Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
UF Purchases Golf and Country Club/

By CAROLE BARDELLA
Gator Features Editor
The UF Athletic Association,
Inc. purchased the Gainesville Golf
and Country Club Wednesday for
$550,000.
According to Dean Dennis K.
Stanley of the College of Physic Physical
al Physical Education and Health, the Ath Athletic
letic Athletic Association, Inc., and the
Country Club have been negotia negotiating
ting negotiating over the sale since May. The
Association made a committment
June 12, and Wednesday the 360
Certificate holding members of
the Country Club voted to accept
it.
The UF plans to take possession
of the Country Club in September,
1063, as soon as a new Country
Club is built.
Stanley said the Athletic Asso Association,
ciation, Association, Inc. will provide such
funds that are initially needed to
buy the Club, and will borrow the
remainder of the money to com complete
plete complete the deal.
He said that the golf course is

Miracle
Worker
See Page 5

Volume 54 Number 5

: |gg|
*lr m i.
Mi 1 BHiHr :
: : WM
MARTIN
Samuel Martin
Named Provost
Os Med Center
Dr. Samuel P. Martin, noted
medical educator and researcher,
was Thursday named provost of
the J. Hillia Miller Health Cen Center.
ter. Center.
Announcement of Martins ap appointment
pointment appointment to the top position was
made by UF Pres. J. Wayne
Reitz, following Board of Control
approval. Martin will assume his
dutfj i* Aug. l,
Ms rtin replaces Dr. Russell S.
PCojr who recently resigned to
becofie director of the Division of
Nuclear Education and Training
for die Atomic Energy Commis Commission
sion Commission In Washington.
As provost of the Health Center,
Martin is responsible to the UF
president for the Colleges of Medi Medicine,
cine, Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, Health
Related Services, as well as the
Teaching Hospital and Clinics.
Martin has served as professor
of medicine and head of the UF
Department of Medicine since
1966. He was also Medical Di Director
rector Director of the General Clinics and
Director of Post Graduate Educa Education
tion Education in the College of Medicine.
Martin received his MJ>. de degree
gree degree from Washington University
School of Medicine. He was asso associate
ciate associate professor of medicine at
Duke until joining the Rockefeller
institute for Medical R ess arch.
He joined the UF faculty in
1906.

expected to become self-sustaining
in order to reimburse the borrow borrowed
ed borrowed money. v
According to Stanley the 18-hole
golf course will be open to all stu students
dents students and faculty for modest fees,
but that the method of operation
has not been determined yet. This
will be up to the Board of Direc Directors
tors Directors of the Athletic Association,
Inc.

THE SUMMER GATOR

> J
UF Engineering
Gains Strength
The State Board of Control has
recommended the UF engineer engineering
ing engineering program be strengthened.
In a progress report A. J. Brum Brumbaugh,
baugh, Brumbaugh, director of the Role and
Scope study of state universities,
said the UF should be allowed to
offer the Ph. D. in mechanical,
aerospace and industrial engineer engineering.
ing. engineering.
Brumbaugh also recommended
the UF undergraduate program in
nursing be strengthened.
Florida State University was al also
so also given the authority to increase
its engineering program to the
Ph. D. level effective in the fall
of 1065.
FftU nursing program also was
increased.
The board recommended against
establishing a degree program in
engineering at the University of
South Florida at this time.
Dr. John Allen of the Universi University
ty University of South Florida protested the
survey team had spent only a few
hours on his campus.
Alien said in light of a survey
showing a shortage of 30,000 engin engineers
eers engineers by 1970, there is a definite
need to plan now to set up an engi engineering
neering engineering program at South Florida.
The board also began consider considering
ing considering the 1903-06 budgets at its meet meeting
ing meeting last week. Its own request for
a 38 per cent increase in appropri appropriations
ations appropriations was submitted.
The board approved an asking
of $403,106 for its general office,
which calls for salary increases of
10 per cent for the first year of the
biennium and five per cent for the
second. J
The 1001-40 biennium budget was
$004,001.

Curved Country Club Overlooks Golf Course

University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida Friday, July 27, 1962

Sophomores, Transfers Face
Upper Division Entry Exams

He said that the entire Country
Club including pool, dancing facili facilities
ties facilities and locker rooms will be used
by the UF, in some way but that
the golf course is the main rea reason
son reason for the purchase. The course
will be used by students and facul faculty
ty faculty and as a laboratory for physi physical
cal physical education classes.
The Athletic Association has
been studying a list of 51 universi universities

WiWMWIimiIIWWMWMIIIMIIIIIIIIWBMWWtIffIWIIIWHtttIIfIIHIItIHIHIWIiWggWHWBBHfOTWIWIBIMWBBMIMMWHBMMMHBBWI
Med Center Obtains
$2 Million Grunt
The largest research grant in the UFs 100-year history historys2,o7B,
s2,o7B, historys2,o7B, ,306 has been awarded the J. Hillis Miller Health Center by
the U. d Public Health Service.
The grant provides for the establishment and support of a clin clinical
ical clinical research center. The center will include patient care and nurs nursing
ing nursing and technical staffs for a 10-bed research clinic.
The cHntoal research center will enable physicians at the Teach Teaching
ing Teaching Hospital and Clinics to study and treat selected patients under
controlled conditions while avoiding the prohibitive costs normally
encountered for this kjnjd of care.
Patients admitted to th4 special unit will not be charged for
(Continued on Page THREE J

ties universities that have golf courses to see
how they operate. Among schools
on the list are LSU, Duke, N. C.,
111. and Mich.
We have unqualified statements
from all schools with golf courses
that it is one of the finest attri attributes
butes attributes a college can have," Stanley
said.
The Club is located on Newber Newberry
ry Newberry Road a mile from the Stadium

*
What UF Gets
18 hole golf course
swimming pool
locker rooms
boll room
restaurant

and adjoins UF property on the
, SW. With the purchase of this pro property
perty property there will be continuous UF
land SW to the center of campus.
"The purchase of the Country
Club will be wonderful for the mor morale,
ale, morale, spirit and health of all stu students
dents students at the UF," Stanley said.
"We are pleased to accept the
proposal of the Gainesville Golf
(Continued on Page TWO)

Control Board
Passes Ruling
By BEN GARRETT
Gator News Editor
Sophomores in the future may
have to pass comprehensive exam examinations
inations examinations before they can be admit admitted
ted admitted to the upper division.
The State Board of Control has
accepted a compulsory sophomore
examination as one of the criter criteria
ia criteria for selecting students for admis admission
sion admission to the junior and senior lev level.
el. level.
The test requirement must now
be approved by the State Board of
Education. If approved, it will be begin
gin begin with the fall trimester 1964.
At present, the general require requirement
ment requirement for upper-division admit admittance
tance admittance is an overall C average in
the University College.
The aim of the examination is
to motivate students in their fresh freshman
man freshman and sophomore years, up upgrade
grade upgrade the level of teaching for
those classes and weed out be low lowaverage
average lowaverage students.
The board agreed to start in
March 1963 an 18-month period of
evaluation, to compare scores with
actual student progress, to deter determine
mine determine the validity of the test and
to arrive at a cutoff point in the
scoring.
Public junior colleges and all
state universities will administer
the tests if they are approved by
the board of education.
A period of evaluation is neces necessary
sary necessary because the test is new and
there is no national norm of per performance.
formance. performance.
Test scores will be a major fac factor
tor factor in upper division admittance
but not the only one. Grades and
other factors bearing on the stu students
dents students ability will be taken into
consideration.
The new test was developed by
the National Testing Center in
Princeton, N. J. It is similar to
the graduate record examinations
given to graduate school appli applicants.
cants. applicants.

