Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
t..
$
e& / t toi
Annual Florida Relays To Run Saturday

Sprinters, Weightmen
$
Head Standout List
At Track Carnival
By BILL BUCHALTER
Alligator Sports Editor
Dave Segal,! 4 Ed Nutting, Pat Garrett, Richard
Crane.
They are just a few of the outstanding track and
field stars that will be assembled at the new asphalt
track Saturday fcjr the 18th running of the Florida Re-

lays.
The cinder carnival, the larg largest
est largest track meet in tqc south, is
the brainchild of Percy Beard,
UF track coach. More than 1400
athletes are expected to enter
this year representing teams
from Princeton of the Ivy Lea League
gue League to independent i Northeast
Louisiana State.
The Kearney Rabun Trophy,
emblematic of the meets out outstanding
standing outstanding performer, j will be
awarded at the conclusion. Last
years winners were the Styron
twins, Don and Dave, ffom North Northeast
east Northeast Louisiana State. L
Noticeably absent from this
years track festival will be Loui Louisiana
siana Louisiana State, defending Southeast Southeastern
ern Southeastern Conference champions, Flor Floridas
idas Floridas legendary pole vakilter Hen Henry
ry Henry Wadsworth, and the Styron
boys who transferred td Southern
Illinois. I
But many outstanding thinclads
will be on hand and several re records
cords records may be in danger.
Segal, Furmans great sprinter
and one of the British Isles fast fastest
est fastest dashmen, is a threat to break
Dave Styron and Dave Simes 9.5
century mark. He will be pushed
by Louisiana Techs Garrett and
Vanderbilts Guy Tallent.
Nutting, Georgias Tech tackle
and shot putter deluxe, may be become
come become the first southerner to ex exceed
ceed exceed 60 feet in his specialty. The
235 pounder hit 57-3 last week
mark set last year. His best ef effort
fort effort was 58*0 against Miami last
spring.
(See SPRINTERS, Page 6)

Council Runs Smoothly
As Parlies Cooperate
j

By JACK HORAN
Gator Staff Writer
Student and United Party legis legislators
lators legislators politically cooperated de
spite minor bloc voting on pres#
dential appointments in the first
meeting of the new Legislative
Council Tuesday night.
Student body Vice President
Jack Mahaffey (Student Party)
presided over the United domi dominated
nated dominated Council in what was
termed a smooth meeting by
both sides.
Bullocks Address
t
After the newly-elected | legisla legislators
tors legislators were sworn in, student body
President Bruce Bullock exhort exhorted
ed exhorted members to bring up ideas
from the grass roots. We want
to keep student government prog progress
ress progress moving forward. ;
Bullocks cabinet and adminis administrative
trative administrative appointments wcjre re referred
ferred referred to an appointment; evalu evaluation
ation evaluation committee for study of in individual
dividual individual qualifications.
The committee is composed of
three United and two Student
Party members.
ONeill Approved
When Clarence ONeill had been
unanimously approved as Secre Secretary
tary Secretary of Finance, United Independ Independent
ent Independent whip Mac Melvin moved that
Irv Cohen, traffic clerk appoin appointee,
tee, appointee, be referred to the commit committee
tee committee with the rest of the proposed
cabinet members.
This brought strong opposition
from the Student faction.
Melvin stated that Cohen had
illegally opened a voting machine
in the law building to determine
who had won in the spring elec elections.
tions. elections.
Bullock rose to Cohens defense,
saying that he did open the ma machine,
chine, machine, but was extremely well
qualified for clerk.
The motion passed as the re remainder
mainder remainder of the Traffic Court was
approved.

* EDUCATION HEADLINERS

In a strongly worded resolu resolution
tion resolution last weekend, the Florida
Education Association conven conventions
tions conventions 5,000 delegates endorsed
without reservation federal aid
to education.
This constituted backing by
Floridas more than 33,000 pub public
lic public school teachers behind Pre President
sident President Kennedys federal aid
program as a possible inroad to
teacher salary raises-
THE SAME day (Saturday),
Senate Appropriations Commit Committee
tee Committee Chairman Wilson Carraway
of Leon County strongly hinted
that Floridas appropriations to
schools might be reduced if fed federal
eral federal aid is made available un under
der under Kennedys program.
MONDAY, the legisla ti v e
council made up of legisla legislators
tors legislators from each of the
congressinal districts Wk&
to sponsor in the upcoming leg legislative
islative legislative session tax Mils which

'Sank. 'aoHh
iijayk. mi itili
as Brag
I :
B, y-j
ML Jp||gt
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LOWENSTEIN
UF Hopeful

Minority floor leader Dick Her Herrich
rich Herrich said we were surprised at
the objection against Cohen and
are awaiting the report of the
united-sponsored committee.
Tie Broken
The Council also voted Tommy
Landphair as Freshman repre representative,
sentative, representative, breaking an election tie
between her and Charles Ed Edwards.
wards. Edwards.
Landphair is a United mem member.
ber. member.
In other business, Mort Perlin
was appointed parliamentarian;
several appropriations were grant granted
ed granted to organizations for conven conventions;
tions; conventions; and a resolution to send
the Alligator to alumni associa associations
tions associations was adopted.
Foreign Students
Plan New Dance
Instead of Frolics
Spring frolics may go dance danceless,
less, danceless, but a new international
dance will 1 keep gators hopping
in semi-formal attire April 14, ac according
cording according to Luis Gomez, incum incumbent
bent incumbent International Student Organ Organization
ization Organization president.
The dance, to be held in con conjunction
junction conjunction with the groups Inter International
national International Week, will be a campus campuswide
wide campuswide event.
Set for the Hub, the dance will
feature crowning of the Pan
American Queen.
Earl Barrett, chairman of the
activity, said he would seek late
permits for coeds for the night
of the dance.
The group received SSOO from
the legislative council to finance
the weeks activities.

would raise $7,100,000.
Among the recommended pro proposals
posals proposals was a bill calling for ex extension
tension extension of the states three per
cent sales tax to all meals ser served
ved served at colleges and universities
and to dormitory rentals. The
estimated income from such a
bill is set at between $300,000
and $1 million a year.
TALLAHASSEES Senator
Wilson Carraway followed up
the Council (of which he is a
member) recommendations
Tuesday with a statement that
an alarming decline in state
sales tax revenues may force
the 1961 legislature to enact new
tax measures.
AUSO on Tuesday, Board of
Control member Joe K. Hays
of Winter Haven submitted his
resignation to make way for a
Gov. Farris Bryant appointee.
Hays term would terminate in
July.

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

Volume 53, No. 41

BB Balks
AlTrio
For ISO
Triumvirate
May Get Post
By BOBBIE FLEISOHMAN
Gator Staff Writer
A cabinet appointment
believed by Student Body
President Bruce Bullock to
be a mere formality has
ballooned into a situation
that will probably be
smoothed over by the nam naming
ing naming of three persons to the
post.
Bullock announced Wednesday
the probable formation of a tri triumvirate
umvirate triumvirate to occupy the position
of commissioner of foreign af affairs.
fairs. affairs. The group would consist of
Rene Monet, Nelson Mora, and
Ishaque Mehdi, wiht Monet act acting
ing acting as senior member.
Im meeting the three of
them Friday afternoon to discuss
this matter and get their ideas,
he said. The most important
thing is that all the members of
the 1.5.0. are fairly represented.
Bullock withdrew the tentative
appointment of Monet Sunday af after
ter after learning that Monets ten tenpoint
point tenpoint lead in an International
Student Association election did
not automatically establish his
right to the office.
Mora and Mehdi received the
next largest number of votes.
According to 1.5.0. rules, the
names of the three top candidates
were to be submitted to Bullock
for consideration. Monet, in a
telephone call to Bullock after the
election, neglected to m ention
this, but claimed the office.
I knew about the rule, Monet
later said, I just didnt think
about it. The procedure was put
out of my mind by the fact that
at the election it was stated that
the person getting the highest
number of votes would be com commissioner.
missioner. commissioner.

Bullock, also under this miscon misconception,
ception, misconception, said, It was my impres impression
sion impression that the winner of the elec election
tion election would be appointed as a
mere formality.
He later mentioned Monets
right to the position because of
his margin in the voting, saying,
The foreign students decided
themselves to have the election.
I think they should abide by it
themselves.
At that time he expressed the
intention of appointing Monet to
the post if he would bring his
program up.
This is the only thing about
this man that has been attacked,
he said. His ticket was put to together
gether together at the last minute. Dis Dissenters
senters Dissenters say the man has no pro program.
gram. program.
Bullock then stated that the
commissioner occupies a position
subordinate to that of the presi president
dent president of the 1.5.0.
He said, The position in ques question
tion question is only a liaison man between
student government and 1.5.0.
My point is he doesnt need a
program because the 1.5.0. has
a president and its own pro program,
gram, program, he added.
After speaking briefly with Mo Monet
net Monet on the telephone, Bullock de decided
cided decided to reverse his former inten intention
tion intention to award the office to Mo Monet
net Monet alone, and announced the tri triumvirate
umvirate triumvirate plan as the probable
outcome of the situation.
Boone Here!
Crooner Pat Boone paid a
surprise visit to campus yes yesterday.
terday. yesterday.
Hie recording star, current currently
ly currently appearing in his hometown
of Jacksonville, came to cam campus
pus campus to visit his brother, Cecil
Nk*k Boone, a UF student.
Wearing his famed white
buckskin shoes, Boone visited
the UF College of Law before
returning to Jacksonville.
Historian Speaks
On S. America
Nationalism in Latin Amer America
ica America will be the topic of a series
of lectures to be given at the
University of Florida of March
27-29.
Professor Arthur P. Whitaker,
generally regarded as the Dean
of Latin American historians in
the United States will give the
lectures. The Department of
History will produce the program
as part of its fifth annual Lec Lectures
tures Lectures on American Civilization,
to be held in the Law School Au Auditorium
ditorium Auditorium at 8 p. m., Monday,
March 27 through Wednesday,
March 29.
Whitaker has taught at var various
ious various universities in the United
States and is presently a profes professor
sor professor of Latin-American history at
the University of Pennsylvania.

| E3I

Philpott &
Speakers
UF Vice President Dr. Har Harry
ry Harry M. Philpott is shown ad addressing
dressing addressing members of the Flori Florida
da Florida Blue Key Speakers Bureau

House Appropriations

Group 'Very Friendly

By NANCY MYKEL
Gator Editorial Assistant
Several alternatives are avail available
able available to Florida in balancing its
finances and educational struc structure,
ture, structure, according to Alachua Coun County
ty County Representative Ralph Turling Turlington.
ton. Turlington.
A member of the House Appro Appropriations
priations Appropriations Sub committee which
visited the campus this week to
see what the budget requests
were all about, Turlington spoke
before the Kiwanis Club Tuesday.
Either cut the quality of edu education,
cation, education, restrict admissions or find
new sources of revenue and meet
the challenge, he said.
No Tax Platform
Governor Farris Bryant was
elected last fall on a no new
tax platform but an increasing
number of legislators are saying
new taxes are imperative.
The house appropriations sub subcommittee,
committee, subcommittee, on campus this week
to see what the budget requests
were all about was termed very
friendly by UF Vice-Pres. Har Harry
ry Harry M. Philpott.
No Commitments
Although no one made any
commitments, it seemed clear
that if crucial needs of the UF
are to be met, there will have
to be new taxes, Dr. Philpott
said.
Need More
Applicants
Response to applications for ori orientation
entation orientation group leaders has been
alarmingly low, according to Don
Cohen, associate director for fall
orientation.
We need about 300 applicants,
but we have only 30 so far, he
said.
Deadline for applications is
April 6. Forms may be picked
up in Room 128 of Tigert Hall.
Cohen said many students who
want to apply are cut out be because
cause because they miss the deadline.
We have 150 openings plus
about 30 alternate posts to fill,
he said.
Explaining that two applicants
are wanted for each opening, Co Cohen
hen Cohen stressed that the orientation
staff was seeking quality.
He said interviewers will con consider
sider consider the applicants interest in
the program, knowledge of the
campus, grades, and interest in
advancing to an orientation staff
position.
Applications
For Miss UF
Applications for the 1981 Miss
University of Florida contest will
be available until the end of
April, was yesterdays announce announcement
ment announcement from Mike Parks, contest
chairman.
All student organizations, fra fraternities
ternities fraternities and sororities will re receive
ceive receive application blanks. Each
girl must be sponsored by an or organization
ganization organization and pay an entrants
fee of five dollars.
This years contest will again
be held at Silver Springs. As soon
as BimJ plans are made they will
be announced, said Parks.

University of Florida, GainesvilleFriday, March 24, 1961

at a meeting Wednesday after afternoon.
noon. afternoon. Dr. Philpott told the
speakers reasons behind the
UFs emphasis on research, de defended
fended defended criticism leveled against
teachers light loads, and gave
them other information about
the UFs growth and potential.
The speakers have begun their
engagements, which will conti continue
nue continue until Apr. 30.

Alachua county Representative
Osee Fagan, who attended all the
subcommittee meetings on cam campus,
pus, campus, said he thought things went
as well as could be expected
during the conferences with UF
administrators.
I feel very strongly that if the
subcommittee members had the
assurance of adequate revenue,
the UF would not have to worry
about its needs being filled, Fa Fagan
gan Fagan said Wednesday.
Chicken vs. Egg*
However, its back to the old
question of the chicken and the

UF FISCAL
INFO READY
Students anxious to let the folks
back home know about UFs eco economic
nomic economic straits can obtain facts and
figures from Room 314 in the
Florida Union.
Chuck Warren, chairman of the
Educational Analysis Committee
which was formed in 1960 to
make the people aware of high higher
er higher educations precarious situa situation
tion situation announced that new life is
going into the committee over
Easter.
Student governments legislative
council of about sixty members
has unanmiously agreed to make
contacts throughout the state over
Easter vacation, Warren said.
The committee welcomes unof unofficial
ficial unofficial participation, and will fur furnish
nish furnish any interested student with
dittoed sheets which list facts and
figures, which spell out suggested
contact procedures, and on which
students may want to evaluate
the kind of reception which influ influential
ential influential people give them.

