Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
New Point Plan
1 Gives SN Cup
=
Sigma Nu fraternity won the Blue Key silver
| sweepstakes trophy for outstanding performance
| in Homecoming *6O.
The Snakes picked up 198.5 points, out of 200,
i to place first in competition for the coveted Flor Flor|
| Flor| ida Blue Key trophy. They placed first in Gator
§ Growl with their skit Why Sherman Didn't
| March Through Gainesville" and second in the
| parade with a float decorated with a live Dixie Dixie|
| Dixie| land Jaz Band.
The silver cup was presented to SN president
| Tom Pfleger at the half during Saturday's soot soots
s soots ball game.
1 We were completely overwhelmed to hear
| that we had won," said Pfleger, because we
j hadn't even decided what aur float would be un uni
i uni til Tuesday."
This Homecoming saw the institution of a new
f system of awarding points to the entrants in the
I three major activities of the week-end. The only
| points that an organization would receive were
1 those accrued from the two events in which the
I group obtained the highest number of points.
Sweepstakes Chairman Homer Spense com com-1
-1 com-1 mented on the purpose of the new system.
It was proposed by the organizational heads
1 of the fraternities and sororities that the points
1 be awarded on the new basis," said Spense,
I "since it would save the organizations from go-
I ing to the expense of working so hard on three
| activities and taking the chance of spreading
1 their efforts thin."

Wave Nosori,'
Hoot Owl Are
Float Winners
Some 50,000 spectators lined the walks of University Avenue
Friday to view the Homecoming parade, Southern 6O style, the
largest in UF history.

Wave-nosori and owls floated
their way down University Avenue
and into the three top places in
competition.
Alpha Tau Omega put last years
winner, Pi Kappa Alpha, into third
place and squeezed Sigma Nu, the
1958 winner, into second with their
creation.
As it happened, the ATOs had
absolutely no trouble at all in th
construction of their float once
it was started.
So many ideas and plans had
been accepted and rejected it was wasnt
nt wasnt until Tuesday morning when
Roger LaVoie and Tom Wales
were caught by a brainstorm that
the Green Wave-nosorous was
evolved.
When asked how they went about
converting a brainstorm into an
Orange League division first place,
LaVoie noted that they worked on
the basis of novelty, originality
and crowd appeal, the points set
down by the judges.
Sororities began plotting and
planning for the big weekend

DECORATIONS
FADE FAST
House decorations, repre representing
senting representing untold amounts of
time, toil, and lack of sleep,
began to disappear Sunday
morning'.
Even in Che midst of this
confusion, no serious prob problems
lems problems in co-ordination were
encountered by the House
Decorations Chairman. Julie
Thordarson. Instead, she said,
Everyone seemed to co-op co-operate
erate co-operate really well.

At THE GATOR IS UFS NEWEST
LEADIN' am RAISIN'SPIRITS

4*l WT
PI JPI
H
ALBERT
. Newest Cheerleader

many weeks in advance.
Chi Omega Parade Chairman
Sandy Smith, whose sisters and
pledges took first place in the sor sorority
ority sorority float division, said the Chi
O's had quite a few moments to
remember in preparation for
their float.
Their own was just too heavy for
the lop-sided boat trailer they were
using.
The truck shifted and the owl
slipped. Some quick stepping on
the part of the Chi Os balanced
the bird.
Blue League winners were Del Delta
ta Delta Upsilon in first place, with Del Delta
ta Delta Sigma Phi placing second.
Kappa Delta, with their angel angelhair
hair angelhair bedecked float, took second
place while Alpha Delta Pi came
in third.
The music and high stepping
majorettes of high school bands
from all over the state added to
the festivity Homecoming 1960.

HOMECOMING REPORTS

(olorama Bows Out in Ball Beauty

- By BOBBIE FLEISCHMAN
Gator Staff Writer
Homecoming 6O bowed out in a
maze of pink and purple streamers
Saturday night as an estimated
750 persons participated in this
years Homecoming Ball.
Alumni, students, and faculty
and staff members attended the
event, which featured a "some "something-for-everyone
thing-for-everyone "something-for-everyone theme. Danc Dancers
ers Dancers occupied the upper floor of
the Hub, while listeners and rem reminiscers

Floridas newest cheerleader is
Albert the Alligator.
Albert, who put in his first app appearance
earance appearance at the Homecoming game
Saturday, will continue in future
football games in hopes of estab establishing
lishing establishing a tradition.
Really A Fake
The new mascot is really Pete
Zies, a student dressed as a fight fightin
in fightin Gator, with an alligator head
[ and a football uniform. The idea
was conceived by the Freshman
Council after seeing the Tiger
I mascot brought out by L. S. U.
To Raise Spirit
We are trying to raise more
school spirit on the field, said
Bill Nelson, President of the Fresh Freshman
man Freshman council. We may even have
[him come to basketball games
| pext year, Nelson added.
Rang Beil First
Albert will operate in coordina coordination
tion coordination with the cheerleaders to raise
and promote enthusiasm for the
| Gators. He was the first to ring the
victory bell Friday night at the
Gator Growl, combining Floridas
two newest traditions.

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Sigma Nu Skit: Sherman on The Move .

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THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

Volume 53, No. 17

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COLLINS, REITZ
SLING LAW MUD
Governor Leoy Collins indulg indulges
es indulges in some post-election mud mudslinging
slinging mudslinging Saturday morning as
ht wields a spade at the formal
ground-breaking for an annex to
the College of Law.
UF President Dr. J. Wayne
Reitz and Law School Dean
Frank E. Maloney also presided
at the ceremonies which immed immediately
iately immediately preceded the John Marsh Marshall

