Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Merchants Laud
Lauderdale Trek;
Makes A Million
Cop Chief Says 'Behave/
Expects About,so,ooo
The grass (and beach) is greener where the boys
are, especially for many Ft. Lauderdale merchants
but not for Police Chief J. Lester Holt and the Ft.
Lauderdale police department.
Behave as college students and well get along
fine, Chief Holt advised the exodus of students plan planning
ning planning to celebrate the Easter holidays in the beach city.

"There isnt a# much trouble
you would imaging, said Holt,
"We can handle it without any
extra help if it doesnt get any
worse than in the its the
concentration on'the beaches that
is hard to cope with.
Reached by telephone, Holt es estimated
timated estimated a record crowd this year.
Inquiries from all over the natiQn
indicate this years gathering will
surpass last years record 20,000,
and may reach 60,000.
T
Movie Cause ?
Much of the anticipated, iac*e as e
is attributed to the recent movie,
"Where The Boyg Are".
The Chamber of Commerce said
that the students spend about a
million dollars annually. Mer Merchants,
chants, Merchants, however,; are divided as
to whether*ifirwdfth it. Some,
those who seU beer, hamburgers
end suntan nils* say its great.
Others complain" th< h-1 h d e n t s
drive away the* older, freer freerspending
spending freerspending tpigrttf*.
Last yeaillipnaiWMlrests
of all kindR v EWIt 4f|id that only
about five ,of the stu students
dents students got HpHllllhie with the
law. Records show that most
trouble makers at Ft. Lauder Lauderdale
dale Lauderdale are also trouble makers at
their own institutions.
College student* gel blamed for
a lot of mischief committed by
non students.* These "impos "impostors,
tors, "impostors, who ere not always just
, *v niA..'
LATINSW
YANKEES,
ISO IN HUB,
CHACHACHA
Yankee and Latin bands will
help UFers to whoop it up in an
International way at the Interna International
tional International Week dance on April 14.
Featured will be the Bill Byers
Band, which will supply dance mu music
sic music during most of the affair. A
Latin American group will join in
during breaks.
Held In Hub
The dance, to be held in the
Hub, will be the last semiformal
of the semester. Tickets are $2
per couple.
Topping off International Week
activities will be the crowning of
the Pan Amercan Queen during
the dance.
The young lady chosen for the
title will receive a free trip to
Nicaragua as the representative
of the UF. She will meet Nicara Nicaraguan
guan Nicaraguan dignitaries and will probab probably
ly probably have a meetings with the
president of Nicaragua.
Apply In Union
All campus organisations are
eligible to sponsor contestants.
Application blanks can be obtain obtained
ed obtained at the International Student
Organisation office in Room 314,
Florida Union. |
Contestants will be chosen on
the basis of appearance, person personality,
ality, personality, and talent. i
Deadline for entries ta Tuesday,
April 4.

'Front' Group To Protest
Election of ISO President

Bj BOBBIE njCBCHMAN
Gator Staff Writer
The case of the -president
who- might not be, president,
after all, and the Xice presi president
dent president who isnt a jaefnber of the
organisation that 'elected,* him
came to a head ie*MfsU*e'yeek ie*MfsU*e'yeekend.
end. ie*MfsU*e'yeekend. * w ir ~
Plans to lodge *M complaint
with the Honor Court kgmst
the election of MigOat Mafias-
M president of theftrtefS*Won theftrtefS*Won*l
*l theftrtefS*Won*l Student Association were
announced Friday by members
of a losing factioft
JJ Make Charges
.. Sabodh Krishnan ands, FShed
Baraxi, representihgff a group
called the International Front,
charge that Megias i| ineligible
for the post because not
A member of the g, q. ex exfmM
fmM exfmM *

having a good time, often claim
to be students in hopes of len leniency
iency leniency from law officials.
Frank Ridenour, formerly po police
lice police captain of the Broward Coun County
ty County Sheriffs office and presently
a UF student, has had ten years
of experience policing the Ft. Lau Lauderdale
derdale Lauderdale phenomenon.
Ridenour recalls that one year
a city bus was stolen by students.
On an another occasion a five fivefoot
foot fivefoot hammerhead shark was put
in seaside resort swimming pool.
Said Ridenour; "It was the af aftermath
termath aftermath of the affairs that I re recall
call recall best. When the sun rose the
next morning you were blinded
by the glare of empty cans on
the beach. Beach property own owners
ers owners had to hire bulldozer# to
bury them.
UF Passive,.
The UF takes no official posi position
tion position on students visiting Ft. Lau Lauderdale.
derdale. Lauderdale. Fraternity Advisor Wil William
liam William G. Cross said the univer universitys
sitys universitys attitude was passive and
that students were on their own
during vacations.
"Naturally we are concerned
tor the safety of our student# and
how they represent the universi university,"
ty," university," said Cross, "but I believe
the city of Ft. Lauderdale has
handled the situation well in the
past."
Traffic Hazard
Cross recalls that the schools
of the mid west were more
fearful of traffic accident# than
anything else. "Since the bulk of
our students are from the south
Florida area, I dont imagine the
traffic hazard is as bad here,
he said.
Chief Holt said that reports of
offenses committed by students,
except for minor traffic violations,
are forwarded to the universities
and college# concerned.
Visiting Prof To Speak
About Lotin America
Arthur P. Whitaker, professor
of Latin-American history at the
University of Pennsylvania, will
be presented by the department
of history as a part of its f i fth
annual "Lectures on American
Civilization.
The lectures will be held today
and tomorrow at 6 p. m. in the
Law School auditorium.
Whitaker# topic will be Na Nationalism
tionalism Nationalism in Latin America."
PLAY TRY-OUTS
Try-outs for the Florida Play Players
ers Players production of "Pantag "Pantagleise
leise "Pantagleise are scheduled for 4 p.m.
this afternoon In Room 238 Tig Tigert
ert Tigert HalL
Ail interested person# may
audition, whether or not they
have any theatrical exyperience.
"Pantagleise, by Michel de
GheMerode, Is a modern, neo neoexpressionists
expressionists neoexpressionists farce. The play
has never before been produced
in the United States.

ecutive council for two semes semesters
ters semesters prior to bis election.
The I. S. O, constitution mak makes
es makes such service a prerequisite
for the position.
Megias plans to answer the
charge with proof that he did
serve on the council several
years ago, ami that he has ful fulfilled
filled fulfilled all requirements.
Hos A Member
The charges also mention the
fact that John Young, elected
vice president, has never been
a member of the organization.
Young was notified that he is not
elegible to hold the position.
Luis Gomez, chairman of the
I. S. O. nomination and elec elections
tions elections committee, said, A spec special
ial special nominating gfbup chose the
nominees, and it was assumed

HAPPY CASTER ... DON'T FOR OCT YOUR BATHING SUIT

... w ...
s&s* *:*:*:'*A : : : : : :
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

Volume 53# No* 42

IP '"^|
BStfc- Jm i-
JSk gLilj
m JBHHh
EI U I
Bb. I
'JOHN HENRY' TAKES PRIZE
\
Balladeer Bob Sieger
Gras Nets $1,000;
Balladeer Wins
Trip to Nassau

The Gator Gras Talent Show
and carnival netted over a thou thousand
sand thousand dollars, which will probably
go into the Dollars for Scholars
fund, according to Nelson De-
Camp, Gator Gras General Chair Chairman.
man. Chairman.
Only a first prize was given in
the talent show which was a trip
to Nassau for two. The winner of
'Countdown'
April 6
Faculty and students are re reminded
minded reminded that Thursday, April ,
is tike day for viewing "Count "Countdown
down "Countdown For Education over
WJXT Channel 4 TV out of
Jacksonville.
Part of the award winning
"Project 4a documentary pres presentations,
entations, presentations, the program centers
around the condition of Floridas
higher education and was
filmed mainly on the UF cam campus.
pus. campus.
Viewing time is 10:30 p.m.
Prof To Give
Piano Recital
Russell Danburg, versatile UF
pianist, will present bis annual
solo recital Tuesday, March 28,
in the P. K. Yonge Auditorium.
Danburg, associate professor of
music and chairman of the piano
and theory staff in the Depart Department
ment Department of Music, will perform se selected
lected selected works of Mozart, Beetho Beethoven,
ven, Beethoven, Chopin, and Debussy. He
will also present an original com composition
position composition entitled "Chorale and Al Allegro.
legro. Allegro.
He is a well known composer
whose works have been per performed
formed performed by major symphony or orchestras
chestras orchestras throughout the country.
Three of his original compositions
have been premiered in Carnegie
Hall. He has 25 published com compositions
positions compositions to date.
Danburg received his master of
music degree from the Eastman
School of Music in Rochester,
New York, and did graduate work
at the Julliard School of Music
in New York City.