Banker Tells Threats to America

Democracy has built-in fea features
tures features of self-destruction, said
Florida banker Henry C. Cole Coleman,
man, Coleman, Tuesday as he addressed
more than 200 persons at the 11th
annual B-day (Business Day)
luncheon.
Coleman, chairman of the board
of the Commercial Bank of Day Daytona
tona Daytona Beach, said, As citizens, we
are free to vote or not to vote,
to offer constructive criticism
about our government or to
disregard mistakes made by
those in positions of power.*
In his talk, concerned with the
preservation of the American way
of life, Coleman listed three areas
in which freedom could be im improved.
proved. improved. He suggested several
changes in government, labor,
and business.
Hold Down Inflation
Coleman urged businessmen to
take an interest in politics, to do
their part in holding the line
against inflation, to avoid clan clandestined
destined clandestined deals with labor leaders,
and to steer dear of mergers,
unfair practices and excessive
pricing. v
Stop pressuring for unneces unnecessary
sary unnecessary raises," he cautioned labor
groups. Give a days work for
a days pay."
(Bee B-DAY, Page %)

'Vice' Goes Legal
As Gras Spotlights
Midway, Big Top

By LINDA HAMEL
Gator Staff Writer
The south end of Florida Field
will look like a paradise for a vice
squad Saturday night when big time
gambling, drownings, and ciga cigarette
rette cigarette girls run rampant.
Girls will give away kisses for
only a dime, while dance hall cuties
beckon.
All is legalized, though, and un under
der under the auspices of Gator Gras. The
/vice is part of the booths at the
Gator Gras Carnival open from 6
p.m. to midnight.
About 25 booths are expected, an

egg, because the revenues are of often
ten often affected by appropriation re requests.
quests. requests.
The legislature will lie in ses session
sion session during April and May, for
sixty days.
In the past the bill covering in institutions
stitutions institutions of higher learning has
not come up for a vote until late
in May, UF Business Manager W.
Ellis Jones said.
Up to People
The appropriations bill is us usually
ually usually presented after the state
revenues have been decided.
Now the problem is on the
grass roots level, with the folks
back home, according to* Rep.
Fagan.
If the people cant see the
need for increased taxes, you
cant expect their legislative re representatives
presentatives representatives to vote for taxes
against their wishes, he said.
The people of Florida are the
ones to be shown UFs budget
needs now, he said.
Players Project
Foreign Farce
Michel de Ghelderodes Pan Pantagleize
tagleize Pantagleize is to be the Florida
Players final major production of
the Spring semester. Tryouts for
the play will be held at 4:00 p.m.
and 7:30 p.m. on Monday, March
27, and Tuesday, March 28, in
Room 239 Tigert Hall.
Pantagleize is a modem, neo neoexpressionistic
expressionistic neoexpressionistic farce. The Players
production will be the first in the
United States. All interested per persons
sons persons are invited to the readings
no experience is necessary.

R jH Hk nri
pi SSBtigKr
m §

QUEEN HONORED
A carnation coronation honored Miss
Jane Sloan 3 BA, Sarasota, B-Day Queen.
Judy Laurent, last years B-Day Queen

LAW JUNIOR
APPOINTED
ATTORNEY
GENERAL
Selig J. Goldin has been ap appointed
pointed appointed Attorney General of the
Honor Co*U.Z by new Honor Court
Chancellor Bill Trickel.
Goldin, 22-year-old married law
junior, will be responsible for
conducting pre-trial investigations
and conferences. The attorney
general provides the evidence, but
conviction and penalties are given
by the Honor Court justices.
The post was created last Oc October
tober October by former Chancellor Ga Gavin
vin Gavin OBrien. Thom Rhumberger
was first Attorney General.
Court policy stipulates that the
official shall be at all times an
upperclassman in the College of
Law.
Goldin was assistant attorney
general under Rhumberger.
The new attorney general re received
ceived received his BA from the UF in
1959. From Miami, Goldin is a
member of Alpha Epsilon Pi so social
cial social fraternity and Phi Alpha Del Delta
ta Delta legal fraternity.
Serving as his aids will be six
other law students: Charles M.
Rieders, 25, 3LW; Edward Clay
Parker, 23, ILW; Tad Davis,
22, ILW; Bud Stone, 22, 2LAW;
Ron Cacciatore, 24, ILW and
Walter Crumbley, 28, l LW.
Danish Dinnar on Tap
Danish delicacies will be served
by the International Suppers
Committee this Sunday at 6 p.m.
in the Johnson Lounge of the
Florida Union.
A movie about Denmark will be
shown after the supper.
Tickets will be available in
Room 315 of the Florida Union
until 5 p.m. this afternoon.
Prices are $1.25 for non nonstudents
students nonstudents and one dollar for stu students.
dents. students.

crowned her successor March 24 at the
B-Day luncheon, during the day set aside 1
the College of Business Administration
speeches and discussions by outrtapdfcy*^- ~
bus! n AlMtrnwr \.

Six Pages This Edition

increase of eight over last years
Carnival.
The Carnival, complete with
Barker Dave Hudson, cotton candy t
carnival music, and clown, will pro provide
vide provide continuous entertainment. <
Other booths sponsored by 21
Greek organizations and four inde-
pendent groups, will include a
record-breaking event,
the-eye throwing, putt-putt, Chin Chinese
ese Chinese egg roll, smashing an old car,
and a mystery exhibit.
Two trophies will be awarded to
the most original booth and to the
booth that brings in the most pro proceeds.
ceeds. proceeds.

Prizes in the form of ye-yoe,
jumping beans, hats and! fay
mice wiil be awarded ter .the
winners at the booths. In addi addition,
tion, addition, organizations will provida
extra prizes,
Charity Event
Proceeds from the Gamivnl
will go to charity through the
Florida Union Board.
Admission to the Carnival is
the price of five tickets, -SiLeetet
Chairman of the Gator Grits
Nelson DeCamp registered disap disappointment
pointment disappointment at the number of in independent
dependent independent groups who ara parti participating
cipating participating in the Camivil.
For All Students
The carnival and Talent Show
was not designed to be just
another Greek social event," said
DeCamp. We expected more in independent
dependent independent organizations to join
the Carnival after ail, it was
designed for the whole student
body," he added. ;~i:
DeCamp said it is still not too
late to put a booth in the Carni Carnival.
val. Carnival. Those who wish to partici participate
pate participate should come to Graham field
Saturday morning.
Thats Show Bte
Students will try their hands at
show biz when the Big Top is
raised at the Gator Graa~TVthmt
Show, part of the Carnival, The
Big Show will start at 7:l# p.m.
and 9 p.m.
The show, which will last one
and one-half hours, will feature
11 acts competing for a trip for
two to Nassau. Acts will include
Johnny Miller doing a take-off on
the movie, Ben Hur" from the
viewpoint of the producer.
Song and Jest
A1 Malniger will sing Student
Number," a song he wrote as a
parady on the University system.
Ballad singer, Bob Stegar, will
present songs he has recorded.
Steger has sung at the Continen Continental
tal Continental Coffee House.
Other student acts include a
rockn roll trio, Latin American
combo, blues and jazz singers,
and a classical pianist. Hie Col Collegiates
legiates Collegiates will provide between*
acts music.
(See TALENT, Page *),



Page 2

Health Center Saves
350,000 Dollars;
Best In Two Years

By FAX TUNSTttA
Gator Editorial Assistant
Cured of a financial ailment
projected to cost $360,060, the J.
HUlis Miller Health Center ia op operating
erating operating more in the black than it
has in two years, according to
director L. R. Jordan.
Jordan and UF President J.
Wayne Reitz announced recently
that the Health Center would not
need the $350,000 pledged by the
State Budget Commission. The
pledge was made to counteract
an anticipated deficit, g
Present Funds Sufficient
'We have re-organized and re reassigned
assigned reassigned personnel, as well as
making some internal budget ad adjustments
justments adjustments our current projections
indicate that we will not need the
funfe requested, said Jordan in
an Alligator interview. %
He explained that he had
been director of the hospital
for It months of the tostltnttoe*
34 month operation. { Before
he came from Duke, file hospital
had keen under the acting di direction
rection direction of Buseelt Pear, Provost.
Jordan stated that the hospital

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I IkM r CM to tom
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I
HOW OEEP IS THE OCEAN* Scientific Director Dr. Andreas B.
Rechnitzer end the li. S. Navy bathyscaph Trieste" found Hk
out: 7 history-making mites. Dr. Rechnitzer is a Camel smoker.
He says. '*l smoke Camels for one good reason: taste ...rich. V
satisfying taste I enjoy every time I light up. :' f <
* # '. 4§w?** *?v v # ** .* * ,>< * . j*\ Isy 1 ';
IliifiH B MB M f 'MS ** IfS[
I

The Florida AHifotor, Friday, Merth 24, 1961

(EDITOR'S NOTE: Al Although
though Although the University Med Medical
ical Medical Center hod been silent
on the specific reasons for
the decision, this Interview
explains hew Director L
R. Jordon was able to moke
economies to carry the
Center through the year
without financial help
originally thouoht needed.)
wmm
m p
TUNSTALL
had had many inexperienced and
some inadequate personnel. He
has tightened up on hoapital
spending by issuing strict budgets
to various- departments and by
requiring ordering of only such

drugs and linens as needed to
prevent waste.
Before the money was all in
one lump sum and people seemed
to think it was a bottomless well
We have had night shifts work working
ing working to issue bills and to reorgan reorganize
ize reorganize spending.
The second reason cited by
Jordan for the improved finan financial
cial financial situation Is the increased
number of paying patients.
We were not planned as an
Indigent hospital, he said.
But formerly a large number
of our patients were indigent,
part-pay patients, or those w r ho
could not pay.
We are now getting patient
who would have gone to Hopkins,
Mayo or Duke for care.
Our overall patient load has
increased from 80 daily the first
year to 190 the second. This helps
our situation considerably. Our
new changes mean that now we
are spending as much for 160 pa patients
tients patients a we formerly did for
190.** \
BID Collections Improving
Collections of bills has increased
from 36 to 72 per cent in the past
year and a half. T7ie number of
patients treated in clinics has in increased
creased increased to 45,000.
We did get and have used
substantially $150,000 for a defi deficit
cit deficit last year.
Some of the money for oper operation
ation operation of the hospital will come
from the opening up of 70 more
beds In July.
The funds for staffing this por portion
tion portion of the hospital will come
from the next biennium budget,
he explained.
The health center will be able
to use only 70 of 150 available
beds if the Budget Commission
approves the Board of Controls
cuts in the Hospitals requests for
funds.
Capacity Operation Seen
If however, he said, the
commission approved our original
request, we would be able to
ppen to our full 400 bed capacity
plus utilizing out-patient clinic fa facilities.
cilities. facilities.
The hospital will a&k the Leg Legislature
islature Legislature for $12,661,580 for hos hospital
pital hospital operation. Jordan plans
for $4,349,485 to come from pay paying
ing paying patients.
The other money will come
from state appropriations, said
Jordan. Much of it will be spent
on completing the building.
Even though we are in our
third year, we have yet to finish
(install plaster and equipment)
one delivery room, four operating
and eight radiology (X-ray)
rooms.
Not only are we incomplete,
but we are not able to attract X Xray
ray Xray and medical technologist be because
cause because our salaries are so far be.
low the national average.

Follow Rules, |
Treasurer Tells
Money Men
Follow procedures and keep
staff workers informed R. E.
Shepard, new secretary-treasurer
of student activities told business
managers in an inaugural meet meeting
ing meeting Tuesday.
Some 26 activities. were repre represented
sented represented as Shepard outlined a sys system
tem system of record keeping designed
to promote better efficiency in
requisitioning and spending.
Not Tough
This is not a get tough pol policy,
icy, policy, he explained earlier. It Is
intended to get everyone off on
the right foot. We want to ac acquire
quire acquire the confidence of the busi business
ness business managers and let them
know we are interested in help helping
ing helping them with their problems.
One of the bookkeeping head headaches
aches headaches the new secretary-treasurer
hopes to eliminate is the short shortcircuiting
circuiting shortcircuiting of purchase orders. He
pointed out that the practice of
by-passing his office in purchas purchasing
ing purchasing will not be accepted.
Advanced Orders
Approved practices for purchas purchasing
ing purchasing calls for requisitions to be
filed in advance with the secre secretary-treasurer,
tary-treasurer, secretary-treasurer, Those okayed are
forwarded to the finance office
and from there & purchase order
is sent to the firm.
In some cases requisitions have
been presented after the purchase
was made. Firms made delivery
of goods on request of activities
in expectation of receiving pur purchase
chase purchase orders later.
Firm* involved in this practice
in the future would do so at their
own risk said Shepard.
Adds Experts*
Shepard has added two effi efficiency
ciency efficiency experts to his staff in an
effort to streamline operations.
These helpers will maintain con contact
tact contact with business managers and
provide assistance.
Over $400,000 a year is distrib distributed
uted distributed to the 26 participating ac activities
tivities activities from the activity fund.
The bulk of it comes from the
$14.50 earmarked from each stu students
dents students enrollment fee. Athletics
get the biggest bite of the fund
followed by Florida Union and
intramural activities.
Shepard reiterated that cooper cooperation
ation cooperation was essential in building a
sound system. He promised busi business
ness business managers that if requests
are in on time he will get them
out on time.
Talent Show Saturday
(Continued from Rage ONE;
Judges for' the Talent Show are
Vicki Smith, Lyceum President,
Dr. Glen Wagner of the Infir Infirmary,
mary, Infirmary, Bruce Bullock, student body
president, Amelia Macy of Mor Mortar
tar Mortar Board, and Margie Hendricks;
program director of the Florida
Union.
Entertainers were selected from
a group of 30 who tried out for
the show.
Mickey Tarler, 2UC, will emcee
the show. Admission is 40 cents.