Democracy
Firat
See Page 4

1



Page 2

Jfc* HI &Vi 1 il > i i
Groundbreak Set
For New Buildings

By CAROLE RARDELLA
Gator Feature* Editor
Construction on the new Archi Architecture
tecture Architecture and Fine Arts Building
is expected to start by Decem December
ber December or January, Dean Turpin C.
Bannister of the College of Archi Architecture
tecture Architecture and Fine Arts announced
Tuesday.
Dean Bannister said the build building
ing building will start as soon as the work working
ing working plans are finished. He said
the plans have been in progress
since 1958, but could not be com completed
pleted completed until the state released the
necessary funds this year.
According to Bannister, money
has now been released for com completion
pletion completion of the plans, but not for
the actual construction. However,
he is confident that the money
will be in the new bond issue and
will be released when the plans
are finished.
We have every expectation
that we will receive the money as
soon as we're ready to start build building,"
ing," building," Dean Bannister said.
The new college will be three
modem buildings located south
of Building E between Tigert
Hall and the Yulee area.
"It will be built on one of the
most beautiful sites on campus,"
Dean Bannister said.
At present the College of Ar Architecture
chitecture Architecture and Fine Arts is using
eight temporary buildings scat scattered
tered scattered across campus.
Dean Bannister said that these
temporary buildings are danger-
Country Club
(Continued from Page ONE)
and Country Club," UF President
J. Wayne Reitz said after learn learning
ing learning of that organizations vote last
night to sell its present facilities
to the University Athletic Asso Association,
ciation, Association, Inc.
The initial portion of the $550,*
000 purchase price will come from'
Athletic Assn, reserve funds ac accumulated
cumulated accumulated a few years back and
the balance will be obtained by
using the Associations chartered
corporate authority to borrow
funds. It is expected to be self
sustaining.
Reitz said, The purchase of
these facilities will provide an
opportunity for faculty and stu students
dents students to engage in & well-designed
plan of recreation and also pro provide
vide provide a laboratory for physical
education students." Every ef effort
fort effort will be made to utilize the
entire facility for the maximum
recreational benefit of faculty and
staff and students.
The University plans to take
possession of the facilities in Sep Septemper,
temper, Septemper, 1963 unless conditions at
the new country club require a
delay.
Dean D. K. (Dutch) Stanley,
chairman of the Committee which
negotiated the purchase for the
Athletic Association, said "This
addition is a tremendously val valuable
uable valuable facility in the continuing
development of one of the finest
physical education and recre recretional
tional recretional set-ups in the entire coun country.
try. country.
"We believe," he said, "that
the health benefits our students
and faculty will enjoy will im improve
prove improve morale, provide an attrac attractive
tive attractive environment for students on
campus and result in a higher
level of physical fitness throughout
the student body."
Rome 1
Stylist
W Your Friendly
shop
W
Welcome Students
319 UNIV WJL
Pfc. 372-5549
FREE EARRING IN REAR
Next to Long's Cafeteria

The Summer Gofer, Friday, July 27, 1962

ous besides being a hinderance
to good work. He said he was
greatly alarmed when the tem temporary
porary temporary music building caught cm
fire during the first of this
month.
"We are the last major unit
at the UF not to have any per permanent
manent permanent facilities," he said.
Dean Bannister said even after
the new buildings are erected, it
will be necessary to still occupy
four of the present temporary
buildings, because the state is ex expected
pected expected to only release $1.75 mil million
lion million while $2.5 million is necessary
to accommodate all students.
In an ordinary semester the Col College
lege College 'handles about 850-900 upper
and lower division students. This
includes architecture, building con construction,
struction, construction, interior design, art
and music students.
The new college will be built
by Kemp, Bunch and Jackson, of
Jacksonville and is expected to be
finished in two years. Besides
classrooms, there will be an ex exhibition
hibition exhibition gallery which will serve
the whole University.
"We expect more and better
work to be done by the stu students
dents students in these new modem build buildings,"
ings," buildings," Dean Bannister said.
Florida Union
Has Frothy Past
By ELMA HENDERSON
Gator Staff Writer
The Florida Union, center of UF
student activities, might be consid considered
ered considered a YMCA clubhouse.
According to Dr. Austin B.
Creel, of the religion department,
all credit for the idea of & Union
should go to the Y.M.C.A. which,
at one time, controlled all student
activities on campus.
Plans for.the Union were begun
in the 1920s when the Y.M.C.A. re recognized
cognized recognized a need for a student acti activities
vities activities center. William Jennings
Bryan, for whom Bryan Lounge is
named, and who was a close friend
of the UF's President A. A. Mur Murphree,
phree, Murphree, stomped the state, using
his silver tongue to inveigle dona donations
tions donations for the project.
Several thousands of dollars in
cash and pledges had been collect collected
ed collected when the depression came
along, making it impossible to col collect
lect collect all the pledges. For a time,
plans for the center were aban abandoned.
doned. abandoned.
In the late 1930s the money
which had been collected was add added
ed added to state funds and the center
was finally built.
Originally the building was much
smaller than it is now. The North
Wing was not added until after
World War 11.
The Florida Union houses many
game rooms, publications offices
and student government offices,
there is also the Department of
Religion, the guest rooms, listen listening
ing listening rooms, art exhibits and a
browsing library.
Soon the present Union will give
way to a modem air conditioned
Union with increased recreational
facilities. Plans are now being for formulated
mulated formulated for the new Union, which
is expected to be completed by the
fall of 1965.

CHECK THE
CALICO KITCHEN
DAILY
for
3 'lil 9 Specials \

THE QUEEN OF 1962 SUMMER FROLICS AND HER COURT.
UF Praises Frolics Queen

. . Pictured above are Queen
Carol Zimmer, 4AS; First run runner
ner runner up Irene Wilde, IUC; Sec Second
ond Second Runner up Qfnthia Wheeler,
IUC.
The Queen was awarded an
Electric Hair dryer, donated by

Goy't Grants Help Studies
In Lotin American Area

By M. JEAN EWING
Gator Special Writer
The test for the United States
is understanding our Latin Ameri American
can American neighbors said Dr. Harvey
K. Meyer in a speech Thursday.
Creating this mood of understand understanding,
ing, understanding, Dr. Meyer showed slides of
ancient and modem modes of life
in Nicaragua and the other 13 re republics
publics republics bordering the Caribbean.
There are active volcanoes and
old tree-clad craters, steel-and steel-andconcrete
concrete steel-andconcrete office buildings and
thatched huts. Com is ground
oh stone-age hand mills, yet the
national granary in Managua,
Nicaragua, is one of the most
modem in the world. There are
a few wealthy landholding fam families,
ilies, families, multilingual and well-edu well-educated,
cated, well-educated, but two-thirds of the people
are illiterate and poor.
Dr. Meyers main interest, how however,
ever, however, is education of the people.
dr e n entering
eight will gradu- **
ate from second- j§
ary school. This
average gradu graduating
ating graduating senior 'j|.
class consists of
four students. Meyer
Elementary school is nominally
compulsory from ages six to 13
but attendance is not enforced,
and neither secondary education
nor teacher qualification Is uni uniform.
form. uniform. Nicaragua admits to 05 per
cent illiteracy, but of the remain remaining
ing remaining 35 per cent almost one-half
do not have functional literacy
that is materials to read.
The high illiteracy and eco economic
nomic economic under-development should
be met with imaginative smaH
programs at the level of the peo peoples
ples peoples daily needs not with vast
government projects which are

Baird Hardware Co.; an elec electric
tric electric clock, by Chase and Kitch Kitchens;
ens; Kitchens; a pearl necklace by Du Duval
val Duval Jewelry Store; a $35 gift
certificate, by Donigans; and
a shampoo and set, by Blanche's
Beauty Shop.

often remote economic or social
realities, says Dr. Meyer. He
questions further, "Why not use
water wheel* out of a thousand
small creeks rath*er than build
oversize multimillion dollar hy hydroelectric
droelectric hydroelectric project*."
If the United States is not able
to carry out imaginative pro programs
grams programs of education, assistance,
and understanding, the southern
half of the hemisphere will cer certainly
tainly certainly be Communist or its equiv equivalent
alent equivalent within a decade, he says.
A program to assist technical
education in Nicaragua was es established
tablished established in 1065 by the Inter International
national International Cooperative Association,
the UF, and two cooperating
Nicaraguan agencies. Dr. Meyer
served as Chief Advisor of the
program.