that the people they named
would be qualified.
'We discovered that Young
is not a member of the I. S. O.
while we were checking grades
and qualifications before ap approving
proving approving the election of the of officers,
ficers, officers, he stated.
Bpecial Meeting
Gomes has called a special
meeting of his committee for
tonight to discuss the matters.
The I. S. O. officially recog recognizes
nizes recognizes the appointment of Rene
Monet a# commissioner of for foreign
eign foreign affairs, with Nelson Mora
and Ishaque Mehdi as i e e
commissioners. The appoint appointment
ment appointment put an end to a heated
controversy involving the. I. S.
O. and student government.
The newly-elected officers will
take office April 17.
i

the first prize was Robert Steger,
a balladeer, singing "John Hen Henry.
ry. Henry.
Tijuana Take-Off
Second place was El Chivo, a
Latin American combo. Hurd
place wentto Renny Temple do doing
ing doing a take-off on the Kingston
Trio# Tijuana Jail "So Here
We Are in Ft. Lauderdale Jail!
The winner of the most out outstanding
standing outstanding booth, Delta Gamma, re received
ceived received a trophy for their pie piethrowing
throwing piethrowing booth. The booth was
such a success that they had to
replace the pie mix four times.
The other trophy given wa# for
the booth that took in the most
proceeds. First, was Pi Kappa
Alpha with a gambling casino.
No Prizes
The second and third place# in
proceed# received no prize.
AEPis took second with a com combination
bination combination nail-driving, dart-poker,
and bowling booth. Third place
went to Delta Gamma.
Dean R. C. Beatty, dean of
Alumni Affairs, contacted during
Gator Gras, said that these two
gras (this and last years) were
"the only attempt at such an
event since Ive been here -
over 25 years.
"It is really a tremendous thing
to see so many students out
together instead of sticking toget together
her together in groups as they so often
do.

It's Broward Plaza
Far Gator Concert
Twilight Wednesday

Broward. Plaza directly be behind
hind behind Broward Hall, will be the
scene of the Gator Band Twilight
Concert, scheduled for Wednes Wednesday,
day, Wednesday, March 28 at 6:30 p.m.
This program will .mark the
years first concert appearance by
the Gator Band. David Brooker of
West Palm Beach will be student
conductor of the group; more than
60 musicians will participate in
the event.
Effecting Rapport
The Concert, directed by Ri Richard
chard Richard W. Bowles, is sponsored by
Student Government a* a means
of effecting a closer feeling of
rapport among students on the
campus. The location of the con concert
cert concert was changed from the for former
mer former setting of the Plaza of the
Americas in order to make it
available to more students.
Mrs. Norman Sloan, wife of the
UF basketball coach, will be fea featured
tured featured as soprano soloist with the
band. She will sing My Hero,
from the operetta, The Choco Chocolate
late Chocolate Soldier, by Oscar Strauss.
Others Featured
Other featured numbers by
the band will include the Over Overture
ture Overture to Madame Favart, by Of Offcnbach,
fcnbach, Offcnbach, Luiginis Ballet Egyp Egyptian,
tian, Egyptian, and excerpts from Wag Wagners
ners Wagners We Meistersinger.
Other selections will include
Mill Mountain, Roanoke, by
Milton Bush; Clare Grundmana
Second American Folk Rhap Rhapsody;
sody; Rhapsody; a collection of Jerome
Kern melodies entitled Silhouet Silhouettes;

University of Florida# Gainesville Tuesdoy# March 28# 1961

Student Heads
' ... v
Create 'FUND'
To Lobby State

~ By DICK HEBERT
Gator Managing Editor
Campus sights are zeroing in on Tallahassee.
Florida Universities Need Dollars (FUND) was
the cry aimed at the state legislature by student leaders
as they met this weekend to form the April-long move movement
ment movement by that name.
Spearheading FUND will be a steering committee,
formed from an all-star cast of leaders from everv area
of the campus.

Meeting Sunday, the FUND
committee developed a three threepoint
point threepoint overall program:
Rally Climax
1) A mid-April rally on c a lu lupus
pus lupus as the months climax a
demonstration to the state of stu student
dent student interest in their education a 1
needs:
- (2) Proclamation of April as
FUND MONTH an all out
effort at lobbying the legisla legislature
ture legislature by both mail and person personal
al personal contact:
3) A drive to encourage all
students to reach the people in
their hometowns with the financ financial
ial financial plight oi the university sys system.
tem. system.
FUND Chairman Charley Wells
said Sunday he hoped it would
be possible to hold a "spirited stu student
dent student interest rally on or about
the evening of Wednesday, April,
10.
Student Concern
"It should be a clear demon demonstration
stration demonstration of mature student con concern
cern concern for the plight of higher ed education
ucation education in Florida.
"We hope to have at the rally
speakers with the knowledge of
our Universitys problems and
plans to combat them.
"We hope this rally will fo focus
cus focus attention throughout the
state mi the fact that Floridas
young citizens have a sincere
interest in the future of their
state, said Wells.
He explained that the wheels
of machinery have already been
set into motion.
"We have drawn up the steer steering
ing steering committee membership list,
relying on students in the most

tes; Silhouettes; Leroy Anderson's "Promen "Promenade;
ade; "Promenade; and representative military
marches.
Refreshments will be served on
the lawn south of Broward Hall
beginning at 8 p.m. The hour*
long concert will begin prompt promptly
ly promptly at 8:30.
Bullock Fills
Cabinet Slots
Replacement for a cabinet post
appointment and filling of the
post of commissioner of foreign
affairs were announced by Stu Student
dent Student Body President Bruce Bul Bullock
lock Bullock Sunday.
Bill Pinney, 2UC, replaces Paul
Martin as appointee to the post of
secretary of mens affairs.' Mar Martin
tin Martin declined the post because he
"already had a heavy academic
and extracurricular schedule."
Renet lionet, SBA, from Brus Brussels,
sels, Brussels, Belgium, has been appoint appointed
ed appointed commissiooer of foreign af affairs.
fairs. affairs. Two other International Stu Student
dent Student Organisation recommedees
Nelson Mora and Isaque Meh Mehdi
di Mehdi will serve as vice-commis vice-commissioners.
sioners. vice-commissioners.
New Secretary of Men# Af Affairs
fairs Affairs BUI Pinney had previously
been tapped by Bullock as com commissioner
missioner commissioner of social affairs, a new
post. Pinney, 2UC, will handle
his commissionership duties under
his cabinet post
(See CABINET, Page S)

ALL-CAMPUS DRIVE

responsible positions on campus,
and making it as representative
as possible of the student body.
DeGrove Named
Among the measures already
begun by the group are the pub publication
lication publication of the names and home
counties of the Tallahassee legis legistors
tors legistors for distribution this week
around the campus; correspond correspondence
ence correspondence with the other state univer universities
sities universities to solicit their aid in what
is hoped to be a state-wide
movement; and naming Dr. John
DeGrove, of political science, fa faculty
culty faculty adviser to the steering com committee.
mittee. committee.
(Dr. DeGrove is chairman of
the Political Action Committee of
the UF chapter of the Associa Association
tion Association of American University Pro ProfessorsAAUP.
fessorsAAUP. ProfessorsAAUP.
Campus leader# joined Sun Sunday
day Sunday in high commendation of
the FUND program and listed
their entire support behind It.
Three student body presidents
released statements to the stu student
dent student body to ask its aid in the
program. Newly elected presi president
dent president Bruce Bullock voiced his
concern for the need of reaching
the voters at home:
Need# Known
"Lets face it, he said, "the
University needs money, and
the legislature know# it.
"But most legislators are pub publicly
licly publicly opposed to increased taxa taxation
tion taxation required to create funds for
higher education. They need
a mandate from the people. It is
up to each student to show his
representative he is deeply con concerned.
cerned. concerned.
"Os even more practical val value,
ue, value, we must influence parents
and other registered voter# to
help carry this message to the
legislature.
"The voice of the electorate
and the future electorate is not
lightly put aside, he stated.
((Sec STUDENT, Page l)

Banquet Lauds Nash, Leader
. t 0
1 'dk' Jk
S2L ; WMfrJm m m : |3H
m. SP^
my. nm
DR. REITZ, OGDEN NASH TALK
... At Student Leaders Banquet

Perennial sophomore Ogden
Nash and UF junior Charles
Pillans shared honors Thursday
night at the second Ga Gator
tor Gator Gras Student Leaders Ban Banquet.
quet. Banquet.
Nash, guest speaker, read
several of his poems about cui cuisine
sine cuisine and conessieurs, including
"Coffee WITH the Meal.
Nash commented that he al always
ways always felt intrigued by being
asked to speak before students
about to graduate, because he

BULLOCK WELLS
JSn^agmJy
Four campus leaders FUND Chairman Charley Wells, Student
Body President Bruce Bullock, and ex-presidents Bob Park and
Joe Ripley have thrown their weight behind the April lobby
movement:
WELLS: A clear demonstration of mature student concern.
BULLOCK: No one knows better the fruits of economy" educa education
tion education than the student upon whom it is inflicted.
PARK: This program touches every student, their families and
every alumnus.
RIPLEY: It offers an excellent opportunity for securing and
voicing this synthesis of opinion.