iniscers reminiscers took over the lower
level. Each group had its own
band.
Jazz Downstairs
Downstairs the Quintones enter entertained
tained entertained with jazz, Latin, and Dixie Dixieland
land Dixieland rythms as guests sat in a
nightclub atmosphere, complete
with candles.
The dance band, led by little
Jake, was delayed by a minor
traffic accident. They arrived
one Uour late, bringing with them
the Blenders vocal group as a
bonus.
The Continentals, originally sche scheduled
duled scheduled to provide the dance music,
suffered a chain of personal mis misfortunes
fortunes misfortunes which prevented their
appearance.
Despite these mishaps, the Ball
went smoothly.
Interpiping
While one band took a breath breather,
er, breather, listeners on that floor heard
music piped in from the other lev level.
el. level. This provided for a constant
stream of music from the beginn beginning
ing beginning of the affair at 8:30 p. m. until
it closed at 12:80 a. m.
At 9:30 master of ceremonies
and ball committee chairman
A. J. I vie presented Homecom Homecoming
ing Homecoming Sweetheart Libby Baker and
her princesses, Anne Sisler and
Judy Lynn Prince. The ladies,
dressed in pastel ball gowns,
were escorted by members of
the Billy Mitchell Drill Team.
Ivie described the girls, decora decorations,
tions, decorations, and occasion in general with
one word: Beautiful!
Profits Unprecedented
He pointed out that although the
admission price was file lowest
that has ever been charged, the
Prop Club To Discuss
The UF Propeller Club will
hold a panel discussion with mem members
bers members of the Jacksonville Propel Propeller
ler Propeller Club, Nov. IS at 8 p.m. in
room 18 of Matherly Hall.
The Propeller Club is a nation national
al national organization interested in the
promotion and welfare of the
United States Merchant Marine.
The Jacksonville debaters are
prominent in waterbom trans transportation.
portation. transportation.

all Marshall Bar Association skits.
The new addition was termed
*a significant step in the develop development
ment development of an already great College
of Law by Collins.
The new wing will cost approx approximately
imately approximately $266,000, and will ex extend
tend extend from the present courtroom
and library eastward toward 13-
th Street. It will be built of brick
and stone, as is the more recent
addition.
Target date for completion is
spring semester, 1962.

attendance and profit figures ex exceeded
ceeded exceeded all past totals.
This year, for the first time,
the ball was in the hands of the
Mens Presidents Council. The
Cavaliers presented the affair in
previous years.
Ivie comments, Id like to ex express
press express my appreciation to all who
helped to make the dance a suc success
cess success and to all who attended. I
heard so many remarks to the
effect that it was the best ever.
We really are pleased.

Alums Chit-Chat And Chow
In Shifts at Pre-Game Feast

There were big doings in the
Florida Gymnasium Saturday, as
a record number of alumni and
state notables trudged into the
basement for a pre-game barbe barbecue.
cue. barbecue.
An estimated 3,000 persons ga gathered
thered gathered to meet their congressmen,
venture predictions on the UF-Tu UF-Tulane
lane UF-Tulane score and consume astound astounding
ing astounding amounts of barbecued-beef,
baked beans, potato chips, cole
slaw and ice cream.
Politicos Present
Among the personages present
were United States Senators Spes Spessard
sard Spessard Holland and George Smathers
and a large part of the State Legis Legislature.
lature. Legislature.
Florida Blue Key sponsored the
affair, which was directed by
barbecue committee Chairman
Jack Shreve. Food preparation
vas handled by University Food
Service.
Tradition These Days
The barbecue has become a
tradition on campus, having be begun
gun begun way back in UF homecoming
history. As Shreve puts it, The
thing just grew and grew, and it
has gotten bigger and better every
year.

THEY BOTH TOOK HOMECOMING PRIZES

University of Florida, Gainesville Tuesday, November 15, 1960

Reitz & Ray Give FBK
Slant on Florida Quality


Smothers Proposes
Electoral Revisions
At Blue Key Banquet
Politics state and national openly flared up at the annual
Florida Blue Key Banquet Friday night as U.S. Senator George
Smathers proposed sweeping revision of the electoral structure of
the country.

A record group of close to 1,000
heard the Florida junior senator
propose a nationwide primary to
select presidential candidates for
the parties, apportioning of elec electoral
toral electoral college votes, according to
the popular vote and the ingrain ingraining
ing ingraining into our political tradition and
laws if necessary, for future pres presidential
idential presidential campaigns provisions for
head-to-head debates through the
media of TV.
National Primaries
Nationwide presidential primar primaries,
ies, primaries, a long-standing aim of the sen senator,
ator, senator, would eliminate our present
antiquated, raucus, unmanageable
convention system with its back
room deals and its hot-house plat platforms
forms platforms written by men and women
who have never been elected to of office.
fice. office. .for candidates who have nev never
er never even seen it in advance of their
nomination.
A primary would be conducted
in each state at the same time
to indicate the tide of public op opinionbut
inionbut opinionbut to actually choose the
partys candidate.
Smathers, in proposing TV de debates
bates debates as standard procedure in
presidential campaigns, said our
system is such that the people
must make decisions on the basis

Because of the size of this
years crowd, participants had to
occupy the 1,000 table settings in
shifts.

(EDITOR'S NOTE: The
following ir part of o series
of progress reports on the
activities of the various de departments
partments departments in student gov government.)
ernment.) government.)
By MART ANNE AWTRET
Gator Staff Writer
Public Relations functions to
keep students, faculty, the ad administration
ministration administration and alumni inform informed
ed informed on student government, its
ideas, programs, attitudes and
student services, said Paul
Hendrick, secretary of public
relations, Sunday.
The public relations staff dis distributes
tributes distributes material through cam campus
pus campus outlets as well as through
the mass communications me media
dia media Os area newspapers and ra radio.
dio. radio.

PR Functions Outlined, Listed

1188 i^ :
?* 4^'vt**"*" 1 SmBMI

of thorough exposure of the candi candidates.
dates. candidates.
Debates Emphasize Qualities
It could be said, the senator not noted,
ed, noted, that the TV debates emphasize
the qualitiesleast important in a
candidate: poise and quick reac reaction
tion reaction before a camera.
Tet, he contended that the maxi maximum
mum maximum exposure of candidates was
important and that the peop 1 e
should make up their minds j and
weigh the TV results as best they
could.
The electoral college revision he
proposed was equally as sweeping.
Charges of antiquity were leveled
at the college vote which was
clearly unrepresentative of the
popular vote, according to Smath Smathers.
ers. Smathers.
He submitted that in three elec elections
tions elections thus far the candidate elect elected
ed elected had lost the popular vote ma majority
jority majority but had won the electoral
college.
Scoreboard And Menace
It is at best a scoreboard and
at worse a menace to the very
prestige of the presidency, he
commented.
He proposed that the present
structure of 587 votes, one for
each senator and representative of
each state, be maintained but that
the votes of any given state be di divided
vided divided between the states in por porportion
portion porportion with the popular vote in
that state.
In closing his address, the sena senator
tor senator made a plea for a united front
of support for newly elected presi president
dent president John F. Kennedy, irregard irregardless
less irregardless of party or personal ties.

