACK-TO-SCHOOL SPECIAL
N Z C rtrid *"" *> worth olcrtr^p* E
*3.93 VALUE FOR *£9s
Sheafferq

Spence was president of the Or.
lando Junior College Political Un Union
ion Union during the 1961*62 school year
He attended file legbl a uvfo£
server program serving la the at.
torney generals office for a week
While at the conference he work*
ed with other .students toward
preatmg a state constitution for
all college political organizations.



Sororities Select New Pledges

Thirteen ITF sororities have an announced
nounced announced their new pledges. The
22? pledges are listed below by
nf filiation.
According to Panhellenic rush
rules, each house may have 65
sisters and pledges. But during
formal rush an arbitrary number
is set by the Panhellenic Council
allowing each sorority to pledge
as many as they wish tup to that
number) even if they do exceed
the membership quota of 65 girls.
Following formal rush only those
sororities who have not filled their
membership quota can rush in informally.
formally. informally. Informal rush has no
arbitrary quota. In informal rush,
a sorority may. rush until it has
filled its rolls with 65 members.
APOPKA --- Delta Gamma
Tina T. Tinsley.
BOCA RATON Alpha Omi Omicron
cron Omicron Pi Kathleen Egan.
BOYNTON BEACH Zeta Tau
Alpha Betty Sikes.
BRADENTON Alpha Chi
Omega Sally Truitt; Delta
Gamma Julia Payne; Sigvna
Kappa Sandra Littleton.
CLEARWATER Alpha Chi
Omega Eleanor Stucky; Delta
Gamma Carole Lee Ralston;
Kappa Delta Betty Jean Was Waschak,
chak, Waschak, Sharon Kay Bleakly.
COCOA Chi Omega Barbara
Hill; Kappa Alpha Theta Jean Jeanne
ne Jeanne Howard.
CORAL GABLES-Alpha Delta
Pi Carolyn Wilkes; Alpha Ep Epsilon
silon Epsilon Phi Phyllis Brenner; Kap Kappa
pa Kappa Delta Rebecca Jones, Nan
cy Ninrmo.
CECIL FIELD Kappa Alpha
Theta Carol Hahn.
CRESCENT CITY Kappa Ah
pha Theta Sue Miller.
DAYTONA BEACH Alpha
Delta Pi Virenda Rouse; Delta
Phi Epsilon Sandra Madorsky;
Kappa Alpha Theta Rebecca
Reed.
DUNEDIN Alpha Delta Pi
Kristy Ann Jones.
EAU GALLIE Phi Mu Sha Sharon
ron Sharon Dorn Galloway.
EGLIN AIR FORCE BASE
Ka-ppa Delta Susan Saunders.
FORT LAUDERDALE Alpha
Chi OmegaMerlene R. Sweet;
Alpha Delta Pi Linda Sumwall;
Alpha Omicron Pi Carolyn
Long; Chi Omega Bernadette
Castro; Delta Delta Delta Rita
Mae Brown;
Delta Gamma Betty Jean Me-
Naull, Judith Elms; Kappa Alpha
Theta Patricia Delvin, Jane
Harris; Phi Mu Marian Fow Fowler;
ler; Fowler; Zeta Tau Alpha Judith Ann
Powell, Statia Ann Smith, Edythe
Mary Morris.
FORT MYERS Delta Gamma
--Helen Starnes.
FORT PIERCE Chi Omega
Mary Ann Bruner. Linda Janse;
Phi Mu Ann Cali.

FORT *WALTON -- Chi Omega
*"' Mary Anne Beall; Kappa Al Alpha
pha Alpha Theta Loueen Dee Hender Henderson;
son; Henderson; Zeta Tau Alpha Katherine
Nancy Ward*
GAINESVILLE Alpha Delta
Pi Anna Adkins, Frances An Anderson,
derson, Anderson, Mary Ruth Hazen; Alpha
Epsilon Phi Barbara Ann Buns;
Alpha Omicron Pi Bonnie Jane
Fairbanks; Chi Omega -- Judith
Margaret Brill, Mary Gracv, Bar Barbara
bara Barbara Robin Graham, Elizabeth
Anne Pound; Delta Delta Delta
Jeanne Grand; Kappa Alpha The Theta
ta Theta -- Mary Creighton; Phi Mu --
Josephine Johnson; Sigma Kappa
Carol Kromer, Judith Pofahl;
Zeta Tau Alpha Ann Pierson.
GRACEVILLE Alpha Delta Pi
* Suzanne Mcae.
HOLLYWOOD Delta Phi Ep Epsilon
silon Epsilon Vicki Nathanson, Barbara
Ramo; Zeta Tail Alpha -- Joyce
Feeney.
HOLMES BEACH Sigma Kap Kappa
pa Kappa Sue Krone.
HOMESTEAD Kappa Delta
Cheryl Robinson.
INDIAN ROCKS BEACH Del Delta
ta Delta Gamma Gail Rice.
IRVINE Chi Omega Mar Martha
tha Martha Edwards.

**

SLUSH Our slush shake is the coldest thickest shake

in town and it has a super flavor.

CORN CABIN
opposite Mary Tuner Gift Shop
102 N.W. 13th. Street 376-1552
All varieties of popcorn in pack or bulk
FREE Introductory Offer
A Ball Point Pen with Each Order Served

* Sunday, September 30, 1962 The Florida Al I igator

JACKSONVILLE Alphi Chi
Omega. Cynthia Tunstall
Alpha Delta Pi Mary Elmore,
riazel Thebaut; Alpha Epsilon Phi
Donna Hackel, Cynthia Still Stillman;
man; Stillman; Alpha Omicron Pi Carol
Boal, Barbara Coffron, Mary Lou
Cox, Suzanne Crane, Ellen Louise
Hester; Chi Omega Jennifer
Brown, Alice Gla.se, Dixie Hard Hardman;
man; Hardman; Delta Delta Delta Arlene
Hildeibrandt, Mary Ellen The Thebaut;
baut; Thebaut; Delta Gamma Gwen
Laney, Catherine Mahon; Kappa
Alpha Theta Patty Tabita;
Zeta Tau Alpha Brenda Bra li linen.
nen. linen.
LAKE CITY Alpha Omicron
Pi Janice Sizemore.
LAKELAND Alpha. Delta Pi
Marian Rich.
LANTANA Zeta Tau Alpha
Marsha Wolventon.
LARGO Alpha Clii Omega
Jean Salisbury; Sigma Kappa --
Rina Celeste Blome.
LEESBURG Delta Delta Del Delta
ta Delta Mary Larsen; Kappa Alpha
Theta Jo Ann Fetchtel.
Me DILL AIR FORCE BASE
Alpha Omicrom l\i Sharon
Thompson.

NEW
FOUNTAIN and
SANDWICH BAR
We now serve creamy thick shakes >
ice cream sandwiches Mexiburgers

MAITLAND Alpha Omicron
Pi ~~ Judith E. Garren.
MARIANNA Delta Phi Epsi Epsilon
lon Epsilon Lynn Wolly.
MIAMI Alpha Chi Omega-
Patsy Richey; Alpha Delta Pi
Evelyn Kehoe; Alpha Epsilon Phi
- Mary Kratze, Susan Rabin, Sa Sara
ra Sara Ronny Robinson, Cecc StolL
mack, Nicki Sussman; Alpha Cmni Cmnicron
cron Cmnicron Pi Mary Ponce, Katherine
Pratt; Chi Omega Susan Mo-
Nayr; Delta Delhi Delta Mary
Beth McEnery; Delta Gamma
Mary Jo Malice, Pamela Mat Mathews,
hews, Mathews, Elizabeth Ann Morrison;
Delta Phi Epsilon Linda Lee
Boral, Gloria Elrod, Gail Ostrie;
Zeta Tau Alpha Johanna Car Carolyn
olyn Carolyn Hilldring, Marietta Jane
Smith.
Meeting
Alumni and members of Pi Be Beta
ta Beta Phi sorority are slated to have
a meeting Wednesday at the re residence
sidence residence of Mrs. Walter Muphee,
1010 NE sth Te.

Page 15



Page 16

The Florida Alligator Sunday, September 30, 1962

Sex On Campus The Real Issue

.By MARGARET MEAI)
One of the worlds most wide widely
ly widely respeeted anthropologists, Dr.
Mead lectures extensively at col colleges
leges colleges and universities through throughout
out throughout the United States. In the
following column she discusses
what she feels to be the real
issue behind 4 widespread con controversy
troversy controversy ignited by President
Sarah Blandings remarks to the
students of Vassar College last
April.
THE EDITORS

COUPON SPECIAL
Your Gipcious Host Sunday with this coupon
Present
M :3C p m. to 8 :05 p.m.)
T-BONE STEAK xS|C
And Gulden Dowi French Fries
-r**-
Complete Luncheon Special
' >3 11:30-2:30
&. turkey pan pie
Green Peas mO.
Whipped Potatoes
Hot Roll & Butter
w&£mf* Hot Coffee or
-f\J .Iced Tea COMPLETE
\ Efo ALWAYS FREE!!
Seconds on Coffee or Ice Tea
COUPON SPECIAL
MONDAY EVENING 4:30 pm 8:05 pm
LARGE
CHOPPED SIRLOIN STEAK '/ 2 lb
FRENCH FRIES HnC
TOSSED SALAD W T
hot tTT""
APPLE Qr
COBBLER
CHILD'S PLATE: a quarter pound of S.dis- AQC Lunch
- bury Steak, string beans, mashed potatoes Hours:
- 11:30a!m.
M
* - 8.05 pm.
CAFETERIA
1212 N. Main St.
GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER
Open Daily And Sundcy