New Court Procedure Rules

Rule 1: Adoption of RulesArticle IV,
Section 412 (5) a. These roles are adopted
in compliance with Article IV Section
412 (5) of the University of Florida Stu Student
dent Student Body Constitution, b. These rules
are to be effective immediately upon
adoption by the Chancellor and seven
(7) Justices of the Honor Court, c. All
previous rules of procedure are void,
and of no effect, d. These rules shall bo
made known to all Honor Court Officials,
to the accused, and Defense Counsel.
These rules are public records and open
to the public.
Rule 2: Cheating a. Any student violab
ing Article IV, Section 407 by cheating
shall be tried by the Honor Court for
the offense, b. Cheating is defined as:
the rendering of any information cal calculated
culated calculated to wrtmgfully-lllegally help your yourself
self yourself or another with a quit, tost, final
examination nr other item of like or
similar nature which Is considered in
the determination of the final grade,
c. Cheating ia also defined as the taking
of any information calculated to wrong wrongfully-illegally
fully-illegally wrongfully-illegally help another with a quiz,
test, or a final examination in the de determination
termination determination of the final grade, d. Cheat Cheating
ing Cheating is also rendering, taking or giving
information calculated to wrongfully wrongfullyillegally
illegally wrongfullyillegally help another in the prepara preparation
tion preparation of any academic papers with the
value of a toot, quiz or final examina examination.
tion. examination. e. All parties aiding in such
rendering, taking, or giving of informa information,
tion, information, shall bo liable as a principa l and
subject to the penal jurisdiction of the
Honor Court, f. The court, upon advice
from the Chancellor, retains the authority
to classify action as it sees fit.
Role 3: Stealing a. The taking of the
property of another without consent of
the owner is stealing, as covered in
Article IV. Section 407 of the University
of Florida Student Body Constitution,
b. The refusing to return property with within
in within a reasonable time after request by
the owner or valid possessor, is steal stealing
ing stealing under the Honor Code. c. The ma malicious
licious malicious destruction, abuse, or damaging
of the property of another, without con*
sent of the owner in possession is punish punishable
able punishable as a violation under Section 407.
(3o> d. Stealing is also defined as:
knowingly receiving stolen property or
retaining property after learning that it
Is stolen property, e. Stealing. as
disposing of property of another or
offering of property of another for sale
without the consent of another, f. The
Court upon advice from the Chancellor,
retains the authority to classify as it
sees fit.
Rule 4: Bad Checks a. The passing of
bad checks is: knowingly obtaining
money or credit or knowingly negotlat.
ing such worthless checks, b. Failure to
make good a chock after forty-eight
hours have elapsed after notification will
result in a contempt proceeding under
Rule 5: c. The Court upon advice from
the Chancellor, retains the authority to
classify action sa It sees fit.
Rule 5: Procedural Powers a. The
Justices may, upon recommendation of
the Chancellor by a majority vote, ap approve
prove approve reprimands or loss of credit for
behavior in contempt of the Honor
Court in its proceedings. Penalties levied
under the authority of this section may
be appealed to the Honor Court Board
of Masters. The powers of the Honor
Court shall include the power to require
witnesses to appear, but no witness shall
be required to testify against himself,
b. Note Rule 4b. .Letter of notification
of bad check is a Court Order, e. All
persons taking part in an Honor Court
proceeding or under the Honor Code,
are subject to the jurisdiction of the
Honor Court, d. No counsel may repre represent
sent represent anyone before the Honor Court
unless: 1. The counsel is a student
under jurisdiction of the court, or 2.
The defendant will sign a written state statement
ment statement accepting all penalty assessed hla
counsel for contempt of court preceding
the trial, o. The Court, upon advice from
the Chancellor, retains the authority
to classify action as it sees fit.
Rule 6: a. The Chancellor shall cause
to be investigated by the Attorney Gen General
eral General all chargea of violation of the Hon Honor
or Honor Code and shall take appropriate
action In regards to the individual rec record.
ord. record. b. A staff working under the At Attorney
torney Attorney General shall gather all facts
pertinent to the charge, c. Whenever
necessary, there shall be a preliminary
hearing whereat the Attorney General
and the Defense Counsel and the In Inveatlgating
veatlgating Inveatlgating Justice shall arrive at the
issues, d. The Investigating Justice shall
appear before the Chancellor and thereat
the Chancellor shall determine if there
is sufficient ground for a trial, e. Defense
has the right to be present at all hear hearings,
ings, hearings, f. If there is sufficient grounds for
trial, the Chancellor shall place the
defendant upon the docket and have sum summons
mons summons served upon him.
Ruie 7: a. In every case summons
shall he served upon the defendant
as provided for in Article IV Section
411. paragraph 4s "Any student charged
with a violation of the Honor Code shall
be notified of such charge and of the
hearing thereof no less than forty-eight
hours prior to such hearing. Upon such
hearing such student shall bo entitled to
face his accusers and to learn any mat matter
ter matter considered hy the Honor Court in
its decision on the charge. b. When Whenever
ever Whenever necessary, the Chancellor shall
cause to be Issued upon a witness, a
summons to appear and testify before
the Honor Court, c. Failure to answer
said summons without just and cogent
reasons will be an act In contempt
of the Honor Court.
Rule 8: Trial Procedure a. The Clerk
shall call the court to order upon entry
by the Chancellor and thereafter, the
Chancellor shall open the court for busi business.
ness. business. b. The clerk shall call the cases
in order of the Official Docket, c. The
Clerk shall arraign the accused before
the court for plea. The defendant may
plea guilty, not guilty, or defer plea
until later. If plea is deferred, the Clerk
shall enter a plea of not guilty, whieh
may be changed hy motion at a later
time in the trial, if motion granted by
the court, d. The Chancellor then will
pursue the trial by; 1. Receiving the
report of the Investigating Justice. -2.
Each side will be allowed a reasonable
amount of time for a summation. First,
Attorney General, then the Defense;
followed by a rebuttal by the Attorney
General if requested. 3. Recess for ver verdict.
dict. verdict. 4. Verdict and/or penalty with or
without recommendation *or removal
of verdict from permanent record, e.
Verdict must be by seven (7) votes.
Penalty must be by seven (7) votes.
Quorum must be by eight (8) votes.
Recommendation for removal of mark
on records must be by seven (7> votes,
f. Defendant may waive any and a!l
rights by written stipulation except a*
to quorum and vote for conviction and
penalty.
Rule 9; Trials in Absentia a. Trials in
absentia shall be governed by the above
Rule . b. A person may be tried la
absentia: X. By written stipulation of the
defendant, or. .2. By reason of failure
t- wer a summons without just and
cogent reason.
Rule 10: These ruks may be changed j
by vote of seven <7> members of the
Court in compliance with the Student

Moc Sz:
- We bought
the reserve cnampion
steer at the cattlemen's
stock show.
Talk about hot
succulent
K.C. STRIP STEAK
CLUB STEAK J M
we've got 'emand they ff
are charbroiied before your i
very eyesexactly the
way you want it! iA
And I know you will \
think I'm a sucker I Jff
There is no increase [ f
in price I
Medium Large
$1.35 $1.65
with cool crisp salad
and hot rolls.
ALSO KOSHER PRODUCTS
OF ALL KINDS
Wonder House if
14 S.W. IrtSl.
behind Sean

Body Constitution.
Rule 11: Any Honor Court Justices
who misses two or more proceedings of
the Court without an excuse! from the
Chancellor shall bo relieved of his posi position
tion position by seven (7) votes of the Justices,
provided a quorum Is present.
Rqle 12: The Attorney General upon
recommendation of the Chancellor shall
be approved tar seven (7) votes of the
Justices provided there is a quorum.
Attorney General staff will be appoiated
by the Attorney General upon approval
of the Chancellor. These shall be no
more than five (3) Assistant Attorney
Generals except by waiver of seven (7)
Justices.
SECTION I: Pre-trial procedure.
Rule 1: Civil jurisdiction of the Honor
Court. The Honor Court has jurisdiction
>to interpiet any part of the Constitution
of the Student Body, or law or charter
enacted or granted hy the Executive
Council.
Rule 2; Commencement of Civil Action.
A civil action may bn commenced by
filing with the Chancellor(a) A written
request by the President of the Stu Student
dent Student Body, or (b) A written petition
signed by twenty (Jo> members of the
student body.
Rule 3: Requests or Petition, (a) The
request or petition shall act forth the
following: 1. The specific provision or
provisions of the Constitution, laws, or
charters, the Interpretation of whieh is
sought. 2. The problem, question, or con controversy
troversy controversy w'hich will be resolved by
such interpretation. 3. The interpreta interpretation
tion interpretation which, in the opinion of the party
or parties filing the request or petition,
would be proper, and the specific reasons
and constitutional grounds upon which
that opinion ia based, (b) Filing of re request
quest request or petition. 1. A request or petition
shall be deemed filed with the Chancel Chancellor
lor Chancellor when delivered by the party or par parties
ties parties thereto to the person in charge of
the Honor Court office during regular
office hours. Such person In charge
may be the Chancellor, the Clerk, a jus justice,
tice, justice, or the Honor Court secretary, (c)
Penalty for failure to draft request or
petition in accordance with these re requirements:
quirements: requirements: 1. Any request or petition
not satisfying the requirements of this
rule shall, within two (2) days (ex (exclusive
clusive (exclusive of Saturdays, Sundays, and holi holidays)
days) holidays) after the filing thereof, be re rejected
jected rejected by the Chancellor and returned to
the. party who filed it with a brief state statement
ment statement of the reasons for such rejection.
2. The rejected request or petition may
be amended to conform with this rule
and refiled.
Rule 4; Temporary relief. The
request or petition may include a prayer
for temporary relief whieh must state
in full the particular grounds thereof,
(b) Immediately upon receipt of such
request or petition, the Chancellor, in
his discretion, shall enter a temporary
order granting or denying such relief,
considering only the grounds alleged
in the request or petition, *c) If the
Chancellor Issues an order granting such
relief, he ahall convene the Honor
Court within forty-eight (48) hours after
receipt of the request or petition, to alt
CLASSIFIED
Gainesville* favorite bandTHE
CARR-TUNESCaIi FR 6-3437.
RENTAL EQUIPMENT: Tools.
Bens. Party Equip. UNITED
RENT-ALLS. 625 NW 8 Ave.
FR 6-2835.
Interested in purchasing guitar.
E. S. Priem Ext. 236 or FR 2-
4509.
FOUND 2-10-61: Grue Precision
Watch. Owner may claim by
calling and identifying. FR ?
9372. M. Ellis.
Complete Hi Fi System: 6 speak speaker
er speaker and cab. Garrard Rc-121
changer. Shure MBK cartridge.
FM turner and aerial S2OO. Call
Knight 20 Watt Am AM-FIM
turner and aerial S2OO. Call FR FR-6-9022
-6-9022 FR-6-9022 after 5:00 p.m.
IF YOUVE a station wagon or
truck Ill pay your expenaea to
Miami at Easter. Put a note in
my box, C*3 office: James Wiles.
1959 CUSHMAN Scooter. Buddy
seat and windshield. $l5O. Call
Taylor FR 2-9303.
FOR SALE. Complete line of div diving
ing diving and scruha equipment. Most
of it new. Contact Bob Mun Munson,
son, Munson, 3045 Hume Hail.
NEED part time man for deliv deliveries
eries deliveries and installation of drap drapery
ery drapery rod*. Gaddum Interiors, 12
N.W. 3rd Ave.
WANTED: 410 ShotgunSingle
shot-Bill Wirtz. Rh. 106 B Bldg.
I.
FOR SALE: 1959 Lambretta Ali
accessories FR 6-8003.
1950 DESOTO Good Condition-
Reliable transportation. $250
or best offer. Contact Hugh
Wise, Leigh Hall Room 356 or
430, Extension 608.

as a body in open session to review the
action of the Chancellor, considering only
the allegations included in the request
or petition. A quorum for the proceeding
shall be nine (9) Justices, (d) A majority
vote of the justices present shall be
required to affirm the action of the
Chaaeellor and continue the order in
effect until a civil trial may be held.
If the Court votes to disaffirm this action,
the order shall be immediately vacated,
(e) Any orders promulgated in this
manner shall be published in the FLORI FLORIDA
DA FLORIDA ALLIGATOR or the SUMMER GA GATOR
TOR GATOR within one week after they are
made.
Rule 5: Preliminary hearing, (a) When
the preliminary hearing shall be held
1. Within three 13) days (exclusive of
Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays) after
the date on which the request or petition
is filed, the Chancellor shall set the
date, hour and place for a preliminary preliminaryhearing,
hearing, preliminaryhearing, such date to be not later than
seven (7) days (excluding Saturdays.
Sundays, and holidays) after the date
of filing. 2. Notice of the date, hour,
and place of the preliminary hearing
shall be delivered to the filing party
within three (3) days (exclusive of Sat Saturdays,
urdays, Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays) after
the date of filing, (b) Purpose and pro procedure
cedure procedure of preliminary hearing. 1. At
the preliminary hearing, the party or
parties w-ho filed the request or petition,
and/or their duly authorised representa representatives,
tives, representatives, shall appear before the Chancel Chancellor
lor Chancellor and Board of Masters to discuss
and exchange ideas regarding the mat matters
ters matters set out in the request or petition,
solely for the purpose of exploring the
possibilities of further clarifying the
iasuos to oxpodite the trial. 2. No altorna- j
tioo or withdrawal of the request or
petition shall be made at the pre preliminary
liminary preliminary hearing except by the volun voluntary
tary voluntary action of the party or parties who
filed such request or petition. 3. The
Chancellor and Board of Masters, shah
not attempt to render an official inter interpretation
pretation interpretation or dismiss the request or peti petition
tion petition at the preliminary hearing. 4. At
the close of the preliminary bearing, a
signed copy of the request or petition
containing any alterations made thereto
by the party or parties during the pre preliminary
liminary preliminary hearing shall be delivered to
the Chancellor and the trial shall be had
only on the issues and grounds set out
in such request or petition. (c>. Penal tv
for failure or refusal to comply with
the requirements of this rule. 1. Failure
or refusal of the filing party or parties
or their duly authorised representatives
to appear at the preliminary hearing
shall result in a dismissal of the request
or petition by the Chancellor unless the
filing party proves that notice of the
preliminary hearing was not received.
Rule 4; Publication of request or peti petition.
tion. petition. After the preliminary hearing, the
Chancellor shall cause to be delivered
to the editor of the FLORIDA ALLIGA ALLIGATOR
TOR ALLIGATOR or SUMMER GATOR for publica publication
tion publication a copy of the request or petition
received hy him from the party or par partita
tita partita at the close of the preliminary
hearing.
Rule 7: Withdrawal of request or peti petition,
tion, petition, If at any time prior to the com commencement
mencement commencement of the trial the party or
parties should wish to withdraw the
request or petition, a written state statement
ment statement to that effect delivered to the
ChaneeUor shall constitute a withdrawal.
Rule <: Trial Date. The trial ahall be
held within two (!) weeks after the
official publication of the request or
petition.
SECTION II: Trial Procedure
Rule 9i Place of Trial. All civil trials
shall bo open to the public and shall
bo hold in a place designated -by the
Chancellor.
Rule 10: Composition of the court;
Quorumt Number for Decision; Board
of Masters, (a) A quorum for Civil Trials
shall consist of nine (9) members of the
court. A majority of the members pres present
ent present must concur in the decision, (b) The
Board of Masters shall sit with the
Court while hearing the presentation of j
the case; provided, however, that only!
the Chairmen of the Board shall sit i

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with the Court and participate in the
rendering of their decision.
Rule 11: When trial commenced. The
trial shall be deemed commenced upon
the reading of the request or petition
by the Clerk. Once a trial has com commenced
menced commenced it shall proceed to a verdict
without adjournment.
Rule 12: Order of trial. (a) The
proponents shall be allowed twenty (20)
minutes to present the merits of their
request or petition. There shall be al-'
lowed not more than two (2) speakers
in favor of the request or petition (b>
The opponents then shall be allowed
thirty (30) minutes to present any argu arguments
ments arguments against the interpretation urged
in the request or petition. The opponents
shall be allowed not more than two
(2) speakers in opposition to the request
or petition, (c) The proponents el the
request or petition then shall be ellewed
ten (10) minutes solely for the purpose
of rebutting the arguments of the op opponents
ponents opponents ana not for the presentation of
now matter. The proponents shall be
allowed not more than two (2) speakers
on rebuttal, (d) After the arguments
on the merits of the request or petition
the Court shall have the opportunity to
question the proponents and opponents.
() When the questions are concluded
the opponents shall be allowed five (S>
minutes solely for the purpose of sum summarising
marising summarising their arguments, after which
the proponents shall be allowed five
(5) minutes for the same purpose. ts)
Nothing in this rule shall' be construed
as prohibiting the Chancellor from ex*
panding any of the limitations set forth
herein when the ends of justice so
require.
Rule 13: Ho aid of Masters opinion.
After the summations, the Board oi
Masters shall consider the case in closed
session. Upon teaching a majority
opinion the Board shall present that
opinion to the Court, together with the
minority opinion if there be one.
Rule 14. Verdict of the Court: An Announcement.
nouncement. Announcement. After presentation of the
opinion or opinions of the Board of
Masters, the court shall consider Its
verdict in closed session. The Chancellor
shall make a public announcement of the
decision of the Court immediately after
it is reached. The Chancellor shall cause
such decision to be published in the
FLORIDA ALLIGATOR or SUMMER
GATOR within one week after the trial.
Rule 15: Record of Trial. AU trials
shall be recorded verbatim.
Rule Id: Adoption of rules. These rules
shall be deemed effective upon adoption
by two-third* of all Justices. All rules
of civil procedure in conflict with these
rules are hereby repealed.
Rule 17: Amendments. Amendments
to these rules shall be made by a two twothirds
thirds twothirds vote of all Justices, but no
amendment shall apply to cases in
which a request or petition has been
filed prior to the adoption of such
amendment.
Rule 18: Constitutionality, invalidation
of any portion of these rules as un unconstitutional
constitutional unconstitutional shall not invalidate the
remainder.
Rule 19: Citation. These roles may be
cited as lion. Ct. R. Civ. Proc.*
CRUISE HEADQUARTERS
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JFK Peace Corps Panacea Offered

r (EDITOR'S NOTE: In an
effort to explain the work workings
ings workings of one of the most
talked about agencies of
modem times, the Alliga Alligator
tor Alligator presents for the stu students
dents students this account derived
from correspondence with
the Peace Corps.)
Jsy JARED LEBOW
Gator Staff Writer
K.
University of Florida graduates
will be able to participate in a
new force for freedom, the Peace
Corps, if they fit qualifications of
the groups.
The Cforpa, a group of collegi collegiate
ate collegiate young men and women, was
established recently by executive
order of President John F. Ken Kennedy.
nedy. Kennedy. |
How Will the members be cho chosen?
sen? chosen? What jobs will they be do do!
! do!