Wells Asks, Students
To Help FUND Cause
DEAR STUDENT BODY
Florida's universities need your help. You and I
are in a position to give this help, if we will put out
the time, the effort, and the work. It is with this in
mind your student leadership has set up the organi organization
zation organization named FUND (Florida Universities Need Dol Dollars).
lars). Dollars).
For FUND to be effective it will have to rely on
you. FUND is going to declare April as Legislature
Month on campus. To start the month FUND asks you
to talk about University needs when you are home
for Easter.
After Easter, petitions will be available for you
to sign, addresses of legislators will be given to you in
order that you might write to them in Tallahassee,
and a large student rally will be organized to show
student interest.
The students on the FUND steering committee feel
that now is the time to stop talking about our needs
and start a program of action that these needs might
be taken care of. We are ready to go to work and to
do so we must have your participation.
CHARLEY WELLS

had completed only one year at
Harvard.
"My whole family, he said,
"including three daughters, a
wife and five grandchildren,
have only six years of college
Pillans, who almost didn't go
to the banquet, received the
award for being the years most
outstanding student leader.
He was chosen by the ban banquet
quet banquet committee which asked for
nominations from various cam campus
pus campus organizations.
"I almost didnt go, said

Four Pages This Editioir

Pillans. But I decided finally
that I did have time.
Pillans, 3AS, Orlando has been
president of the Florida Union
Board of Student Activities,
and is president of Region I V
Association of College Unions,
has been a Florida Blue Key
Speaker and trainer for three
years and President of the stu student
dent student Bodys Cabinet.
He has also been I.F.C. re representative
presentative representative and political repre representative
sentative representative of his fraternity? Al Alpha
pha Alpha Tau Omega.
.



THE

Page 2

Member Associated Ceieaiote Frost
The FLORIDA ALLIGATOR to tte afftefal tfaw> ? tt* V*^***** 1 ** m * ah *>
Tmi4m u 4 FrfaUy maniag netft farifa keltoaya aai OMfaOs. The SOMMER GATOR fa Mfani M mis*
cists matter at tte United States rest Office at Gafaeavi) to, Florida. Offices are toested to Reams S. IS sa U to
tt! FleriAa Onto. Build!*, Basement. Tataphcoo Onfaewl M Ftorids FR MSSL Rst. SSS, and reaest dither edttfafla.
office er hostoess efflee.
Editor-in-Chief Jim Moorhead
Managing Editor Dick Hebert
Business Manager ?/. Ron Jones

EDITORIAL STAFF
Frances Aid man, Cedi Anderson. Marty Beckerman,
Chuck Broward. Carol Buller, Cappy Capexzera. Sue
Allen Cauthen. Mike Colodny. Diane Falk. Bobbie
Fleischman, Harvey Goldstein, Linda Hamel. Nancy
Hooter. Jack Horan. Ida La£>ce, Jan Lathrop, Julie
McClure, George Moore, Judy Lynn Prince, Mike Rosen*
thal, Phyllis Smith. ¥
SPORTS STAFF
Sport, Editor: Bill Bucholter
' Mike Gore, intramurals editor; Robert Green, Ralph
Lazzera, Jared Lebow, Jim Martin, Ed Robin, Chuck
Warren, Ed Witten.

Ploy FUND Gomes

The doors of the Florida capital
building swing jfepen next week. We
anticipate that snany a cry from this
and other camp! will come pouring in
to let the legislators know we are be behind
hind behind them . if theyre behind U.S.
Needless to say, we wholeheartedly
endorse FUNDI; a new, all-campus
month-long drive to tell Tallahassee
that Florida universities Need Dol Dollars.
lars. Dollars.
*I *
NOT THAT they dont know it al already.
ready. already. They doi But the solons have
constituents back home to listen to.
They know what promises they have
made to their voters. And it seems
very few of them have promised the
voters they will support higher educa education
tion education in the state!
Who has told these state leaders
that education is on the brink of dis disaster
aster disaster in this state ? A very small
group of courageous people, an elite
composed of administrative, faculty
and student leaders. But they haven't
yet heard from Joe College. They
haven't heard from you.
* "| *
OKAY, THE TIME to stand up and
be counted is right here and now. We
can all have a &and in shaping this
states future, a| future which does
depend on us and Floridas, education educational
al educational progress.
One Mr. Boi'bd has deigned to
jvnte us a which w e cite
his closing sentence:
1 think y.oulljfind -most of us stu students
dents students are in accord with the Univer University
sity University s needs and demands.
*! *
WE AGREE. We think you are. But
dont write us about it Write your
Tallahassee representative. He prob probably
ably probably hasn't heard from you yet.
Better still, gos home this weekend
and talk it up. Tell your family about
the UFs plight.! Tell your friends.
They have away of letting legislators
know what they want ... if you ask
them to.
FUND has provided the initiative.
We of the Alligator can proudly say
we had a in its formation. But
it will not be success unless you, the

MANAGING EDITOR'S NOTE

Hove Your Sun Orgy, I'll Take Home

By DICK HEBERT
Okay, everybody, it's time to
abandon the books, abandon
the classrooms, abandon the
campus, abandon the morals
4if you!had any to begin with),
abandon everything. ?
Head for Fort Lauderdale,
where the boys are . and the
girls.
tion my friends
not to heed the HEBERT
ad vlce pro propounded
pounded propounded in the first lines of
this commentary.
It seems that college students
havent a creative thing to do
around Easter time. But they
all become extremely interested
in aelf-education all of a sud sudden.
den. sudden. f

THEY HEAD for the balmy
beaches and mobs. They are

THEM
I SAr *UR* WROM6.'I SAY MV- *-> It) PACT ILL BET IF I ASKED THE NEXT / 7T^~. >1 / >,
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Editorials

EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS
Mnryanne Aw trey. Bill Curry, Nancy Mykel, Nell
Swan, Pat Tunstall.
BUSINESS STAFF
Asst. Manager: Ron Rothstein
Ad Salesmen: Jeff Huberman, Steve Baron, Barbara
DeLoach; Classified Ad Manager: Louise Boothe; Na National
tional National Ad Manager: Joel Proyect; Office Staff: Jean
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MacDonald, Nancy Spiegel; Production Manager: Am
Evernden; Subscription Manager: Steve Hertz.

students, join in and show your con concern.
cern. concern.
During this most important month
there are four things you can do:
1) Talk it up at home. If at all
possible, see your local representa representative.
tive. representative. Discuss the problems with the
hometown P-TA, the banker, the store
clerk, the barber.
2) Then use the mails. Get a let letter
ter letter off to Tallahassee saying you dont
like going to a cramped classroom.
Tell them you need more professors.
Tell them you think a good, teacher
should be paid for.
* *
3) AND WHEN that petition goes
around this month, sign it. Add your
name to what we hope will be a long
list of interested students.
4) Finally, be seen at the rally.
Therell be .lots of fanfare, speeches
and spirited demonstration.. It isnt
bad. Its our way of showing the state
we are sticking together in this thing.
Help the UF fire the shot heard
round the state. It WILL be hearcl.
Your job is to make it loud enough
and mature enough so it will be heed heeded
ed heeded as well.
Happy Easter
Vacation time again, so here we go
again:
Firstly, drive safely, if youre navi navigating
gating navigating by car. An estimated 50,000
migrant collegians (according to the
Fort Lauderdale police chief) are
now crowded into the state for the
spring holidays, and this doesnt make
the roads any safer.
* *
ITS OUR hope youll keep your
Easter lilies on your hats and not
across your caskets (ugh, what a ma macabre
cabre macabre thought).
Secondly, in the midst of your bon bonnet
net bonnet buying, Easter-egg hunting and
v hatever ELSE youll be doing, come
Sunday dont forget what day it is.
It 11 be a long, crowded weekend.
Saturday, April 1, will be only one of
four days youll have a chance to play
the fool, so take it easy. Well see
you next week.

all going to study mass behav behavior,
ior, behavior, mob rule, Roman history,
or some other such social study.
For me, I'd rather relax over
m y all too short vacation. I
can understand why our Ivy
League neighbors to the north
wind their chilly ways to Lau Lauderdale
derdale Lauderdale for Easter. But us? We
thrive in palm and pine wea weather
ther weather oil year. Or hadnt we
noticed the papers Jatelyl
* *
REALLY, Fort Lauderdale at
Eastertime is a wonderful soci sociological
ological sociological laboratory. You will
meet all kinds of people, and
everyone of them will be a col college
lege college student, of all things. They
will have their orgies, their fun
games, their artificial enter entertainment
tainment entertainment
Naturally, 75 per cent of them
would rather die than tell their
parents where they are going
for tiie Easter holidays. They
jpst wouldnt understand.
But, I am afraid they would.
They probably know that the
young mind has just got to run
wild for a few days after being
penned- up in classrooms and
dormitories for months.
BUT WHY NOT do it in a
reatfol, quiet, reasonable sort