On April 4,1962, President Sarah
Blanding of Vassar College made
a speech to the assembled students
in response to a request from the
student government that she clar clarify
ify clarify a sentence in the college cat catalogue
alogue: catalogue 1 The college expects
every student to uphold the high highest
est highest standards.
As has since been reported,
Miss Blinding told the students
in her speech that premarital sex sexual
ual sexual relations and excessive drink drinking

ing drinking are indecent and immoral; she
also said that any student who
could not live up to the college
standards had better withdraw
voluntarily.
H*er statment, exactly what
might be expected from any col college
lege college president, especially the pres president
ident president of a womens college, stirred
up an immediate commotion on
and off the campus'. Polls w r ere
taken on the campusVassar stu students
dents students were almost equally divided
in their approval and disapproval
of Miss Blandings speech.
Heated articles appeared in col college
lege college newspapers and later in the
nations press. Through all the dis discussion,
cussion, discussion, however, one thing is
clear: Most people have missed
the point.
TIIE ISSUE is not whether a
college president or anyone else
in a posittion of authority any anywhere
where anywhere in the country should come
out in favor of or against premar premarital
ital premarital sex relations.
Nor is the issue, whether a per persons
sons persons private life, if it is kept
private, is the concern of society
a college society or a larger
societyeven though this second
issue is, indeed, one on which
there is deep .disagreement in the
United States and one on which
Miss Blandings speech touched off
a lively debate.
I ISE LIE A E that the real point,
the central issue about premarital
sex relations, is the risk of pro producing
ducing producing illegitimate children
children W'ho from the start are
denied the protection every human
society has found it necessary to
give.
And if girls are not to become
the mother of illegitimate chil children,
dren, children, or brides of hasty and pre premature
mature premature marriages, thev them themselves
selves themselves need ito be protected
against their immaturity their
own impulses, their curiosity.
TWENTY-FIVE YEARS ago
a simple sanction was used by
American colleges. Any gi r l who
stayed out under circumstances
in which she might be suspected
of having had premarital sex re relations
lations relations was removed from the col college
lege college sometimes gently, some sometimes
times sometimes harshly. Punishment for any anyone
one anyone who was caught was sure and
certain.
ON THE WHOLE, only the girl
who did not value staying in col college
lege college indulged in conspicious be behavior
havior behavior that without question would
get her thrown out. College ad administrators
ministrators administrators felt it was their duty
to protect the daughters of the
parents who trusted them.
They not only protecting
the reputations of their institutions
which W'ere dependent for their
funds on wealthy alumnae, church
boards, boards of trustees and
state legislatures; they were also
Pr' >ding an atmosphere in which
young girls would be safe and
the most inexperienced students

Advance Reprint by Permission fi;om October REDBOOK

carefully looked after.
.At that time a married college
girl was not allowed to live in
a dormitory, for she might pro provide
vide provide a "contaminating' atmos atmosphere
phere atmosphere for the other girls.

THEN SOMETHING happened.
The mores of the country, for
a variety of reasons, began to
change. Rigid attitudes toward be behavior
havior behavior had slackened. Chaperon Chaperonage
age Chaperonage and .protection for girls
against hoysand for boys against
girlsvanished wOth the student
automobile. In fact, in the climate
of opinion that began to prevail
in the United no college
could offer 'the old-fashioned type
cf chaperonage an which the
chaperon acted almost as a par parent.
ent. parent.
Increasingly the college made
rules to protect itself rather than
to protect its students. Rules and
chaperons were intended to pro provide
vide provide the school with effective pro protection
tection protection from criticism, not to effec effectively
tively effectively prevent either drinking or
promiscuity. Gradually colleges
settled down to a simple demand
that students behave on campus
and in college-identified situations';
otherwise they gave up.
Students who wanted to stay in
college recognized that the college
was making a reasonable demand
on.them, and they usually were
discreet. Fdagralnt indiscretions
and premarital pregnancy, which
in the last analysis is what must
be prevented, were punished by
expulsion. That was all.
BUT THEN a new era began
and a further compromise was
made. Occasionally a girl who had
had some unfortunate misadven misadventure
ture misadventure was permitted to return qui quietly
etly quietly to college.
Many of the moral guardians
felt, quite understandably, that
they should not punish young peo people
ple people whom they had failed to pro protect.
tect. protect.
Meanwhile the whole country
was experiencing a new moral
alignment, one which is not un unfamiliar
familiar unfamiliar in peasant communities
in Europe but which is relatively
new to the American middle class,
fioni which college students come
or into which they are moving.
In this new morality the idea is
accepted, without explicit state statement,
ment, statement, that premarital sex is all
right provided that it ends in mar marliage.
liage. marliage. This is related to the in inti
ti inti easing acceptance of early mar*
liage subsidized by parents.
B\ ACCEPTING this new mor morality
ality morality that early .marriage is
desirable and premarital sex is
not undesirable if it leads to mar marriage
riage marriage parents, teachers, guid guidance
ance guidance authorities, preachers, have
abdicated their responsibility to
young people.
Instead of encouraging them to
realize the opportunity to remain
single and abstinent and respon respon>Sl
>Sl respon>Sl e during their developing stu stucen
cen stucen years and giving them a

rationale for doing
only -speeding their
early irrespeu^j
triggered in'. an
ber of cases by pn
nancy.
The college haa j
place where girls a
from pregnancy to j
pregnancyif it end
is not penalized bi
warded.
The. college, in est
girl to get her mai
country, in numei
where I have talked talkedofficials,
officials, talkedofficials, the prevail
"If they get marri
right.
MOVING AWAY
£>
lier ethic, which re<
havior that might
birth of another hill
governed by the mos
mand for respond
slipped into a positio
the idea that the a
thing in the world i
people, boys and g
Premarital sex a
conception, as a i
end, have becomes!
parents, colleges
selves behind eat
however such a i
affect young peof
and spiritual future
THE ATTITIUfI
colleges toward set
have put a sociali
hands of the young
and a boy whowai
have, today, an*
back of their min
gets pregnant, W
ried with eus*
In many high seto
for granted P
young couples
denly are
are dealing.**
pregnant girl
couple, ofectively ofectivelysociety
society ofectivelysociety that has
accepted .sex
marriage.
MISS
uproar by
which is honcP
the belief
the ,aviodanee relations, no
sible and disPj
The resulting
tions of I )ublic .ji
ity, but it
Should our so*
means of
into marriage
ible, a>r should* 1
people what P
20th century,
them, and heP
lish a sense



they are
iron into
narria'ge,
ng num numdal
dal numdal preg pregl
l pregl from a
]
ce where
carriage
ther, re relclps
lclps relclps the
ross the
colleger
guidance
titude is
t is all
the ear*
l that be*
t in the
being be
ngent .de*
we have
accepting
important
jet young
married,
remarital
s to this
able. Like
s ranged
marriage,
age may
personal
irenls and
marriage
n into the
)le. A girl
d married
ght at the
E the girl
get mar*
! blessing,
ris taken
ny of the
itry sud*
What we
is not a
pregnant
mailing a
eluetantly
even in
evoked an
an ethic
'"O' alone
y requires
artial .sex
u rt.-spou rt.-spouri'ied
ri'ied rt.-spouri'ied out.
lis ed ques quesde
de quesde moral*
eal issue:
s x as a
I S' people
,.as_ poss possde
de possde young
11 in the
in,iing of
. to estah estahibilitv
ibilitv estahibilitv
V

Pushing hubby through school
is the mutual bond of the Univer University
sity University Dames, organization of stu student
dent student wives, according to Presi President
dent President Mrs. Aubrey C. Daniels.
A wedding ring pierced by an
arrow representing devotion and
friendship is our pin, says
Mrs. Daniels. The emblem re reflects
flects reflects the dual purpose of helping
husbands earn degrees and pro promoting
moting promoting social fellovyship among
student wives, she added.
All student wives are eligible
to join the University Dames. At
present the UF Chapter, affiliat affiliated
ed affiliated with the National Association
of University Dames, has about
430 members.
Although sponsored by the Uni University
versity University Womens Club since the
Dames origin in 1948, the activi activities
ties activities of the University Dames are
separate.
UNIVERSITY DAMES Co n*
sists of 14 distinct college units un under
der under a general framework and
members belong to the curricul curriculum
um curriculum area in which their husbands
are enrolled. The Engineering and
Law School units have the larg largest
est largest memberships.
The 14 college units have their
own officers and each sends a re representative
presentative representative to the executive
board to coordinate activities of
the various units.
THE MRS. UNIVERSITY
of Florida contest, set for Oct.
12, is the most publicized func function
tion function of the Dames. Any fratc/-
nity, sorority, or other organiza organization
tion organization may sponsor an entry.
Naturally we hope Mrs. U. of
F. will be a University Dame but
this is not a prerequisite, Mrs.
Daniels said. Mrs. U.. of F. will
be presented at Gator Growl dur during
ing during homecoming festivities and
will represent the university at
many official' occasions.
Other projects scheduled f r
the Dames include Thanksgiv Thanksgiving
ing Thanksgiving and Christmas -baskets for
needy families, an open house and
dance in February, a March fash fashion
ion fashion show, an Easter egg and

Dames 'Pushing
Hubby Through

aPh T. banquet where wives re receive
ceive receive pushing hubby through
degrees.
Engineering Dames
Sell Candy
The Engineering Dames will
hold a candy sale near Room 300
in the Engineering Building Mon Monday
day Monday through Wednesday from 0
a. m. to 3 p. m.
According to project chairman
Mrs. Linda Slippy, proceeds
from the sale will go to support
the Engineering Dames projects
throughout the trimester.
Orange Bowl
Looks for Queen
MIAMI Deadline for entries
in the contest to choose an Orange
Bowl Queen is midnight, Oct. 23.
To be eligible, a girl must be
a resident of Florida, 18 through
24 years of age. have never been
married and must not be a pro professional
fessional professional entertainer.
Judging to choose 25 semi-fin semi-finalists
alists semi-finalists from pictures submitted by
candidates is scheduled for Oct.
2i. Those selected will be invited
to appear in person Nov. 3 when
the queen and her court of four
pricesses will be chosen.
Prospective queens'should send
in three black and white photos photosa
a photosa full-face portrait, one in street
or evening clothes and one in
s wim suit or shorts. They should
be addressed to Orange Bowl
Queen Contest, Orange BoWl Com Committee,
mittee, Committee, P.O. Box 35-748, Miami.
Along with the pictures, entries
should have the contestants name,
age, weight, height, color of hair
and eyes, measurements, schools
attended, hobbies, school activities*
ambitions, previous contests vron
and address of parents.