The Information Distribution
System has been formed by Hen Hendrick
drick Hendrick to assist campus organiza organizations
tions organizations in publicizing cultural, so social
cial social and educational events
through effective coverage on
and off campus, and is headed
by Everett Brinkman.
The bookmark calendar dis distributed
tributed distributed by the Public Relations
Committee lists C course pro progress
gress progress tests, Lyceum Council
functions and major campus
events.
Public relations also handles
the large field of developing stu student
dent student body awareness of oppor opportunities
tunities opportunities to participate in student
government activities.
Never before have so many
students had so much opportuni opportunity
ty opportunity to participate in the field of

Chi Omega Floats Graves Little Acre

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.. .Makes FBK Address
1,500 ALUMS
VIEW EXHIBIT
OF CAMPUS
FOR HC '6O
Life and learning exhibit* in the
Florida Union attracted 1,500
alumni during HC-00, according to
Chairman Mike Crews.
The exhibits, planned along the
theme of Progress and Pro Problems,
blems, Problems, were sponsored by Nine Nineteen
teen Nineteen colleges and departments.
They will be open for students
until Thursday.
We planned to show the pro problems
blems problems of the University to the
alumni, who were once so vitally
interested in the UF when they
were enrolled here. said Crews.
Crews said that the exhibit could
have attracted more than the
wandering alums the ones
heading from one place to anoth another,
er, another, if set up differenUy.
We are, however, quite pleased
with the immediate response, he
said, and stressed that the long
range results. support of the
UF by alums wouldnt be seen
until a later date.

student government. The effec effectiveness
tiveness effectiveness of our activities in this
line is due to the fact that the
under secretaries, assistants and
dividuals in student government
have served so conscientiously,
said Hendrick.
Student body leadership pro promotion
motion promotion programs have included
the Freshman Forum, chaired
by Hendriek.
Travel Information
The Bureau for International
Travel and Study, headed by
Franklin Ritcfa and Gerald Sch Schweitzer,
weitzer, Schweitzer, is compiling informa information
tion information on opportunities for stu student
dent student travel and study abroad.
The Bureau has written letters
to film agencies, airlines, travel
bureaus and foreign embassies
to collect material for displays

Six Pages This Edition

Level of Profs,
Team 'Knack'
Eyed by Pair
By DICK HEBERT
Gator Managing Editor
The Florida Blue Key
Banquets hard-hitting main
speech by Senator George
Smathers Friday night was
prefaced in somewhat
equally challenging tones
by the addresses of UF
President Dr. J. Wayne
Reitz and Head Football
Coach Ray Graves.
Dr. Reitz expressed his concern
for the University and other insti institutions
tutions institutions of higher learning in the
state.
Heart of University
The heart of a university Is the
quality of its faculty, he said.
The president said one of the
most effective lures to industry
which Florida could maintain
would be high excellence in its
higher education.
The crucial problem facing
higher education in Florida is to
enhance and keep up the quality
of the faculty.
One of the best lures to in industry
dustry industry is excellence in education
not only excellence in science
and technology, but excellence in
the social sciences and humanities
as well.
Need Adequate Salaries
He pointed out that unless more
adequate salaries are provided,
the universities in the state stand
to lose many of their key person personnel.
nel. personnel.
Coach Graves was termed, first,
a man of unquestionable char character
acter character with high ethical standards,
by the University president.
In his remarks before the ban banquet
quet banquet audience the coach lauded
Ids team for having a knack
for making every game inter interesting.**
esting.** interesting.**
(See JUNIOR, Page 3)

in form lounges to promote an
international atmosphere.
Reciprocal Program
We must not only carry on
our own specific programs, but
we must see that all students
are aware of student govern governments
ments governments interest in problems and
needs and their efforts! to find
realistic solutions, said Hen Hendrick.
drick. Hendrick.
Student government has tak taken
en taken on a new vitality, he contin continued,
ued, continued, and it remained for his of office
fice office to acquaint others with the
ideas of service and accomplish accomplishment.
ment. accomplishment.
The public relations office
handles all publicity material
for student government, jand co coordinates
ordinates coordinates printing, poster pub publicity
licity publicity and poop distribution.



7 HE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

Page 2

Member Associated Collegiate Frees ___ ...
The FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Is tie official stein* sows yapsr of the Uaivsratty f Florida Mi Is fekttsksi etety
Yessday ui Frlisy Monday tsupt iartac holidays and *a cation periods. The SUMMER GATOR Is sstsiM * ****
class natter at the United States Pate Office at Gateosril o, Florida, Offices are located h Rooms S, It teT ts
She Florida Union Buiidiaff Baooanoat. Tolsphrao UaiTsrsity of Florida FR W1 *** *> ed rofeost either edltlerla.
office or heshtess office.
Editor-In-Chief Jiw Moorheod
Monaging Editor Dick Hebert
Assistant Editor F*t Cilley
Business Manager Ron Jones

EDITORIAL STAFF
Office Manager: Eleanor Yeager
Francos Aldmaa. Mary Anno Awtrey. Carol Bailor,
Ed Byrd, See Alloa Canthcn, M. E, Cleveland, Snsaa
Enale, Frio Estes, Lee Ferris, Jr., Bobbie Flelsehman,
Harvey Goldstein, Sarah Groonborr. Nancy Hooter, Bee
Harder, Natalie Rayons, Don* Richie, Karon Shachat.
SPORTS STAFF
Sports Editor: Bill Bucholtsr
Mike Gera, intramarals editori Fran Warren, sporte
featuresi Bill Abel, Robert Green. Jack Horan. Jared
Lebow, Solomon Robbins, Sandy Rosenthal, A1 Skolnick,
Ed Witten.