Tuesday, March 28, 1961

of way?
What enchantment does Lau Lauderdale
derdale Lauderdale hold for the college
youth, in or at least approach approaching
ing approaching the age of reason?
Its expensive. Its noisy. Its
crowded. Its a mess.
I in the a.m., eat good home
cooking, go out on a few re relaxed
laxed relaxed dates, perhaps. But at
least, not be a follower of the
crowd.
*
AND THAT is exactly what
is wrong with the annual Lau Lauderdale
derdale Lauderdale jaunt. It destroys the
individual.
As I said before, you will
meet all kinds of people there.
The crime is, they all try to act
alike. Wholesomeness doesnt
enter into the atmosphere at
all.
If you are scared of yourself,
go to Lauderdale and hide in
the mob. If you dont think you
can enjoy a vacation in a ma mature
ture mature and individual way, join
the wave that makes the Lau Lauderdale
derdale Lauderdale police force turn out
en masse each year.
For me, Im going home to
mothers cooking, and my own
bed . just to be different

They Can't Say They Didn't Hear Us
THE FLAIL
'Our Father'?... Nowhere;
Like, It's 'Great Pops' Now

By JOHN MILLER
Much time, attention and ap applause
plause applause has been accorded a new
translation of the Bible which
has been published and released
this month. Under the name the New English Bible, the New
Testament is now on the stands,
with the Old Testament and
Apocrypha to follow soon.
The New
modem man. MILLER
Now, I am not one of these
people who think that God sat
forward and to the left of King
James throne during his reign
and, as a result, there is only
one true version of the Holy
Scripture.
*
- AND I JOIN the applause
when reading the clarity that
has been brought to the ar archaic
chaic archaic phraseology and termino terminology
logy terminology of many passages. This, I
feel, should be the aim of all
such new translations.
(For excellent articles on the
new work, I refer you to last
weeks issue of TIME and this
months issue of HORIZON.)
*
HOWEVER, I have two criti criticisms
cisms criticisms which are meant both sin sincerely
cerely sincerely and severely. In reading,
I find the new work too prosy
and too mundane. In spirit, I
not only find none of a religious religiously
ly religiously elevating nature; I find over overzealousness
zealousness overzealousness has clarified the
apparent into obscurity.
To wit: I found need for the
translators to clarify the phrase,
I myself was not burdensome
to you . (II Corinthians
12:13) with the substitution of
the words, I never spbnged up upon
on upon you. .**
*
IN THE frantic worry to be
ENTIRELY modem and col colloquial,
loquial, colloquial, St. Paul seems to be
avowing all innocence of forc forcing
ing forcing these people to submit to his
bathing them. And Luke 15:14,
He began to be in want.
gains very little by becoming,
He began to feel the pinch. .
One feels if he'd stayed out
of loose company, no one would
havfe so bothered him, especial especially
ly especially in tightly packed crowds.
In just a few other quick ex examples,
amples, examples, we find Jesus the
Anointed One, or Jesus Mes Messiah
siah Messiah (the word Christ is used
hut once in John 20:31), con consorting
sorting consorting with bad characters

The Alligator Welcomes. *.
Letters to the Editor
Please sign ell letters...
.. end limit them to 300 words
Names will be withheld on request
We reserve the right...
... to edit letters...
... lor space purposes

instead of sinners. Those of
us with nary a pearl to spare
anyway, lose a lot when the
neither cast ye your pearls
before swine becomes do not
feed your pearls to pigs.
I can safely say I have obey obeyed
ed obeyed the Lords word in that to
the very letter. I fed my last
pearl to my pig in 1947.
*
IN A MANNER newly calculat calculated
ed calculated to make the finest Madison
Avenue rhymster and jinglist
green with envy, we find Jesus
presenting the rhymed couplet,
If your right eye leads you
astray, tear it out and fling it
away.
Somehow Id shrink from read reading
ing reading that to a Sunday School class
of second graders. They get
enough violence on TV.
Actually, I think the British
missed the whole point, any anyway.
way. anyway. I mean, if youre going to
be colloquial, if youre going to
appeal to todays man, why
not be really hip?
* *
THE ABOVE verse from II
Corinthians is vastly more ill illuminating
uminating illuminating as, I have never
been a drag . And Luke
15 has such life and JOIE-DE JOIE-DEVTVRE
VTVRE JOIE-DEVTVRE as He came on wast wasting
ing wasting from the top.
As for individual changes in
terminology, sinners are more
easily comprehended as finks;
mammon, instead of becom becoming
ing becoming wealth, should be
bread, or, if you prefer,
loot. Scribes, becoming
lawyers, should have been
mouthpieces and when old
wine is taken out of new bot bottles
tles bottles and placed in new wine wineskins.
skins. wineskins.
T fear the bloody Britishers
have been watching rather too
many Hemingway movies,
what?

YES, YES, I think thats the
ticket . pardon, makes it.
What this world needs is a good
five-cent translation. The real
people, the ones who are earn earnestly
estly earnestly searching, have a right
to their interpretations, too.
Why, I can see the coffee
houses of the world with doors
flung wide each Sunday morn morning,
ing, morning, and from them rolling forth
in sonorous phrases:
Great Pops, who art really
floating, we dig Your name THE
END. We bring You on. Your
bit be IT for squares, like it is
in Skysville. Lay on us our daily
scoff from the top and dont
be hacked if we goof off. We
dont nohow to put down others
for the same slip. Cool us from
flipping and dont turn us over
to the fuss. For You are nutty,
holding, and a gasser. Coda.
Who needs it?

letters to the Editor
11 a m m 'j. r yj. l m e

I'm Consistent: Carleton
Deans Softsoap: Withheld

EDITOR:
In a recent letter to the Al Alligator,
ligator, Alligator, Dr. Franklin Doty ex expreseed
preseed expreseed surprise at some in incidental
cidental incidental remarks I made about
the University College in a talk
before the Student Government
banquet
Now I am cure that Dr. Dotys
surprise was merely rhetori rhetorical,
cal, rhetorical, for on several occasions
we have discussed in private
my disappointment that gener general
al general education at the University
of Florida has been moving
in the direction of the Junior
college brand and not in the
direction et the Harvard ver version.
sion. version.

AND THE Junior college
brand, as we see by the pro programs
grams programs and practices of Flori Floridas
das Floridas proliferating Junior colleges,
is being taken over by young
graduates of teachers colleges^
In my opinion, as Dr. Doty
knows, it would be far better
for freshmen and sophomores
to take basic courses in the
traditional departments than to
be subjected to the callow gen general
eral general education approaches which
are becoming prevalent in the
Junior colleges and have devel developed
oped developed to an extent in some of our
University College courses here
at the University of Florida.
*
PERHAPS Dr. Doty took um umbrage
brage umbrage because I expressed my myself
self myself publicly rather than pri privately.
vately. privately. 2h that case, I must tell
him that I am committed to
writing an article on general
education for one of the na national
tional national professional Journals, and
it may be that after he sees
my systematic treatment of the
subject, as distinguished from
my informal remarks, he will
react with less emotion.
Dr. Doty referred to the part
played by me in molding the
content of the C-l course. Again,
Dr. Doty knows full well that
C-l, as now developed in its
study guide, bears little resem resemblance
blance resemblance to the course as it was
when I was connected with it
four years ago.

PERHAPS it is a better course
now than it was then. But that
is not the point.
Dr. Doty is well aware that
it is a different course, for we
discussed this matter only re recently,
cently, recently, and I do not think it
was quite fair of him to con connect
nect connect me with that course as cur currently
rently currently organized and taught.
Moreover, it was not quite fair
to those who are now molding
the course.
It seems that instructors in
some of the University College
courses are now beginning to
pay less attention to the study
guides and textbooks ahd to
encourage their students to read
the paper-back originals..
*
IF THIS practice is encourag encouraged
ed encouraged by administrative officials,
then the trend here to mere
junior college teaching may be
reversed, and general educa education
tion education on this campus may yet
become what many of its early
friends hoped it would become.
Back in February of 1937, I
made the Winter commence commencement
ment commencement address here at the Uni University
versity University of Florida. The theme
of my talk on that occasion
was that we should throw the
textbooks out the window and
read the original*. Many of my
fellow faculty members, still
teaching here, will remember
what I said at that time.
If consistency is the issue,
then in this through the year*
I have certiinly been consistent.
WILLIAM G. CARLETON
Poll Story
Distorted
EDITOR:
Our group and all the follow followers
ers followers it has gained take issue
with the manner in which your*
writer, Mr. Swan, distorted the
first artcile on the ROTC poll.
While we were not in the
least surprised to find the stu students
dents students (57 out of 100) dislike
compulsory ROTC, we beg to
correct writer Swan on two
points:

1) A furor over compulsory
ROTC arose this year it not
true which can be readily prov proven
en proven by last years Alligators.
2) the Board of Control has
no authority to make a con contract
tract contract with the defense depart department,
ment, department, legal or moral.
Also, it should be emphasized
that if the UF is among the
remaining one per cent of col colleges
leges colleges still having compulsory
ROTC, then it is adequate com commentary
mentary commentary on the leadership
cliques on campus.
Group for
Academic Emphasis
L. W. TUTTLE JR.