Sunday, September 30, 1962 The Florida Alligator

OPEN DAILY M 9jL*
9:30 AM # MjkA fir
fJM / OPEN UNTIL
(ft/ 9 PM MONDAY,
THURSDAY & FRIDAY NIGHTS
WE CANT MENTION THE FAMOUS
MAKERS NAME
But This Is the Nations Top Quality
Sportswear And Its Exclusively Yours,
at WILSONS
MENS I 1
S-M-L&XL jl \y t #
WOOL OR ORLON jd \ \ J f
Sl wool f V r |
PULLOVER f.'fX' fl
SWEATERS (3^^
USUALLY 10.95 13.95
ANNIVERSARY SALE 7.99,
fiPk mens
Qj* FALL &. WINTER
II \ \ JACKETS
/ | 'y y orlon lined
M i for W '^
I little weight
sizes 36 to 44
USUALLY 22.95 25.95
ANNIVERSARY SALE 17.99
MEN'S SHOP STREET FLOOR

Page 17



Page 18

The Florida Alligator Sunday, September 30, 1962

Formal Panhellenic Rush Quotas Unfilled

Less than a third of the coeds
who went out for fall formal rush
pledged a sorority.
Approximately 700 girls signed
up for rush this trimester. Os those
700 only 227 completed rush hy
pledging a sorority.
In previous years the average
sign up rate for fall rush has been
around 900 coeds. The drop-out

"I Had to Take the Phone
Off the Hook!
8-5 weekdays. (7-2 t-c).
MALE STUDENT waiter, part
to 10:30. Must %v
5 Attractive cirl wanted ak
M hostess for Kirkpatrick $ Piei-\ to
son, builders. $3.00 per hour 1
THIS CLASSIFIED AD IN THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
*
* 1
PRODUCED OVER 20 PHONE CALLS IN TWO HOURS
.... -; :i ' ~ ~
, h
And they kept coming for two days! The advertiser, unable to do anything but
answer the phone, finally had to notify the phone company he was leaving the
receiver off the hook.
Just one example of Alligator classified readership.
i : : ~
V*-
To Place Your Result-Producing Ad
in the Florida Alligator, Call
FR 6-3261 Ext. 2832

rate for rushees was also greater
this year.
Linda Hurd, Panhellenic Council
representative, suggests four ex explanations
planations explanations for the lessened inter interest
est interest in sororities this year:
1) Raising of the standard for
college entrance examinations has
kept out a lot of those girls who

would like to have come strictly
for the social life.
2. ) Enrollment of a greater num.
ber of junior college graduates
who are reluctant to pledge in
their junior year of college.
3. Advent of the tri-mester
system worrying students about
increased work as far as studies
are concerned.

4.) Smaller freshman class with
drop out percentage as in the past.
Along with these four reasons
are listed enumerable other rea reasons
sons reasons girls drop out of fall rush*
financial aspects, desire to make
their grades first, parental deci decisions,
sions, decisions, pre-conceived ideas about
one sorority and anti-sorority id ideas.
eas. ideas.

Rush Statistics
Two sororities completely filled
their fall formal rush pledging
quota.
Alpha Delta Pi and Chi Omega
each pledged 24 coeds.
Kappa Alpha Theta, rushing in
a house of their own for the first
time, pledged 21 girls.
Delta Delta Delta, Delta Gam Gamma
ma Gamma and Delta Phi Epsilon each
took in 20 girls.
Alpha Epsilon Phi pledged 18.
. There were 16 new pledges for
Alpha Chi Omega. Kappa Delta
and Zeta Tau Alpha pledged 14
each.
Sigma Kappa pledged 12 and
Phi Mu took in 9 new girls.
The Chase

Three girls, clad only in pa pajamas,
jamas, pajamas, trench coats, shoWer shoes
and ruffled curler caps, stood
long after curfew hour Monday
night watching the Law Library
fire.
A fireman turned the head headlights
lights headlights of his truck on them. The
trying to escape the glare
of the lights, started to run.
'lhe truck followed them down
the sidewalk and around the cor corner.
ner. corner.
In panic, they hopped into a
hedge of bushes.
The chase ended there.



'Sweets to the Sweet' Via Grounds Men

When UF says it with flowers,' Plants and Grounds
plays florist.
And local florists along with some UF officials have
questioned the use of Grounds funds for growing flowers.
The primary objection is that it seems to be costing
ihe UF more money in the long run.
-Grounds Department Superintendent, Noel Lake said.

Jp/XvAvX:;' :£$SS&.<: :
. >.v. < WBgW^wwqQMM^*^^MMMflQCHppgaWM^
* f'-y
*

Fluffy Pooch Ascends
From Rags to Riches
Fluffie has never been late to class.
In-addition, she probably holds the record for attend attending
ing attending the greatest number of psychology lectures.
Fluffie has been the almost constant companion ot Dr.
Dorothy Rethlingshafer, psychology professor, for nine
years. She was homeless and faced with extermination
when she was rescued by Dr. Rethlingshafer.
Who is this mysterious miss who dotes on psychoanaly psychoanalysis?
sis? psychoanalysis?
Fluffie is a dog.
SHE WAS RESCUED BY DR. RETHLINGSHAFER
from the Gainesville Humane Society. She has no pedigree,
is probably of Spitz descent, and, as her name indicates, is
white and fluffy. ...
Following her master around campus, Huffie know
the labyrinth of Florida passageways better than most
freshmen. ~ ..
She tags along everywhere, and even waits pa tie y
outside the cafeteria until her master finishes lunch
brings doggie delicacies.' wrapped in a napkin to t mine.
This then is a success story.
This pampered psychological pooch now eats
steak and enjoys many of lifes luxuries.

Sunday, September 30, 1962 The Florida Alligator

This issue keeps coming up
because of some undeveloped
landscaping on campus, and loc*
al florists feel they can sell UF
flowers cheaper than we can
grow them. It is true that our
budget isnt large enough to cov cover
er cover 100 per cent of the cost of main maintenance
tenance maintenance and landscaping, but we
can still grow flowers at an
enormous saving, he added.
IN A RECENT campaign
study it was found the UF grows
the flora at a cost of approxima approximately
tely approximately $4,444. The purchase cost of
a similar amount of flowers from
florists would run approximately
sll,lll. Thus a savings of $6,-
667.
The nurserys efficiency today
has risen even since the survey,
Lake said.

lamnnnnnnnnnnnrff^^
i a. sportira \
i PROPOSITION i
I I I
I I In many fields of business today, it is con-
Isidered cricket for a gentleman to wear sport
jackets. If you enjoy this privilege, a wise %
selection is shown here, at a price which
will prove a canny investment. r
from $35 %
1 lA Aral j
jo 13 West University Avenue
I idLiUULOJLIULfIJ>JULftJLiLB-
With the aid of better ma machinery,
chinery, machinery, new chemicals, some
flowers being supplied by the
horticulture experiment station
and development of an economi economical
cal economical steamer to treat soils, savings
and production are greater, he
said.
The Presidents office, Mrs. J.
Wayne Reitz, wife of the UF
President, and the UF Womens
Club have first priority in'flower
distribution. Second on the list
are deans, department head?, less lesser
er lesser officials and all campus func functions
tions functions for the purpose of official
entertainment.
No student organizations such
as fraternities or sororities Receive
their flowers from plants and
grounds.
The nursery is situated just
north of the sewage plant.

Page 19



The Florida Alligator Sunday, September 30, 1962

Page 20

Threesome
Sings Along
Beneath the facade of a book bookkeeper
keeper bookkeeper beats the heart and soul
of a singer.
Mig Toole, bookkeeper for the
Florida Union, has been singing
on campus sinnce 195 k, when she
joined the Choral Union.
Mig (short for Margaret) is the
guiding force for the "Cool
Tooles" a singing group composed
of her daughters: Pat. 17 and Pam,
13 and Mig.
"We always used to go around
the house singing like crazy."
said Mig. "About two years ago
vve were asked to do something
for a church party and we cooked
up a few songs."
Since this beginning, the "Cool
Tooles" and their accompanist.
Manny Diogo, have appeared at
several campus fum-thm.s.
Both Pat and Pam sing in
Choral Union and Mig sings in
the .University Choir. "Pam is
now definitely interested in sing singing
ing singing as a career," Mig says, "al "although
though "although Pat is interested in
dancing and Is a Gainesville High
School majorette this year.

Important! Do NOT handle with care...
WOOL-KODEL*
Sweaters by
J In 1
Machine-wash, machine-dry our 65% wool 35%
Kodel* sweaters by Brentwood. These handsome
and hardy sweaters will last a long time . and
will always keep their shape. Brentwood guar guarantees
antees guarantees it naturally and permanently washable.
Needs no blocking, no stretching, no special care.
Buy yours now . choose from styles and colors
as new and fresh as Spring. from $8.95

Smith's
MEN'S SHOP

\ 3wBhhHBSH jft

1117 W. University Avc.

the cool tooles

M 0000(
lOld Bistros Ncoer Die I
They Just Close Early j
§ NEW ORLEANS (UPI) A self-imposed midnight §
g curfew has turned surprised and disgruntled eus- f|
§ tomers outdoors along Bourbon Street is expected to con- 0
3 tinue as strip club owners fight a district attorneys office §
g anti-vice drive. 0
§ Fifteen Bourbon Street clubs shut down at midnight §
3 recently. Customers were put out hours ahead of the usual §
g 4 a.m. closing time. ~ ft
|| Yes, were closing as of midnight, said one club own- 3
g er, and were going to shut down at 12 every night until §
§ the district attorney takes the heat off us. §
§ No one could make us call the dogs off, Assistant 8
H Dist. Atty. Frank J. Klein answered. §
8 The early closure of the strip clubs did not affect fl
g Bourbon Street restaurants, bars and jazz clubs. The |§
§ move was the latest maneuver between the operators and 0
H new Dist. Atty. James Garrison. §
o GARRISON \ OWED he would clean up vice in the g
H French quarter. He began a systematic enforcement of §§
S largely ignored laws prohibiting B-drinking, prostitution §
g and allied activities. §
£: Bourban Street is a national net for the criminal ele- H
cf ment, Klein said. Ig
g These places cannot exist without B-drinking and that ts
5 is against the law. We will continue to enforce the law, if :§
g: it means these places will be closed permanently and for-
S ever, he added.