SANITONE
Colors sparkle, patterns revive, fine fabrics stay new looking longer
that's what these famous fashion houses discovered in test after
test of the Sanitone Dry Cleaning Process. And that's why they
recommend Sanitone to give clothes a "like-new" look every time
you wear them.
COSTS NO MORE
You pay as much for any quality dry cleaning, so why not be sure
of America's best? Call on us todoy for nationally advertised
Sanitone service.
KLEAN-A-MATIC
1724 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
DRIVE IN 1717 N.W. Is AVE.
Gatehouse .gjjk-j.
RESTAURANT W"!
1222 Wot* Untvw*ltv Av*. \ v /
FRIED CHICKEN DINNERS V,
SEA FOOD PIXTTERS
STEAK DINNERS V
Of Deity fram f
Niw Iwfcw
< it* | | /
il
1222W.0i.1v. Av*. Hhm 176-5842

The two runners-up each re received
ceived received a shampoo aad set, do donated
nated donated by Renees Beauty Sa Salon;
lon; Salon; a womans Parker Fen, by
Barkers Office Supply; a steak
dinner, by Larrys Wonder
House; and a spaghetti dinner,
by Manaros Restaurant.
The winners were chosen in
day-long competition beginning
last Saturday at if a.m. with
an interview at the Holiday
Inns General Gaines Steak
House. Coffee and douglinuta
were served the judges and 10
contestants. That afternoon, the
bathing suit competition wa*
held at the Holiday Inn pool hi
conjunction with a fashion show
from Donigans clothing store.
That evening, the Third An Annual
nual Annual Saints and Sinners Ball
was kicked off witk the display
of balance, poise and grace by
the contestants to climax the
queen judging.
Judges for the queen contest
were Alachua County Sheriff
Joe Crevasse; UF political m>
enoo professor Harry Kaoter;
Wynn Brown, WGGG; Alan
Franks, Holiday Inn man manager;
ager; manager; Barbara Chamberlain,
Blanche's; Mrs. David Brandy
G'vllle Daily Sun.



.the idea was from the UF Architecture Dept, as part of
student project.
UF Students
Build House

By CAROLE BARDELLA
Gator Features Editor
A three-bedroom house is located
fta Westmoreland Estates in Gain Gainesville,
esville, Gainesville, and like all the other three
bedroom houses in this area, its
occupied by a family.
The different thing about this
house, however, is its background.
The whole house was a project
Os the School of Architecture and
Fine Arts under contract with the
student Builders Association, Inc.
Which is a nonprofit organization.
The house was designed by ar architecture
chitecture architecture students, and built by
building construction students;
the landscape was done by land landscape
scape landscape architecture students and
the inside was decorated by in interior
terior interior design students.
The Gainesville chapter of the
Florida Homebuilders Assn, gave
advice and assistance during the
construction.
According to Professor Herman
H. Block, head of the Building
Construction Department, the
house got started in early 1958
and was finished in the spring of
1959. It was built to be shown in
the Architecture and Fine Arts
Home Show April 23, 1959.
Block said that the structure
part of the house was built in
Tampa and brought to Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville by a large trailer truck. It
was then constructed by students

UF Gets $2 Million Grant
(Continued from Page ONE)
their treatment nor will the state of Florida or hospitalization In Insurance
surance Insurance companies. In order for a patient to be admitted a doctor
must show that the course of treatment he plans will increase medi medi*al
*al medi*al knowledge of the particular disease and that file treatment is
consistent with good patient care.
Dr. William C. Thomas Jr. was named medical director of the
unit. It will be governed by a committee of physicians from the
clinical departments of the College of Medicine.
The center is one of 40 established at teaching hospitals through throughout
out throughout the nation to advance the study of medical problems.
jm
d
'I omm
Bis
Mkml Smmer Rites New n Effect I
WORLD TRAVEL SERVICE
808 Wrf Unirersity Are.
Phone F 8 6-4641

on its present site. The project
took about three semesters, and
as one group of students gradua graduated,
ted, graduated, another group took over.
The job was done completely
by students, Bloc k said. It
provided a wonderful opportunity
for them to find out all the dif difficulties
ficulties difficulties you can get into when
building any type of structure. It
also made them aware of the fact
that you have to control all pro progress
gress progress and finances to remain in
business.
Block said that the house is equal
to any of its kind done by a pro professional
fessional professional firm.
It would take a very good con constructioner
structioner constructioner to turn out a better
house, he said.
After the house was completed,
it was featured at the Architec Architecture
ture Architecture Home Show and an estimated
20,000 people visited it. Students
conducted tours through the house
giving out informatics! and ans answering
wering answering questions.
After the Home Show was over
the house was put up for sale
with the asking price of $32,000,
but it sold six months later for
quite a bit less.
According to Block, the money
received for the house just about
covered the cost of building it.
The house later was resold to
the family presently living in it.

Yes! We Have Chickens

By ROGER COPPEDGE
Gator Staff Writer
Most people dont even know
we exist, said N. R. Mehrhof,
head of the UFs Department of
Poultry Science.
The Department of Poultry
Science is located at the Poultry
Experiment Station one mile
west of the J. Hillis Miller Health
Center on Archer Road.
The main project presently un under
der under way at the station is experi experiments
ments experiments with nutritional values of
various feed mixtures.
Other projects have been deve developed
loped developed with an eye toward junior
high and high schools throughout
Florida.
One of the most popular pro projects
jects projects is hatching colored baby
chicks. Ttie kids seem to like
this one the best of all, said
Mehrhof.
The object of the project is to
dye developing baby chicks in the
egg shell to produce colored
chicks at hatching.
Mehrhof attributes the special
attention given to high schools for
the growing emphasis placed on all
areas of science in public schools.
We frequently have requests
from students asking for ideas
and suggestions on projects,
said Mehriiof. In order to fill
these requests, the station pub published
lished published a bulletin outlining three
main project ideas.
The first project is the chicka chickadee
dee chickadee dying. The second is watching
the baby chick from start of in incubation
cubation incubation through time of hatch hatching.
ing. hatching. The third is the effect of in incubation
cubation incubation temperatures on the
development of the chick embryo.
Each year as more and more
students are introduced to the
world of poultry science a great greater
er greater load is placed on the experi-

The ORIGINAL PIZZA PATIO
has moved
and combines with the
PIZZA PANTRY
1308 W. UNIV. AVE.
PIZZA
LARGE SIZE 50c
SMALL SIZE 25c Wl I
PLAIN 2O con large
10c off on small
ALL YOU CAN EAT
SPAGHETTI . SI.OO
served with plain sauce v
or meat sauce
These Specials and Prices Good
'til Aug. 11th
PHONE FR 2-1655
' M i'l 1111 |j,, j | |

Tto Siwwif Gator, Friday, July 27, 1962

FOR NE'ER DO WELL CHICKEN-PLUCKERS, et of
. .Take your lessons from UFs Chicken Farm where the
chickens come in assorted colors.

mental station.
In order to further accommo accommodate
date accommodate these demands from all over
Florida, the experiment station
has sent out two incubators for
statewide display.
According to Mehrhof, these
incubators tour the various high
schools and also are used by other
organizations throughout the state.
Additional projects are currently

under development for use in
science clubs or high schools.
We have a tremendous need for
science projects of this sort, not
only in Florida, but all over the
U. S., M said Mehrhof.
For those interested in seeing
the life cycle of the baby chicks,
Mehrhof said that members of
the staff will show visitors through
the station.