Murphree Mixes
With Mallory
At Hall Social

Mallory and Murphree residents
mixed in an informal social Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday night with about 36 people
attending. .|
Sponsored by the inter-hall so social
cial social committee, the get-together
was one of the first this semes semester.
ter. semester. H
The two-hour social presented
an opportunity for the area stu students
dents students to dance, talk, and eat to together.
gether. together.
Gary Becker, represent ative
from Murphree Area, said the
social was a genuine success.
I feel that the socials are
great and I hope they will con continue.
tinue. continue. They give me an oppor opportunity
tunity opportunity to meet girls and enjoy
their company, quipped Beck Becker.
er. Becker.
This statement and many simi similar
lar similar ones were made by students
enjoying the informal gathering.
The entertainment and refresh refreshments
ments refreshments were provided for by a 25
cent donatiQn from the students
participating.
Have You
Been in
MIBAN ELL'S
LATELY?

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Ag 99hk
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Mr &
THIS YOUNG MAN IS A BUSINESS ANALYST
FOR THE TELEPHONE COMPANY

When Gene Bernier received his degree in Busi Business
ness Business Administration at the University of Michigan
in 1957* he had top offers from several businesses.
Gene chose Michigan Bell Telephone Company
because: job was tougher to get. There was
no doubt in my mind that 1 was being carefully
evaluated for a responsible management job. Just
getting this job was a challenge.
One of Genes early assignments was writing
a training manual for new employees which would
explain telephone accounting in simple everyday
termsa tough job even for a seasoned writer.
Put Gene did it. And his next step was a natural.
In November, 1958, he was transferred to the
Michigan Bell Economic Studies Section as editor

T Our number one aim ie to have in att
management jobs the most vital, inteHi inteHigent,
gent, inteHigent, positive and imaginative men we u
Frederick R. Kamtx, President
American Telephone & Telegraph Co. BELL TELEPHONE COMPANIES
| v

ing and how will they be trained?
These questions were answered
in a recent report made to the
President by Sargent Shiver, the
director of the Peace Corps.
Members for the Peace Corp
will be selected by a nationwide
recruitment program. Most Peace
Corps volunteers will probably be
young college graduates, but there
will be no rigid age limit. The
length of service will be from
two to three years.
The major areas in which
Peace Corps volunteers are want wanted
ed wanted are these:
Teaching. In most of the worlds
newly developing nations, the
shortage of teachers is a major
bottleneck on the road toward na national
tional national development.
Since in many African and As Asian
ian Asian countries teaching is conduct conducted
ed conducted in English, U.S. college gradu graduates
ates graduates could play a vital role
teaching in primary or secondary

'KliilSf x: M
'?? iP' V m
jBBmLi Jm m M
wkl Wm y| mom
p jA 8 mm
K B I
m o%&Aml Wm im
BjtW. -
p i |
DANCING IN MALLORY
... At Inter-Hall Social

B-Day Speaker Tells of Threat*

(Continued from Page ONE>
Throw out crooked labor lead leaders
ers leaders and stop trying to force other
Americans into unions against
their wills, he warned.
He charged future business
leaders with the task of doing
something about American com complacency.
placency. complacency.
Coleman said that all the prob problems
lems problems confronting America could
not possibly .be discussed, but a
study of a few could show us that
if we want to preserve our way
of life, everybody must cooper cooperate.
ate. cooperate.
Held In Hub
The luncheon, in he student
service center, climaxed the B-

schools and in trade schools. In
many developing nations, English
teachers are wanted.
Fighting Malaria and working
in other health projects. Person Personnel
nel Personnel are needed for work in inocu inoculation
lation inoculation campaigns against typhoid,
smallpox and tetnus and in water
sanitation programs.
Working in agricultural projects
and rural development programs.
Skilled agriculture workers are
needed to assure the effective effectiveness
ness effectiveness of demonstration programs
for animal husbandry, new farm
techniques and irrigation. Volun Volunteers
teers Volunteers are needed to work along alongside
side alongside native citizens in community
development programs.
Working in large scale con construction
struction construction and industrial projects.
Here there is a great need for
s Hied workers in the various en engineering
gineering engineering fields.
Working in government admin adminislation.
islation. adminislation. Many Peace Corps vol-

day activities which included lec lectures,
tures, lectures, forums, and panels.
The entire B-aay program was
planned and coordinated by busi business
ness business administration students be belonging
longing belonging to the Business Adminis Administration
tration Administration Students Organizaton
Council (BASOC).
The Council, is composed of 11
business clubs and fraternities on
the UF campus.
Stewart L. Baker, president of
BASOC, said that this years pro program
gram program proved the most successful
since B-day was begun. He
traced the reason for the increas increasing
ing increasing success to the fact that
more and more business lead leaders
ers leaders in the Southwest are taking
an interest in the program.

of a monthly publication, Michigan Business
Trends. In this work, Gene analyzes and reports
business trends in Michigan as an aid to tele telephone
phone telephone management people in decision making.
Gene proved his skill in reducing complex eco economic
nomic economic problems to simple terms. And, sixteen
months after his transfer he was promoted to
Senior Statistician.
Today, Gene sums it up this way: The idea
around here is to get the best a man has in him.
. To me that spells opportunity.
If you want a job where you will get real responsi responsibility
bility responsibility and have a chance to move ahead as fast as
your ability will take youthen youll want to find
out more about the Bell Companies. Your Place Placement
ment Placement Office has literature and additional information.

LISTINGS IN SG OFFICE

Summer Jobs Available

Summer jobs are still available
for interested students through
the student government secretary
of labors office.
There are still several good
offers left particularly in re resort
sort resort jobs, Under-secretary Bill
Kicklighter said.
Waiters, Shoeehlners
Resorts are looking for waiters,
waitresses, busboya, and conces concessioniers,
sioniers, concessioniers, as well as various serv service
ice service job, such as maids, ironer,
and shoeshine boys.
Camp counselors, Kicklighter
said, do not necessarily need
to be expert swimmers. They
are looking for people with all
sorts of talent: music, singing,
dramatics, and skills in particu particular
lar particular sports, to name a few.
Camp jobs concentrate primar primarily
ily primarily in New England and the At Atlantic
lantic Atlantic states, with a few openings
in the Southeast. Resorts have a
wide geographical distribution,
with openings in the West (Col (Colorado
orado (Colorado and New Mexico), New
England, and in New Yorks Cat Catskills
skills Catskills and Adriondacks.
New Lists In
The office has just received a
few new listings from Florida,
Kicklighter said.
We have an extensive list listing,
ing, listing, he added, but we have
no way of knowing how many
of these jobs have already been
filled. Since Easter is early this
year, we can be fairly sure
that there are still quite a few
openings.
The office functions on a per personal
sonal personal basis, he pointed out. We
make every effort to place each
student who contacts us, Kick Kicklighter
lighter Kicklighter said. If we have no job
listed for which the student is
qualified, then we make every ef effort
fort effort to find one.

unteers will be needed in public
administration on all levels, in including
cluding including urban development.
The training program will vary
from six weeks to perhaps six
months. There will be great em emphasis
phasis emphasis on language preparation
for the particular work to be as assigned.
signed. assigned. There will also be train training
ing training on practical problems of
health and living in the country
assigned.
The Peace Corps should have
several hundred persons in train training
ing training this summer for placement
next fall. Within a year several
thousand might be in the service.
In the first year there will be
considerable emphasis on teach teaching
ing teaching projects. The first members
of the Corp will be spread
through several countries in Latin
America, Africa and Asia.
Further information may be ob obtained
tained obtained by writing to Peace Corps,
Washington 25, D.C.

The office is branching into
summer placement in Gainesville
for summer school students a
service the married students ap apparently
parently apparently need very badly, he
said.
The office plans extension of
its industrial listings, and will
put out an information sheet
after Easter.
Placement involves no fee in
any case, and the results, al although
though although its a little early, look
very good, Kicklighter said.
The office, at 308 Fla. Union,
is open Monday, Wednesday, and
Friday from 3:30-5 p.m., and
Tuesday- -Thursday from 2:30 5
p.m.
Concerts Go
From Dusk
To Darkness
Music from daylight to dusk is
planned by the UF Music Depart Department
ment Department for the coming week.
Russell Danburg, pianist, will
be the featured artist in the sec second
ond second of the current series of Fa Faculty
culty Faculty Concerts, at 8:15 Tuesday,
March 28, in the new P. K.
Yonge Auditorium.
Mr. Danburg will play Rondo
in A Minor, by Mozart, So Sonata
nata Sonata in E Flat Major by Bee Beethoven,
thoven, Beethoven, and one of his own com compositions,
positions, compositions, Chorale and Allegro.
Also included in the program
are two pieces by Chopin and De Debussy.
bussy. Debussy.
A student recital is scheduled
in the Music Building Auditorium
at 3:40 p.m. Manuel Alvarex, te tenor;
nor; tenor; David Brooker, saxophone;
Sherry Johnson, harp, Richard
Biggert, trumpet, will be among
the participants.
The Twilight concert by the Ga Gator
tor Gator Concert Band on Wednesday,
March 29 will be held in the Pla Plaza
za Plaza directly back of Broward Hall.
The concert will begin at 6:30
p.m.
Vowles Ventures
To Wisconsin U.
Dr. Richard B. Vowles, associ associate
ate associate professor of English at the
UF will be associate professor of
comparative literature and Scan Scandinavian
dinavian Scandinavian languages at the Univer University
sity University of Wisconsin beginning next
semester.
Vowles is secretary of the Eng English
lish English department, chairman of the
high honors committee, secretary
of Phi Beta Kappa, and president
of the Language and Literature
Club.
A recognized expert on Scandi Scandinavian
navian Scandinavian culture, and author of
many articles on the literature of
northern Europe, he is currently
editing a volume of Scandinavian
plays.

What's New in Paperbacks
THE NICER OF THE NARCISSUS
Joseph Conrad
GREEN WILLOW
B. J. Shute
THE AWKWARD AGE
Henry James
DAVID HARUM
Edward Noyes Westcott
THE BELL IN THE FOG
John Stephan Strange
IT'S EASY TO INCREASE
YOUR VOCABULARY
William Morris
HIGHER LEARNING IN AMERICA
Thorstein Veplin
UNCLE TOM'S CABIN
Harriet Beecher Stowe
\BRAHAM LINCOLN, 3 Vol.s
Carl Sandburg
MYSTICISM AND LOGIC
Bertrand Russell
AT THE
BROWSE SHOP
CAMPUS SHOP AND BOOK STOKE
Located in Hit Student Service Center

Dorm Sections
-
Are Revamped;
Open Next Fall
An experimental housing pro program
gram program will be available to upper upperclass
class upperclass students in four colleges
this fall.
Special sections will be creat created
ed created with most of the residents
from one of the four schools. The
sections will be open to men ma majoring
joring majoring in agriculture, architecture,
engineering and pharmacy.
The experimental project was
made possible through the coop cooperation
eration cooperation of Housing Director H.C.
Riker and student government. A
recent survey conducted by stu student
dent student government indicated a fa favorable
vorable favorable attitude among students
for the program.
Frank G. McGill, head resident
counselor of mens halls, said the
program was similar to the use
of Buckman Hall for graduate
students.
Evaluation of the experiment
will depend on what the residents
involved think, McGill said.
It may be easier to evaluate
this program for under-gradu under-graduates.
ates. under-graduates. McGill said.
Riker announced the sections
which will be available are: Mur Murphree
phree Murphree Hall, space in four sec sections,
tions, sections, one for each of the col colleges;
leges; colleges; North or Simpson Hall
(under construction), space in
one section for engineering ma majors;
jors; majors; and Hume Hall, space in
one section for pharmacy stu students.
dents. students.

DU HONORS FACULTY:
ELEVEN PROFS INITIATED

Eleven administrators and fac faculty
ulty faculty members were initiated into
Delta Upsilon fraternity Wednes Wednesday
day Wednesday as alumni members.
Dean of Student Personnel Les Lester
ter Lester Hale addressed the initiates,
actives and pledges. Hale is a
member of Delta Upsilon and
helped to establish the chapter
here in 1957.
Fraternities on this campus
are beginning to catch the signif significant
icant significant perspective of the moral
and intellectual renaissance that
is taking place at the UF, said
Dean Hale.
He presented a set of Ten
Commandments for the modern modernizing
izing modernizing and revamping of fraterni fraternity
ty fraternity goals in view of the changing
collegiate atmosphere.
The faculty initiates were:
Dr. Ernest Haynes Cox, profes professor
sor professor of English and logic; Wil William
liam William Earl Elmore, associate busi business
ness business manager of the University;
Calvin Clay Greene, Jr., director
of plant and grounds and cam campus
pus campus engineer; Dr. Armin Henry
Gropp, chemistry professor and
assistant dean of the College of
Arts and Sciences; Jack C. Guist Guistwhite,
white, Guistwhite, assistant registrar of the
University.
Manaro's
t
Specializing in
PIZZA
& Spaghetti
In every town or city you
go to you will find ONE
good Italian Restaurant.
This is it .
#
ORDERS TO TAKE OUT
DIAL
FRanklin 2-4690
2120 Hawthorne Rd.
Near Drive-In Theater

The Florida Alligator, Friday, March 24, 1961

Food Service,
Cross Argue-
IFC Food Plan

Fraternities seeking a co-opera co-operative
tive co-operative food buying plan should
place themselves under the direc direction
tion direction of the University Food Serv Service
ice Service according to Gay H. Welborn,
director of the University Food
Service.
He observed, The fraternities
cant get the prices they could
get through us. They wont have
the purchasing power or the
know-how as to quality, competi competitive
tive competitive prices and the most econom economical
ical economical quanitites and sizes to pro procure.
cure. procure.
Intergroup Symposium
Draws Research Prof
Raymond E. Crist, UF geogra geography
phy geography research professor, will par participate
ticipate participate in a symposium on inter intergroup
group intergroup relations and leadership at
the University of Oklahoma, April
6 to 8.
Crist will read a paper on the
influence of land holdings on na national
tional national and international relations.
The symposium is an exchange
of notes on theory, research and
practical implications in the area
of intergroup relations and lead leadership.
ership. leadership. Anthropology, psychology,
sociology and other related social
science disciplines will be dis discussed.
cussed. discussed.
The sympoisum is organized by
the Institute of Group Relations
of the University of Oklahoma.

Hugh B. Hollingsworth, Jr., cur currently
rently currently a student who will be em employed
ployed employed next year in the Office of
Academic Affairs; Edward Ma Majors.
jors. Majors. a state auditor working at
the University; Dr. Fayette W\
Parvin, assistant to the UF pres president;
ident; president; Dr. Robert Sholtes,
assistant professor of mechanical
engineering; Dr. Roy Edwards
Tew, speech professor; and Rae
O. Weimer, director of the School
of Journalism and Communica Communications.
tions. Communications.