Tower Has
Own Story
There are no low flying plane.'
in the Campus Club, according
to latest reports.
Rumours purporting that therr
are voices shouting Pilot-to-Tow
er, Pilot-to-tower, are stricth
jokes pulled by overzealous stu
dents,
This latest rash of aero-jargon
comes because of a formerly un unidentified
identified unidentified glassed-in tower situated
behind the Campus Club count
ers.
According to Cafeteria Manager
William W. Hicks, The tower is
a communications center, with
intercoms linking the five serving
lines, the kitchen and the dish dishwashing
washing dishwashing room in the basement.
From the tower Hicks can see
the flow of customer traffic and
keep the serving lines supplied
with proper amounts of food, trays
and clean utensils.
Because of the rush of students
at lunchtime, Hicks is usually in
the tower from 11 to 1:30 trying
to coordinate customer flow and
the food line shortages.



[pose: After the Curtain Falls

Theatergoer

(Him Jerit is a member of the
|Htre staff aJKI is the techni-
I director of Florida Play*
rrit is well known for his
fHonious set designs notably
H Oedipus Rex and Death
a Salesman.*
any of the techniques Jer.
|Hias used at UF have been
ognized nationally and some
Higii ideas have been patent-
Hby him.
Blso Jerit directed bust years
Hmnedia Del Arte production
Hied The Roves of Harle-
Hn."

By RON JERIT
H Speech Instructor
The provocative nature of all four plays scheduled by
>rida Players for this theatre season, coupled with
imaginative production techniques is likely to stimu stimue
e stimue much conversation among seasoned and neophyte
atregoers.
Scheduled productions include The Larke, the sea seal's
l's seal's opener, followed by The Madwoman of Chaillot."
he Cherry Orchard, and finally The Insect Comedy.
B summer show has yet to be announced.
HTHOUGH THEATRICAL performance doesn't exist for
sake of spirited conversation the discussion that may
low a performance is a fringe benefit for those who
Bend.
Conversation usually first turns' to the skill >f the
next to the director and his artistic conception
Hi control of the entire production and finally, if tin*
Hening or the drinks are long enough, the visual spectacle
scenery and lighting.
H Mv concern in this short article is the last item men-
Bned. What is the function of the stage set in theatrical
B'formanee?
H- afc ;. t * ; -7 - :
l.V STAGE SET I simply mean everything one sees
the stage including light and light modulation, but ex*
Biding the actor.
llt is probably not necessary to remind the reader
Bt a stage setting may be an overture to a play as it
fcgcsts time, physical location, mood, style and many
ecific environmental conditions. This visual capsuliza-
W of pertinent data mav be considered one purpose
B the stage set.
I Another purpose is the visual argument a set is capable
presenting when it has been designed to suggest the-
Btic material and point of view, as they exist in the
B. v or the directors interpretation.
STILL ANOTHER purpose might be the creation of
atmosphere and environment that will aid the actor
building a character.
finally the set may serve to satisfy the audiences
Baipation of spectacle. In this role the delight of the
tting is its construction, scenery, ornamentation and
'll in execution.
The theatregoer who turns in discussion to the stage
1 to criticize the skill and artistry with which the set
moved information, point of view, and delight in
-ctaele has not yet considered the primary function
' age scenery and lighting.
Discussing the set with one of the performers to dis-
Vt r how well it served the actor, though revealing,
"d reflect only a secondary function.
1 SHOULD LIKE to stop now, for I have blundered
b* having to make a definite statement that unveils a
ini ary purpose.

/

In t!ie academic world this is
an unpardonable goof. I hope to
be sufficiently vague in what fol follows
lows follows in order that I cannot be held
f *r anything which I commit mv mvself.
self. mvself.
The primary purpose of the
stage set is shaping the move movement
ment movement of an action through time
and space.
THE ARTISTIC SUCCESS of
a stage design should be evaluat evaluated
ed evaluated first by the influence it exerts
over the movement of the actor
and its potential for suggesting
the movement and structur structural
al structural rhythms of the entire play.
Consequently, this most impor important
tant important function cannot be evaluated
by looking at a bare set or even
by populating the set with ac actors
tors actors arranged like flowers in plea pleasing
sing pleasing compositions.
A CRITICAL STUDY OF a
stage setting without actors will
reveal all the secondary purposes
mentioned earlier. Under these
conditions the stage design is view viewed
ed viewed much like a painting and the
art of the theatre is submerged in
the jargon and aesthetics of the
painter's art.
A critical evaluation of the set
arranged with Jiving stat statuary
uary statuary caught in moments of hei heightened
ghtened heightened emotion renders the set
in the jargon and aesthetics of the
sculptor.
(See pg. 22 'Theatergoer)

M I
237 W. Umvmty Avnu I

Sunday, September 30, 1962 The Florida Alligator

CLASSIFIED

FOR SALE Kroehler sofa and
arm chair. Clean, in excellent
condition, slip-covered. Also a
radio cabinet. CalT 376-5009.
<9-2t-cl
FOR SALE 1961 MCA, white,
R&H, show room shape, SI4OO.
To see. call Mr. Kennedy from
S to 5 at 372-6347. (9-ts-c).
MALE STUDENT waiter, part
time. Hours 4:30 to 10:30. Must
be 21 or over. Call 376-9335.
(9-ts-c >

ROCK N ROLL tenor sax player
desires work. Call Dirk Loper,
FR 2 9303. 9-3 t- P)
FOR SALE Harley Davidson
Hummer motorcycle, recently
overhauled, excellent condition.
Maying must sell immediate immediately.
ly. immediately. Call FR 2 2260 or see at
1228A YV, Untv. Ave. (9-lt-c)

^ | .. | | l [ ir||||llj|l|l ||)|||||r |||r |||||l|)r||l ir|T|p | . rilT|||| || l|lli -- |f|ri )||ll|rr|ri| -. |T .- T .rinn.iiiiinmin I'liiiin iiiiiii 1111 im in n i in in
I YOU'LL HAVE THAT SATISFIED I
JC* FEELING WHEN YOU TRY THE I
I U DAILY SPECIALS I
I f 3p.m. to 9 p.m. at the I
I If CALICO KITCHENI
I T 201 N.W. 13th St.
"Make eating a pleasure instead of labor.
Be waited on at no extra cost*" H
EVERY MONDAY 'l f EVERY TUESDAY |
I Armour's choice cut GIANT S
L AAeT SPAGHETTI I
IROAST SIRLOIN and MEATBALL I
lot BEEF DINNER DINNER I
Reg. Special Reg. Special
I $1.25 J sbes 99c I
f EVERY WEDNESDAY i r EVERY THURSDAY
I NEW ENGLAND K.C. STRIP I
I FRISH FRY STEAK DINNER!
I Boneless fillet. Second ] /i lh. Armour's choice cut 1
H helping fish free I
t Req. Special | Reg. Special 1
99C J tSLQS' sl-251

Gainesville*s newest
department store is
interviewing for part parttime
time parttime sales and clerical
positions
Hours include evenings
and weekends
Apply in person
J.M. Fields
1409 NW 23rd Blvd.

FOR SALE hv owner 1 i*5S
M(tA. like new condition, must
sell. !li:ho 076>8150 after 3
p.m. <9 ts-c).
TOR SALE 1955 MG TP-1300.
classic mode), excellent condi condition.
tion. condition. never raced. New top and
1 lint job. Call Mr. A. L. Pau Pauley,
ley, Pauley, FR 2 6950. (9-lt-C ).

Page 21



The Florida Alligator Sunday September 30/ 1962

Page 22

Untold Egyptian Secrets See New Light

Ancient Egyptian prescriptions
and "enchantments will join the
annals of modem medicine in the
Uof F's medical school library
today.
Five books, two of them rare
and valuable editions of the "Eb "Ebers
ers "Ebers Papyros, were presented,, to
the library as gifts by Mrs. Em Emily
ily Emily Kitterman, of Fort Pierce, wi widow'
dow' widow' of the late surgeon Peter
Gad Kitterman, who retired to
the city in 1946.
Dr, George T. Harrell, dean
of the College of Medicine, said
the volumes are welcome addit additions
ions additions to the librarys previously li limited
mited limited collection on the "most an ancient
cient ancient arts of healing. They were
placed on display in the library's
showcase today.
ACCORDING TO DEAN HAR HARRELL,
RELL, HARRELL, the rare 1875 editions, pub published
lished published in Leipzig, are reproduc reproductions
tions reproductions of prescriptions believed
written around 1500 B. C. on an
Egyptian scroll later discover discovered
ed discovered and published by Georg Eb Ebers.
ers. Ebers. Written in a free-form of hi hieroglyphics,
eroglyphics, hieroglyphics, the original parch parchment
ment parchment of ancient chants to gods,
charms and medicines, is sup supposed
posed supposed to be housed at the Univer University
sity University of Leipzig, now behind the
Iron Curtin.

COLLEGE
BRAND ROUND-UP
DDITCC ZENITH STEREO SET
rKllfc): 1. Contest open to all groups or individuals.
2. Each pack of Marlboro, Parliament, or Alphine
turned in will have a value of 5 points. Each
Philip Morris Regular or Commander will have
RULES* alO P oin value value-3.
3. value-3. Packages must be in bundles of 50 with 5 and
10 point packs separated.
4. No packs will be accepted before 2 p.m. or
after 5 p.m.
WHO WINS: Prizes will be awarded to group, fraternity, sorority,
or individual turning in the greatest number of
points. Contest closes Dec. 5,1962; Univ. Book
Store; 2 p.m.
Get on the BRANDWAGON ... its lots of fun!
iri ,| i
IVI VI
Marlboro ; I Alpine § I

: jflH
sips */*' |S| !
'' Ls snl
jHHg| i W fj
Hi Ml \mUMM

TRANQUILIZERS IN ANCIENT EGYPT?
Ron Prati of Miami, a UF senior medical student is
discovering that modern medicine had many counterparts
in 1500 B.C. Looking over some rare editions of ancient
Egyptian prescriptions, donated to the medical school li library
brary library recently, he is learning the early "sorcerers" claimed
cures for tension and nerves, cancer, baldness, poor appe appetite,
tite, appetite, eye diseases, grey hair and halitosis, among many
other ancient complaints still in existence.