EDITOR:
My congratulations to Deans
Hale, McClelland, and Little
for their excellent Job of soft softsoaping
soaping softsoaping in last Tuesdays Al Alligator.
ligator. Alligator.
Speaking of the research
scholar versus teaching scho scholar
lar scholar problem, Dean Hale made
the profound statement that
this problem Is no different
here than at any other state
university in the nation.
This is exactly what Dr. Carle Carleton
ton Carleton said in his address at the
student government banquet.
*
DOES THIS mean that be because
cause because every other state uni university
versity university in the nation has this
problem, that it is permissble for
the University of Florida to
have it, or is this just, another
bit of shoo thing, honey-covered
manna which constantly oozes
from Tigert Hall?
Dean McClelland is quoted
as saying that it is better to
strive for top grades AND for
outside reading as did Presi President
dent President Kennedy.
This is a wonderful God,
mother, country, croas-of-gold
statement, but I rather doubt
that President Kenedy really
made an effort to make good
grades as such.
*
IT IS rather obvious that
President Kennedy made an ef effort
fort effort to become educated, and
as a result of his prolific read reading,
ing, reading, it was inevitable that he
make good grades. Good grades
are a RESULT of intensive read reading,
ing, reading, not an end to be striven
tor.
The most intellectual state statement,
ment, statement, however, was made (ac (according
cording (according to the Alligator) by
both Dean Hale and Dean Mc-
Clelland. They start off by say saying
ing saying that there has been tremen tremendous
dous tremendous growth in libraries and
culturally oriented cities, but
they turn right around and say
that there has been a lag
in these areas.

NOW REALLY, what are men
trying to say? It is obvious that
they are not trying to say any anything,
thing, anything, but rather Just soft softsoaping
soaping softsoaping the issue.
I had the previlege of hear hearing
ing hearing Dr. Carleton at the Student
Government banquet, but I
certainly wouldnt consider leav leaving
ing leaving one of his classes strictly
to read on my own.

IN HIS Pcl-201 class last se semester,
mester, semester, each session was a
unique intellectual experience.
I have had in the past, and
continue to have now, profes professors
sors professors under whom I would have
benefited more had I spent the
time alloted for their classes in
the library reading an article
or a book pertaining to their
subject.

NE SHOULD certainly not
stop attending classes of a
good instructor, but good in instructors
structors instructors are in the minority
on this campus.
The most amazing information
contained in the Alligators arti article
cle article is that our beneficient
friend/ Dean Little, took time
out from his newspaper read reading
ing reading (with his feet propped on
his desk, of course) to spout a
platitude about everyone being
entitled to his own opinion.
*
THIS brilliant statement was
followed by an all-encompassing
generalization that many depart departments
ments departments at the University of Flori Florida
da Florida have their weaknesses.
Yes, Dean Little, everyone IS
entitled to his own opinion.
Why dont you have one?
NAME WITHHELD
Too Busy
For Drill
EEHTOR:
Your recent story about
ROTC was terrible. I think it
was unfair to the really serious
type of student who Just is too
busy with everything to have
to go to drills and all that sort
of thing. Any of .them will tell
you its Just a waste of time.
NAME WITHHELD

__ m m T LAST DAY!
II UridO "THE WORLD OF
ir SUSIE WONG
L 1 '
ItIKE IWTHIMOWtC EVER SEEN BffOjjj
mi Jw&
* *** 2 2*

Let's Get Off
Tally's Back

EDITOR:
I agree with you, the most
important thing we have to
think about right now is state
appropriations tor our educa educational
tional educational system.
But couldnt you get off the
legislators backs, Just for a lit little
tle little while? We, your faithful
readers, get dam sick and tired
of seeing nothing in your lead
editorials except please meet
our financial needs. Once in
a while its okay. It is impor important.
tant. important. But all the time?
It seems there are enough
issues right here at home, in
our student government, in our
Honor Court and System, in
our administration, to name a
few.

PLEASE, dont get carried
away! Your readers are the
students, remember? They have
a stake in what is going on right
here in their own little com community.
munity. community. You dont have to go
muckraking In Tallahassee.
There is some iftuck around here
as well.
For instance: Why drag our
dear legislators into every nook
and cranny of campus life? Your
Gras editorial was fine, until
you pulled Mr. Heberts Tally
Hassy Into it. Sure It was a fine
idea (although not original as
our Gras chairman pointed out).
But frankly, I am getting sick
of seeing It.
They need pushing, to be sure.
But I think youll find most of
* us students are In accord with
the Universitys needs and de demands.
mands. demands.
BORED.
Don't Give
Ship Up!
EDITOR:
Having just finished another
hysterical edition of the ALLI ALLIGATOR,
GATOR, ALLIGATOR, I feel compelled to
write a few comments that have
plagued me tor "the last few
years concerning the annual
problems facing the campus.
TTie first i< that I think the
AU4GATOR is hysterical be because
cause because it has reduced Itself to a
comic strip (with continuing
chapters meandering about go going
ing going now her*
*
THE ARTICLES about the
earth-shaking campus problems
come regularly like asthma.
Every rah! rah! rah rahand
and rahand what does it get you?
It seems that some of the peo people
ple people on this campus actually be believe
lieve believe the SjtMe is concerned
aMW'Whatui ese individuals
think.
* *
APPARENTLY, NOTHING
could be farther from truth.
Else, why the continuing cru crusade
sade crusade that warrants no improve improvements.
ments. improvements.
The Administration, the Board
of Control, the Budget Commit Committee,
tee, Committee, and finally the Legisla Legislature
ture Legislature do damn well what they
please and are not REALLY
concerned over a few feeble ar articles
ticles articles in the ALLIGATOR.
*
DEAN MAUTZ has made
the profound statement that the
student-teacher ratio and class
facilities are ideal in those
fields where It counts. This
was obviously intended to paci pacify
fy pacify the architecture and psycho psychology
logy psychology departments so THEY
KNOW WHERE THEY STAND.
There seems to be great alarm
about the amount of money the
Budget Committee will appro appropriate
priate appropriate this year to raise teach teachers
ers teachers salaries. And if they dont,
Oh, Oh.
I dont, for one minute, advo advocate
cate advocate complacency, but I would
like to know what youre-fighting
for. Perhaps there are just a
few disgruntled people crying
out in the darkness but every everyone
one everyone else is opulently satisfied
or THEY WOULD DO SOME SOMETHING
THING SOMETHING ABOUT IT.
*
SURELY SOME far-sighted
individuals must see what has to
be done and take the necessary
action to get results. If the pro professors
fessors professors want higher salaries,
Im sure their active imagina imaginations
tions imaginations could devise some scheme
to attain these ends.
So, of course, Dont give up
the ship, and all that - but
dont expect anything either.
B. R. WADE