Page 3



Page Four

democracy first
%
About 100 years ago the North and South squared
off to do battle. In that century old battle the North
came out the victor.
This Wednesday, the North and South will square
off for another big one. Only this time the batitle will
be confined to North Florida vs. South Florida. Lots of
people are betting on the South to win this one.
* *
WE HOPE the special session of the State Legisla Legislature
ture Legislature doesnt turn into another civil war battle field.
Battle cries such as South Florida might elect the
governor but theyll never elect the Legislature,
should be forgotten.
If the South should win a total victory, then recon reconstruction
struction reconstruction will begin in the North. If the North should
win, then well be right back where we started and
in for more Federal Court action.
We tend to like Gov. Bryants thinking on the issue,
a geographically apportioned Senate and a popula population
tion population apportioned House of Representatives.
* *
HOWEVER, other states have experimented with
this set up. As in other states, we fear Florida would
end up with an industrial liberal House of Represen Representatives
tatives Representatives and an agricultural conservative Senate. We
feel this would sharpen the legislative issues too fine
and reach a point of diminishing returns.
On the other hand, if the entire Legislature were
apportioned on the basis of population, then the small
counties would end up taking pot luck.
One extreme or the other could have alarming rami ramifications
fications ramifications here at the UF. If South Florida controlled
the purse strings, the UF could become a financial
ghost town until reconstruction was over. With a
liberal-conservative the same thing could
happen. Need we remind our state Legislators of
the financial difficulties in Michigan when Gov. G.
Mennen Williams left office,
. tv >'4
UNTOLD millions have been poured into the UF
and Florida State University in the past. What earth earthly
ly earthly good could come from a wallowing in the spoils of
victory and pouring the states higher education
monies into one end of the dftate ? What earthly jgood
could come from a deadlocked legislature and jpour jpouring
ing jpouring money into no part of the state?
Come Wednesday, we hope our legislators' Nvill
keep one thought in mind at all times: Our democracy
is based on majority rule but recognition of the mi minority.
nority. minority.
We are glad Gov. Bryant has not adamantly? said
there should be one senator per county and the House
of Representatives based on population. Nor has he
said the whole works should be based on population.
We hope the legislators will bear this in mind.
THE SOMMER GATOR
Member Associated Collegiate Press
The SUMMER GATOR is the official student' newspaper of the -University and is
published every Friday morning during the summer session. The SUMMER GATOR
ia entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville.
Florida. Offices are located is Rooms 8, 10 and 15 in the Florida Union Building Base*
ment. Telephone University of Florida, FR 6 3261, Ext. 2031 and reguest either
editorial office or business office.
Opinions voiced in personal columns on this page do not necessarily reflect the
pinions of the editors. Only editorials are the official voice Os the paper.
Editor-in-Chief Tom Gibson
Managing Editor Fred Schneider
Business Manager Sharon Smith
Sports Editor: Jared Lebow
Feature Editor Carole Bardell#
News Editor Ben Garrett
Ass t. News Editor Larry Woods
Headline Editor Bonnie Dahlquist
Photographer Sam Johnston
Artid Milton Bloc
EDITORIAL STAFF
Pam Bishop, Linda Guelker, Hugh Me Arthur, Jackie Stevens, Rosalyn MacDonald,
Pete Supove, Harry Reid, Gary Peacock, Milton Bloc, Sam Johnston, Elma Hen Henderson,
derson, Henderson, Bob Haggard, Jon Williams. Rosalie Filsinger, Bonnie Dahlguist, Larry Wood,
Mark Frankel, Robert Jones, Bill Carry.
BUSINESS STAFF
Advertising Staff Jim Harper, Steve Green, Dave Whitfield, Otto Busot
Office Manager Suzanne Coots
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V. CAN I HELP VOO? \ Board I i | NEW BULLETIN BdAODand V
V "/ l THIS JOKgfc qjANTSTO Hg=Vl

Editorials

July 27/1962

By FRED SCHNEIDER
Theres a little problem.
Through some misinterpreta misinterpretation
tion misinterpretation on MY part, I last week
chided the infirmary for send sending
ing sending me home with ptomaine poi poisoning.
soning. poisoning.
Well, what I really had was
never told me
I had ptomaine Schneider
but I felt like I was poisoned,
so I figured What poison do
you contract that you dont die
from? Ptomaine I said. There
may be others but Im not writ writing
ing writing a book.
So from my sickbed I wrote
about ptomaine poisoning. I felt
very sorry for myself. I thought
I was dying. I wanted to be
remembered as a martyr.
Now, I dont mind admitting
when I make a mistake. Im not
perfect. Right?
The main thing that opened
my eyes to the fact that I had
something special other than
you-know-whatwas the fact
that everyone at the Gator
caught my ptomaine.
It isnt everyday that people
catch ptomaine. So I had to dis disqualify
qualify disqualify my theory about pto ptomaine.
maine. ptomaine.
Also, when I thought my days
were up I asked to be admit admitted
ted admitted to the infirmary. AND THEY
LET ME IN!
I found the whole place air airconditioned
conditioned airconditioned and comfortable.
And the night nurse (I dont
know her name) was really
great. I felt like I was in a real,
live-type hospital. She was won wonderful.
derful. wonderful.
And then the doctor came in.
With my colurqn. He was nice
about itbut I was wrong about
my ailment. Well, were clear clearing
ing clearing that up right now.
He was very nice to me. It
isnt often you meet a doctor

mi A
7r l gMw
+ Vj
V X (SSUE
MANAGING EDITOR'S NOTE
Infirmary Revisited;
About That Tummy Ache

with a sense of humor. Hes
from my hometown.
He jokingly sent in the psychi psychiatrist
atrist psychiatrist (psychologist) trying
ing to joke at me for my nut nutty
ty nutty column.
I apologize for the tongue-in tongue-incheek
cheek tongue-incheek about the doctor. He was
really very nice to me.
HOWEVERif anyone else
has any complaints about my
columnkindly write a letter to
the editor. He is also very friend friendly.
ly. friendly.
The
Summer Gator
Welcomes
Letters
To the Editor
Names will be .
.withheld on request.
We reserve the right.;.
. .to edit letters
Please sign all letters.

CONSERVATIVE COMMENT

Senator from Tennessee
Not Talking Muck Lately

By ROBERT L. JONES
Tennessees Sen. Estes Kefau Kefauver
ver Kefauver has been maintaining a
strange silence these past
months on one of his favorite
subjectsthe alleged malprac malpractices
tices malpractices of the drug industry.
The silence is strange only be because
cause because the senator has for some
time claimed the drug industry
as his personal punching bag,
walloping away at it with great
abandon. There is good reason
for his current silence on the
subject.
On October 31, Robert L. Pi Piper,
per, Piper, a hearing examiner for the
Federal Trade Commis Commission,
sion, Commission, completely debunked the
Kefauver medicine show.
* *
AFTER A thorough examina examination
tion examination of the charges level e d
against five major drug firms
by the F.T.C., essentially the
same accusation made by Ke Kefauvers
fauvers Kefauvers investigating subcom subcommitteePiper
mitteePiper subcommitteePiper declared:
The respondents have not
engaged in any (repeat, any) of
the violations alleged in the
oompiak*. Among other
tilings, Piper discovered:
There has been a steady de decline
cline decline of effective prices 1 to con consumers

Speaking of traditions .
A term paper forced me to
invade the inner sanctum of
males the other day . the
Law Library.
The law school shuffle. a
form of protest, greeted me .
along with banging on the walls
and stomping of feet. One in indignant
dignant indignant law student got so vo vociferous
ciferous vociferous at 'my presence he be began
gan began to knock his umbrella
against the wall.
I needed ma- ....
prerogi prerogitive
tive prerogitive to be in c*.o)
the library.
* *
PRINCIPLE FIRST . term
paper second ... I stayed.
The noise subsided but started
again . and again. By the
time I was ready to leave, the
law school shuffle was pret pretty
ty pretty willy-nilly in my estima estimation.
tion. estimation.
However, that was before I
found out that Frank Maloney,
Dean of the Law School, also
got similar treatment later that
same night.
It made me think ... not
everyone gets shuffled You
have to be SOMEBODY ... or
a girl.
* # #
JAM TODAY .
In Alice Through the Look Looking
ing Looking Glass, the Queen tells Alice
she can have jam yesterday
and jam tomorrow, but never
jam today.
Why do so many people wait
for tomorrow to enjoy life when
there are so many things avail available
able available today . the poetry of
Shakespeare, the music, of
Tchaikovsky and the paintings of
Chagalle.
Or if you like things in a
different vein . how about
the music of Dave Brubeck, the
twist, beat poetry, Zen .
Then theres the beauty of
the campus, friendship, even
work . these things are ac accessable
cessable accessable now.
Why not jam today?
. . Carole Bardella

sumers consumers and Federal agencies ov over
er over the years which negates an
inference of conspiracy to fix
prices".
* *
THERE IS nothing wicked in
companies charging the same
price for drugs and, in (act, in
many instances this is the re re its prices to meet those of com competitors.
petitors. competitors.
None of the respondents made
any misrepresentations to or
withheld any material informa information
tion information from the Patent Office, as
has been charged.
* *
NOR, I might add, is the Fe Federal
deral Federal Trade Commission any
patsy for big business. The P.
T.C., egged on by Kefauvers in investigations,
vestigations, investigations, has been in the
forefront of the hounding cam campaign
paign campaign against the drug industry.
If anything, Hr. Piper must
have been under severe press pressure
ure pressure to render a verdict against
the firms investigated. For one
reason, Mr. Pipers boss is
Paul Rand Dixon, former chief
council of Kefauvers anti- trust
subcommittee.
At the risk of appearing naive,
may I suggest that the Tennes Tennessee
see Tennessee senator owes an apology to
the drug industry.