The campus is tired. Let's face it.
We are in no shape to take up ouf
books and plod the road of education.
Students have doled out their hours
on house decorations, parade floats,
Growl skits and what-not.
To make matters worse, they have
tried to squeeze into the too-tight pre-
Homecoming schedule the little mat matter
ter matter of progress tests. Unfortunately,
progress tests are an essential part of
the academic year somewhere around
mid-semester.
* *
EVEN MORE unfortunately, many
people feel that Homecoming is also
an essential part of that period in the
school year.
This makes things difficult, to say
the least. Deeply engrained in the
Homecoming tradition is the notion
that it must be the biggest and best
ever seen in Dixie or the whole
nation for that matter.
* Sjc
GRANTED, we put on The Big
Show to welcome our alumni back to
their college environs. We would not
do away with this. We do not want
to do away with Homecoming. We
DO want to get a little more realistic
about the program, though.
First, is a football game necessary
to act as a drawing card to the alumni
really interested in our school ?
It doesnt seem reasonable to as assume
sume assume so. If the alums really are look looking
ing looking to help the University through
which they reached heights of vary varying
ing varying degrees, it seems that an athletic
billing is of minor importance.
* *
SECOND, and in line with outward
exhibitions of grandeur, is the great
rainbow array of decorations, costly
both in hours and money, a necessary
part of the big weekend ? Is it neces necessary
sary necessary that students push ever harder
. to get the best ever ?
It seems to be terribly wasteful at
a time when the University is in such
acute financial straits, that so much
should be spent making the campus
look like a millionaires birthday par party.
ty. party.
* *
THOSE ORGANIZATIONS, frater fraternities
nities fraternities and sororities, that approached
the festivities with some degree of
moderation are to be commendedif
the notion behind such moderation
was to provide more available time
and effort for studies and other acad acad.
. acad. emic pursuits, the prime purpose of
our community.
Would it not be wise to revamp
the fiesta structure, possibly putting
curbs on the color-cost? Would it not
be wise to consider moving it into the
spring semester which is unclutter uncluttered
ed uncluttered with extra-curricular capers? The
fall semester has an abundance of
such goings-on.
** *
THE SPRING has long been decri decried
ed decried as the time when socials ten tension
sion tension relievers are in dire need. The
fall has long been criticized for being
too jam-packed with such diversion diversionary
ary diversionary activities.
Has some law been handed down
from above that says Homecoming

THEM

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Editorials

Is It Worth It?

Tuatday, Novambar 15, 1960

EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS
Kirk Callahan, None 7 Myksl, Gary Fesesck. Ft
TvnstftU.
BUSINESS STAFF
Assistant Business Mgr: Carl Griffith
Ad Salesmen: Joe Anthony, Charles Ahramson. Boh
Perkins. Allan DeLoaeh. Jim Everaden, Sandy MHeheU.
Bin MeGartty: Advertiser and Layout; Ronnie Good*
stein; Ctrenlatloa Manager: Ray Wateoni Classified Adst
Loots# Booth i National Advertising Manager: Ron Both*
stein i Offlee Manager: Jolle MeClnre; Office Staff:
Carol Linger, Dottle MacDonald. DeEtte MePheron. Jana
Miller, Jan Watkins, Barbara Nessler, Mare! Fltegtb Fltegtbbonst
bonst Fltegtbbonst Subscription Manager: Chris Licfrted.

shall be in the fall and at no other
time?
With a maturely approached Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming in the spring, alumni who are
really interested in the welfare of
their University would be attracted attractednot
not attractednot simply football fans.
* *
STUDENTS WOULD be freed from
the great time-consuming house dec decorations,
orations, decorations, floats and skits in the fall,
and in turn would gain the needed
spring diversion.
(The entering freshman, probably
more than any other student, is hurt
by the pre-Homecoming work week.
He must adjust to school, meet
the ever higher scholastic standards
and still try to satisfy the decorating
mania of his group leader.)
* *
MOST OF ALL, perhaps the impres impression
sion impression of the University handed down
to the state and its leaders would not
be so colorful and rosy. Perhaps with
a more subdued, yet nevertheless en entertaining,
tertaining, entertaining, atmosphere the state
might realize that there is a poten potentially
tially potentially great University in Gainesville
if only its needs are met.
Perhaps the state might send more
of its most promising youth here in instead
stead instead of to the big name institutions
outside the state if people could see
more evidence on our own parts of
emphasis on higher learning first
both in and out of the classroom
with gay festivities decisively in sec second
ond second place.
Hello,'Rival'
t
We welcome into the field, with in interest
terest interest and speculation, a rival pub publication,
lication, publication, The Gator Greek, published
for the first time this past weekend.
Rather than view it as competition,
we view it as a potentially useful in instrument
strument instrument Os service to the University,
so long as it reflects and encourages
the true purposes of the fraternity
system and the Inter-Fraternity Coun Council,
cil, Council, i.e., service to the University and
not service to selves.
* *
WE NOTE, with a measure of un understanding,
derstanding, understanding, the fact that the initial
issue consisted largely of back-patting
within the inter-fraternity system it itself,
self, itself, giving it the appearance of
public relations brochure.
Since this first sheet was directed
mostly toward returning alumni, back
for a couple days of bygone camara camaraderie,
derie, camaraderie, this approach was perhaps in
keeping with the occasion.
a a a
WE TRUST subsequent issues will
be less glossy, more realistic, and will
not recoil from nor attempt to hide the
problems and obligations which the
UF fraternity system faces.
Indeed, this is the main obligation of
such a publication in the first place...
if it is to serve what can be called a
useful purpose.

letters to the Editor^

#
(Wa remind our readers that all
letters, in order to be printed,
must be signed. Several have late lately
ly lately crossed our desk unsigned and
could not be considered for publi publication
cation publication for this reason. Names will,
of course, be withheld on re request.)
quest.) request.)
ISO Deserves
Apologies
EDITOR:
I was greatly astonished and
ashamed when I saw four drun drunken
ken drunken foreign students from Latin
America climb up, without per permission,
mission, permission, to the International Stu Student
dent Student Organizations float during
the Homecoming parade proces procession.
sion. procession.
* *
SUCH AN action not only an annoyed
noyed annoyed the girls on the float, but
also gave a bad impression to
the general public about the for foreign
eign foreign students in the UF.
The barbarous, impolite, and
uncivilized behavior of these
four students, I think, demands
a public apology from them to
the Homecoming Committee, to
the International Student Organ Organization,
ization, Organization, and to the representa representatives
tives representatives of the countries on the float.
Lillian L. L. Young
Honor And
Bibliokleptai
EDITOR:
Messrs. Davidson and Free Freemon
mon Freemon have obviously never ex experienced
perienced experienced the frustration of sear searching
ching searching through the stacks for
books which, as it turns out,
have been permanently borrow borrowed.
ed. borrowed. Otherwise they might not
be so indignant over the brief briefcase
case briefcase inspection at the library
exit.
* *
WHETHER OR not the Honor
System works anywhere else, it
does not, apparently, in the lib library,
rary, library, thanks to a few chronic
bibliokleptai in our midst.
Hence, dear friends, the need
for inspection. And after all, why
yelp: Those are such nice old
ladies at the door.
Robert Detweiler
Is UF Now
Huge IBM?
EDITOR:
Has the University, in its ne never-ending
ver-ending never-ending search for efficiency,
become one huge IBM machine?
Two years ago (September,
1958) was the last time that stu students
dents students living in the dorms were
able to effect legal room trans transfers.
fers. transfers. This was a good policy be because
cause because more compatible arrange arrangements
ments arrangements were possible, and the ex experience
perience experience of dorm-living was
made more pleasant for all
concerned.
*
LIVING WITH someone of si similar
milar similar tastes, ideals, beliefs, or
backgrounds is much easier and
mere pleasant than living with a
person diametrically opposed to
oneself.