Scope To Feature
Charcoal, Ink Art

Charcoal, and ink drawings,
and photography will highlight
the first edition of Scope, new
campus magazine, according to
Editor Michael Donaldson.
"We plan to use a variety of
line drawings as well as a photo photography
graphy photography portfolio of student work
from the Art Department, he
said Sunday. 1
Under the direction of layout
editor Bruce Thrasher, the work
on the cover and the internal art
work is going to be quite impres impressive,
sive, impressive, we think, he said.
Orange Peel editor Don Addis
has contributed a cartoon and sa satire
tire satire for Scope, and we will also
have a story on extra-sensory
phenomena by Kyle Webster.
Featured will be UF Negro law
school student, George Allen's
story of his reasons for choosing
the University.
Comments on Cuba by students
and Cuban ambassador to the Or Organization
ganization Organization of American States
will appear in the late April pub publication.
lication. publication.
The magazine will be sold to
students for twenty five cent 3,
and to nonnstudents for fifty
cents.
We are planning wide distri distribution
bution distribution for this first edition,
said Donaldson, but we dont
plan to have any left-over copies.
Selected poetry and short stor stories
ies stories by UF students as well as a
book review will also appear in
the magazine, according to Man-
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SB
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Flappers positively flip over lids groomed with Vaseline Hair 1 PflHfti j! l %
Tonic. Its the only hair tonic specially made to use with water. 1 B9EBa f SuflMll
Water evaporates robs your hair of grooming oils. Alcohol 1 jssSSC i j] 1 1 j
and cream ionics evaporate too. But Vaseline Hair Tonic 11 ;[ LUJ-LUi
wont H ht room\ng oil that re- I _ y iniYiVnli
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aging Editor Roberta Fichter.
We plan to have something in
this issue for every interest on
campus, said Donaldson.
Two Cabinet
Spots Filled
(Continued from Page ONE)
Martin, 4 EG, was first eligible
choice of a list of three names
submitted by the Mens Presi Presidents
dents Presidents Council, according to Bul Bullock.
lock. Bullock.
Bullock said Martin told him
his appointment was made with without
out without his knowledge. Martin was
former Student Body President,
Joe Ripleys Secretary of the In Interior.
terior. Interior.
Students Get
Cash Awards
Six University juniors received
a total of 575 dollars Friday for
outstanding projects in architec architectual
tual architectual design.
Each semester, at the Building
Construction Convocation, Pearce-
Uible, a Jacksonville housing and
developing firm honors six first
semester juniors placing in com competition
petition competition for building plans and
specifications.
Top awards of 150 dollars went
to: Irwin S. Holm of Bartow, W.
H. Squires of Atlanta, Ga., and
J. J. Smith of Ponte Vedra.
75 dollar awards went to G. F.
Richman of Miami Beach, and F.
L. Conlan of Miami. B. H. Black Blackmon
mon Blackmon of Gainesville received 50
dollars for his project.
Also featured at the convoca convocation
tion convocation was the chairman of Stone
and Webster Engineering Corpora Corporation
tion Corporation of New York, T. C. Williams.
Mr. Williams spoke on Super Supervisory
visory Supervisory Personnel Problems and
Requirements in the Construction
Industry.

gMfHg Jeo HHfflhfatw
TOP FRATERNITY ADVISER
. . Professor A. A. Murphree
KA ADVISER
MurphreeWins Award

Winner of the second annual
Delta Sigma Phi Fraternity Ad Advisers
visers Advisers Award is Kappa Alpha ad adviser
viser adviser A. A. Murphree, UF asso associate
ciate associate professor of English.
The award was presented to
Murphree at a reception in the
DSP house Sunday afternoon.
A board of UF deans and fra fraternity
ternity fraternity officers chose Murphree
outstanding faculty advisor of
the year.
Last years winner was Alpha
Tau Omega faculty advisor Mari Marion
on Marion M. Lasley.
A UF graduate, Murphree is a
member of Florida Blue Key, a
Rhodes Scholar, President of UF
Fraternity Advisors, and Presi President
dent President of Gainesville Little Theatre.
He has been faculty advisor to
Kappa Alpha since 1955.
Two members of the Board of
Governors of Delta Sigma Phi In International
ternational International Col. Earl Killgore
(AF Ret.) of Gainesville and Rev.
Bonaventure Kiley, T.D.R., of
Philadelphia, Pa. joined the
president of the DSP chapter Ro Robert
bert Robert Thompson, house mother,

Campus Calendar

TUESDAY, MARCH 28: Day
The Earth Stood Still will be
featured at the Florida Un lon
Auditorium tonight beginning at
7 and 9 p. m.
The film classic, The Magni Magnificent
ficent Magnificent Amersons, will be featur featured
ed featured at the Medical Science Build Building
ing Building Auditorium beginning at 8
p. m. tonight and Wednesday.
The Student Music Recital will
be held in Building R, room 122,
beginning at 3:40 p. m.
The Faculty Concert Series will
present Russel' Danburg at the
piano tonight in the P. K. Yonge
Auditorium at 8:15 p. m.
The American Civilization Lec Lecture
ture Lecture Series will host Arthur P.
Whitaker tonight at 8 p. m. in
the Law Auditorium. Mr. Whit Whitakers
akers Whitakers subject will be Local
Perspective, Case of Argentina.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29:
The Band Twilight Concert will
be presented tonight at 6:45 p.
m. in the Plaza of the Americas.
The American Civilization Lec Lecture
ture Lecture Series will present Arthur
p. Whitaker tonight in the
Law Auditorium at 8 p. m. Mr.
Whitaker will speak on Con Continental
tinental Continental Nationalism and the
United States.

Mrs. Lottie Tennant, and DSP
Dream Girl Karen Ramos in the
reception line.
GROUP SCOOP
Philosophers
To Hear Chemist
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE OR ORGANIZATION:
GANIZATION: ORGANIZATION: There will he a
meeting of. this organizat ion
March 28 at 4:45 p. m. in the
Florida Union Auditorium. All
are welcome.
PHILOSOPHY CLUB: The
Philosophy Club will present Jo Joseph
seph Joseph H. Simons on March 29 at
8:30 in room 218 of the Florida
Union. Mr. Simons, a professor
in the UF Chemical Engineering
Department and the author of
A Structure of Science, will
speak on A Scientist Looks at
Science.

The Cancer Education Lec Lecture
ture Lecture Series will host Dr. Arnold
D. Welsh tonight in the Medical
Science Building. 601 at 8 p.
M. Dr. Welshs subject will
speak on Some Metabolic Ap Approaches
proaches Approaches to Cancer-Chemothera Cancer-Chemotherapy-
py- Cancer-Chemotherapy-
THURSDAY, MARCH ?0:
Spring Recess begins at 6:30 p.
m. and ends on April 4 at 7:40
a. m. I

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Is your future up in the air?

As the communications needs of our nation
become steadily greater and more complex,
the Bell Telephone System is continuing its
pioneer work in microwave by taking to the
air more and more to get the word across.
To this end, Western Electricthe manu manufacturing
facturing manufacturing arm of the Bell Systemhas the
monumental task of producing a large part of
the microwave transmission equipment that
knits our country together by shrinking thou thousands
sands thousands of miles into mere seconds.
In spite of its great technological strides,
die science of radio relay is a rapidly-changing
one. And new break-throughs and advances
are common occurrences. A case in point: our
Bell System TH Microwave Radio Relay.
This newest development in long-distance
telephone transmission will eventually triple
the present message-carrying capacity of exist existing
ing existing long-haul radio relay installations. A full fullscale
scale fullscale system of 6 working and 2 protection
channels can handle 11,000 telephone mes messages
sages messages at the same time.
To make microwave work takes a host of
special equipment and components: relay
towers, antennae, waveguides, traveling wave wavetubes,
tubes, wavetubes, transistors, etc. But just as important,

Principal manufacturing locations at Chicago, Hl.* Kearny, N. J.| Baltimore, Md.; Indianapolis, Ind.; Allentown and Laureldale, Pa.j
Winston-Salem, N. C.; Buffalo, N. Y.; North Andover, Mass.; Omaha, Neb.; Kansas City, Mo.; Columbus, Ohio; Oklahoma City*, Okla.
Engineering Research Center, Princeton, N. J. Teletype Corporation, Skokie, 111., and Little Rock, Ark. Also Western Electric distri distribution
bution distribution centers in 33 cities and installation headquarters la 16 cities. General headquarters: 195 Broadway, New York 7, N. Y.

Hopefuls Vie
For GE Bowl
Appearance
*nie long steady process of eli elimination
mination elimination is just beginning for stu students
dents students vying for a position on the
G-E College Bowl team.
The contestants will meet reg regularly
ularly regularly every Wednesday night in
the Florida Union for practice
sessions. Anyone who is still
interested but has not signed up
for participation may attend the
meetings. Interested students
may contact Allen Skaggs, co-or co-ordinator,
dinator, co-ordinator, at the University News
Bureau or extension 288.
The practice and elimination
will proceed under realistic con conditions,
ditions, conditions, with equipment similar to
that used in actual programming.
The contestants will compete
against each other in mock bat battles
tles battles of wit and wisdom forth e
first few meetings until they are
accustomed to the situation, ac according
cording according to Skaggs. Eliminations
will not begin until after the ini initial
tial initial trial period.
The G-E College Bowl is a
televised quiz show pitting two
four-member team 3 of college
students against each other in a
quick-response question-and-an question-and-answer
swer question-and-answer game. The UF has been
invited to compete in the pro program
gram program om May 21.

Young Democrats Select
New Officers, Make Plans

The Young Democrats began a
new year with new officers, and
a new program last Thursday
night.
At a meeting of all registered
members, Joe Chapman, Sigma
Chi, was elected unanimously as
the new president of the young
political organization.
According to Chapman, the fu future
ture future plans of the club are center centered
ed centered around two main ideas.
The club hopes to work with
other Young Democrats and stu student
dent student government organizations in
the state to let Florida know that
students are interested in the
future of higher education and in
the prohlem of leadership.