(Author of tl l TTas a Teen-age Dwarf The Many I
Loves of Dobie Uillis , etc.)
LOVE IN REVERSE
They met. His heart leapt. I love you, he cried.
Me, too, hey, she cried.
Tell me, he cried, are you a girl of expensive tastes?*
No, hey, she cried, I am a girl of simple tastes.
Good, he cried, for my cruel father sends me an allowancf
barely large enough to support life.
Money does not matter to me, she cried. My tastes are
simple, my wants are few. Just take me riding in a iQng, new,
yellow convertible and I am content.
Goodbye, he cried, and ran away as fast as his chubby little
legs could carry him, for he had no convertible, nor the money id
buy one, nor the means to get the money, short of picking up his'
stingy father by the ankles and shaking him till his wallet
fell out.
He knew he must forget this girl but, lying on his pallet at the
dormitory, whimpering and moaning, he knew he could not.
At last an idea came to him: though he did riot have the money
to buy a convertible, perhaps he had enough to rent one!
Hope reborn, he rushed at once to an automobile rental
company and rented a yellow convertible for $lO down plus 10(£
a mile, and with many a laugh and cheer drove away to pick
up the girl.
g 'r la v,
Oh, goody, she said when she saw the car. This suits my
simple tastes to a *T\ Come, let us speed over rolling highways
and through bosky dells.
And away they drove. All that day and night they drove and
finally, tired but happy, they parked high on a windswept hill.
Marlboro? he said.
Yum yum, she said.
They lit up. They puffed with deep contentment, lou
know, he said, you are like a Marlboromild and fresh
and relaxing.
But there is a big difference between Marlboro and me, she
said, because. I do not have a Selectrate filter nor do I come
in soft pack or flip-top box.
They laughed. They kissed. He screamed.
What is it, my dear, she cried, alarmed.
Look at the speedometer, he said. We have driven 200
miles and this car costs 10ff a mile and I have only 120 left.
But thats exactly enough, she said.
Yes, he said, but we still have to drive home. --
They fell into a profound gloom. He started the nxQtor and
backed out of the parking place. '~;
Hey, look! she said. The speedometer doesnt move when
youre backing up.
* He looked. It was true. Eureka 1 he cried. That solves my
problem. I will drive home in reverse. Then no more miles will
register on the speedometer and I will have enough money
to pay!
I think thats a marvelous idea, she said, and shejEftS right.
Because today our hero is in the county jail where food, clothes
and lodging are provided free of charge and his allowance is
piling up so fast that he will have enough money to take his girl
riding again as soon as he is released.
' 1961 MasSbutmaa
* *
Backward or forward a Ene, new experience in smoking is
yours from the makers of Marlboro*the unaltered king kingsize
size kingsize Philip Morris Commander. Welcome aboardl

Bill Cross, university advisor to
fraternities gave his opposing
view. I firmly recommend that
co-operative food buying be in independent
dependent independent of the UF except for
advice and guidance. Fraternity
dining rooms are independent op operations,
erations, operations, and the experience
across the nation has been that
this is more successful.
The two officials also present presented
ed presented differing approaches to the
standardization of menus and pur purchasing.
chasing. purchasing.
Standard Menu
Welborn suggested that uni uniformity
formity uniformity is the key to economical
food purchasing.
The Food Service director said,
I think the best thing they can
do is to hire a full time person
to coordinate buying and menu
making. It would mean a stand standard
ard standard menu for each nteal.
He stated, If the project is to
be successful, professional food
people will have to be recognized
for their contributions ta the pro program.
gram. program.
Welborn observed that an inde independent
pendent independent co-op would coordinate
buying where the fraternities
agree on specific grades and
quality. Each organization would
use the same brands and grades
of vegetables, meats, etc.*
Cross said that he was opposed
to the central planning of menus.
The fraternity advisor emphasized
that the co-op would merely pool
the fraternities purchasing pow power.
er. power. Each participating group
would order what it wished, spe specifying
cifying specifying the brand, quality and
amount of food it wanted'
Money Saved
He said that the individual fra fraternities
ternities fraternities could do what they
wished with the resulting pioney
saved. They could cut oper operating
ating operating costs or they ooukt pur purchase
chase purchase more and better £ood.
Welborn said that he aijtl sev several
eral several members of hi* stnff4iad at attended
tended attended a fraternity fooT co-op
meeting on Feb. 15, but u that he
had not received Tiny *nimuni *nimunication
cation *nimunication from the fraternity advis advisors
ors advisors office since then.

Page 3



THE

Page 4

Member Associated Collegiate Press
The FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is the elflelsl steieat Mser ml the Polrsrstty mi flsfe eei h pehMsheA ewry
TeesAsj snA FrtAsy mmrning eseept Aeriag holiday* mod tto perteAs. The SUMMER GATOR Is wtenA > **eenA
slue Better et the United States Feet Office at Gainesville. Florida. Officesi arel*to4 hi Reems S. 1A
the FlerlAa Unlen BeUAtag Basement. Telephene Unlrereity mi FlerlAa FR S-3MI. Eat. ASS. and regent either eiitterla*
mttiem er easiness efflse.
Editor-in-Chief J ,m Moorhoad
Managing Editor i Dick Hebert
Business Manager i & ofl J nw

EDITORIAL STAFF
Frances Aidraan, Dedi Anderson, Marty Beckerman,
Cafrol Bufler, Cappy Capezzera, (Sue Allen Cauthen, Mike
Colodny, Diane Falk, Bobbie Fleischman, Harvey Gold Goldstein,
stein, Goldstein, Linda Hamel. Nancy Hooter, Jack Horan, Da
LaFace, Jan Lathrop, George Moore, Judy Lynn Prince,
Mike Rosenthal, Phyllis Smith.
SPORTS StAFF
Sports Editor: Bill Bucholter
> Mike Gora, intramurals editor; Robert Green, Ralph
Lazzera, Jared Lebow, Jim Martin, Ed Robin, Chuck
Warren, Ed Witten.

It was regrettable to note one ac action
tion action of the Florida Legislative Council
early this week.
Meeting Monday, the council
made up of. state legislators from
each of Floridas cohgressional dis districts
tricts districts voted to spdnsor in the up upcoming
coming upcoming legislative session several tax
bills calculated to raise state revenues
in the coming bienniuin.
* jk
ONE OF THESE bills would extend
the three per cent sales tax to all
meals served at colleges and univer universities
sities universities and also to dormitory rentals.
The estimated income would be $300,-
000 to $1 million.
This is rubbing salt into open
wounds if we ever heard it.
While its commendable that the
council is recognizing Floridas need
for increased revenues and taking
steps to rectify it all these steps,
incidentally, call for extensions or re revisions
visions revisions on present taxes its pathet pathetically
ically pathetically laughable that theyre advocat advocating
ing advocating a l§vy on those of us connected
with one of the hardest pressed areas
of all the institutions of higher
learning.
* *
THIS IN the face of increased reg registration
istration registration fees beginning next fall.
35£e11, theyll say, youre the ones
whjr are benefitting from these in institutions
stitutions institutions why shouldnt you help
fo Admittedly, this was our reaction
at first. Since the council was recom recommending
mending recommending nine other measures which
WgNT hit us r plus another one
encouraging 100 per cent assessment
of real estate in the various counties
we figured maybe it would indi indicate
cate indicate an act of good faith if we con consented
sented consented to do our part.
BUT IN THE first place, with this
university and Floridas others in the
condition theyre in, not obliged
to contribute in the form of direct, on oncampus
campus oncampus taxation such as this. Seems
MANAGING EDITOR'S NOTE:

Sharpen Pencils, 80y5,.. I'm Ready

By DICK HEBEBT
A few weeks ago, one of
the greatest minds in our Uni University
versity University community referred to
dear old Alma Mater as be belonging
longing belonging to the bush leagues of
learning. Its really a shame
there arent more around here
like Dr. Carleton who readily
decries the poor standards of
education.
Instead we
have put up
with the pow powers
ers powers that be. w
like the Hfe
Baileys and
Connerses who
would have w*f
never gotten ' m
their degrees -I'J
back in the ice f f §
age of educa- HFRI tr T
tion had UF HEBERT
entrance re requirements
quirements requirements been as high as
they are now.
But, again, where in this
country must one go to get a
decent meal at the scholastic
table? I dont know.
* *
I HAVE studied in four dif different
ferent different institutions of so-called
higher learning to date, and
please God, I shant try anqth anqther.
er. anqther.
Some have been tetter than
others. The UF has not been
the worst . .but comes darn
close to It. t: . |
I might as well warn all the
narrow-minded letter-writer#?
right now ... sharpen your

THEM
\ HOW aBOOf PSEUDO- IkJTEUECroAI" H0 ABOUT *tASSTUDe' oEfiNSS? / HEY, HERB'S A GOOD ODE !_J (THAT OUGHT TO BE \
"MACHIAVELLIAM" AND 'SOPORIFIC*? ASSIDUOUS" 'PAIUATtVE" ''FRIPPERY L ~£PUERIL£ * r >. ENOUGH LETS START i J
' f ''==r" MINUTIAE* Al 7 /~p==/NftER MIND THE ) -1 -r^-'-=>~'7T'S.
V J H V PEFiMinowrsPEa iT/j

Don't 3% Us!

pencils, boys. I expect a lot of
enlightening letters condemning
my enraged criticisms of educa education
tion education in general, education at
the UF, and education in our
schools of lower education.
(Isnt that the correct termino terminology
logy terminology for schools below the 13th
gradewhich is supposed to
be the level at which higher
learning makes its feeble start?
* *
FIRST, SOME over-generaliz over-generalized
ed over-generalized comments on eduation.
I have gone on record as
stating that we dont think right,,
and that we dont think at all.
Now for another gross genera generalizationwe
lizationwe generalizationwe arent ALLOWED
to think.
This is probably the greatest
weakness our educational struc structure
ture structure has . right where it
hurts in the foundation.
Thinking is the foundation of
the learning process. No one
educates you. You do it to your yourself.
self. yourself. But first, you must get a
permit to teacha license, as
it were.
* #
A PROFESSOR gives a stu student
dent student this permit by inspiration,
by mentally awakening the hid hidden
den hidden reaches of gray matter in
a. students brain . .not the
memorizing sectors. To hell
with them. The important part
of the brain is the reasoning
segments.
Else why do they keep a
child out of school until he
attains the age of reason.

Editorials

EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS
Maryanne Awtrey, Bill Curry, Nancy Mykel, Nett
Swan, Pat Tunatall.
BUSINESS STAFF
Ad Salesmen: Jeff Huberman, Steve Baron, Barbara
DeLoach; Classified Ad Manager: Louise Boothe; Na National
tional National Ad Manager: Joel Proyect; Office Staff: Jean
Holman, Carolyn Law, Carol Linger, Linda Merk, Dottie
MacDonald, Nancy Spiegel; Production Manager: Jim
Evernden; Subscription Manager: Steve Hertz.

to us were paying out the nose al already
ready already for what we receive in return.
In the second place, there are plen plenty
ty plenty of areas of downright ineqqity in
Floridas tax structure which, if made
right, could darn well provide for the
needs of the state; areas which could
produce much more in the way of
deserving tax appropriations then a
chinchy little three per cent tax on
what we eat and where we sleep.
* *
FULL-VALUE real estate assess assessment
ment assessment is only one of the major areas in
need of reform . and the legisla legislators
tors legislators know it.
We suggest they stalk the big game
first before they start sniping at us.
Pick Wisely
The first mortality on the Board of
Control under the Bryant adminis administration
tration administration is now in the recording
stage.
Board member Joe K. Hays of Win Winter
ter Winter Haven has tendered his resigna resignation
tion resignation to the governor this week, three
months before the scheduled expira expiration
tion expiration of his term of office.
* *
BEFORE Bryant leaves office he
will be faced with securing replace replacements
ments replacements for all the members of the pres present
ent present Board that is, provided none
of them stay on for another term.
Board Chairman J. J. Daniel of
Jacksonville will be the next to go,
in July.
* *
UNDER Floridas educational set setup,
up, setup, the makeup of the Board of Con Control
trol Control is crucial to the states institu institutions
tions institutions of higher learning.
IN ALL likelihood, most of us will
not know the men Bryant picks. But
: he owes it to the state to review
carefully the records and qualifica qualifications
tions qualifications of prospective members, and
choose those best fitted to promote
progress for Floridas higher educa education.
tion. education.

Friday, March 24, 1961

(As an asidehow can a mere
child reach the age of reason
when the whole of mankind has
failed to date?)
* *
NONETHELESS, our society
has lost one of its greatest
assets. All the clinches that
describes this asset are inscrib inscribed
ed inscribed in Latin, attesting to the
withered age of this concept,
and its fall to disuse.
"Cor ad cor loquitur . .ars
gratia artis, and others.
Being a poor linguist, I will
translate liberally instead of
literally: "Mind speaks to mind
(thought, discussion) . and
education (art) for Educations
sake.
"But we must train, not edu educate,
cate, educate, says Tally Hassy. "TOnk "TOnkei*s
ei*s "TOnkei*s cause nothing but trouble.
* *
SO EDUCATION has lost its
meaning. We no longer want to
train men to be rational animals
(a contradiction if I ever heard
one) ... we prefer them to
be, in the words of one lauded
but anonymous columnist, "Ro "Robot
bot "Robot Vegetables or mechanical
animals: Three cheer for the
achievements of Disneyland.
So, once again, a prayer for
thought. Only when our minds
are loosened from the grabs of
training (leave that for the
tech schools) will we begin the
education process as it was in
the beginning. The Russian
leaders are doing marvelously
well with it, I think.

Uli
_ \ c c '&K % /<>VpV
* Ya
Taxation Without Remuneration
THE TOP DRAWER
A Parting Shot Or Two
From Frohock to Brooks

By FRED FROHOCK
Thi3, dear readers throbbing
with virile impatience, will be
the lastl hopein a series
of columns which must be ap approaching
proaching approaching the edge of boredom.
As a matter
of fact, the
Brooks Fro Frohock
hock Frohock debate
should with B XV
all justification
end on Mr. B |j§|
Brooks last
column. What m could T possi possibly
bly possibly answer to w g|!
the charge that
lam doing the FROHOCK
the jab of the
Secretary of Academic Affairs
by publicly criticizing student
government?
* *
INSTEAD OF answering this
will try to do at this point is
sum up what been said and
clarify the various positions.
There is a difference of opin opinion,
ion, opinion, on the role of student gov government
ernment government in a university.
It must be pointed out, how however,
ever, however, that this disagreement
even extends into the ranks of
Bob Parks admission that it is
the faithful, ranging from Mr.
Bob Parks admission that it is
a "humdrum, generally tedious
business all the way over to
the extravagant multi-purpose
claims of Mr. Brooks; ie.,
"dances, job finding . .beauty
contests, girls, two hundred or
so interest organizations ...
* m
PERHAPS what Mr. Park
humdrum and tedious, Mr.
Brooks finds extravagent, or
vice versa, or something. Oh,
well.
Then there exists the disagree disagreement
ment disagreement between the faithful and
the unfaithful, the latter repre represented
sented represented right now by me.
My position is that student
government is peripheral vis visa-vis
a-vis visa-vis the primary purpose of
a university, which issurprise,
surpriseeducation. In fact,
I have gone so far a to say
that campus politics really isnt
even essential to most of the
social activities on a campus.
*
at this point a ringing
accusation bellowed up from
the opposition, hereafter to be
known exclusively as the faith faithful,
ful, faithful, in the nature of a calm
that I had not spoken to any
of the WORKERS, but only
to the scurriers, in drawing my
conclusions.
My. Let me admit at the out outset
set outset that I do have difficulty in
distinguishing political WORK WORKERS
ERS WORKERS from political scurriers,
and also that it is true I have
not encountered many of the
former.
But let me daringly go a
bit further and contend that
this objection does not detract
substantially from the validity
of my thesis because my cri critique
tique critique does not rely on a varia variation
tion variation of efficiency within stu student
dent student government.
* *
IT HAS seemed to me
throughout this debate that the
faithful do not understand the
essence of my point, which is
simply that the role of student
government within the frame framework
work framework of a college system is a
minor one at best.
No amount of scurrying and
or WORKING can alter this

contention as such. One would
have to prove that campus gov government
ernment government possesses the power
and latitude to act with sig significance
nificance significance in student affairs, not
that an insignificant task is
carried out with great efficiency,.
And this needed proof, lads,
would really take some juggling
with words.
*
AT THIS point, there is an
obvious answer to the argument
of the unfaithful, but one that
in reality only elaborates upon
the basic thesis; that is, if
student government were actual actually
ly actually so insignificant, then why the
recent reams of written ma material
terial material on it?
So much has been written
about it in this column simply
because so much braying about
this trifling matter has been
done by some student politici politicians.
ans. politicians. It transcends even Mr.
Brooks extravagance to claim
that the myth of campus poli politics
tics politics has been created by me.