IN THE DARK

More on Nuremberg Trials
Only in a Different Vein

By H. T. REID
Nominee for eleven. Acade Academy
my Academy Awards, Judgment at Nu Nuremberg"
remberg" Nuremberg" explores* one of the
most pressing problems of 20th
Century life.
Revolving around many indi individuals,
viduals, individuals, the screenplay by Ab Abby
by Abby Mann combines these num-
Have Pros
At Studies?
EDITOR:
Concerning the educational
systems of this state, there has
been much controversy over
funds and monies. We have all
listened with gracious ears to
the cries of the faculty and ad administration
ministration administration over monetary pol policy.
icy. policy.
Instead of worrying over
money that we dont have, I
ask you to examine an insti institution
tution institution that is wasting money
that we DO have.
Every year an army of train trained
ed trained gladiators passes through
our school. They are well in instructed
structed instructed in the various and
sundry arts of combat. They are
usually fed at the expense of
the school.
They are usually in need of
special tutoring and they usual usually
ly usually receive vast sums for equip equipment
ment equipment (not books).
They are the objects of much
adoration by the highly inebriat inebriated
ed inebriated alumni that descend upon
us every year, and of the highly
inebriated fraternity men.
If you conclude from the
above that I am against foot football,
ball, football, you are, of course, grossly
mistaken. What I am against
is the waste of money, the spe special
cial special privileges, and the adora adoration
tion adoration of nothing.
Professional sporting events
play a great part in our lives,
but why not leave them to the
pros? Can anybody tell me
why this school needs a pro professional
fessional professional football team?
ROBERT DORP, 2UC
HALFNOTE

UF's Musical Summer
Closes With Two Operas

By JACKY STEVENS
This musical summer will come
to a close with Dr. Elwood Keis Keisters
ters Keisters production of The Tele Telephone
phone Telephone and The Medium. This
pair of operettas by the well wellknown
known wellknown American composer Gian-
Carlo Menotti will be presented in
the new P. K. Yonge auditori auditorium,
um, auditorium, Aug. 2 and 3 at 8:15 p. m.
The Medium, written in 1942,
'Ur according to Menotti, the
not believe.
The story deals with a woman
of mystical powers whose spiri-
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erous stories into the theme of
human responsibility.
Aiding this award winning
screenplay are the adroit per performances
formances performances turned in by veter veterans
ans veterans of motion pictures.
Spencer Tracy portrays a
small town American judge.
judges person- REID
al life.
* *
MAXIMILIAN SCHELL, a
newcomer, earns his Oscar for
best actor with his performance
as the defense lawyer.
Burt Lancasters acting is of
the caliber of a great star. Add Added
ed Added to this talent is a job of
make-up seldom seen on the
screen. One might sit entirely
through this movie and not rea realize
lize realize that Lancaster is in it.
* *
JUDY GARLAND returns to
the screen in this picture after
an absence of six years. She
portrays the victim of a notor notoriously
iously notoriously vicious miscarriage 6f
justice. Judys performance won
her a nomination for best sup supporting
porting supporting actress.
With these actors, superb per performances,
formances, performances, excellent script,
skilled photography and brillir
ant direction, Judgment At
Nuremberg at the State Thea Theatre
tre Theatre through Tuesday is more
than a must see movie, its a
dont miss!
* *
WALT DISNEYS latest Pol Pollyanna
lyanna Pollyanna venture at the
theatre this week falls short of
his recent comedies. Even those
who might feel embarrassed for
enjoying The Shaggy Dog or
101 Dalmations wont have
to worry about enjoying Bon
Voyage.
Jane Wyman is Jane Wyman
and Fred Mac Murray ?s Fred
Mac Murray and Europe is Eur Europe
ope Europe . again and again and
again.

tualistic actions evoke an event
unexplainable. This event so com completely
pletely completely unnerves her that she
gives up her profession and ends
up by committing murder.
The Telephone, written in
1947, is a satirical piece, the plot
is enacted mainly over the tele telephone.
phone. telephone. It is centered around the
efforts of a suitor constantly inter interrupted
rupted interrupted by phone calls. The cast,
John Culligan and Laura Cobbs
will dress in costumes of the
1900s.
The Medium set in 1930 will
include Barbara and Larry Clark Clarkston,
ston, Clarkston, Charles Hopkins, Becky
Daniels, Marilyn Uelsmann and
Marlene Potter. The cast has
been practicing hard all sum- 1
mer and an excellent perform performance
ance performance is anticipated.

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THIS IS THE WAY!
. > Annie, Helen and little boy in a scene from The Miracle
Worker playing at Normal Hall Auditorium through Saturday, j
GATOR GUEST CRITIC
'Miracle Worker Lauded

By JACK PENROD
UF English Professor
Florida Players summer pro production,
duction, production, The Miracle Work Worker,
er, Worker, opened Wednesday even evening
ing evening in Norman Hall to a large
and receptive audience. The per performance,
formance, performance, directed by Dr. John
Kirk, was strongly handled by
a hard-working, well-chosen cast
and the difficult technical pro problems
blems problems of the play were excel excellently
lently excellently solved.
William Gibsons Broadway
hit of two years ago, now in
production as a movie, is con concerned
cerned concerned with the enormous bar barriers
riers barriers encountered by Annie Sul Sullivan
livan Sullivan when she came to Tuscum Tuscumbia,
bia, Tuscumbia, Alabama in the 1870s to at attempt
tempt attempt to teach the mute, blind,
and deaf child, Helen Keller.
Margaret Kaler, St. Augus Augustine
tine Augustine freshman, and Diane Pel Pelfrey,
frey, Pelfrey, Ocala junior, were remark remarkably
ably remarkably effective in the parts of
Miss Sullivan and Helen Keller,
respectively.
Both of these roles are tre tremendously
mendously tremendously demanding, physical physically
ly physically as well as emotionally, and
each actress met the require requirements
ments requirements of her part with force forcefulness
fulness forcefulness and sensitivity alike.
The conflict between the child
and her teacher often breaks
out into physical violence. These
difficult scenes are played by
Miss Pelfrey and Miss Kaler
with authentic realism.
At the same time, the delicate
moments when the teacher is
trying so desperately to com communicate
municate communicate the meaning of lang language
uage language to her pupil, are profess professionally
ionally professionally handled by the two
leads.
Three other parts are almost
as important and almost as
large are those of Miss Sulli-
Politicians
Play Pickers
A scene on the third floor of
the Florida Union last week re revealed
vealed revealed the highest authority in
Student Government busily util utilizing
izing utilizing hairpins, paperclips, nailfiles
and a hammer as they tried to re reveal
veal reveal the contents of a long locked
defiant filing cabinet.
The President, Vice President,
and Treasurer of the Student Body
all strived to outwit the engin engineers
eers engineers who designed the object of
their intentions, also, they finally
called maintenance to unlock the
empty filing cabinet.

The Summer Gator, Friday, July 27, 1962

van and Helen Keller. Helens
mother and father, played by
Eleanor Broome and Klip
Smith, are constantly on stage
and intensely involved in the
struggle, now on the side of their
child, now seeing the value in
the teachers methods.
Hie brother James, portray portrayed
ed portrayed by Taylor Brooks, introduces
a sub-plot in a father-son con*
flict. This then merges with the
main plot when James takes a
stand on the side of Miss Sulli Sullivan.
van. Sullivan.
The smaller parts, taken by
Sara Jo Edlin, Dan Wilson, Jane
Soli, and Ted Curry were all
competent.
High praise must be given to
Mr. Ron Jerit, who served as
technical director for the pro production.
duction. production. The Miracle Worker

DON'T DO THAT!
... Annie is tempted to slap Helen in a scene from The
Mircle Worker which can be seen at Normal Hall Auditorium
through Saturday.
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is certainly one of the most dif difficult
ficult difficult plays, technically, that
the Florida Players have at attempted
tempted attempted in a long time.
Costuming, under the direction
of Miss Mary Stephenson, was
likewise effective and authentic.
From all the foregoing, it
should be clear that The Mir Miracle
acle Miracle Worker is at once a very
difficult and very reward in g
play. Full credit belongs to Kirk
for his highly successful direc direction.
tion. direction. His people move excellent excellently
ly excellently on the stage. The groupings
were natural yet dynamic, and
the whole productiona long
onemoved well.
The Players have a hit going
in this one. Two last perform performances
ances performances are offered: tonight and
Saturday, 8:00 p. m., in Nor Norman
man Norman Hall Auditorium.