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MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY

it takes top-caliber people to help us broaden
our horizons into such exciting new areas as
communication by satellites!
And microwave is only part of Western
Electrics opportunity story. We haveright
nowhundreds of challenging and rewarding
positions in virtually all areas of telephony,
as well as in development and building of
defense communications and missile guidance
systems for the Government
So, if your future is up in the air, you owe
it to your career to see whats up for you at
Western Electric.
Opportunities exist for electrical, mechanical, indus industrial,
trial, industrial, civil and chemical engineers, as wed as physical
science, liberal arts, and business majors. For more
information, gat your copy of "Western Electric and
Your Career" from your Placement Officer. Or write
Callage Relations, Roam 4106, Western Electric Com Company,
pany, Company, 195 Broadway, Now York 7, N. Y. And bo sura
to arrange far a Western Electric interview when the
Bell System recruiting team visits your campus.
[wsm&zzizi
auMUMcnama ano Nwr or an mi ww

UF Student Heads
Create All-Campus
FUND State Lobby

(Continued from Page ONE)
Former president Bob Park
added his complete endorsement
of FUND: The most significant
aspect of this movement is t h e
breadth of student organizations
which are becoming involved.
Students should get their par parents
ents parents interested. This program
touches every student; their fam families
ilies families and every alumnus.
Another ex-president, Joe
Ripley, voiced Ms wholeheart wholehearted
ed wholehearted endorsement of the organiza organization
tion organization and its aims commenting
that We are long overdue in
presenting effectively and con concertedly
certedly concertedly student feelings to toward
ward toward Mgher education.
Florida Blue Key was also re represented
presented represented in the movement by
both its president, Dave Strawn,
and vice president, Jim Jackson,
who enlisted the leadership fra fraternitys
ternitys fraternitys complete assistance:
As far as Blue Key is concern concerned,
ed, concerned, we will do anything possible
to assist in this program.
The heart of the program is

| In a series of dinner meet meetings,
ings, meetings, we hope to bring three
main speakers to campus with
the idea of discussing the respon responsibility
sibility responsibility of leadership.
Acting as his vice president
will be Paul Hendrick, independ independent,
ent, independent, and as secretary-treasurer,
Andy Abemethy, Kappa Delta.
The club was organized last
September to help with the Ken Kennedy-Johnson
nedy-Johnson Kennedy-Johnson campaign, but has
also sponsored the voter registra registration
tion registration drive, the get-out-and- vote
drive and arranged for the visit
of Vice President Johnson last
October, said former president,
Joe Thomas.

The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, March 28, *961

cooperation. Thia must come
I from the students and their par*
ents.
Profs Fed Up
The situation hag reached the
point where many ot the best fa faculty
culty faculty in many of our depart*
ments have had the carrot (of fi financial
nancial financial aid) dangled in front of
them for so long now, they will
have to either get it now, or
they will get out.
Legislative council majority
floor leader Bill Hollingsworth
said he would do everything
in Ms power to get the coun councils
cils councils support and cooperation
for the FUND program.
Besides Student government
and Florida Blue Key, the steer steering
ing steering committee has received the
endorsement and members hip
from the married villages may mayors
ors mayors council (represented by Tony
Cunningham, council chairman),
Inter-fraternity Council (Stu Par Parson,
son, Parson, president), Panhellenic Coun Council,
cil, Council, (Flossie Copeland, president),
Womens Student Association,
(Stephanie Brodie, president),
Mortar Board (Jean Harrison,

Have You
Been in
McDANIELL'S
LATELY?

(Author of I Was a Teen-age Dwarf* The Many
Lovee of Debit Gillit, etc.)
I WAS A TEEN-AGE SLIDE RULE
In a recent learned journal ( Mad) the distinguished board
chairman (Ralph Hot-Lips Sigafoos) of one of our most
important American corporations (the Arf Mechanical Dog Co.)
wrote a trenchant article in which he pinpointed our gravest
national problem: the lack of culture among science graduates.
Mr. Sigafooss article, it must be emphasized, was in no sense
derogatory. He stated quite clearly that the science student,
what with his gruelling curriculum in physics, math, and chem chemistry,
istry, chemistry, can hardly be expected to find time to study the arts
too. What Mr. Sigafoos deploresindeed, what we all deplore
is the lopsided result of todays science courses: graduates
who can build a bridge but cant compose a concerto, who know
Plancks Constant but not Botticellis Venus, who are familiar
with Fraunhofers lines but not with Schillers.
Mr. Sigafoos can find no solution to this hideous imbalance.
I, however, believe there is oneand a very simple one. It is
this: if students of science dont have time to come to the arts,
then we must let the arte come to students of science.
mi/Z too# ifathfc fer.~
'
For example, it would be a very easy thing to teach poetry
and music right along with physics. Students, instead of merely
being called upon to recite in physics class, would instead be
required to rhyme their answers and set them to familiar tunes
like, for instance, The Colonel Bogey March. Thus recitations
would not only be chock-full of important facte but would, at
the same time, expose the student to the aesthetic delights of
great music. Here, try it yourself. You all know The Colonel
Bogey March. Come, sing along with me:
Physics
Is what we learn in doss.
Einstein
Said energy is mass,
Newton
Is highfalutin
And Pascals a rascal. SoB Boyle.
Do you see how much more broadening, how much more
uplifting to learn physics this way? Os course you do. What?
You want another chorus? By all means:
Leyden
He made the Leyden jar.
Trolley
He made the Trolley car.
Curie
Rode in a surrey,
And Diesels a weasel. Sos Boyle.
Once the student has mastered The Colonel Bogey March. he
can go on to more complicated melodies like Death and Trans Transfiguration,
figuration, Transfiguration, the Eroica, and Love Me Tender.
And when the student, loaded with science and culture,
leaves the classroom and lights his Marlboro, how much more
he will enjoy that filter, that flavor, that pack or box! Because
there will no longer be an unease gnawing at his soul, no longer
a little voice within him repeating that he is culturally a dolt.
He will know know joyously that he is a fulfilled man, a
whole man, and he will .bask and revel in -the pleasure of his
Marlboro as a colt rolls in new grasscontent, complete, truly
educateda credit to his college, to himself, and to his tobao*
conisfc! e IMJ Mu Sfaotmaa
0 0*
And while he is rolling, colt-wise, in the new grass, perhaps
he would stop long enough to try a new cigarette from the
makers of Marlborounfiltered, king-size Philip Morris
Commander Welcome aboturdl

president), and the Young Dem Democrats,
ocrats, Democrats, represented by both in incumbent
cumbent incumbent president Joe Chapman
and past president Joe Thomas.
Demo Initiative
Young Democrats took initia initiative
tive initiative in organizing the FUND
drive under Wells, who is chair
man of the Political Action com committee
mittee committee of the organization.
A meeting has been called for
4 p.m. today to organize the
steering committee and start the
full scale work and planning of
the month. The meeting will be
held in Room 212, Florida Union.
STUDENTS!
SOLES
PUT ON
, 15 MINUTES
HEELS
PUT ON
5 Minutes
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Page 3



Page 4

Weightmen Wallop Relays Records

WINNING FORMFLORIDA RELAYS STYLE
... Is displayed by UFs Wendell Willis and Auburn's record-shattering Rich Richard
ard Richard Crane. Crane provided plenty of sunshine for Tiger track followers with his
shot and discus efforts. Willis copped the high jump with this leap.
PRICE TOSSES SATURDAY SHUTOUT

UF, Auburn Nines Split

By MIKE GOKA
Gator Asst. Sports Editor
C. W. Price spaced five Auburn
hits Saturday as the Gator stick stickmen
men stickmen collected 19 hits to rout the
Tigers 10-0 in their SBC clash
at Auburn.
The win gave the Gators a
split in the two game series. Au Auburn
burn Auburn won the Friday contest, 7-
6.
Booherg Bat Big
Paul Booher, UFs all-SEC
catcher held the big bat in Sat Saturdays
urdays Saturdays contest collecting four
hits in five trips to the plate.
Other Gator hitting stars wer e
Len Scheinhoft, three singles in
five trips, and Jim Dzuris who
had two singles and a dbuble in
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Follow the Eating Crowd
fUll to the
CAFETERIA
1212 N. Main Street
Gainesville Shopping Center
(Just 5 Minutes East of Campus)
DINNER LUNCH
4:30 11:30
8:05 2:05
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including beverage
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The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, March 21, 1961

six appearances.
The Gators failed to score in
the second but left the bases
loaded against Mack Whitaker
the eventual losing pitcher.
Whitacker got the first man to
face him in the third before four
consecutive singles sent the hurl hurler
er hurler scurring for the showers.
First gacker Charlie Bean
drove in two runs in the big
third. When the dust had clear cleared
ed cleared Price was perched atop a 5*
0 cushion.
The issue was never in doubt
after that, as the Gators added
two in the fourth and three more
in the eighth to clinch their
week-end split.