The 'Theatergoer

THOUGH THE SCENE design
ner and "theatregoer may learn
much from the fine arts of paint painting
ing painting and sculpture, they need not
exist on borrowed aesthetics. To
appreciate the role of the stage
set, the theatregoer needs to recog recognize
nize recognize the unique characteristic of
the art he is viewing.
The theatre with dance has as its
most 'basic material, a dimen dimension
sion dimension unknown to all other fine
arts the dimension of. actual
time and actual space.
The importance of these dimen dimensions
sions dimensions in artistic achievement is
unquestioned. The painter-sculp painter-sculptor
tor painter-sculptor and writer with various means
(Cubism, mobiles, stream of con conscience)
science) conscience) is able to achieve a sen sensation
sation sensation of these dimensions which
can be called virtual time and vir virtual
tual virtual pace.

I WE NEVER CLOSE I
I (OPEN 24 HOURS) S
I CALICO KITCHEN I
Make eating a pleasure instead of labor. 1
Be waited on at no extra cost." I
I 201_NW 13th st. |

Not only is it (the original
papyrus) the oldest complete me medical
dical medical book in existence, it is said
to be the most ancient existing
to historical references?
i '
complementing the hake
copies are three other books do donated
nated donated by Mrs. Kitterman, one
of which her late husband co-au co-authored
thored co-authored in 1914 when he began his
life-long hobby of Egyptology.
His book, Medicine In Ancient
Egypt, and two others t h e
Hearst Medical Papyrus' and
assorted translations of the Egy Egyptian
ptian Egyptian medical arts, as prescrib prescribed
ed prescribed by the elder sorcerers and
priest-physicians, several thous thousand
and thousand years ago.
. The books given to the UF were
part of the late Dr. Kittermans
personal library. A graduate of
the University of Illinois medical
school, Dr. Kitterman practiced
medicine as a surgeon and roen roentgenologist
tgenologist roentgenologist in Chicago and El Pa Paso
so Paso for many years prior to his
retirement in Fort Pierce. His
Granddaughter, Miss Karen Vit Vitunae,
unae, Vitunae, is a freshman at the Univer University
sity University of Florida this year.

THE ARTIST IN the theatre is
given actual time and actual
space; his problem is to use
them with the skill of a crafts craftsman
man craftsman and the ingenuity of an art artist.
ist. artist. For this reason, the artistic
success of a set can only be de determined
termined determined with the unfolding of an
action in time and space.
It is the manner in which the
designer articulates time and
space and more important the po potential
tential potential for stage movement that
he builds into the design.
The first test the theatregoer
should apply to a set is to w h a t
ends and how well did the set
shape the movement of an action
through time and space? Second Secondly
ly Secondly he should ask, did the set sug suggest
gest suggest the movement and structur structural
al structural rhythms of the entire Play?



Tech Engineers 17-0 Win

By RON SPENCER
Gator Sportswriter
Billy Lothridge, a 184-
pound junior quarterback
and jack-of-all-trades from,
of all places, Gainesville,
Georgia, proved the undoing
of Floridas Gators Saturday
afternoon as he directed the
Techmen to a 17-0 Southeast Southeastern
ern Southeastern Conference victory over
the Gators before a near
capacity crowd of 44,500 fans
in the 62 home opener at
Florida Field.
Lothridge, getting plenty
of protection from a mam mammoth
moth mammoth wall of defending Tech
linemen, riddled the often oftencriticized
criticized oftencriticized Florida pass de defense
fense defense for seven completions
in 12 tries and 104 yards, as
well as leading all rushers by
pounding out 82 yards in 12
carries from scrimmage.
Meanwhile, a steamrolling
Tech groundgaining machine
chewed up 195 yards and a
rock-ribbed 4' ec h defense
stopped everything Coach
Ray Graves chargers threw
at them, be it by land or by
air.
Florida Tech
First downs 6 14
Yards rushing Passes attempted I t 15
Passes completed 4 7
Passes intercepted by 11
Yards passing 50 101
Total k yardage !ll 29!)
Punting average 44.0 40.8
Yards penalized 49 76
Fumbles 9 2
Fumbles lost 0 1

Gator Soccer Team
Trims Ft. Stuart 3-1

By KEN KEYES
By Ken Keyes
Gator Sportswriter
The UF Soccer club defeat defeated
ed defeated Ft. Stuart, Georgia, 3-1
Saturday morning at Flem Fleming
ing Fleming Field. In their opening
game Coach Allen Moore's
more experienced Florida
club outplayed the visitors all
the way.
During the first 30-minute
half, the UF scored to take
a 1-0 lead. The goal came at
after two minutes-and-thirty
seconds of play on a play
from Carlos Bongue to Willy
Miles.

Both teams battled
through the first quarter
in a 0-0 deadlock liefore
Tech organized two scoring
inarches in the waning sec seconds
onds seconds of the second period
to notch a field goal and
touchdown and gain a 10-0
halftime advantage. Loth Lothridge
ridge Lothridge and Co. added anoth another
er another TD in the third period,
then throttled the Gators
the rest of the way to
maintain the 17-0 lead.
Tech won the opening coin
toss and elected to receive.
Flashy halfback Joe Auer re returned
turned returned the kickoff 24 yards
to the Tech 34. On the second
play from scrimmage. Loth Lothridge
ridge Lothridge hit right half Johnny
Gresham on a 11-yard strike
for the first of 'Techs 14 first
downs. A brilliant piece of
defensive work by halfback
Lindy Infante broke up the
drive, as he knocked down a
Lothridge aerial.
It wasnt until the close of
the initial quarter that Flor Florida
ida Florida mqun 1e d it sizeable
threat., Beginning at the Ga Gator
tor Gator 23,- the Florida ground
machine, sparked by Dick
Skellys 14-yard burst tip the
middle, rolled to the Tech 4(i
before the aggressive Tech
line pushed the Gators back
to midfield.

The UF scored again at
3:00 of the second half on a
boot by Jerry Kivett, who
outmaneuvered the Ft. Stuart
goalie.
Fort Stuart scored six
minutes before the end of
the game to make the score
H 2-l. Carlos Bongue hit on a
long boot two minutes before
the whistle to make the final
tally 3-1.
Other outstanding players
were co-captains Mike Kes Kessler
sler Kessler anjl iron-man Mauricio
Flores.
The UF Soccer Club, which

Sunday, September 30, 162 The Florida Alligator

Florida mounted an early
second quarter drive that car carried
ried carried from the Gator 20 to the
46 before Georgia 'Techs for forward
ward forward wall again applied the
brakesr
After swapping pun ts.
Tech regained ball control at
their own 44 and. directed by
Lothridge. marched 50 yards
in nine plays to the Gator six
until a spirited Florida de defensive
fensive defensive stand forced 'Tech to
try a field goal. Lothridge,
sixth leading SEC scorer as
a sophomore, booted a 15-
yard field goal from an angle
to put Tech ahead 3-0 with
2:08 remaining in the half.
After gaining and short shortly
ly shortly thereafter losing control
of the hall, the Gators saw
Lothridge lead a blitzkrieg
attack that in three plays
gave Tech their first touch touchdown.
down. touchdown.
Taking over at the Tech
39, Lothridge bolted 17
yards up the middle to the
Florida 44, passed to Auer
for 13 yards, and then hit
end Billy Martin on a 31-
yard scoring heave with a
i>are 38 seconds remaining
on the clock, as the Florida
pass defense collapsed. The
extra point was good, and
Tech left the field at half halftime
time halftime leading 10-0.

had a terrific 12-0 record last
year, plays an eight-game
schedule through the fall and
spring. Ft. Stuarts coach,
Sgt. Tingley, said the Ft.
Stuart team will return Oct.
13 for a rematch.
Although soccer is per perhaps
haps perhaps the UFs most grueling
sport, and definitely the win winningest
ningest winningest against tough inter intercollegiate
collegiate intercollegiate and service com competition,
petition, competition, it does not have even
the status of a minor sport
and is administered through
the intramural department.

Tech took advantage of a
Florida interception early in
the third period to pave the
way for their seeond I'D. Sen Senior
ior Senior end Bob Caldwell snatch snatched
ed snatched a 1 ,arrv I,i bora tore pass at
tht' Gator .*JO anl there was
no stopping the Fngineers.
The Jackets erus ho tl
through a reluctant Gator
defense for the remaining .JO
yards in nine rushing plays,
with I ,ot bridge eat iug up 11
of 4hose and getting the
touchdown on a one-yard
plunge. Lot bridge again split
the uprights and tin* Kami)
1 i nyr Wrecks led 17-0.
The Gators stopped an another
other another third-quarter drive
at.the Florida 19. then took
to the air. throwing every everything
thing everything they had at the Tech Technien.
nien. Technien. I'he (tutors, who fail failed
ed failed to complete a single
pass in the first three threefourths
fourths threefourths of the hall game,
went to the air, hut the
lech secondary proved as
adept as the line.
Sam Hollands recovery of
a Tech fumble on the Geor Georgians
gians Georgians 32 yard line in the
opening minutes of the final
quarter afforded Florida a
golden opportunity, but on.*
the first play halfback Joe
Auer intercepted Tom Hat Hattons
tons Hattons aerial at the three-yard
line, squelching that drive.
Moments later, F1 o r i d a
again possessed the ball at
the Tech 30, but again on the
first play from scrimmage a
Tom Shannon pass was eor eorraled
raled eorraled by Yellow Jacket senior
Tom Windlinger on the Tech
10.
The remainder of the hard hardfought
fought hardfought game was played at
midfield, where Tom Batten
finally hit 6-4, 245-pound end
Floyd Dean on a 11 -yard pass
play with less than two min minutes
utes minutes left in the gameFlor gameFloridas
idas gameFloridas first completed pass of
the afternoon. He added two
more completions, but the
harm had already been done.
Tech outgained the Gators
299 to 94 yards and picked
up 14 first downs to six for
Florida. Jack Katz starred on
defense for the Gators, lead leading
ing leading all linemen with a total
of eight tackles.
Florida 0 0 0 0 0
Georgia Tech .. 0 10 7 0 17
Scoring:
Tech FC, Loth ridge, 17.
Tech Mai-tin 31, pass from Loth Lothridge;
ridge; Lothridge; Lothridge kick.
Tech- Lothridge, 1-run; Lothridge
kick.
Attendance; 41,500,