Because we are directly in involved
volved involved in the red-tape efficiency
of the housing division, it would
be interesting to know why the
policy of legal room transfers
has been cancelled.
*
WE WOULD ALSO like to know
why, when a question concern concerning
ing concerning policy arises, a person is
given the run-around from the
lowest (the section advisor) to
the highest (the Director of
Housing).
If the university is so effic efficiency-minded,
iency-minded, efficiency-minded, why not out tut
the counseling service or the
university psychiatrist? After
all these men are human, and
therefore subject to human er errors.
rors. errors.
PETER S. PERKEL
KENNETH GUTMAN
Dollars for
Faculty Pay?
EDITOR:
I do not understand why we
hear so much about more dol dollars
lars dollars for scholars. Why not more
dollars for professors? Certain Certainly
ly Certainly I am not against scholars, but
I think that the ones who are
in school would profit greatly
from a campaign for more dol dollars
lars dollars for professors.
Many schools would find it in incredible
credible incredible that our faculty has to
handle as many students as they
are now forced to. In my cal calculus
culus calculus class (which meets at
7:40), there are approximately
fifty students.
* *
SMALL WONDER that the
professor noted that the grades
on the first hour exam were low lower
er lower than he had ever before
seen on a similar test.
It seems to me that we are
already sacrificing quality for
quantity in this universitywhy
not give the students enrolled a
chance to learn by paying our
faculty more, hiring more pro professors,
fessors, professors, etc.
Jill Pipkin
Solution To
Dating Woes
EDITOR:
In reference to the letter about
the sad dating situation, I think
that I have a plausible solution.
The problem is that there is no
way for the girls to meet the
boys.
Why couldnt the* Florida
Union or some other agency
sponsor a sock hop in the gym
every other weekend? They
could charge a nominal fee to
cover the cost of using the gym.
*
ALL YOU need is a record
player and some good up-to-date
records for it to be a success.
This type of dance is used by
high schools. In some cities disc
jockeys also put on this type of
dance which is a tremendous
success.
I dont see why this couldnt
be given a try.
808 McCLASKEY

THE COURT SPEAKS

Honor Court Revision Proposals listed

(EDITOR'S NOTEs The Alliga Alligator
tor Alligator continues th series of articles
by Honor Court Clerk Davo Stanley
telling of Hie history and opera operations
tions operations of tho Court. Today's in installment
stallment installment reveals several proposed
revisions.)
By DAVE STANLEY
Honor Court Clerk
Z wish to express my grati gratitude
tude gratitude both to Tom Clark, secre secretary
tary secretary of the Honor Court Public
Relations Committee, and to
Jack Graff, member of the
John Marshall Bar Association
Honor Court Revision Commit Committee,
tee, Committee, for their help in this ar article.
ticle. article.
*
PROPOSALS FOR REVISION
OF THE MECHANICS OF AD ADMINISTRATING
MINISTRATING ADMINISTRATING JUSTICE
IN THE HONOR COURT OF
THE UNIVERSITY OF FLOR FLORIDA
IDA FLORIDA
'lt has been said that the
Honor System is the University
of Floridas most cherished tra tradition.
dition. tradition. Tradi-

STANLEY

ness and efficiency, the systems
must be altered to meet the
needs of the time.
The following proposals do
not attempt to detract from the
traditional spirit of the Honor
System; rather they seek to
further that spirit by promoting
a more equitable and practical
dispensation of justice under
the system.
An intelligent analysis of any
system must begin with the
birth of the system and end
with its present-day status. Here
we will attempt to depict the
great change in conditions from
b i r t h to the present and
in addition to explain briefly
how the Honor Court functions,

MR.
4%
FR 2-2592

Our Specialty
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Zeroing in on the future

.

P GENERAL ir .^J
9 TELEPHONES ELECTRONICS Wtj


with a concomitant evaluation
of its effectiveness.
*
WHEN THE Honor System
was initiated on the Florida
campus, the student body was
composed of approximately 1,-
200 men. That was 40 years
ago; today the student body to totals
tals totals approximately 13,000 men
and women, and yet the pro procedures
cedures procedures in the Honor Court re remain
main remain substantially the same.
While the so-called informed
procedures of the Court were
possibly adequate at its incep inception,
tion, inception, they cannot dispense fair
and impartial justice today.
The Court was purposefully
designed to circumvent those
features of our civil and crim criminal
inal criminal court systems which the
faculty and student leaders felt
were undesirable and led to
inequitable results.
The aim of those who initiated
the system was to promote the
fair implementation of its prin principles
ciples principles through an informal and
personalized treatment of each
accused defendant.
*
WHILE IT IS conceivable that
such treatment of each indi individual
vidual individual case could, among a
small group, effectuate justice,
it is equally inconceivable that
such personalized and inform informal
al informal treatment can be effective or
fair when dealing with the
crowded docket of cases pres presently
ently presently facing the court.
As a result of the antiquated
mechanism now in use, the
number of erroneous convic convictions
tions convictions and acquittals will con continue
tinue continue to grow with the student
body population. It is incum incumbent
bent incumbent upon those responsible for
perpetuating the Honor System
to reevaluate the Court and the
feasibility of instituting a more
formalized procedure.
No one would refute the fact
that the taint of a criminal con conviction
viction conviction in the courts of our
state is an overwhelming bur burden
den burden that must be borne by the
convict throughout his life.
* *
IT ENTERS INTO, and in
many cases makes unbearably
difficult, the attainment of his
social, economic, and political
welfare. It is because of the

tion has its im important
portant important place
on campus.
However, when
outdated and
outmoded sys systems
tems systems are per perpetuated
petuated perpetuated sole solely
ly solely for the sake
of tradition at
a great sacri sacrifice
fice sacrifice of correct-