Page 5



Page 6

Music Dept Presents Opera Aug. 2-3

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. The sound of one hand clapping in the music
department presentation of The Medium.
Pictured here are Becky Daniels and Charles
Hopkins.

UF PROFESSOR BIDS

A Farewell To Arms

By CONNIE OLEARY
Gator Staff Writer
Even the war is a very small
place, according to Dr. Albert
Wass de Czege, associate profes professor
sor professor of foreign languages. He illu illustrates
strates illustrates this statement with a per personal
sonal personal account
In the fall of 1944, Wass de
Oege, a captain in the Hungarian
Cavalry and aide to Commanding
General Veress, head of the Hun Hungarian
garian Hungarian Underground, was travel traveling
ing traveling in an offfi-
and Veress
ducked into a,
nearby field. Wa ~ de * e
Wass de Czege always carried a
large rifle, similar to an elephant
gun, which had been given to
him when, as a forestry inspec inspector,
tor, inspector, he had allowed a baron to
shoot a bear.
When the planes began to fire
upon the field, the former Olym Olympic
pic Olympic pistol shooter aimed at one
plane, fired, and hit his mark.
The plane made a hasty landing
behind the Russian trenches.
Two years ago Wass de Czege
was sitting in the foreign language
lab and heard someone outside
cursing loudly in Rumanian. He
discovered that a man had dropped
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The Summer Gator, Friday, July 27, 1962

some books on his foot and was
venting his anger in a language
he thought no one understood.
Later that day the man was
brought in and introduced as the
husband of a member of the lang language
uage language staff. He was to be working
as an assistant for the department.
He and Wass de Czege convers conversed
ed conversed about people and places, and
he asked Wass de Czege what
part of Hungary he was from.
When Wass de Czege told him,
he remarked, You know, a very
strange thing happened to me in
Hungary during the war. Some
Tool* shot at my plane from a
cornfield and put a hole in the en engine
gine engine as big as my fist. I dont
know what kind of gun he used.
I know what kind of gun, an answered
swered answered the professor, it was a
9.3 mm Magnum.
Astounded, the man stammered,
But how do you know?
Because, Wass de Czege re replied,
plied, replied, I was that fool.
Wass de Czege has published 24
novels in Hungarian and German
one of these a European best
seller. He also publishes books
in Hungarian in this country, dir directed
ected directed toward an audience in exile.
The value of books for people
in exile is greater than most peo people
ple people understand, he says. A wri writer
ter writer in exile doesnt make money.

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By CUFF LANDERS
Gator Special Writer
A harrassed lover and a haunt haunted
ed haunted medium highlight the first full
scale operettas to be presented by
the music department AugUst 2
and 3.
Dr. Elwood Keister, director,
has announced the following cast
members: THE TELEPHONE
Laurel Cobb and John Culligan;
THE MEDIUMBecky Daniels,
Barbara Clarkson, Marilyn Uels Uelsmann,
mann, Uelsmann, Larry Clarkson, Marlene
Potter, Charles Hopkins.
According to Keister, This
will be the first time, to the best
of our knowledge, that opera with
all the trappings has been present presented
ed presented on the campus by a student
group. He stressed the fact that
the composer, Gian-Carlo Menot Menotti,
ti, Menotti, is recognized as among the
foremost American composers of
light and serious opera.
THE TELEPHONE, a farce on
one act, is usually offered on the
same program with the more seri serious
ous serious THE MEDIUM. It centers
around the comical efforts of Ben,
a young man who has to catch a
train, to propose to Lucy, his
true love. Interrupted time and
again by the phone, Ben in desper desperation
ation desperation calls Lucy from the station,
and the two pledge their love in
a moving finale.
THE MEDIUM, a tragedy in two
acts, first won nation wide recog recognition
nition recognition for Menotti when it was

ROTC Programs Classes
In New Summer Trimester

By HOWARD STOMESIFER
Gator Staff Writer
Summer ROTC will accompany
the trimester system at the UF,
bringing with it various new prob problems
lems problems and attitudes.
Well teach ROTC in the sum summertime.
mertime. summertime. Thats an there is to
it, said Capt. John M. Browder,
Head of the Department of Mili Military
tary Military Science Professors (Army),
when queried as to how the com coming
ing coming trimester will affect the ROTC
program.
Apprised of the tidings, incom incoming
ing incoming freshman Donald Harper said,
I wouldnt take it then for any anything.
thing. anything. Harper*s reply is typical
of the students questioned.
Associate Registrar Richard H.
Whitehead said that he had no idea
of how many would sign up. I
dont even know how many will
attend the first trimester summer
section. You know, its hard to
break the four year habit.
The full year program of ROTC
is the step-child of the trimester
system. It was completely revamp revamped
ed revamped for the man who wants to grad graduate
uate graduate in three years and still
be able to complete advanced of officer
ficer officer training for a commission in
the service.
Under the new method, the Ar Army
my Army will offer ail but one of its

presented on Broadway in 1947.
Madama Flora, the title charac character,
ter, character, is a charlatan who fleeces the
gullible by conjuring spirits of
departed loved ones. Tragedy en enters
ters enters when the Medium calls forth
a spectre which she cannot ac account
count account for, driving her to such des despair
pair despair that she murders a bystand bystander
er bystander in a crazed attempt to free her herself
self herself of the supernatural grip of the
strange apparition.
Both works are among the
best-known by Menotti, an Italian Italianborn
born Italianborn composer who came to the
U.S. at the age of 17. Menotti won
the Pulitzer Prize in 1954 for his
The Saint of Bleeker Street, and
his Amahl and the Night Visi Visitors
tors Visitors is an annual presentation in
this country on Christmas Eve via
television. Menottis other works
include The Old Maid and the
Thief, The Consul, and Amel Amelia
ia Amelia Goes to the Ball.
Both productions will be present presented
ed presented at 8:15, August 2 and 3, at the
air-conditioned new P. K. Yonge
Auditorium, and that the Universi University
ty University Symphony Orchestra will ac accompany.
company. accompany. Sponsored jointly by the
Department of Music and by Stu Student
dent Student Government, the operas will
be open to the public and no ad admission
mission admission charge will be made.
More than 100 high school stu students,
dents, students, participants in the state
voice and chorus clinic, witness witnessed
ed witnessed a full-stage dress rehearsal of
THE TELEPHONE and THE
MEDIUM, Keister concluded.

required courses in the summer.
The course omitted will be the
first semester freshman program,
as high school students will not
graduate in time to take it. The
Air Force has a similar program
planned.
Capt. Browder believe? that over
720 will attend the Army pro program.
gram. program. Capt. William C. Taylor,
Asst. Professor of Education (Air
Force), estimates that about 300
will attend the Air Force ROTC.
Taylor said that it seemed strange
that the Army program should en enroll
roll enroll more students in the sum summer
mer summer trimester, as the Air Force
normally tops the Army by about
400.
Both Capt. Browder and Capt.
Taylor said the men would be per permitted
mitted permitted to wear short sleeve
shirts because of the heat, but
AIR CONDIITONED
NOW THRU TUESDAY
live la Fun!
presents
Sour
VOYAGE J
TECHNICOLOR*
i Starts Wednesday
' WILLIAM HOLDEN
LI LI PALMER J
* "THE COUNTERFEIT j
TRAITOR"

Br mm ohhmme iISC; oH
<, ij!
Hr J|
riH jfi
GET OFF THAT STINKIN' TELEPHONE!
... John Culligan and Laurel Cobb sing-a-song
of courtship divided by Alexander Graham Bell.
In the UF presentation of The Telephone.