MURAL MUSE
PKPhi Wins Volleyball;
Handball Is Underway

Pi Kappa Phi defeated Chi Phi
Wednesday afternoon to cop Vol Volleyball
leyball Volleyball laurels in the Blue Lea*
gue and to bring to a halt Intra Intramural
mural Intramural Volleyball tournaments
for the current campaign.
SAE had previously defeated
Tau Epsilon phi to regain the
Volleyball championship in the
Orange.
The handball tourneys in both
Orange and Blue Leagues got
underway yesterday. Theta Chi
met Kappa Alpha and Alpha Ep Epsilon
silon Epsilon Pi met Delta Tau Delta in
Golfers Stroke
To 6th Straight
The undefeated Gator Golf team
won its sixth dual match on Sat Saturday
urday Saturday as the Gators downed Rol Rollins
lins Rollins College 22% to 4%. The
match was played In Winter Park.
Captain Frank Beard had a six sixunder-par
under-par sixunder-par 65 to led both teams.
Phil Leckey came in with 66
while Harry Root had a 69.
The Gators will leave soon for
Houston where they will take
part in the Houston Invitational
Meet March 28-30. Twenty teams
are entered in the meet including
Yale, Oklahoma, Texas, Florida
State, LSU, SMU, and Houston,
the defending NCAA champions.
In addition to a team cham championship,
pionship, championship, an individual champion
will be determined. Top con contenders
tenders contenders for the title are National
Champion Richard Crawford, his
Houston teammate Homero Balan Balancas,
cas, Balancas, and the Gators Beard.
Beard defeated Blancas by one
stroke in the recent Florida In Intercollegiate
tercollegiate Intercollegiate tournament at Ocala.

UFs mound staff didnt fare
as well in the Friday opener as
the Plainsmen collected 10 hits
six runs in the first five inn innings
ings innings off Rcky Smith.
The Gators chased starter Jim
Shirley with three runs in the
first but were unable to handle
reliever-winner Jim Boyd who
replaced Shirely with one out in
the initial frame.
The fifth was Auburns big
inning scoring four runs for a 6-
3 lead which was extended to 7-
3 with a singleton in the sixth.
The last run proved to be the
needed margin as the -Gators
came back to collect a run each
of the last three innings to fail
by one in their comeback try.

the inaugural in the Orange.
Phi Gamma Delta met Alpha
Gamma Rho and Chi Phi faced
Phi Epsilon Pi to get things roll rolling
ing rolling in the Blue.
In the other first round matches
TEP faces Pi Lambda Phi in a
game which ha been rescheduled
for 5:30 Tuesday afternoon, Alp Alpha
ha Alpha Tau Omega meets Pi Kappa
Alpha, Phi Kappa Tau meets Be Beta
ta Beta Theta pi, AEPi meets Delta
Tau Delta, Kappa Sig meets Sig Sigma
ma Sigma Chi, Sigma Nu meets SPE,
and Phi Delt meets SAE.
Add a correction to the A 11-
jcampus volleyball team which
qame out in the last issue of the
Alligator. Replacing SAE Bob
Patton is SAE Hubert Williams.

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Crane Shatters Shot, Disc Mark;
Wins Kearney-Rayh un Trophy

Navy copped the unofficial team title
and Auburn's Richard Crane walked
away with the individual honors in the
18th annual Florida Relays Saturday at
the Florida track.
The Midshipmen raced to 38 points,
mainly on the strength of their fine re relay
lay relay teams, to outdistance Northeast
Louisiana State, the runner-up with 32.
Crane broke two Relays records by
putting the shot 58 feet even and toss tossing
ing tossing the discuss 176 feet 2V 2 inches. The
muscular Auburn star was presented
the Keamey-Raybun Trophy, symbolic
of the meets outstanding individual per performer,
former, performer, for his efforts.
Out-Distanced Nutting's Mark
The shot toss out-distanced Ed Nut Nuttings
tings Nuttings mark of 173 feet 1/8 inch.
Two more weight records fell in the
high school class as future Gator tackle
Roger Orrell, of Daytona Beach Sea Seabreeze,
breeze, Seabreeze, tossed the shot 58 feet 2y 2
inches, the furthest irt Florida prep his history,
tory, history, and Miamis Southwests Ron Pas Pascarella
carella Pascarella whirled the disc 166 feet 10
inches.

Netters Wreck
Tech, FSU
Over Weekend
The UF Tennis Team swept
through two more matches last
weekend, running their victory
streak to 18 over the last two
seasons.
On Friday, the Gators blasted
Georgia Tech, 9-0 Saturday, FSU
was the victim, 7-2. The wins
were the eighth and ninth of the
1961 season.
The Tech team is defending
SEC champion, but only one
man, Dave Peake, has returned
for this season. Jim Shaffer de defeated
feated defeated him 9-7, 6-2 in the number
one match.
The match was played at the
UF courts.
Florida State gave the Gators
a tougher time on Saturday in
Tallahassee. The Seminoles were
also undefeated going into the
days play with seven wing to
their credit.
However, the Gators came
through and took five of the six
singles matches and two of the
three doubles events for the vic victory.
tory. victory.
In the number one match, Shaf Shaffer
fer Shaffer defeated Rebel Bellamy, 6-4,
1-1, 6, 6-4. Shaffer then teamed
with Bill Tyn, who also won in
singles, to defeat Bellamy and
Gordy Smith in doubles, 6-4, 6-4.

list. To e;arn the Kearney-Raybun prize which has
gone to such notable track stars as the Styron twins,
Dave and Lon, Leonard Edelon and Dave Sime.
Crane had to out do Nick Kovalikides, Keith Locke
and Pat Garrett among others.

Maryland's Kovalikides tossed the javelin
over 227 feet. Kentuckys brilliant sophomore dis distance
tance distance man Locke, the SEC frosh two-mile record
holder, won his even handily and in the second
fastest relay time posted. And Garrett soundly
thrashed all competitors in the 100 including the
favorite, Furmans Dave Segal, the British olym olympian.
pian. olympian.
Garrett had the fastest time of the afternoon,
a 9.7 clocking in the preliminaries, even though he
won in a relatively slow time of 9.9.
Other poi\; producers for the Gators were the
440-yard relay team, which tied for fifth; javelin
thrower Oscar Macallum, with a fifth; and discus
thrower Walt Buettner with a fifth.
McDAVIDS BARBER SHOP
for your convenience
and pleasure.
SEVEN BARBERS
Shoe Repair Shop in Rear i
1718 W. Univ. Ave.

preferred to develop their own compact, FROOD NOW OFFERS HIS
CAR TO SOME LUCKY COLLEGE STUDENT! This is a brand-new, gas-driven, REAL CAR. (t features
four (4) wheels, genuine foot-power brakes, fresh-air conditioning, M and actual left-right
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the Froodmobile. A carton of Luckies will be given to the first 100 runners-up. Along with your entry / Ml
send your name, return address, college or university, and class. Entries must be postmarked no /c/ cA m y y :J? j
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High jumper Wendell Willi* was the
lone Florida winner in star-studded
field that broke nine records and
equalled two more. Willis cleared the
bar at 6-3 3/4.
North Carolinas distance medley
quartet broke the other college mark by
touring the two and one-half mile dis distance
tance distance in 10:05 to lower the standard
set by Duke last year.
St. Pete High School's half-mile relay
team and Altanta Southwests mile re relay
lay relay outfit set new marks in the high
school division as did relay units from
Northeast Louisiana State in the mile re relay
lay relay and Alabama in the sprint medley
in the freshman and junior college class.
Two more marks were equalled in the
high school division. John Kirkley, a
speedy dashman from Tuscaloosa, Ala.,
twice ran the 100-yard dash in 9.8 to tie
Ellis Goodloe, former UF sprinter, old
mark. Miler Ernie Drown of Bishop Ken Kenny
ny Kenny nosed out Northeasts Steve Bond in
the mile though both equalled Ronnie
Haynes old mark of 4:32.0.
Many Outstanding Individuals
There were many outstanding individ individual
ual individual performances but Cranes topped the

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AUBURN ACE ACCEPTS AWARD
.' \
Billy Richardson, one of the three UF sports fans
who have donated the Kearney-Raybun Trophy to the
meets outstanding performer presents the award to
Crane. Ben McGahey and Bill Thompson look on.
MERMEN MOP UP MIAMI

Gator mermen slipped by the
University of Miami, 52-43. set setting
ting setting new records in two events
in the process.
Sophomore Terry Green was a

John T. Beckum, O.D.
announces
j the opening of his office
of 917 W. University Avenue
Practice limited to examination of the eye
Phone FR 6-1288
.l.ll I I I 1
Be perspicacious! jfl|
Not thu o lud.nl who Thu pum.U.ctuwi
drowsas ovw book* no mattor *harp! NEDi* WljS you
how much sleep he get*. owake and elert-wiefelyl
If you sometimes find studying soporific (and who doesnt?), the word
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always keep NoDoz in proximity.
Tha **fa stay awaka tablatavailable everywhere. Another fine product of Grove Laboratories.

i double winner, taking the 220
: and 440-yard freestyles. sharing
| [
| high point honor* with Miami's
1 1 Bob Freidman.