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At Gen Tel, our arm is to develop the super communica communications
tions communications system that will be needed to meet the demands
of tomorrow. And were constantly shooting new ideas
at this target
In our 24 research laboratories, more than 3500 sdeo sdeotists
tists sdeotists and engineers have their sights set on eafcbefy v
new concepts in order to achieve these results.
Example: a task force of General Telephone & Elec Electronics
tronics Electronics scientists, working in the unexplored areas of
electroluminescence and photoconductivity, have
developed an operating model of a switching device
with no moving parts, that may revolutionize telephone
communications. It is a thin wafer only 3 inches square
that may someday connect and disconnect up to
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Meanwhile, this new discovery holds promise of having
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ing switching and read-out devices for electronic computers.
Research is but one of themany areas in which Genera!
Telephone & Electronics is thinking and working ahead
-not only to meet today's communications needs* but
tomorrow's as well. [ T

grave nature of such a convic conviction
tion conviction that the framers of our
constitutional form of govern government
ment government so carefully sought to pre preserve
serve preserve to the accused every pos possible
sible possible protection of ills right to
lifs and liberty.
Without these safeguards a
mans individual dignity is at the
mercy of the whimj of the mob
or the despot. Surejly all will
agree that a person shall be
proclaimed and presumed In Innocent
nocent Innocent until proved guilty be beyond
yond beyond any and every reasonable
doubt.
Have the founders of our
Honor Court failed to realize
the close parallel of the Honor
Court to the criminal courts of
ttfe| state? All evidence points
to such a misconception.
* * [.V
A PERSON accused of a vio violation
lation violation of the Honor Code is in
much the same position as the
person accused of violating a
state statute who Is tried for
an alleged breach of standard
conduct as determined by the
laws or rules of the particular
political or govemruental body
under which he lives.
So, too, an Honor Court con conviction
viction conviction is a mark which will
follow the alleged wrongdoer
throughout his life and affect
hiis future in many irreparable
ways.
What of the aspiring medi medical
cal medical student, law student, den dental
tal dental student, etc.? The hopes
and lifelong aspirations of these
people frequently crushed under
the gavel pronouncing the
Courts finding of guilty.
*
SURELY THERE is just as
much need for the utfnost surety
in an Honor Court conviction as
there is in criminal courts. Does
not the accused deserve the
same protections afforded by
the criminal courts when he fa faces
ces faces the Honor Court!?
There is a great laick of these
safeguards in our present pro procedures,
cedures, procedures, and immediate correc correction
tion correction is imperative if the faculty
and student body of this univer university
sity university are to face their consciences
with head held proudly high.

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,
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The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, Nov. 15, 1960

SCs Progress Report Includes
expansion, Initiations And Studies

Student government expansion
programs have produced major re results
sults results in the form of Honor Court
revisions, leadership forums for
top entering freshman, and in increased
creased increased University participation
for foreign students, according to
Secretary of Public Relations Paul
Hendrick.
The* progress report, released
Sunday, included the following
programs and studies:
Freshmen Welcomed
Large groups of freshmen in
their first days on campus were
reached by the Freshman Wel Welcome,
come, Welcome, formed by Vice-President
Allen Poole, and the Honor Sys System
tem System Forum organized by Adminis Administrative
trative Administrative Assistant Joe Chapman.
The Freshman Forum, chaired
by Hendrick, gave inside informa information
tion information on University traditions and
policies to top freshmen, marked
as potential campus leaders.
Honor Court revision stu dies
have created major changes in the
functions of the Honor Court
Among these is creation of the
new post of Attorney General, fill filled
ed filled by Thom Rumburger.

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ABOVE McDAVID'S BARBER SHOP
C V* *y (Author of VI Was a Teen-age Dwarf, The Many
Loves of Dobie GiUis, etc.)
HOW TO BEAT THE BEAT GENERATION
My cousin Herkie Nylet is a sturdy lad of nineteen summers
who has, we all believed until recently, a lively intelligence and
an assured future. Herkies father, Walter O. Nylet, is as every everyone
one everyone knows, president of the First National Artificial Cherry
Company, worlds largest maker of artificial cherries for ladies
hats. Uncle Walter had great plans for Herkie. Last year he
sent Herkie to the Maryland College of Humanities, Sciences,
and Artificial Cherries, and he intended, upon Herkies gradu graduation,
ation, graduation, to find him a nice fat wife and take him into the firm as
a full partner.
Could a young man have more pleasing prospects? Os course
not. But a couple of months ago, to everyones consternation,
Herkie announced that he was not going into the artificial cherry
business. Nor was he going to stay in college. I am, said
Herkie, a member of the Beat Generation. I am going to San
Francisco and grow a beard.
Well sir, you can imagine the commotion in the family when
Herkie went traipsing off to San Francisco! Uncle Walter would
have gone after him and dragged him home, but unfortunately
he was right in the middle of the artificial cherry season. Aunt
Thelma couldnt go either because of her old leg trouble. (One
of her legs is older than the other.)
I
So I went. I searched San Francisco for weeks before I found
HVrlcift living under the counter of a Pronto Pup stand. Herkie,
how are you? I cried, looking distraughtly upon his tangled
beard, his corduroy Jacket, his stricken eyes.
i'Beat, said Herkie.
I offered him a Marlboro and felt instantly better when he
took it because when one smokes Marlboros, one cannot be too
far removed from the world. One still has, so to Speak, a hold
on the finer things of life-like good tobacco, like easy-drawing
filtration, like settling back and getting comfortable and enjoy enjoying
ing enjoying a full-flavored smoke. One is, despite all appearances, basi basically
cally basically happiness-oriented, fulfillment-directed, pleasure-prone.
Herkie, what are you doing with yourself? I asked.
I am finding myself, he replied. I am writing a novel in
the sand with a pointed stick. I am composing a fugue for
clavier and police whistle. I am sculpting in experimental ma materialslike
terialslike materialslike English muffins.
And what do you do for fun? I asked.
f Come, he said and took me to a dank little night club
where men in beards and women in basic burlap sat on orange
.crates and drank espresso. On a tiny stage stood a poet reciting
a free-form work of his own composition entitled Excemo: The
Storu of a Boy while behind him a jaa trio played 200 choruses
ct Tin Roof Blue*,
Herkie said I, comehome with me to the artificial cherries.
IVSo. said Herkie, so sadly I went home to tell Uncle Walter
thebadnews. He was less distressed than I had feared. It seems
Unde Walter has another son, a quiet boy named Edvorts, about
whom be hri completely forgotten, and today Edvorts is in
business with Unde Walter and Herkie is beat in San Francisco,
and everyone is happy. owwmuiwm.
*
And you too will bo happyWith Marlboro*, or if you prefer
an untutored smoko, with Philip Morris. Try the brand-now
Philip Morris king-size Commandertony, mild, end leis leisurely.
urely. leisurely. Have a Commanderwelcome aboardt