drill would still take place in the
afternoon.
Ill tell you one thing for sure,**
said Donald Harper. You arent
going to catch me out on the field
in that heat!**
Gainesvicte
1# DRIVE-IN THEATRE
Fri., 7-27
"Picnic"
KIM NOVAK
"Pepe"
DAN DAILEY. SHIRLEY JONES
Sot., 7-28
'The Plunderers"
JEFF CHANDLER
"Up Front"
TOM EWELL
"Island In The Sun"
JAMES MASON
Sun. Mon., 7-29 j
"Sweet Bird of Youth"
PAUL NEWMAN
"Bridge to the Sun"
CARROLL BAKER
Tues., WED., 7-31,8-1
"Mysterious Island"
MICHAEL CALLAN
"Five Finger Exercise"
ROSALIND RUSSELL
Thurt. Fri., 8/2-3
"Walk on the
Wild Side"
LAURENCE HARVEY
If*,
"Once More
, With Feeling"
YUL BRYNNER



ln This Corner 8
Wasp Hinting I
Grand Sport I
By JARED LEBOW
Gator Sports Editor
Summer is the time for hunting. This ancient sport,
long a favprite in the South, had never held much ap appeal
peal appeal for me until this past weekend. Then fate stepped
in and acquainted me with the thrill the huntsmen gets
while stalking his prey and the quickening of his pulse
as the hunter moves in for the kill.
The game I went after was swifter than an eagle and
deadlier than a lemur. It was a flock (sic) of killer
wasps. (I know they were killer wasps because I watch watchthem
them watchthem kill a spider on my window screen.)
It was an ideal day for big game hunting. The air
was hot and humid, causing sweat to pour from my
brow as I stalked about my room. Suddenly the sound
of buzzing rent the still mid-day air. My keen hunters
ear tracked the sound to the window screen, where
three killer wasps were greedily devouring their freshly
slaughtered spider.
My keen hunters eye surveyed the situation. Quick Quickly
ly Quickly a plan came to mind. I quietly came up to the window
and with one bold thrust pulled it shut trapping the
three killers between the glass and screen.
Wasp Zoo
Now the problem of disposing of my capture arose.
I thought a few moments and a brilliant plan came to
mind. Instead of disposing of the varments I would keep
them trapped and feed them at regular intervals. This
would give me a chance to have my own wasp zoo, I
could see it all, signs on the roads to Gainesville read reading,
ing, reading, WASP ZOO, FIVE MILES AHEAD/' and SEE
THE KILLER WASPS ONLY 25c.*
But my reverie was short lived as the sound of buzz buzzing
ing buzzing once again vibrated through the still air. I looked
up and to my consternation discovered that I had neg neglected
lected neglected to shut the top half of my window, through
which the the three flying killers had escaped into the
room.
Now the roles were reversed, I was the hunted, and
they the hunters. As they circled iq preparation for an
attack, I looked about the room for a weapon. Just as
they began to dive, I grabbed a towel and with grim de determination
termination determination lashed out at my buzzing assailants. Mo Momentarily
mentarily Momentarily beaten off, they circled slowly about the room
waiting for another chance to strike.
Potent Weapon
I soon realized that a towel was no defense against
these vicious creatures. While they prepared for their
next assault, I quietly slipped out of the room to search
for a more potent weapon.
Hand to hand combat was impossible against the
wasps so I chose to resort to the most dreaded of all
means of warfare, germ warfare. Armed with a bor borrowed
rowed borrowed spray bomb of insecticide I bravely re-entered
my room. Carefully gripping my handed fitted bomb
with special ajustable spray and telescopic sight, I
opened fire with a well aimed barrage of sprays.
Death Blow
Soon the air was filled with the deadly fumes. The
wasps reeled from the death blow, and I felt none too
well myself. When the mist finally cleared I found the
three killers sprawled dead on the floor. The hunt was
over and the hunter had won.
The incident did not end there, for the next day when
I awoke I noticed several wasp mothers marching in
front of my window bearing signs. With the aid of a
magnifing glass I read the signs which said, "BAN THE
BOMB.

UF athletic director, Ray Gra Graves,
ves, Graves, has announced that the Ga Gators
tors Gators will play the University of
Illinois in 1967... The game will
be played in Jacksonvilles Ga Gator
tor Gator Bowl.
NOTICE
For The Coldest
Drink In Town, Drink
SLUSH
AT THE
CORN CABIN
Toot Kind of Popcorn
P J U
Bonriii nwfc
102 N.W. Iftfc St:

STEAKS
Sirloin Fillet Mignon T-Bones
Priced SI.OO, $1.35, $1.40 ond $1.95
CHICKEN
Va -95 cVi $1.35 Whole Chicken for two- $2.50
Lunches 65c Dinners 85c
COMPLETE ALA CARTE COLD PLATES
SANDWICHES
"gracious living everyday"
at the
TOWER HOUSE--

V pus.. *>mg**
0 r & jKmJNNk mm wSjBIB Ufil|fkn^g
GATOR LINE CLOSES IN
Bruce Culpepper and Floyd Dean, two of the 16 returning lettermen who will be
in the 1962 Gator line, move in for a tackle in lost year's homecoming game with LSU*
Other returning lettermen in the line are: Tackles, Gerald Odom, Fred Pearson, Aton
Peters and John Dent; ends, Rus Brown, Tom Gregory, Billy Cosh, Sam Holland and Floyd
Dean; guards; Larry Travis, John Olivo, Jack Thompson, Wode Entzminger, Bob Hosack
and Jerome Jones and Centers Bruce Culpepper and Russ Staples. Newcomers, who will
see action in the line are tackles Frank Lasky and Dennis Murphy, guards Jack Katz
and Alan Richbourg and center Jimmy Morgan.

Soccer Team
States Best
By Fernando Gimenez
Gator Sports Writer
The winningest team at the Uni University
versity University is the UP Soccer Club.
Sponsored by the Intramurals De Department
partment Department the team has won 52,
lost three and tied four in its ten
years of operation. Composed of
students from all over the world,
the Soccer Club was last defeat defeated
ed defeated by Rollins College in Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming 1908. The score was 2-1.
Last season the te&m posted
a 12-0 record. Among their vic victories
tories victories the Gators defeated
FSU 8-0 and the Fort Stewart
team by the same score. Olli Ollier
er Ollier victims were Jacksonv ill e
University and Rollins College..
The UF team won the West
Coast Soccer Champions hip,
held in St. Pete.
Chombo Sandoval a veteran of
four campaigns says the team is
playing more games every sea season,
son, season, but that more competition is
needed. Speedy left wing, Mario
Ordonez agrees with him. Some Sometimes
times Sometimes we feel sorry for our oppon opponents
ents opponents and we take the game as an another
other another practice session."
When asked about! the com coming
ing coming season, Manuel Wills toe
leading scorer last season said:
If we only play one game, I
hope it is Miami. Reports came
to my country, Honduras, that
they were Floridas cham champions.
pions. champions. They have to beat vs
first." Other members of toe
team agree with Wills. Willy
Miles, another star, says that
toe team Is ready to play Mi Miami
ami Miami anytime.
The UF Soccer team is coached
by Assistant Professor of Physical
Education, Allan Moore. Coach
Moore in his College years was a
soccer All-American.

The Swimmer Gator, Friday, July 27, 1962

Summer Sports Lull
Ends Next Week

The quiet of summer is over, at
least for many athletes.
After almost two months of look looking
ing looking back over the past football and
basketball seasons, and discussing
the future, the lull has ended.
Beginning Sunday, IS of the
states finest football and bas basketball
ketball basketball players who have Just
start checking into the Univer University
sity University of Florida to open prepar preparations
ations preparations for the August 4th All-
Star game here.
Assn, will hold its annual coach coaching
ing coaching clinic August 2nd through
August 4th at the University of
Florida Medical School Audi Audi.