Page 23



Page 24

The Florida Alligator Sunday, September 30, 1962

National
Football
Scores
*
College Football lie nulls
By United Press International
EAST
Penn St. 20 Air Force 6
Auny 9 Syracuse 2
Columbia 22 Brown 20
Tufts 16 Bowdoin 0
Kings Point 17 American Int. o
Bridgeport 7 Northeastern 6
New Hampshire 18 Colby M
Boston College 28 Villanova J 3
Navy 20 William & Mary 16
Western Maryland 12 Penn. Mil. 7
Amherst 20 Springfield 0
Worcester Tech 21 Central Conn 0
Williams 13 Trinity 'Conn.) 0
Sit. Lawrence 34 Union iN. Y. i 0
Dartmouth 27 Massachusetts 3
Rhode Islands 14 Maine 7
Harvard 27 Lehigh 7
Rochester 8 Hamilton 8
Yale 18 Connecticut 11
Colgate 23 Cornell 12
Lycoming 20 Randolph Macon 7
Albright 14 Muhlenberg 8
Holy Cross 16 Buffalo 6
Delaware St. 12 Hampton Inst. 9
Vermont 82 Rensselaer Poly 6
Moravian 16 Wilkes 6
Wagner 25 Haverford 0
MiUersville 19 Kutztown la
Ithaca 35 Kings 0
West Liberty 15 West. Vn. Tech 0
Slippery Rock 10 Refill boro 7
Hofstra 35 Sou. Connecticut 21
Princeton 15 Rutgers 7
Shtppensburg 14 Shepherd 13
Westminster (Pa.) 7 Ind. St. 6
SOUTH
Morgan St. 14 N. C. College 6
Clemson 7 North Carolina St. 0
West Virginia 14 Virginia Tech 0
Duke 21 South Carolina 8
J. Hopkins 28 Franklin & Mar. 7
Georgia Tech 17 Florida 0
Washington & Lee 28 Lebanon 6
Kentucky St. 12 Knoxville 0
Auburn 22 Tennessee 2i
MIDWEST
Ohio St. 41 North Carolina 7
Nebraska 25 Michigan 13
Augustana 14 Millikin 13
Indiana 26 Cincinnati 6
Sou. Illinois 3 Central Michigan 6
Wisconsin 69 New Mexico St. 13
Miami (Ohio) 17 Western Mich. 7
Denison 39 Carnegie Tech 0
Minnesota 0 Missouri 0
lowa 28 Oregon St. 8
Wheaton 3i Hope 0
Youngstown 19 McMurry 0
Earlham 13 Taylor 7
Drake 21 Colorado St. 0
Lincoln 28 St. Marys 6
LATE SCORES
Miami Fla. 21 TCU 20
Washington 28 Illinois 7
California 25 Jose 8
FSU 42 Furman 0

r - -flff v s x fMB9 *: i ifa; *0 j
H* Hr bMPNE "fr
l|M v '^
9KmI : : s%< ;Jf .-,
*/if|| ; JJ w i & mm, - s
: F 4 "H
||Mii J|l || ssPk
IRINRIMiII II IIIIIMIIUPI "' ¥*v. : : lllllllVlllJllUlHllllllliUlllljlllMp Ml^^Sssssjss^,

Dodd r Tin Delighted

By GEORGE M. GARDNER
Gator Sports Writer
A smiling Bobby Dodd relaxed
in the lockerroom after yester*
days game and had these com comments
ments comments to make after his Tech
team defeated Florida 17-0
BEFORE THE GAME:
On the Florida team "l'm
worried all the time. I worried
about Floridas depth going into
the game and intended to use all
three of our teams to counter
against it.' "We hoped to make
Florida divert from the three
team system.* "Didnt expect
Florida to thro w the ball.
"Thought 14-7 or 14-10 would be
the difference in score.

As Cator tac k, e Rank Lasky looks on in disgust, Georgia Tech quarterback
Billy Lothendge twists out of his grasp and looks down field for a rec receiver.
eiver. receiver.

JUST MISSED HIM

On the Tech team This team
is as good or better than the
1960 team I had. Were really
a running team ourselves, but
anytime were stopped were gon gonna
na gonna throw. We dont have t h e
depth weve had in the past
At THE HALF:
Going out 10-0 instead of 3.0
was an important factor at the
half. The running of Larry Du Dupree,
pree, Dupree, Bob Hoover, and the" rest
worried us. Lothridge was
the difference against our being
ahead at the end of the 1i r st
half. This is the finest game he
ever played for me. I thought
Florida played a great defensive
game first half. Billy Martin

made a great catch for a TD.
AFTER THE GAME:
Dodd to Graves, Hard luck
i>le man. Sorry it had to bo you.
This years Florida team was
better than the 6O Gator team
we played. We got a lot of
good breaks today and Ray did
not get any. Our boys did a
great job of rushing the passer.
I was delighted with the per perfomiance
fomiance perfomiance of our three units. I
have seen them tTech) at their
best now.
In relation J 0 t'F "Larry Lib Libeikire
eikire Libeikire has been a real colorful'
ballplayer for Florida. I think
Mori da will have some real good
victories and theyll get beat
sometimes too.



Js J X ,,^^'^^v^:^>^^-:^^r !v4^^^'i^^ ,^i"' J, ''^ ,; U'{'- .wiw
$&, dm

One picture is worth a thousand words, or
so the saying goes. This one tells the story
of head coach Ray Graves' reaction to
yesterday's 17-0 drubbing his charges
received from Georgia Tech.

. .-; . .';Xv._ :'.'_^PQwy- A /ifev/.v.
IL 4g|Hr
I W' PHHraHU : i&& : a £ft V S W
p i T^^BElr
PP J| jflPHPflfir y ; *y . /Wy Jo** & f 111 -naiWfc? m^i
vii:flHHl iPIBF Hr r
f S : w
r v/;- BBfegro aMp-y :!aMfra : : w;W :<:::>. w ; :W w
, i ||||||P ::
S:X
S IP9k / 'j&frv
jgsp :; wHjgp - JPIh Jfe
.. -1Wfe,..., m j
4. B |MR : P BBS
r Hit' r
'' : mf Slnp . ^...: *"MBF. *mm
life fMMzZMMiffllyMiLi y|y x
'

Tech quarterback. Billy Lotheridge, races over the goal line
for a touchdown in the third quartei of yesterday s game
Gator center Bruce Culpepper falls just short of making the
takle that would have stopped Lofheiidge.

Sunday, September 30, 1962 The Florida Alligator

Devils Come Back,
Face Gators Next

DURHAM, N. C. (UPI) Duke*
hard-running 1 bavkfield over-pow over-powered
ered over-powered South Carolina 21-8 Satur Saturday
day Saturday to give the Blue Devils a
quick start in their bid for n third
straight Atlantic Coast Confer Conference
ence Conference title.
D.ke halfbacks Billy Futrell
and Mark Leggett and fullback
Mike Curtis scored to climax three
sustained drives engineered by
quarterback Walt Rappold.
Tile Gamecocks held Duke at
bay throughout the first half. The
Blue Devils crossed the midfield
strip only once.
But a 38-yard period pass from
Rappold to Futrell on the 27 set
the Blue Devils afire and Futrell

ran over from the 11-yard line
four plays later.
Futrell, Curtis and Leggett ac accounted
counted accounted for most of the yardage
in Dukels- .second touchdown
drive, which began at midfield.
Leggett crashed through left tack tackle
le tackle from tlu> six for the tally.
Curtis ran nine of 11 plays for
the final Blue Devil touchdown
with two minutes remaining. Ho
accounted for IH yards of the 61-
yard march and scored from the
four-yard line.
Bill Reynolds booted for a1 1
Duke's conversions.
Score By Periods
Duke 0 0 7 14 21
Smith Carolina 0 0 0 8 -8

Pass Wins
For Tigers
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. UJPI)
Conversion ace Woo twice shunted to the sidelines in
favor of two-point tides which
failed, Imhmihml a 35-yard extra
point Saturday to give Auburn n
22-21 victory over favored Ten Tennessee.
nessee. Tennessee.
The long extra point try. made
necessary by a 15-yard penalty.
Wound up a wild storing battle
highlighted by the smooth quar quarterbacking
terbacking quarterbacking of Auburn sophomore
Jimmy Sidle, who set up two
Tiger touchdowns and a field goal
by Woodall with his passing.
In delighting the crowd of IS.-
000, Auburn battled back once
from a 11-0 deficit caused by de defensive
fensive defensive errors, and again from a
21-15 margin.
The game was almost a replay
of last years battle between the
two teams. in which Auburn
trailed by two touchdowns, 7-21,
and came back for a 21-21 victory.
Auburn 0 15 7 0 22
Tennessee It 0 7 0 21
Army Edges
Syracuse 9-2
NKW YORK (U'PIl Armys foot football
ball football forces capitalized with toe
and arm on two second period
fumbles and then threw up a
rock-ribbed defense to topple Sy Syracuse,
racuse, Syracuse, b-2, before a crowd of
29,500 at the Polo Grounds Satur Saturday.
day. Saturday.
Dick Hey tit kicked a 20-yard
field goal and Gammy Lewis hit
Bob BcdHi with a 32-yard touch touchdown
down touchdown pass to make tho.se fumbles
pay off.
Kd Hill ('lieseavagc set up the
first Army score when he threw
Bob Belli for an 11-yard loss on
Hit- Syracuse 16 and then re recovered
covered recovered Lellis fumble on the 48.
Army banged to the three yard
line and then Htydt booted his
ice-breaking field goal ,fr 10.

Page 25



Page 26

The Florida Alligator Sunday, September 30, 1962

Block Seats Available To Independent Groups

Block seating will be available to independent organi organizations
zations organizations for the Oct. 13 game with Texas A&M, and for
all following home games.
Any organization that is registered with the Deans
office may participate in the block seating. Those organi organizations
zations organizations interested should come to the student government
office Monday before 5 p.m. with a list of their members.