THE magicians ROAM in the
Florida Union, not on the point
of my pen (perhaps theres
some confusion here with the
story about fairies dancing on
THE head of a pin).
This is the easiest argument
of all to prove. You can do it
yourself, readers. Just talk to
any campus politician at elec election
tion election time, or count the poop
banners in the Plaza of the
Americas some spring se semester.
mester. semester.
Better yet, check the cam campaign
paign campaign budgets of each party partyand
and partyand all this, remember, genera generated
ted generated from WORKERS who do
not overemphasize our own im importance.
portance. importance.
*
LASTLY, it has been sug suggested
gested suggested in the debate that the
lack of an academic atmos atmosphere
phere atmosphere is the reason students
put such emphasis on what
you term superficialities.
This is nothing short of in incredible.
credible. incredible. We are asked to be believe,
lieve, believe, I assume, that frustrated
intellects with just no place
to go on this campus turn to
student government to subli sublimate
mate sublimate their overwhelming drive
for knowledge.
Let me just say this in an answer
swer answer to this absurdity: the easi easiest
est easiest way to discover knowledge,
Mr. Brooks, is not to moan
in your committee about the
absence of an academic atmos atmosphere,
phere, atmosphere, but to scurry over to the
library and read one of those
books youve been hearing
about (see the article on Dr.
Carletons address).
* *
IF MORE students spent their
time doing that, the intellec intellectual
tual intellectual level of the campus might
zoom up like the number of
meaningless activities increase
every year.
Youre absolutely right that
this university lacks an aca academic
demic academic atmosphere, Mr. Brooks,
and I might add that the great greatest
est greatest lack last year was probably
smack dab in the student gov government
ernment government office of academic
affairs.
As a parting word, Mr.
Brooks has thanked me for help helping
ing helping him complete his job in
student government. To this I
can only say: youre welcome,
Mr. Brooks.
And goodbye.

4,
to the Editor

Education Is
Local Burden
EDITOR:
Rreference your editorial of
Tuesday, March 14, 1961.
Additional funds for education
will involve deficit spending or
increased taxation. Other than
bonds for physical improve improvements,
ments, improvements, deficit spending repre represents
sents represents an unnecessary shirking
of current responsibility not to
mention the inflationary evils
which accompany the red ink.
* *
INCREASED taxation for die
support of higher education will
be collected by the federal or
state governments. Assuredly,
some liberal political science
student will dust off his catch catchall,
all, catchall, omnipotent general war warfare
fare warfare clause and conclude that
federal aid is necessary and
proper.
FOR THOSE that will listen;
if the federal government un undertakes
dertakes undertakes aid it will necessitate
a system of administration and
control. To deny this is to be
naive. The system will natural naturally
ly naturally initiate a hieratical bureau bureaucracy
cracy bureaucracy complete with plush of offices
fices offices and fact-finding junkets.
At least Florida would be thor thoroughly
oughly thoroughly investigated. In short,
part of the money appropriated
for education would be spent
it was used. Thig money
will come from John Q. wheth whether
er whether its Uncle Sam or Cracker
Farris thats doing the collect collecting.
ing. collecting.
* *
IT Is improper for them to
be taxed by the federal govern government
ment government to support improvement's
on Floridas schools or waste wasteful
ful wasteful improvements on theirs. Its
Floridas ball. If you want to
punt and pray, kick the prob problem
lem problem over to the socialists. If
you want to win, pick up your
burden and carry it.
STEVEN GLADIN
3AS MATHEMATICS
'Wild Bill'
Adds Salt
EDITOR:
In his talk at the recent stu student
dent student government banquet, Pro Professor
fessor Professor William G. Carleton was
reported to have made refer reference
ence reference to the University College
as tending to make the first
two years of college the 13th
and 14th grades.
These are strange words com coming
ing coming from a man who virtually
founded the American Institu Institutions
tions Institutions course and who chaired
the department for many years
until hig transfer into the up upper
per upper division three years ago.
* *
I CANNOT avoid taking um umbrage
brage umbrage at the implications of
these remarks as one among
many who devote their profes professional
sional professional lives to teaching on the
freshman level the most de demanding
manding demanding year of all and who
are committed to the concept
of general education as having
intellectual integrity as well a a
personal and social utility.
In my fifteen years at this
university, I have known much
of the frustration which Dr.
Carleton elsewhere referred to,
as well as much of the dis discriminations
criminations discriminations in pay scale and
student-teacher ratios which af afflict
flict afflict the instructors in the low lower
er lower division.
I therefore felt it to be with without
out without either grace or taste for
Dr. Carleton to throw this addi additional
tional additional bit of salt in the wounds
of those who still labor below.
FRANKLIN A. DOTY
Prof., Social Science
Be There:
Gras Head 1
EDITOR:
Several years ago, the Flori Florida
da Florida Union Board began its re research
search research about the possibility of
having a large student festival
activity on the campus during
the spring. It discovered that
almost without exception, every
school in the country, large or
small, has some sort of social
event in the spring.
Believing that there was a
need for a centralized spring
project on this campus, we
launched the First Annual Ga Gator
tor Gator Gras two years ago an
innovation which met with ex excellent
cellent excellent success.
*
THE PREBENT Gator Gras
program has been enlarged in
scope, now including a greater
variety of events, new groups,
and new activities.
I was very dismayed during
my first reading of your editor editorial
ial editorial on Gator Gras.
Having the Student Leaders
Banquet and the Carnival k
Talent Show yet to go, I was
greatly worried as to how the
students would react to the
slightly negative first four par paragraphs
agraphs paragraphs of the dissertation on
coordination and meaning.
*
IN REGARD to meaning, on
Parents Day last Saturday, we
planned to benefit the Univer University.
sity. University.
Discussion Forums, headed by j
outstanding professors in vari* |
>ua fields of study, were ached- j
tiled in soma of the older and [

temporary buildings in order to
give the alumni and parents *n
actual insight into the difficul difficulties
ties difficulties the students and faculty
face.
Following the forums, tours
of the campus were arranged
to further orientate alumni and
parents in the comparison of
the problems of the old to the
benefits of the new.
* *
THE STUDENT Leaders Ban Banquet
quet Banquet is the only event in the
year designed to honor the var various
ious various leaders in the 250 or so
student organizations who work
together to keep this Universiy
on the map nationally.
Also, the Carnival k Talent
Show provide an opportunity
for ALL these organizations to
function as a university student
body and not just another
Greek social activity. So far it
looks like the Greeks are the
only ones that are interested in
furthering the schools interests.
*
ANY organization still wishing
to participate has until Satur Saturday
day Saturday morning to contact us.
Lets make this an overwhelm overwhelming
ing overwhelming ALL-Student Festival by en encouraging
couraging encouraging our friends to parti participate
cipate participate in the way of attendance
Saturday night.
NELSON DECAMP
Gras General Chmn.
Stay With It,
'Vegetables'
EDITOR:
The main purpose of this
letter is to encourage the
straightforward, ex expressed,
pressed, expressed, and concise letter from
an education student who asked
that her name be withheld.
I am frankly impressed by
her letter and her views as
were some friends of mine. I
like her philosophy and hope
she stays with the present sys system
tem system long enough to defeat it
and replace it with something
real.
* *
BUT, I am curious. The let letter
ter letter stated clearly her views on
certain subjects. I would like
the opportunity to meet this
person to learn of her views in
other fields. This letter is the
only way I know of contacting
the aware Education Student.
Will you please drop a post
card or a letter to me at 112
N.W. 16th St., and tell me how
to contact you? My friends and
I would like to meet you.
A. J. WILLIAMS 4BA
'Vegetable'
Alters Menu
EDITOR:
For the information of Miss
Sheila Scott, a vegetable grows
according to the kind of ma manure
nure manure supplied it. in the right
soil, none is needed; however,
I thank her for her contribu contribution.
tion. contribution.
Education need have no fear.
Ive switched to Botany.
ROBOT VEGETABLE
B'by, Gortz,
Good T ry!
EDITOR:
Jan Gortz latest attack on
the Arab students which ap appeared
peared appeared in the Alligator of
March 14, 1961, indicated his
hunger for cheap publicity.
Therefore, we would like to
suggest that the Alligator send
one of its reporters to interview
Mr. Gortz and write us a fea feature
ture feature article on the gentleman.
*
l MR. GORTZ may also be in informed
formed informed that we are grateful for
the unsolicited information that
he is Dutch, although it doesnt
matter to us whether he is
Dutch or . .?
We also welcome hi* prom promise
ise promise to end his unsuccessful at attempt
tempt attempt to divert our attention
from the unfounded allegations
which Howard Hollander had
made concerning Mr. Jabris
speech on Arab Foreign Poli Policy.
cy. Policy.
MUHAMMAD HALLAJ
ARAB CLUB

Cast Your Vote Per
The Florida Alligator
MAN OF THE YEAR
Our readers are asked to help the Alligator choose its
annual Man of The Year, 1961, by sending in their nomina nominations
tions nominations via campus mail, to The Florida Alligator, Florida
Union, Room 8. All nominations must be in by midnight,
April 28. All will be considered by the Alligator editorial staff
and decisions will be final. The Man of the Year will be re revealed
vealed revealed in the last edition of the Alligator before final exams.
I would like to place in nomination (name) :
for the following reasons:
Your name ......
%

All About
UF ROTC
EDITOR:
The ROTC issue is not as one?
sided as your great writer evin evinces.
ces. evinces. Mr. Swan should know that
the Board of Control cant sell
anyone into slavery or anything
approaching it.
This is just like the story
controversy last semester about
campaigning on campus. The
Board was wrong, and admitted
it. The Board will have to
change the compulsory program
\f enough letters are written to
it. (Board of Control, c-0 J. J.
Daniel, Jacksonville,. Fla.)
Thank you for the space.
2 UC
EDITOR:
As a junior in political sci science,
ence, science, i am not totally ignorant
of a fallacy in the statement
that voluntary ROTC will break
our national security.
* *
HISTORY speaks its own
truth, and one only has to look
at the evolution of the military
budget to see that the warrior
has more economic power as a
group than ever before, in this
nation or any other nation. In
four short years, military budg budgets
ets budgets have more than doubled.
If anything, the true picture
is that ROTC is a further ex extension
tension extension of an octopodian estab establishment
lishment establishment into spheres where au authoritarianism
thoritarianism authoritarianism has been tradi traditionally
tionally traditionally antithetic.
NAME WITHHELD
EDITOR:
The ROTC article was as if
Col. Farris had wrote it. You
did an injustice to all those who
took the trouble to answer your
questionnaire.
*
THANKS for the honest In Interpretive
terpretive Interpretive journalism. The Alli Alligator
gator Alligator once led student opinion,
believe it or not.
2 UC
EDITOR:
Your article on the contro controversial
versial controversial compulsory ROTC pro program
gram program was misleading. To 14 in individuals
dividuals individuals who favor ROTC as
is, you dedicate over two thirds
of your feature story.
What about the 87 per cent
that your own poll found are
in opposition with compulsory
ROTC? Is that objectivity, and
if so, by what standards?
POINT OF ORDER
Cadet Hall'
Protests Pix
EDITOR:
Have you heard about Ca Cadet
det Cadet Howard Hall? (This is
known among JM 301 students
ag the Howard Hall lead.)
It seems that following con considerable
siderable considerable disagreement and va varied
ried varied discussion of compulsory
ROTC, there appeared an ar article
ticle article on the front page of the
Tuesday, March 14, issue of the
Alligator.
Right in the middle of this
derogatory article on ROTC was
a picture of Cadet Howard
Hall. I protest.
The article nowhere mentions
me, or gives in any way MY
viewpoints toward ROTC.
* *
THE picture was NOT taken
for the specific purpose of the
article in question. It was tak taken
en taken last semester when awards
were presented for the out outstanding
standing outstanding squadrons in the Air
Force Wing. My permission was
NOT obtained to use my pic picture
ture picture with this article.
Since I cannot prove that this
article has had positive damag damaging
ing damaging effects on me or my repu reputation,
tation, reputation, I will not attempt to
sue the Alligator.
* *
HOWEVER, for the sake of
my reputation as an advanced
cadet in the Air Force ROTC
and one who intends to make a
career of the Air Force after
graduation, I feel that some ex explanation
planation explanation or retraction on the
part of the Alligator 1# in or order.
der. order.
Thank you
HOWARD HALL
Cadet Major AFR OT C
(EDITOR'S NOTE: Wo
HAVE heard, Howard; also,
sorry about what apparent apparently
ly apparently turned out to be a mis misleading
leading misleading photo, 'Nuf said?)



IN rifl DARK

Around The Globe
To Outer Space
By BOBBIE FLEISCHMAX
Gator Staff Writer
People from many parts of the world and a few from outside
of It are featured on Gainesville screens this week.
Please Turn Over is now at the State.
It shows what happens when a teen-age girl writes a sizzling
novel about the people in her home town. Her father makes an ap appearance
pearance appearance as an embezzler, her mother as an adultress, and her
aunt is depicted as a love-crazed alcoholic.