For the BEST in
RECAPPING
100% GRADE "A" COLD RUBBER
Use Your Central Charge
Experienced Recopper
Trpined By Factory Engineer
ENGLISH TIRE & RECAPPING
1027 S. Main Street Phone FR 2-2197
MAC SEZ:
EXPECT MORE AND iBB
GET MORE.
Try our famous 1 I
K.C. Strip Steaks
Medium Large
$1.35 $1.65
Chopped Salad French Fries mw
Rolls and Butter §1
LARRY'S WONDERHOUSE
M'S.W. tt s'. For Toko Out
Behind Seors Phone FR 2-2405

. Audi. torluna. '"*
Speakers at the cUnic ki foot football
ball football will be Ray Graves, Head
Coach at Florida, Frank Broyles
Head Coach at Arkansas, Bill Pea*
erson, Head Coach at Florida State
and Marcelino Huerta, Head Coach
at Wichita.
Speaking on basketball will
be Norman Sloan, Head
Coach at Florida, Fred TaykHV
Head Coach at Ohio State, Pea Peary
ry Peary Moore, Assistant Coach at
Florida, Glenn Wilkes, Head
Coach at Stetson, and Bud Ken Kennedy,
nedy, Kennedy, Head Coach at Florida
State.

Page 7



Page 8

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MURAL, MURAL ON THE WALL TELL THE HISTORY
.That is exactly what the mural on the wall of the Humanities room in the UF library does. It
tells the history from the Spanish landing to the present.

Library Mural Shows
Progress In Florida

By CAROLE BARDELLA
Gator Feature Editor
A mural, 32 feet across and 20
feet high, covers the wall above
the entrance to the Humanities
Room of the Main Library.
Entitled The History of Learn Learning
ing Learning in Florida, the mural was
painted in 1963, by Professor Holl Hollis
is Hollis Holbrook of the Art Department.
Holbrook said that the mural de depicts
picts depicts various stages of learning
in Florida, both formal and infor informal.
mal. informal. It starts with the Spanish ar arrival
rival arrival into Florida and continues
to modern times.
According to Holbrook, the paint painting
ing painting starts in the lower left com comer
er comer and reads up, around and down
the right side.
The Spanish are shown introduc introducing
ing introducing fruit, particularly the orange,
to the Indians, in the lower left
part of the picture. In the lower
right the theme has progressed to
a printing press, a school house
and a voting machineall prod products
ucts products of modem time. A series of

Preliminary Selections
Bryant Awards Prizes

By PAM BISHOP
Gator Staff Writer
Gov. Farris Bryant will open a
sealed envelope at a press confer conference
ence conference in Tallahassee August 2 to
reveal the 1962 Homecoming Slog Slogan
an Slogan Contest winners. Bruce Cul Culpepper,
pepper, Culpepper, Gator football captain,
and Pep Michie, Homecoming
committee members, will be on
band to represent the UF.
Preliminary Judging of the 875
entries was completed by a panel
of Gainesville merchants and
Union Winds Up
Summer Program
Florida Union is winding up its
affairs before finals with few new
activities planned.
The bridge and dancing lessons
will be continued until the end of
the summer school, as well the
weekend movies in the Medical
School Auditorium.
On July 26, the movie will be
Picnic starring Kim Novak.
The August 3 movie will be The
Caine Mutiny.
A Contemporary Affairs lecture
will be presented In the Union Aud Auditorium
itorium Auditorium July 28. The UF will hear
the Nieuw Amsterdam Trio, whose
earlier scheduled appearance was
cancelled because of the airline
strike. The Lyceum Council pre presentation
sentation presentation wiH be held in the Uni University
versity University Auditorium.
On August 1, an exhibit of prints
by Jacksonville artists will be pre presented
sented presented in the North Wing Gallery
of the Union. This exhibit is
through August.

The Summer Gator, Friday, July 27, 1962

heads of great men of Florida runs
across the bottom of the mural.
Holbrook said that the mural is
done in egg tempera which is
comprised otf the yolk of egg and
water with colored dry pigment
added.
This is the same medium used
by the Italian painters around 1400
and is the most durable of all
painting mediums, he said.
He said the wall in the Human Humanities
ities Humanities Room was given sever several
al several coats of gesso, a combination of
whiting, glue and water, to make
a smooth plaster finish before he
started to paint on it.
Holbrook was given leave from
his job as art professor for a se semester
mester semester in order to do the mural,
which took about three months
to complete. A scaffold was built
for him to stand on while he did
the actual painting.
According to Holbrook the paint painting
ing painting is representative with symbol-j
ism woven in.
The theme which was suggest- j
ed to me is very suitable for a li- j
brary, Holbrook said.

Homecoming committee mem members
bers members this week.
This year's contest drew the
largest number of entries ever
recorded, said contest Chairman
Fred Lane. The slogans chosen
by the panel have been forwarded
to Governor Bryant and the State
Cabinet for final judging.
First prise includes round trip
tickets for two from anywhere in
Florida to Miami and accommo accommodations
dations accommodations for one week at the Ro Robert
bert Robert Richter Hotel on Miami
Beach. The winner will also re receive
ceive receive free lodging and meals for
two on Homecomnig weekend at
the Holiday inn, two tickets for
the Homecoming football game
and Gator Growl show, and a 8100
Homecoming shopping trip in
Gainesville.
The second prize winner will re receive
ceive receive accommodations for two at
the Grand Bahama Hotel, Grand
Bahama Island, Bahamas, 380 in
gift certificates, and tickets to
Homecoming events.
Third prize is a 3100 gift certifi certificate
cate certificate from Robertsons Jewelers,
fourth, a 3100 U.S. Savings Bond
proffered by Alans Cubana and
fifth, a 350 gift certificate contrib contributed
uted contributed by Gainesville merchants.
The state-wide publicity the
contest has received has provided
a big kick-off for Homecoming pro promotion
motion promotion and activities, said Lane.
Newspapers and radio stations
throughout Florida have picked up
the story.
CLASSIFIED
Driver to New England needed
between now and August 15.
Phone FR 6-8656.
6-2 t-C

Plaza Echos
The Plaza of the Americas will
echo with the sounds of six-gun
fire and hoofbeats tonight at 8
when Student Government spon sponsors
sors sponsors an outdoor movie.
The movie is High Noon, win winner
ner winner of four academy awards and
designated the first original adult
Western. Starring Gary Cooper
and Grace Kelly, High Noons
showing is an experiment in the
feasibility of outdoor movies.

I WANTED
DEAD OR ALIVE!!
I (SEX OR DENOMINATION IMMATERIAL)
I WRITERS
I PROOFREADERS
I COPY READERS
I HEADLINE WRITERS
I ERRAND BOYS (or Girls)
I CIRCULATION PEOPLE
I Any Kind of People
I NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY!
MUST HAVE FIERCE
COMPETITIVE SPIRIT
I Long hours; small pay-
BUT,
TREMENDOUS
FRINGE BENEFITS
I Years in the making, millions spent,
I Cast of Thousands,
WHERE!!
The Daily Florida Alligalor-
WHERE ELSE
I *i; i For Further, Info. Basement Flo. Union
111 '{'*

X Marks The Spot
For Art Treasure

Building X is located behind the
University Auditorium but few stu students
dents students ever bother to look past
its mysterious label. What goes
on behind these walls could
change the life of anyone who
takes the initiative to enter.
Many passers-by have been fas fascinated
cinated fascinated by the glow of a blow torch
and flying sparks in the front
window. During the regular school
year this strange sight is not the
university welding shop, but the
clever work of John G. Naylor,
the black bearded instructor of
sculpture. Naylor drips layers of
melted solder into art forms that
stretch the imagination into a new
world of abstraction.

SPECIAL NOTICE
TINY TOT PLAYSCHOOL
SIX DAYS WEEK
Mondays Thru Saturdays
7:15 A.M. to 6:00 P.M.
ENROLLMENT LIMITED
MRS. NELLIE MATHIS FR 6-7806
LICENSED CLASS DANCING
24 SO. EAST Bth St.
>

On these sleepy summer days it
may seem quiet on the exterior
of Building X, but in the far end
of the building there o ften blares
folk music, and the whistling,
happy-go-lucky presence of Jer Jerry
ry Jerry Uelsmanm, instructor in Pho Photography.
tography. Photography. Behind the scenes,
there exists a little known world
of chemicals, darkrooms, and a
congenial group of Shutter Shutterbugs.
bugs. Shutterbugs.
There is always an attractive dis display
play display of photographs, open to the
public so if you are in the vicinity,
remember X marks the spot
where a new world of art appre appreciation
ciation appreciation can open eyes.