-v
: : :-::*:-: : :-;:':':-:>vX:fP fti i^t11 -> i :::? ? Au->3Wpo^^:-:::3^.v<<->^wfc yj; |:i!: : 8 V
''';*:*i*i*>:*S****^**** ** **'''-'*****'*^'* t x*XvlvX*X%*!*x"x*l*>A*i*!SS% ,Mkdd[| ~ j
.'<' S' i h* '**'*'i'*-*' 1 *''
21 GREAT TOBACCOS MAKE
iiiii j<>r\o for a
20 WONDERFUL SMOKES! ||P Cl |! iMmk f' ~~^
Vintage tobaccos grown, aged, and blended -- taste ordinary cigarettes
mild ... made to taste even milder through Mfill.fy I§|l§l|lf~ sis
the longer length of Chesterfield King. II entov the chesterfield king
CHESTERFIELD KING f** = skssws
W 1 fcltl ltatet# **%* !L through longer length... becomes
TOBACCOS TOO MILD TO FILTER, PLEASURE TOO GOOD TO MISS smooth and gentle to your taste.

17318-B
This advertisement appears in
College NewspapersWeek of September 231,1962

A drawing for seats will be held at 4 p.m. Thursday,
Oct. 4, in Rm. 311 of the Florida Union. Only members of
the registered organizations and their dates may kit in the
block.
Following the drawing, the tickets will be distributed.
A student. ID, or a non student date ticket must be pre presented
sented presented for each ticket received.



jThis Corner



By JARED LEBOW
Gator Sports Editor
CJ The best laid plans of mice and men. often jro astray,
jj 1 was all set to splash Floridas victory over Georgia
eh across the pages of todays Gator. I had our staff
tist draw a picture of a Gator swatting a Yellow Jacket,
Hth the score appearing on fly swatter. The cartoon now
Is in my wastepaper basket.
H A headline had* been written saying, Gators Make
llow Jackets Turn Blue, with the words set in blue and
How ink. That headline now rests alongside the cartoon.
What Happened
jjj The question on everyones tongue following yester yesterlys
lys yesterlys disaster was simply, What happened.
9 Here were Floridas highly touted Gators, playing like
high school junior varsity team on offense and looking
e a bunch of sleep walkers on pass defense.
I Last week, former Gator head coach Bob Woodruff,
w a scout for Tennessee, commented that the reason
orida failed to score until late in the first half against
Mississippi State was their constant changing of offensive
its\ which kept anyone unit from getting warmed up.
Now Woodruff is not one to throw stones, since when
B was at Florida Field his teams finished on the short end
the score often.
I But after viewing Saturdays rout, this corner thinks
ere is some wisdom in what the former Gator said.
I Ihe Gators used three different quarterbacks in rim riming
ing riming otf 50 offensive plays. Tech ran off 68 plays with
|e quarterback, Billy Lotheridge, handling most of the
Tensive chores.
Floridas quarterbacks racked up a total of minus 18
nls rushing. Tom Batten was the only Gator to connect
ssing, hitting three out of eight for 30 yards.
I Face Facts
I Florida fans might as well face up to the fact that
But s good for Louisiana State (the three team system)
I not necessarily good for Florida.
1 he constant shuffling of teams when the Gators had
e ball served only to bog down and confuse their offense.
I I could go on like this, but it is all to easy to be a
nday morning quarterback. Tech had a great team, pos posdy
dy posdy one of the best in the nation. The high expectations
I the Gator fans was due mostly to the optimism of the
aches and sportswriters.
Jhe season did not end yesterday. There are eight
pies left and the Gators will win their share. Now is the
lp e for the student body to rally behind the team. Its
Bsy to support a winner, but it is not always the winners
J! eecl the su PP<>rt.
lickets for the Texas A&M, Oct. 13, will be distributed
students at the stadium ticket windows, beginning
Monday, Oct. 1, at 2 p.m.
, Students who have not yet picked up their tickets for
e Duke game, to be played in Jacksonvilles Gator Bowl
ct. 6, are urged to pick up their tickets before Tuesday.

Rebel Stamp &. Coin Shop
WANT S to buy
~t
US and Canadian Foreign and Confederate
Coins and Currency
K 809 W. University Ave# 6-9110

Best Laid Plans
Often Go Astray

Sunday, September 30, 1962 The Florida Alligator

UF Players Optimistic,
Look Ahead To Duke

The Gators were the losers on
the scoreboard, but the general
opinion and atmosphere was that
of a team having learned a lesson
which it was ready to try on its
next opponent.
Larry Libertore, quarterback of
llie Big Blue, admitted that the
game was a tough one to lose, but
the Gators would win a lot of ball
games before the season ended.
When asked how he felt about
the upcoming Duke game nnd the
Gators chances, he replied Were
not going to lay down and let
them run over us.
Lindy Infantes only statement
on the game was They're a fine
ball club.
Most optimistic of the players
was Tom Kelly. Ills reply ott
the game was I now think we
have a better ball club than I
thought before the kiekoff. We*
vo learned a lot.
UF president J. Wayne Reitz
dropped in to congratulate the
team on its effort.
Jim Cunningham was unable lb
to give any'statement on the con condition
dition condition of the Gators after the
game. He still had to make the
rounds.
Head Coach Ray Graves was
unavailable for comment.

Jr"
%
Mkm Mkmmmw
mmw Mkmmmw
1 ; '' Y:,.
W
WO R LD
k ( i yy-jj travel
SERVICE
o 0 W. UNIVCRSITr avenue MUfe
GAINESVILLE, F L R t A
FR 6-4641

Sidewinder halfback Jerry New Newcomer
comer Newcomer was pleased with the Big
Blue and sidewinder defensive line
play, although he rated the
Sidewinders as having a slight
edge.
Ohio Opens
With Win
COLUMBUS, Ohio (UPDQuick
hitting Ohio State opened its bid
for the national football cham championship
pionship championship Saturday with a convinc convincing
ing convincing 41-7 victory over North Car Carolina
olina Carolina before a record Ohio
Stadium crowd of 84,009 persons.
Rangy quarterback Johnn Mum-
liey skillfully guided the Buck Buckeyes
eyes Buckeyes to the largest opening day
score since 1945 while passing for
one touchdown and running for
another.
The victory was the ninth in a
row for Ohio State, which won
eight in a row* last season after a
7-7 tie with Texas Christian in the
opener.
Ohio State 7 : 7 It 13 -41
North Carolina .... 0 7 0 0 -7

Page 27



The Florida Alligator Sunday, September 30, 1962

Page 28

SAE, Fijis Take Crowns

SAE SPLASHES TO 8-4 VICTORY

4

Two approaches to the
"mans deodorant problem

If a man doesn't mind shaving under his arms, he wiU probably
find a womans rofi-on satisfactory. Most men, however, find it
simpler and surer to use Mennen Spray Deodorant. Mennen Spray
was made to get through to the skin, where perspiration starts.
And made to work atl day. More men use Mennen Spray than any
other deodorant. How about you? 64* and SI.OO plus tan

Water Basketball Ends
Flag Football Starts

Sigma Alpha Epsilon defeated
Sigma Nu 8-4 and Phi Gamma
Delta defeated Delta Upsilon 14-9
in Tuesdays basketball eham ehampionships.
pionships. ehampionships.
Flag football action begins in
both leagues Monday afternoon.
Orange League water-basketball
champion, SAE, scored first, and
clung to their narrow margin to
lead throughout the contest.
All-campus captain Dave Whit Whitfield
field Whitfield led the Lionmen on the of offense,
fense, offense, setting up most of the
scores, and on the defense, not
letting the snakes have many shots
at the basket.

Veteran Hugh Starnes played
well on the defense as did John
Tanner.
Former UF basketball star Lou
Merchant accounted for half the
Snake points on a corner shot.
Defensive play by Randy Schwartz
and Monte Trainer kept the tal talented
ented talented SEA squad from turning
the championship game into a
rout.
The Blue League finale featured
th£ talented shooting of DU
Art Eggers and the defense!of
PGDs Jim Owens. Eggers scored
six points in the losing effort. The
Figi scoring was evenly spread
with All-Campus selections Gary
Klatt, Jim Owen, each garnering
four points,
Tomorrow afternoon The Phi
Gams open title defense of the
Blue League flag football crown.
Kappa Sigma, last years Orange
League champion will also be try trying
ing trying for a repeat performance.
Dorm
Scores
Hi'ME AKI:.v
E 3 over E 2 Forfeit
EC 1 over E 1 20-18
E 3 over ECT 25-21
' E 4 over E 2 Forfeit
EC 4 over EC 3 24-13
EC 2 over W 2 2J-13
EC 4 over VV 2 18 11
W 1 over EC 3 23-19
WC 2 over W 3 26-23
W 4 over WC 4 30-19
WC 3 over WC 1 26-11
WC 4 over W 3 23-18
WC 3 over WC 2 23-13
W 4 over WC 1 Forfeit
MURPIIKEE AREA
SIG over SIH Forfeit
Dorm D over Fie M Forfeit
. Ele O over Fie P 26-IS'
Fie N over Fie S 23-4
SI C over SI. B 55-11
Th E over SI A 36-28
Th H over Th Q 30-2 S
Mur A over Th F Forfeit
Mur D over Mur C Forfeit
Mur B over Mur F 32-18
Mur G over Mur K Forfeit
Mur over Mur H 41-29
Mur J over Mur I, Forfeit
_ GRAHAM AREA
Trus 4 over Trus 1 Forfeit
Gra 2 over Tins 2 30-13
Gra 1 over Trus 3 20-17
Gra 2 over Trus t Forfeit
Gra 1 over Trus 4 19-13
Trus 2 over Trus 9 20-6
Gra 3 over Simp 2 60-16
Simp 4 over Gra 4 Forfeit
Simp 3 over Simp 1 33-12
Gra 3 over Simp 4 32-17
Simp 3 over Simp 2 28-14
Gra 4 over Simp t 28-12
Wr TOiBERT AREA
TM 3 over Tol 2 46-31
Toi 5 over Tol 3 30-16
2 over To! 4 26-18
N 4 over N 3 15-11
N 2 over S 2 Forfeit
S 3 over N 4 25-21
N 3 over SI 2&-ig
Wea 1 over S 4 21-19
Wea S over S 3 22-ia
We a 2 Forfeit
X over Wea 3 41-17
Et over E2 18-12
wea 4 over K 4 Forfeit
over E4 26-11
" *] over EJ is-u



Sunday subtleties

Tm

FRESHMAN (VERY IMPRESSIONABLE)
Hi!
GEE! Do I think your new car is ever cool
Boy, it sure is sharp! I When are we going
out in it? It must have cost a terrible lot
of money. The colors are so dreamy. Gosh,
I can't get over it! It's simply fabulous 11 1
Passionately,
Kitten /
SOPHOMORE
(HOPING TO BE LAVALIERED>
Dear Bob,
Just thought I'd drop you a short note
and say thank you again for the wonderful
time. I had no idea that your new car was
going to be so beautiful. All the girl; in
the House agree with me thct it's the best
car on campus. Just how did you know to
match the color with my winter coat? Hope
to see you again REAL soon.
Yours,
Sally

__ 1... ~ v

I wouldn't ask you to do it over,
v.\
om A if Hancock hadnt made such
a big mess on it!"