Foreign student programs,
aimed at over 400 students here
on campus, are designed to give
them tile fullest value of univer university
sity university life.
The Freshman Council is promo promoting
ting promoting a program that would allow
freshmen and sophomores to
drive registered automobiles on
big University weekends.
Inspector General Scotty Ansel Anselmo
mo Anselmo is instituting student govern government
ment government studies of on and off cam campus
pus campus facilities to insure safety and
livability for students. This post
was created this semester by Stu Student
dent Student Body President Bob Park.
Socials Handled
Inter hall socials are being
handled by the secretary of social
affairs through a committee com composed
posed composed of social chairmen elected
by the dormitories and off-campus
housing councils.
Student government has present presented
ed presented three coffee hour discussion
programs, featuring faculty dis discussions
cussions discussions on economics, social pro progress
gress progress and world government, as
well as .providing facilities for
viewing the Nixon-Kennedy de debates.
bates. debates.

Page 3

Shell Clyatt, secretary ct mens
affairs, has announced plans for
nine Gator Hops, two of which will
feature big-name bands.
Under the guidance of Park,
tile Congress of United Indepen Independents
dents Independents was formed as a non nonpolitical
political nonpolitical body to present inde independent
pendent independent problems to the student
government.
Married students have benefitted
by fee allocations which will pro provide
vide provide fenced play areas and family
recreation in the Flavet Areas,
and student wives are now admiti
ted to Lyceum Council programs
on their husbands identification
cards.
A baby sitting service with quali qualified
fied qualified sitters was initiated for foot football
ball football games.
Fee System Redone
Bob Perry, secretary treasurer,
and Jim Larche, secretary of fin finance,
ance, finance, have worked out a complete
reallocation of the student fee sys system,
tem, system, to provide more funds for
popular activities touching more
students.
Charter revisions for the Florida
Union, Lyceum Council and stu student
dent student publications are presently un under
der under study, in hopes of reducing go government
vernment government red tape.
Public relations work on poop
distribution and promotion Os stu student
dent student awareness has included dis distribution
tribution distribution of a calendar bookmark.
Allen Poole, student body vice
president, is pushing a concerted
drive to complete the Dollars for
Scholars program, through stu student,
dent, student, community and alumni co cooperation.
operation. cooperation.
Student government, in concert concertactivity
activity concertactivity with the Athletic Associ Assocition,
tion, Assocition, completed paving of the
walks beneath the student stands
in the stadium.
Don Cohen, secretary of the in interior,
terior, interior, initiated and completed suc successfully
cessfully successfully the first presidential
straw vote held on campus.
Board Petitioned
In the area of national politics,
Park and student leaders petition petitioned
ed petitioned the State Board of Control for
permission to hold rallies on cam campus,
pus, campus, providing essential support
for student political groups.
GOODRICH
TIRES
(The Best In Dixie)
LUBRICATION
Tom & Bill's
GAS. STATION
626 N.W. 13th St.
FR 2-9777
These are the silver wings of a
U. S. Air Force Navigator. As a
flying officer on the Aerospace
team, he has chosen a career of
leadership, a career that has
meaning, rewards and executive
opportunity.
The Aviation Cadet Program
is the gateway to this career. To
qualify for this rigorous and pro*
fessional training, a high school
diploma is required; however, two
or more years of college are highly
desirable. Upon completion of the
program the Air Force encourages
the new officer to earn his degree
so he can better handle the respon responsibilities
sibilities responsibilities of his position. This in includes
cludes includes full pay and allowances
while taking off-duty courses un under
der under the Bootstrap education pro program.
gram. program. The Air Force will pay a
substantial part of all tuition costs.
After having attained enough
credits so that he can complete
course work and residence require requirements
ments requirements for a college degree in 6
months or less, he is eligible to
apply for temporary duty at the
school of his choice.
If you think you have what it
takes to earn the silver wings of
an Air Force Navigator, see your
local Air Force Recruiter. Ask
him about Aviation Cadet Navi Navigator
gator Navigator training and the benefits
which are available to a flying
officer in the Air Force. Or fill in
and mail this coupon.
There's a place for tomorrow 9
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COUWTT*