Julia Lockfrood stars as the
cause of all the trouble, with Ted
Ray, Jean Kent, Leslie Phillips,
and Joan Sims playing dual roles
as average citizens and social
monstrosities.
Susies World
The Florida is now showing
* The Private World of Suzie
Wong.
The film, set in Hong Kong,
tells of the experiences of a beau beautiful
tiful beautiful young Eurasian whose
virtues arent quite what her
American lover feels they should
be.
William Holden plays an artist j
who uses Suzie as a model, falls
in love with her, and then de decides
cides decides that shes not morally good
enough for him.
The story includes Oriental j
backgrounds, rain stormsj and
quantities of passion.
Nancy Kwan plays Suzie.
Beginning Sunday the State will
present "Studs Lonigan and
"Cage of Evil.
Bootleg Boyhood
Studs Lonigan was ] taken
from James T. Farrells trilogy
about the problems of a young
man growing up in the Chicago
of the Prohibition Era, a particu particularly
larly particularly wicked time for that city.
Christopher Knight, Dick Fo Foran,
ran, Foran, Venetia Stevenson, and J.C.
FUppen are the stars.
"Cage of Evil" tells of a de detective
tective detective who finds the combination
of a blonde and a bundle of dia diamonds
monds diamonds a bit too much for his
honesty.
Diamonds, Death
Theres a moral here: detec detectives
tives detectives who mess around tpo much
with diamonds and gangsters
girlfriends will, more often than
not, obtain death in a violent
way.
"Brlgadoon is playing tonight
at the Florida Union.
A Scottish village rises out of
the mist for ohe day every hun hundred
dred hundred years. Two American travel travelers
ers travelers stumbie irttd the town on The
Day and become entangled in the
affairs of the villagers.
The film is filled with dancing,
singing, and dreams.
The turfto>eGeae Van
Johnson, amrCfd Ch&risse'.
Sunday rUMit the F.U. will show
The Day fra fcarthStood Still,
tarring Michael Rennie and Pa Patricia
tricia Patricia Neal.
~~ m ~ - I"
UlllilifilililillPli
1 1
EVERY
COLLEGE
STUDENT
needs this
book I
to increase
his ability to
learn
An understanding oi the truth
contained in Sciencjc and
Health with Key to the Scrip Scriptures
tures Scriptures by Mary Baker Eddy can
remove the pressure which con concerns
cerns concerns todays college student
upon whom increasing de demands
mands demands are being made for
academic excellence.
Christian Science calms tear
and gives to the student the full
assurance he needs in order to
learn easily and to evaluate
what he has learned. It teaches
that God is mans Mindhis
only Mindfrom which ema emanates
nates emanates all the intelligence he
needs, when and as he needs it.
Science and Health, the text*
- book of Christian Science, may
be read or examined, together
with the Bible, in an atmos atmosphere
phere atmosphere of quiet and peace, at any
Christian Science Reading
Room. Information about Sci Science
ence Science and Heal th may also be ob obtained
tained obtained on campus through the
Christian Science
Organization at
Tuesday At 4:45, In The
Florida Union Auditorium
MMHHiIBne,

CENTER NEWS
Easter Season
In Full Swing
By PHYLLIS SMITH
Gator Staff Writer
A groqp of' discussions are be being
ing being presented by the religious
centers this week. Socials and
suppers are also on many of the
schedules.
EPISCOPAL STUDENT CEN CENTER:
TER: CENTER: During Holy Week com communion
munion communion will be held on Monday
at 5 p.m., Tuesday at 7 a.m.,
Wednesday at 5 p.m. and Thurs Thursday
day Thursday at 7 a.m. and 5 p.m. Services
will begin on Good Friday at 8
PRESBYTERIAN STU DENT
CENTER: On March* 23 and 28
vespers will be held at 9:45 p.m.
On March 26 a bus will leave
the center at 9:30 a.m. for the
First Presbyterian Church. Sup Supper
per Supper will be served at the center
at 5 p.m. A program will follow
supper at 6 p.m. with worship
services following at 6:45.
BAPTIST STUDENT CENTER:
There will be a social held at the
center to decorate Easter eggs
for Sunnyland at 8 p.m. March
24.
On March 25 at 9 a.m., there
will be a work day to raise
money for the summer missions.!
The BSU will be sending Itrel
Monroe to work with missionaries
in Alaska. Following the work
day a barbecue will be served
at 6 p.m. for the workers.
HILLEL FOUNDATION: The
foundation will be open from 1-3
p.m. and from 7-10 p.m. from
now on.
What We Believe About Jus Justice
tice Justice will be the subject at the
religious servioes on March 24.
Following the services there will
be a Kiddush.
CATHOLIC STUDENT CENT CENTER:
ER: CENTER: There will be a general meet meeting
ing meeting of the Newman Club at 7:30
p.m. on March 26.
A discussion on the subject A
Good God Could Not Have Creat Created
ed Created Pain and Evil will be lead
by Father Gannon on March 27.
Wesley foundation : Dr.
Fred Hartmart will speak on
The /Effects of American For Foreign
eign Foreign policy at 7 p.m. on
March! 26. A cordial invitation is
extended by the Wesley Founda Foundation
tion Foundation t students as well as non nonstudent
student nonstudent to attend this discussion,
i;' /
I >,. ~
the
WORLD Os
SUZiE
B
NOW THRU TUESDAY
mm

B ....
is >. If 1
. Playboy (Ralph Dowling) and Pegeen (Laurel Cobb)
- PLAYERS REVIEWED i ,
IRISH 'PLAYBOY' PLAY
HOT REALLY IRISH

By WIN DUSENBURY
In recent years the versatile
Florida Players have brought us
Lorca's Spain, Shaw's England,
Moliere's France, Brechts Ger Germany,
many, Germany, Pirandellos Italy, and Eu Euripedes
ripedes Euripedes Greece. But it is by vir virtue
tue virtue of the universal in each play playwright.
wright. playwright. rather than the provin provincial,
cial, provincial, that their works have sur survived
vived survived the years and crossed the
oceans.
So it is with J. M. Synges
Playboy of the Western World,
now on the boards at the Nor Norman
man Norman Hall theatre. Called a folk
play of rural Ireland and consid considered
ered considered so typically IrLh as to have
aroused violent protest by Irish
Patriots as a slur on their na national
tional national character, it nevertheless is
an enduring play because of the
accuracy of its portrayal of hu human
man human nature.
The lilting speech and the
scene in a country pub may be
Irish, but the Greeks had a play
for the father-slayer and Freud
used their word for the cases of
psychological father-slaying which
he encountered.
The theme is therefore not spe specifically
cifically specifically Irish, but Synges unusu unusual
al unusual treatment of it perhaps de derives
rives derives from his Irish heredity and
environment, for not often has
the subject of the doing in of a
da been treated with lightheart lighthearted
ed lighthearted cynicism.
The humor of the play derives
from Synges ingenious interpre interpretation
tation interpretation of the effect of the pre presumed
sumed presumed slaying on the young hero
the perpetrator of the deed
and on those to whom he tells
the tale.
There is also much humor
based on th e Irish, and human,
propensity to confuse fact and
fiction, to applaud a deed of fic fiction
tion fiction and condemn a deed of fact,
to disregard a simple man and
to make a hero of a braggart.
Admirably played by Ralph
Dowling, the playboy struts and
frets hie hour upon the stage and
then Is gone, but in considerable
triumph.
| Well-portrayed foils to him are
the barefooted Pegeen, who al almost
most almost gets him, played by Laurel
Gobb; the cowardly Shawn
Keogh, who almost gets her,
played by Ben Meyer; the Wid Widow
ow Widow Quin, who also wants the
playboy, played by Stephanie Wit-
Fiiktll Attends Mttt
UF biochemist Dr. J.G. Fisk Fiskell,
ell, Fiskell, has been chosen by president
J. Wayne Reitz to attend a meet meeting
ing meeting of 13 land-grant institutions
in Atlanta.
The conference is to discuss in interest
terest interest in an advanced graduate
course in clay mineralogy in the
South.
fpzzsri
FRIDAY
"THE GREAT
IMPOSTOR"
TONY CURTIS
"SAPPHIRE"
NIGEL PATRICK
SATURDAY
"RIDE CLEAR
OF DIABLO"
AUDIE MURPHY
"I PASSED
FOR WHITE"
SONIA WILDE
"BRIDES OF
DRACULA"
PETER CUSHING
SUNDAY, MONDAY, TUESDAY
"RIO BRAVO"
JOHN WAYNE
"MR. ROBERTS"
HENRY FONDA
WEDNESDAY
"THE TRUE STORY OF
JESSE JAMES"
ROBERT WAGNER
"INN OF THE SIXTH
HAPPINESS"
INGRID BERGMAN
THURSDAY, FRIDAY
"HELLBENT FOR
LEATHER"
- AUDIE MURPHY
"SNOW QUEEN"
Feature length Cartoon

PLAY

koff; and Old Mahon, who gets
his revitalized son in the end,
played by Lee Gramling.
Other convincing local charac characters
ters characters are played by Dick Dorsey,
Larry Gordon, Jim Brickley, Eliz.
abeth Hartley, Fern Roberts,
Mary Lee Chambers, Elmer Har Hardison,
dison, Hardison, and Taylor Brooks.
Ronald Jeritg set has the solid
air of an Irish country pub, com complete
plete complete with fireplace, bar, and bar barrels.
rels. barrels. L. L. Zimmerman skillfully
paces the show to bring out the
ironic humor of the ridiculous sit situations.
uations. situations. Its a short play which
seems even shorter because of its
lively action. Tickets are avail available
able available so Friday and Saturday
nights.

Wlir~Bfeizes
\
WILL WIN THIS FABULOUS J WILL WIN THIS FABULOUS
RCA SET! \ RCA 21-INCH COLOR TV SET!
Heres all you do. Have every member of the sorority save the empty packages sg The rules for fraternities follow the same pattern as for sororities,The fraternity
of any of the Lorillard products displayed below. The sorority that has saved || that saves the most empty Lorillard packages will also win this RCA color 21-
the most empty Lorillard packages will be awarded the RCA color television set. inch television set. So start saving the empty packages of any of the Lorillard
NOTE: 1. Wrap empty packages in bundles of 50. 2. Deliver to (place) by if products shown below. NOTE; 1. Wrap empty packages in bundles of £O.
(date). 3. Winning Sorority will be notified by (date). & 2. Deliver to (place) by (date). 3. Winning Fraternity will be notified by (date).
In event of tits blindfold drawing will decide the winner. || In event of ties a blindfold drawing will decide the winner.
Contest Bogins March 24 Ends April 24 At 5:00 B.M.
Winners Announced At Spring Frolics.
** Wf Entire Student Body AND FACULTY I
CAN ENTER THE LORILLARD SWEEPSTAKES FOR THESE FOUR GREAT PRIZES!
1 You don't have to be o member of a fraternity or sorority to enter.
READ COMPLETE SWEEPSTAKES RULES HERE:
1. Each entry must consist of one empty mil be held under the supervision / tke
pack of any of the following brands: college newspaper staff Enter as many Hr Pjjii JBH n n i -J
Kent .. Newport .. Old Gold Filters, times as you want. Only on# prise per AhHHt IIpSWm rOIIiOKI
t Straights .. Spring ORa plain piece contestant. Entrants need not he present UP* yt| tfrjl land Camera
of paper which has the "hand drawn at drawing to win. jIBS
block letters of any of these brands drawn 3. Lorillard Campus Sweepstakes is open Sgm Dnygl JmjWjmm
in any siae. to all students and faculty members of .*,
Your name and address must be written this school. POrtSulE
the back. 4 Lorillard Campus Sweepstakes is sub- OP* Typewriter
2. Deposit your complete entry in the ject to all Federal, State and local laws. Hi KvA >r mm
Lorillard Campus Sweepstakes entry box. 5. Students and faculty whose immediate FetaMt StBTtO *' *
All entries must be on deposit before: famiUes are employed by the P. Lorillard M Ad RCA j H ||W|
(Time) (Date). There will be a random Co. or its advertising agencies are not 00 Transistor WT Wmtm
drawing in which the prize winners will be eligible. D .. i,' -' >. (*
* selected in consecutive order. Drawing Date of drawing to be announced. wlOCn ndulu

SOCIALLY SPEAKING

Warmin' Up for Lauderdale

By CAROL BULLER
Gator Society Editor
Partying by the Gifeeks this
weekend will mostly b up warmup for the upcoming holiday.
A Pre-Lauderdale pally is set
for Saturday night at 4ie Kappa
Sig house. The Combo Ibngs will
play, and the only thinA missing
will be the sands, surA&nd sun,
according to the The
party, for which the will
scale Elbo will be
closed until 11:00.
Big Drink*
Partying will be in of
The Big Drink (the Atlantic
Ocean!)
Delta Upsilon also plans a Fort
Lauderdale theme party Saturday
night as they get in the holiday
mood. Again refreshments will be
of the traditional Lauderdale va variety.
riety. variety.
The Phi Gams have chosen a
local ranch for their partying site
Accident Meet Planned
The UF campus will be the
scene of th e Eighth Annual Con Conference
ference Conference on Accident Prevention
Engineering on April 12-14.
The keynote address Homo
the Sap, or What Fools We Mor Mortals
tals Mortals Be, will be given by Da n
Blount. The conference annually
attracts safety engineers and
accident prevention administra administrators
tors administrators from industry, government
and insurance companies from
various points in the southeast southeastern
ern southeastern United states.

tliis weekend. The Fijis will have
dinner at tiie ranch to be fol followed
lowed followed by a party.
Also outdoors will be the Phi
Taug. They plan to take in the
cook out at dusk.
Phi Tau Party
Phi Taus will party informally
to records at the house tonight.
Phi Eps and dates will gather
at the house after Playboy Fri Friday
day Friday night for an informal get-
Friday night the Sig Eps. in Ha Hawaiian
waiian Hawaiian attire, will dance to the

-ieirir'aielriririririrlrinririr'kirlrkititirirkirirk'k'k-k'k+'k'lrk-k'k'k'k+'k'k-k-k'k'fi'
| Campus Calendar j

FRIDAY. MARCH 24: Florida
Players present: Playboy of
the Western World at 8 p.m.
in Norman Hall.
A Spring Fever dance will be
sponsored by the Latin Ameri American
can American Club at 7:30 p.m. in the
American Legion Hall, 5H E.
University Ave. Admission is
free for members and $2 for
non members. Music will be
contributed by El Chivo and
his band and refreshments will
be served.
Florida Union movie Briga Brigadoon
doon Brigadoon will be shown at 7 p.m.
and 9 p.m.
SATURDAY. MARCH 23: Gra Graham
ham Graham Field will host the Gator
Gras Carnival and Talent Show
at 6 p.m.
Curtain rises at Norman Hall
for "Playboy of the Western
World at 8 p.m.
Florida Union movie Briga Brigadoon
doon Brigadoon will be s bown at 7 p.m.

THa Florida AUifotor, Friday, March 24, 1961

music of the Rovers.
Friday afternoon the Sigma
Chi's will party informally at a
stag affair.
They will join the Pi Lams at
the Pi Lam house for a party
together honoring five recent in initiates.
itiates. initiates. Saturday night- brothers
and pledges will retire to the Ga Gator
tor Gator Gras Talent Show to root for
their own brother-pledge combo.
The SPEs will be in full re regalia
galia regalia as they go Hawaiian this
weekend. After a Luau sUpper

and 9 p.m.
SUNDAY, MARCH 26: An in international
ternational international "Danish supper
will be served at Johnson-
Lounge. 6 p.m. in the Florida
Union.
Florida Union movie Briga Brigadoon
doon Brigadoon will be shown at 2 p.m
"Day the Earth Stood Still
will be shown at 7 p.m. and 9
p.m. at the Florida Union.
MONDAY, MARCH 27: V. M.
Newton will be honored at an
autograph tea, 3:30 p ni. in
Johnson Lounge.
Arthur P. Whitaker presents
Latin American nationalism
in World Perspective at 8 p.m.
in the Law Auditorium.
Film: Inside Leningrad
will be presented by Dr. Wil William
liam William Fox, at 7:30 p.m. in Flor Florida
ida Florida Union Room 324.
Solar Cells and Transistors
will be discussed at 7 p.m. in
McCarty Auditorium.