By JACK HORAN

A New Car ...

JUNIOR (JUST PINNED)
Dearest George,
I'm in class now and the lecture is as
boring as the professor, so I thought I'd
write you a short note. Your new car is
gorgeous; but, honey do you think you can
afford itr* I'm not trying to run your life,
but you do have grcduate school coming up
in two years and the car will reduce your
savings some, won't it ? Whatever you de decide
cide decide is fine with me. I'll close now.
Love and Kisses,
Nan
SENIOR (ENGAGED FOR TWO YEARS)
John
So you bought the car, huh ? After all
we discussed and argued about. Don't you
have any resistance? You know we can't
afford it with the wedding end your Law
School coming up soon; but YOU had to
buy a $5,000 car! Your mother called me
and we agree completely on this matter.
You'll just have to bring it, back this week weekend.
end. weekend. Ride the bus the rest of the week.
Mary
P.S. Call the dealer tonight!

Sunday, September 30, 1962 The FlSrida Alligator

franklin 2*v93 A|| school supplies
for the college student
II Gainesville's Most Complete Office Machine
Equipment and Supply Store
FLAKE A. PARKER 601 V. UNIVERSITY AVE.
ovnm GAINESVILLE. FLA.

r\ Rebel Lanes
\ I OPEN BOWLING EVERY NIGHT
ll\\ 3 games $1.05 before 6 shoes 15c
/Ivy A SATURDAY A.M. SPECIAL
yl \j 3 games till 1 pm $1 .00
A Shoes Free!
: \ j 809 W. University Avenue
#
- ... N.. ' i-m ' 1 11 *

A *<4-
r \f&-
W )

Jark: Ask me if Im a froj>."
Don: Art* yon a frog-?"
Jaek: Yes, I'm a frog.''
"Ask me if Im a turtle.**
Don: Are you a turtle?"
.lark: No, I'm a frog."
I shall now illustrate what 1
have on my mind. saitl the pro professor
fessor professor as he eraser the board.

Enroll Your Children ot .
NANCY JANE
Nursery School
r
522 N. Main St. N
Phone FR 2-2589

Page 29



Page 30

The Florida Alligator Sunday. September 30. I9A?

WONDER WARTHOG

by Gilbert Shelton TEXAS RANGER

High in the office of a great
MEGATROPOLITAN NEWSPAPER SITS
FHIBERT PtSENEX (who BENEATH
A THIN VENEER OF RESPECTABILITY IS
ACTUALLY WONOER WART HOC )
WRITING STORIES Os GREAT IMPORT..
ITSTOP THE PRESSIS!J

HMJ HfHt'S THE PLACB ~A HUGE
DEPARTMENT STORE, ADEQUATELY
GUARDED! T DONT SEE HOW
ANT SHOPUf riNG GH~S

IPIP

AH,HERE COMES V MLY.LIur-LIVERLP V
MELOPY LANE, m PHILBERT PESENExH
HERE'S AN ASSIGNMENT)
JUST UP YOUR LINE'/
ACASE Os f
bringing n£ < ( SnOrUrTING:/
A PANCEROUS .) Tte"

I'M THE MANAGER, MR. OESENEX, AND
THERE'S SOMETHING STRANGE GOING ONI
HERE* NO MATTER" WHAT PRECAUTION)
VE TAKE EVERY OAT AT 3:27 PM. I
THE SHOPLIFTERS STRIKE' AND WE/JJ

t

MEETS
SUPER SUPERHYPNOTISI
HYPNOTISI SUPERHYPNOTISI

SHOPLIFTING,EH? (x seriously covet /t\
This warrants A Change into the -4
WONDER WART HOG COSTUME, ESPEC/ALL M
SINCE EVERY time E SW/7TJY /NTS THAT/
COSTUME X INADVERTENTLY R/P AfY 4
DRESS SH/RT AND SUIT INTO RIBBONS f))
S|OK INTO IT l
n

Bserk and 1
"TOF GUARDS
Y vhym/
/-A;J

YOUR EYELIDS ARE
GETTING HEAVY! YOUR
BRAIN IS GETTING
SOFT AS
AVOCADO PIZZA!

-to be continued next week



Crossword Puzzle

ACROSS
'' |. Damage
5. Exclamation of discovery
8. Old Russian ruler
12. Restricted place where only
certain vehicles may park on campus
13. Uncooked
14. Unnatural breathing sound
15. Prevaricator
16. Greek letter
17. Became angry
18. Converse
19. Pottery
21. Escaped
23. Semi-precious stone
26. Separate
31. Poe's bird
32. Leisure activities
33. Rot away
34. Delineate
35. Most aged
37. Pale dry wines
43. Short sleeps
47. Roof's edge
48. Nocturnal mammal
49. Biblical character
50. Athena's appellation
51. Island (Fr.)
52. Watermelon's leftover part
53. Group of animals
54. An imal used for carrying heavy loads
55. Hangs down loosely

Married Students, Faculty, Staff
Take One
Home iW)
to Mama ?/_ ->-#3
The
Florida

DOWN
I Stopping command
2. Operatic solo
3. True
4. Put up for sale
5. The beta I palm
6. Abhorred
7. Conscious
8. Cut off fat, as on a piece of meat
9. Garment worn in India
10. Fish sauce
11. Communists
20. Cliches
22. Lacquer-like substance
23. Land measurement
24. Needlefish
25. Coin of Portuguese Macao
27. Mates
28. Wine chalice
29. Things (Law)
30. Mao Tung, Communist leader
36. Small Afri can country
37. Hands out, as playing cards
38. Park in the Rocky Mountains
39. Chair
40. American war hero, Nathan
41. Genus of old-world shrubs
42. Paper mes
42. Paper measure
44. Continent
45. Desire, usually for food
46. Soap foam

Sunday. September 30, 1962 The Florida Alligator

, 4 "Sew Due to our tremendous purchasing power, we were
able to make a special purchase of
quality woolens from America's leading
woolen mills.. .values up to 4.98 yd...
wool flannels, basket weaves, wool
blends, novelties, suitings, dress weights
man y others.. .54 inches wide, choose
NNv from 4,000 yard? s
yr 7 Abbey Flannels . 1.98 yd.
by I. Kaplan 2.48 yd.
150 Pair
Case Curtains . 1.99
Matching Valances .99
v W.
*** _jj
109 W. Univ. Ave. Fabric Phone FR 2-2721

by ALAN WEISS
Ti ia ipar^ji-|7 Mat i.o hr?
'&&&
II I* HI
%v s va
v,;,vw
15 sx:*:: 15
ws
|0 g-jig;:; **
iS'w
'Ti.i.i ..*.*.. .v.M-.'.' wrrrr v..v.v ??rwi
Ivlv.v/ \\y*Xv v\v*;sv H 22 v'v!v wXvM Iv'X'X'J
f-XX.-X; :)sjj*Xv vXvvS; >SXyX ;X;|;X;S wy|^X*j
.vvv*. ii'tXiX-. ........... -.-.-i-n-r mwwxw* iXXfcv.
2* im ay X:X;X : : sss: a 5 37 a 3
;.;.;.vX; X;.v.v.
* !iF!"
'.V.V.V. WiiW
33 : : :x: : :!:v sss& 3M
yXyX; XjXyX >X\;Xy
r.. r.'rr 11 irm irnrw * '** il **** l t ll Lk 'i i ivm nirn rrrrrvr
3w 57 3ft :!s!s:s M!;::-
>/>>>: x : *'-x'-: :: : : : : : ::::::
IvSW: Svxx.; "x:*:"x* x-sx-x ixii.ix
******* ******* ** ** 1 *' 11 ****'** **- *
31 y.yXy
t.-ctt
7 VB H
Si+wi **&>**-
03 :&$ 51 51 1
~* 53 ::':#x : :i 54 55
, yivi'iVl 'lil'ulllli

Answer on Page 13
Jokes
Heard at midterm.:
How* far are you from the A
* /\ correct answer? §
Mother: Where did you learn
such words, Johnny?
Johnny: From Chaucer
Mother: Well, don't play with
him anymore.

Page 31



Page 32

The Florida Alligator sunday / September 30, 1962

a I | f aHEdfl
Jy:::
-,.W : |ff§;'
"**** s,.j£
§: IX' JP
.
rTi liw M W
I < wm
1 I
li \ lif Tff n&NMdd
j
'?*?lp§ *|||j||ws JjM f#"' :|s>
* y y kWi Sk
ii^&'i lf :&#s v l tJ?j'2y' ?:£ijp.'--BB£ v *' _^rf£v£&S?v,
I
'>.. {'BPllll
74 a
I |
fat /a
x
xjs;'*
f Is

STUDENT CHECKS CASHED FREE

Student Hostesses, always
with a smile, always with
an extra glass of tea,
0
} V '.\
Long's takes pride in
employing U of F students
throughout*
A spotless kitchen means
you can always eat here
with confidence.
ALWAYS PLENTY OF
r- r* r r nA ni/n i s~* ik i __
ri\LU rMIVMINU IIS
THE REAR
\
**
Just another service; our
new covered back entrance.

THE
STUDENTS
CHOICE
(MORE THAN 10 MILLION MEALS
SERVED TO UF STUDENTS)
£.O4uA
Cafeteria
Palmer & Sue Long, Owners & Operators
Join the Crowd at Longs
:>;OT T^cfe.
jP|jp if
f till j jflK iili>
i fllll fl| w
I |Kfl Ji|
313 W. Uni versify