Saturday night after the two fra* *
ternities compete in the
Bowl, football game for which
the loser receives a bronzeshoe.
Saturday afternoon, pi Lams will
cheer for Sigma Chi and the Sigs
will cheer for the Pi Lams al
the game. Little Jake and the
Blenders will play for the joint
party.
Alpha Chi and Pi Lam mixed
in an exchange dinner and the
Pi Lams entertained the ADPis
in socials last week.
Alpha Tau Omega has added
32 new brothers to the rolls with
initiation last week. The ATOs
observed Founders Day and hon honored
ored honored the new initiates at a ban banquet
quet banquet Sunday. ATO and Zeta so socialized
cialized socialized Friday night.
Pledge Party
Pi Kappa Phis entertained th
Phi Mu pledges with a dinner so social
cial social Monday night at the Pt Kap
house.
TGIF-ing n tonight will be the
AOPis and the Theta Chis with
a pizza social.
KDs Marg Kuhl and Penny
Harrell were on the Agriculture
Queen court. Linda Beckett waa
finalist for Military Ball Queen.
The KDs and the Sigma Nu'o
will socialize tonight. More Trl*
Delta beauties recognized last
week were Bonnie Butler, Mill*
tary Ball Queen and Delt Sweet*
heart; Sue on the Pelt
court; and Jane Sloan, crowned
Business Day queen.
Delta Delta Delta will be en entertaining
tertaining entertaining sisters and guezts from
throughout the state and from
Auburn University this weekend
for DDD State Day.
ZTA has sixteen new sisters as
of their recent initiation.

Page 5



Page 6

r ~ COP TWO PROM ROLLINS.
UF Nine Fates Auburn

Z By ROBERT GREEN
* t Gator Sports Writer P
After downing the Rollins Tars
for the fourth straight time,. the
Gator Baseball team is off to Au Auburn,
burn, Auburn, meeting the Tigers this af afternoon
ternoon afternoon and Saturday afternoon.
lIT will be the first SEC game
for the Tigers, while the Gators
have split two games in confer conferplay.
play. conferplay. Both were against
Georgia this past weekend.
The Plainsmens' last games
were against Florida State as
they split a doubleheader with
the Semlnoles March 21.
They lost the first game, 10-9,
to the Tribe on a ninth inning
rally. Auburn came back to take
the nightcap, 15-5, as they slam slammed

Smjb jfcAaLft 'yrKr:'<
jilt
b ItjM i
g|; HI m r. < 9
1
. against Georgia Tech as Coach Conrad Rehlings
linksmen stroke to another victory.
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The Florida Alligator, Friday, Merck 24, 1961

med slammed 17 hits over the Tallahassee
ballpark. The win was their first
in four games.
Double Play Combo
Auburn is led by their double
play combination of Bennie Cat Catchings
chings Catchings at shortstop and Jim
Douglas at second base. Another
star is outfielder pitcher Bill
Breakfield.
The Plainsmen will be In
Gainesville for two more games
on April 28 and 29.
The Gators extended their sea season
son season record ,to 5-1 with the wins
on Monday and Tuesday, but it
was no easy task.
They won on Monday by a
5-2 score in a game delayed
more than an hour by rain.
Ike Tars took an early 1-9
lead, but the Gators came back

with five runs in the fifth inn inning.
ing. inning.
The Orange and Blue could on only
ly only manage hits off Rollins pitch pitching
ing pitching in the game, but a combina combination
tion combination of Rollins errors, walks,
and a fielders choice helped the
UF team to its victory.
It was a different story on
Tuesday as the Gators unleashed
their hitting power to come from
behind and gain a 7-6 victory.
Winning Run
The winning run came in the
bottom of the ninth when relief
pitcher Dennis Aust doubled and
shortstop Bemie Haskins follow followed
ed followed With another double to score
Aust.
Rollins got off to a good start
when Jim Emerson homered in
the first inning. They added two
more runs in the third, before
starting pitcher C. W. Price got
the Gators back in the game with
a homer in the bottom of the
third.
The Gators closed the gap
with another run In the sixth
and took the lead in the seventh
with a four-run outburst.
The Gators loaded the bases
in that frame, and pinch-hitter
Butch Talbot promptly unloaded
them with a triple. Talbot scor<*i
himself and the UF team went
ahead 6-3.
Gator Golfers
Wreck Tech
The undefeated Gator Golf
team won its fifth straight match
of the season on Tuesday, March
21, when they downed Georgia
Tech 19-8.
The Gators get back in action
this Saturday, March 25, when
they face Rollins College at Win Winter
ter Winter Park. Last year, they defeat defeated
ed defeated the Tars 19*4-7%.
Following this meet, Coach
Conrad Rehlings team will head
for Texas and the city of Hous Houston
ton Houston to play in the Houston Colle Collegiate
giate Collegiate Invitational Tournament.
The hoat Houston team is the
defendingsNCAA champion. They
defeated the Gator golfers by nine
strokes in the Florida Intercolleg Intercollegiate
iate Intercollegiate Tournament last weekend.
The Houston meet will be held
on March 30 and 31 and April Ist.
It should draw most of the bet better
ter better teams in the South and South Southwest.
west. Southwest.
In the Match against Georgia
Tech, All American Frank
Beard led the way with a 68,
four strokes under par. Sopho Sophomore
more Sophomore Marlin Vogt of Daytona
Beach came in with a 69. Lefty
Ewing was low man for Tech with
74.
MARTIN
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DAVE FULLER
... Baseball Boss
DIVING AO
OFF TO NCAA
Gator diver Steve Mcride will
represent the University at the
NCAA Championships in Seattle,
Washington this wekend. 3
Mcride, a junior in Pre-Law,
is co-captain of the swimming
team. He won three gold medals
in the SEC Champio hips last
year, and placed first in the
three-meter and one meter div diving
ing diving events at the SEC meet this
year.
NCAA competition will be rough
this year, with FSUs Curtis Gen Genders
ders Genders expected to be on hand.
Genders and Mcride have battled
it out twice this season, with
Genders gaining the victory each
time.
Mcride, from Wilmington, De Delaware,
laware, Delaware, has been in diving com
petition constantly since this sum summer,
mer, summer, and has shown steady im improvements.
provements. improvements.

MURAL MUSI

SAE Cops Volleyball

By MIKE GORA
Gator Mural Editor
Sigma Alpha Epsilon defeated
Tau Epsilon Phi Wednesday in
the Volleyball finals of the Orange
League to win the trophy.
This was the second consecu consecutive
tive consecutive year the Lionmen met and
defeated the TEPs in the Volley Volleyball
ball Volleyball finals.
The win moves the SAEs into
first place in the Orange ahead of
Pi Lambda Phi.
SAE Stars
Starring for SAE were Tiny Joe

1
ALL-CAMPUS VOLLEYBALL TEAM
Ed Tkraadgill Sigma Alpha Epsilon
Bill Saba Phi Delta Theta
William Shaw Tau Epsilon Phi
Carlos Morrison Sigma Nu
Hugh Starnes Sigma Alpha Epsilon
Jerome Ross Tau Epsilon Phi
Don Rutledge Phi Delta Theta
Thy Joe Long Sigma Alpha Epsilon j
Kenny Leavit Tau Epsilon Phi
John Waterman Phil Kappa Tau
Wayne Bright Phi Kappa Tau
Mefrel Stainton Kappa Alpha
! J 1
HONORABLE MENTION
"zxzzz I iaiu>[i
Bob Patten, SAE H
Barry Gurwitz, AEP 1
Wayne Williamson, DTD rijfofpPr PllOg"
Richard Jacobs, Tep m i n
Robin Gibson, SN O *** S
Long, and Ed Threadgill who did Escorted, all-expensC
most of the spiking up front and tours for ages 18-30.
Hugh Starnes, brilliant set-up art- jg rowne U College Tours
Freshmen Barry Sanders and feature excellent Steamers,
veteran Dick Jacobs did an ex- choice hotels, all meals,
ceiient job of defending the hard comprehensive itineraries,
hitting Threadgill, blocking many departures by
of the big mans slams. r flQ t,
Earlier in the week sae de- sea and air. aays.
seated Sigma Nu and TEp defeat- From $1093.
ed Phi Kappa Tau in the emi- Also, Popular Tours, DO
final round to move into Wednes- a ~ e limit, from $991.
days finals.
In late bracket action Monday World Travel Service
afternoon Phi Kappa Tau defeat- 80S W. Univ. Ave. FR 6-4641
ed Pi Lam, Theata Chi defeated 55SS5SS3^pBaiSBS^
- - *
"BRIGADOON"
ColorCinemoScope
0
" March 24 Friday 7-9 P.M.
March 25 Saturday 7-9 P.M.
March 26 Sunday 2 P.M. Only
"The Day the Earth Stood Still"
March 26 Sunday 7*9 P.M.
March 27 Monday 7-9 P.M.
March 28 Tuesday 7-9 P.M.
%
Florida Union Auditorium

*. r L v
FLORIDA RELAYS RECORDS
UNIVERSI TY CLASS
440 Relay 41. f NE La. State (Dave Stryon, Hays, Beumer,
Dob Styron) IWt
Mile Relay 3:12.8 NE La. State (Dave Styron, Mouser, Hays
Dim Styron) *966
Two Mile Relay 7:40.4 Kentucky (Whelan, Baxter, Plummer, Gum) 1900
Sprint Medley Relay 3:24.0 FSU (Casteel, Butner, TenrilHger, Conley) 1953
Distance Medley Relay 10:05.7 Duke (Menaker, Bare more, Nourse, Welsiger) 1960
One Mile Run 4:25.8 Fred Curley, Auburn 1047
Two Mile Run 9:16.5 Leonard Edelen, Minnesota 1958
100 Yards 041 (Dave Sime, Duke 1956
9.5 (Dave Styron, NE Louisiana State 1900
120 High Hurdles 14.2 (Dlclde Durham, L.S.U. 1050
144 (Don Styron, NE Louisiana State 1900
Pole Vault 15*5%** Henry Wadsworth, Florida 1000
High Jump 97*4 Lewis Hall, Jr., Florida 1053
Broad Jump 24 Archie Vickers, Florida 1054
Shot Put 57% Ed Nutttog, Georgia Tech 1000
Discus Throw 173OVi Jim Dillion, Auburn 1054
Javelin Throw 2437/j Bill Alley, Kansas 1960
FRESHMAN & JUNIOR COLLEGE CLASS
Mile Relay 3:23.1 Auburn Fr. (Keenan, Buckalew, Smith, Winter) 1960
440 Relay 45.6 Alabama Fr. (James, Hawk, Miller, Boswell) 1030
Sprint Medley 3:33.5 LSU Fr. (Young, West, Cannon, Seefleld) 1957
; i
* HIGH SCHOOL CLASS
ggO Relay 1:20.0 Miami Edison (Cox, Reid, Webster, Curry) 1000
Mile Relay 3:25.2 Winter Haven (Wilson, Heddon, Pottinger, Smith) 1960
100 Yards 9.8 Ellis Goodloe, Baylor 1954
120 High Hurdles 14.1 John Torek, North Miami 1960
Shot Put 55*1%** Cart Vereen, Miami Senior 1953
High Jump 6*2%** (Henry Wadsworth, Coral Gables 1957
6*2%** (David Tillman, North Miami 1960
Mile Run 4:82.0 Ronnie Haynes, Sidney Lanier 1900
Discus 163T* Steve Hendricks, G.M.A. 1959
Pole Vault 186%** Larry Evans, Boone 1960
Broad Jump 22*6 %** Mark Carr, Cairo 1058
1
I

SPE, Sigma Nu defeated Sigma
Chi, and Phi Delta Theta defeat defeated
ed defeated Delta Tau Delta.
Kappa Sigma defeated ATO,
AEPi defeated PiKA. and SAE
defeated Beta Theta Pi.
Blue Loop Action
In Blue League action this week,
Chi phi took two victories defeat defeating
ing defeating AGR and DSP while Phi
Gamma Delta, Pi Kappa Phi,
Lambda Chi Alpha, Delta Upsi Upsilon,
lon, Upsilon, Pi Kappa Phi, and AgR each
posted single wins-

Handball in both Orange and
Blue Leagues begins next week.
The TEPs hold the favorites
spot in the Orange League and
they will be trying for their third
consecutive trophy in this event.
Outstanding returnees for the
TEPs are Howie Rosen, Jerry
Ross and Steve Katz.
Other strong contenders for the
crown will be Phi Delt with Don
Rutledge, Kappa Sigma with Cis Cisco
co Cisco Montana, and Pat Patchen,
and the always potent Sigma Nu
aggregation.

nt in a series of polls conducted by L*M student representatives in over
1 100 colleges throughout the nation. Watch for the next poll coming soon.
. Light up an DM, and answer these
questions. Then compare your answers Xl
with those of 1,383 other college students
(at bottom of page). Pack or Box
Question #1: Suppose the government asked for volunteers among college
students to pioneer in manning the first space station, would
you go if odds for your safe return were 50-50?
Answer: Yes No
Question #2: How many children do you plan to have when you are
married?
Answer: None______ One Two
Three Four Five
Six Seven or more
Question #3: Should class attendance be optional so long as students
pass the exams given in class?
Answer: Yes No
Question #4: When buying cigarettes, which do you usually purchase,
the soft pack or the box?
Answer: Soft Farii Box
M Answer: Question Yes .K./t No
Answer: Question #2. None 3J%. One 83%. Two 303%.
C&mpttS Three 303%. Four 16.4%. Five 43%.
Opinion Six 23%. Seven or more 43%.
Answers l Answer. Question #3. Yes 683%. No 313%.
Answer: Question #4. Soft Pack 723%. Box 27 .8%.
IfM comes both ways, of course, but the big difference in IfM
. is friendly flavor of fine tobaccos Mended to suit your taste.
1961 Ugsatt S My* Tobacco Co.

Frosh Nine Opens
Righthander Eddie Clark is ex.
pected to get the call when the
UF frosh open the baseball sea season
son season Saturday.
The Baby Gators, guided by
Ray Oestricher, will face Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville Lee in the lid-lifter. Oth Other
er Other frosh to watch are Ron Birch Birchall,
all, Birchall, Harry Tuggle and Tom
Jones.

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Sprinters Gain
Star Spotlite
In Track Meet 1
(Continued from Page ONE)
Auburns Crane will be after
the discus mark established in
1954 by another Tiger trackman,
Jim Dillon. He whirled the disc
171 feet in last years relays, a
scant two feet from the existing
mark.
Ron Ablowich of Georgia Tech
and Tony Hogan of Alabama will
join forces with UF footballer Don
Goodman to try to break the 120-
yard high hurdler mark of 14.2.
It will be Goodman's debut as a
Gator thinclad.
Other name performers who
have entered the college field are
Navy shotputter Richard Brown,
a consistent 56-footer; John Pen*
nel 15 foot pole vaulter from
Northeast Louisiana State, Ken*
| tucky distance runner Bob Locke,
| Marylands javelin ace Nick Ko Ko|
| Ko| vallkides, and Georgias defend defend;
; defend; ing SEC broad jump king Mark
| Carr. Carr will pose a double
j threat in the pole vault.
Several records in the high
| school division are also in jepe-
I ordy. The shot and discus ap appear
pear appear to lean the heaviest in this
j category with defending class a
champ Nelson McLaughlin, of
Tampa Chamberlain, Day to n a
I Seabreeze are Roger Orrell, and
j South Broward muscle man
Tucker Frederickson leading the
way. All have been above 54-feet
in early meets while McLaughlin
has surpassed the existing mark
55-54 with his performance in the
state meet last ytear.
Miami Edisons Alvin Smith
has beaten the discus mark twice
this year already and could set
the Relays mark this Saturday.
Other outstanding high school*
j ers expected to compete are St.
j Pete Highs brilliant hurdler Tony
Conte, Ocalas speed merchant
Jimmy Miller, Edison's sprinter
Bob Webster, Escambias all
around athlete Jim Lofton, Jack*
sonville Lees Dave Mann and
many others from Georgia and
Alabama.
Host Floridas hopes lie in the
. middle distance and relay events.
. Bill Lowenstein and Ted Mea Mea.
. Mea. lor, who both placed In the SEC
meet last spring, head the list of
Gator participants.