The second annual FSU-UF
weekend saw student government
sonsoring a banquet and coffee
hour for visiting Florida State
students and leaders, in an overall
effort for closer contact between
the two institutions.
The Mens Presidents Council
has undertaken the responsibility
for the Lost and Found depart department,
ment, department, establishing the procedure
for returning articles to their
owners with a minimum of diffi difficulty:
culty: difficulty:
The Presidents Council func functions
tions functions as a liason betwween the
Inter hall councils and stu students
dents students government, and for the
first time functions nnder the
fee system.
The Council is now working on a
gun storage rack in the camp u s
police station so that enthusiastic
hunters may check their guns on
campus until the hunting season
opens.
A printing machine of high qual quality
ity quality will be installed in the Florida
Union so that campus organiza organizations
tions organizations will have the facilities to
print conveniently and cheaply
material needed for their clubs.
Junior Solon
Says System
Must Change
(Continued from Page ONE)
Although exuding confidence,
Graves was nevertheless wary
enough to refrain from predicting
the victory over Tulane that came
the following day.
Let's Run Again
In contrast to Graves athletic athleticminded
minded athleticminded talk was the almost
cliche like expression from top
state officials Well all have
to run for office again in the next
few years a remark heard
many times in and around Hie
gymnasium, hot on the heels of
last weeks elections.
Warming up to his keynote ad address,
dress, address, Senator Smathers noted that
in 1958 he had introduced Mas Massachusetts
sachusetts Massachusetts Senator Jack Kennedy
at the annual banquet but that in
1959 Senator Stuart Symington of
Missouri had been honored guest.
I can hardly help but feel a
two-year tradition of success
been initiated here, he. said.
I also have to run again ln
1963.
Preceding the address was a
long string of introductions, from
former Blue Key presidents to
State Supreme Court justices and
former Florida governors.
Standing Ovation Given
A resounding standing ovation
was given University President
Emeritus Dr. John J. Tigert sit sitting
ting sitting at the head table.
Five faculty members were ho honored,
nored, honored, in recognition of their fine
contributions, with certificates of
appreciation.
Dr. Wayne H. Chen of electrical
engineering, Dr. Raymond E.
Crist of geography, Dr. James W.
Day of law, Dr. Henry Glenn Ham Hamilton
ilton Hamilton of agricultural economics and
Dr. John Q. Harrison of history re received
ceived received the certificates.
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Top Demo, State
Politicos Stung
By JMBA Skits
Governor-elect Parris Bryant
was chief target for UF law stu students
dents students lampoons Saturday morning
at the annual John Marshall Bar
Association skits.
The skits, a satirical resume of
recent politics, were written, di directed,
rected, directed, produced and narrated by
senior law students, W. D. Fred Frederick
erick Frederick and Arnold Greenfield.
Also on the receiving end of
the mornings barbed satire were
incumbent Governor Leoy Col Collins,
lins, Collins, Senators George Smathers
and Spessard Holland, state po political
litical political figures Charley Johns and
Doyle Carleton, Tampa mobster
Lucky Trafflcante, Tammy po politico
litico politico Carmine DeSapio and oth others.
ers. others.
Collins, Holland and Smathers
were among the estimated 2,500
people attending the skits.
Venturing into national poli politics
tics politics for the hit of the morning,
one of the principal skits fea featured
tured featured an interview with presi president-elect
dent-elect president-elect John Kennedy in
which he announced his cabinet
all of whom were Kennedy kin.
The climax came when a my mysterious
sterious mysterious robed and mitred fig figure
ure figure was carried in on a sedan
chair through the audience. Fears
were quieted when Kennedy said,
NO, its not the Pope lts
Pop. Pop then promised him the
best administration money can
buy.
Termed incisive and amaz amazingly
ingly amazingly knowledgeable by various
state politics in attendance, the
skits are a major Homecoming at attraction
traction attraction and annually elicit edi editorial
torial editorial comment from the larger
Florida newspapers.
Tennessee's
'Menagerie'
To Play Here
Tennessee Williams prize-winn prize-winning
ing prize-winning play, The Glass Menagerie,
will be presented by the Florida
Players starting Wednesday, De December
cember December 7, and continuing through
Friday, December 10.
The Glass Menagerie, Wil Williams
liams Williams first Broadway success,
won the New York Drama Critics
Circle Award in 1945. Williams
calls it a memory play. Director
Robert Keyworth describes it as a
powerful, evocative, intense stu study
dy study of the life of a family in St.
Louis in the 19305.
Flashes of Williams own rebel rebellion
lion rebellion against the conditions of his
youth, appear in the play.
The cast of characters includes
Louise Walker as Amanda, Diane
Pelfrey as Laura, Murray Marden
as Tom, and Charles Harper as
Jim.
Tickets will go on sale at the
Student Service Center from 3:15
to 5:15 p.m. Monday, November
14 to Friday, November 18, or
until they are sold out. All seats
must be reserved. Performances
will be in the Norman Hall audi auditorium.
torium. auditorium.
Extra 3 Weeks
Helps HC '6O Go
'Extremely Well'
Gator Growl, with an extra
three weeks for preparation, went
off extremely well, said Chair Chairman
man Chairman Bill Criokenberger.
Os course, there are always
techniques for seeing that the
general plan is not the same,
he said, like using only one
stage.
The committees worked for an
extra three weeks, because of
the late Homecoming, we had
lots of timealmost as though
we were in only the fifth week of
planning, he said.
Suggestions for next fall's
Growl will be submitted to the
Blue Key office with Crickenber Crickenbergers
gers Crickenbergers report on this one.
High School bands and drill
teams are used extensively in
Growl, because we draw from
the high schools, and if we cant
use other colleges talent in our
homecoming, stated the Chair Chairman.
man. Chairman.
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coat, dark brown with darker
stripes. Valued at 14,000. Will
take less. Call Beenie, FR 2-
9166.

' :.. j
Pranksters Enliven Homecoming' 60
Loosing Armadillos at Sat/s Game

By NANCY M*KEL
Gator Editorial Assistant
Three UF pranksters put a little
life in Homecoming this weekend
with a burlap bagful of armadillos.
One or more of the armored
creatures made their appearances
in the Campus dub at Swimca Swimcapades,
pades, Swimcapades, at Gator Growl, in the Hub,
and on Florida Field at half time
Saturday.
Anonymous Prank stem
The responsible students, two
juniors and one sophomore, said
Sunday night that they prefer to
remain anonymous because
theyre afraid someone will be
angry.
Why did they do this?
College pranks are. dying on
thi* campus, the apparent ring ringleader
leader ringleader said.
Besides, now 44,000 people have
seen armadillos. Most of them had
probably never seen them before.
Armadillo Hunt
Five male and one female arma armadillos
dillos armadillos were caught Thursday
night in East Volusia County, in
Tomoaka River Swamp. Six stu students
dents students went on the hunt, aided by
a black Laborador retriever espec especially
ially especially trained to catch armadillos
(according to the ringleader).
The armadillos were kept in an
automobile overnight, and fed on
grass roots and beetle grubs.
Only the female armadillo was
named by the group. We nam named
ed named her Rebecca because of a lit little
tle little joke we had while we were
hunting. From this seed.
he said.
First appearance of an armadil armadillo
lo armadillo was in the Campus Club Friday,
at 4 p.m. According to the culprits,
the armadillo created some
havoc among visiting high school
students.
Wampus Cat
Interested persons in the Cam Campus
pus Campus Club were informed that it
was a Wampus Cat that was be being
ing being taken to the biology depart department.
ment. department.
With the last strains of the pre prelude
lude prelude music to Swimcapades, one
of the armadillos was thrown into
the middle of the pool, where it
created quite a stir among spec spectators.
tators. spectators.
Hie armadillo swam along at
a pretty fast clip, and crawled in into
to into the gutter, according to one
of the pranksters.
We had dropped back into the
crowd, and when someone captur captured
ed captured it we stepped up and took it in
the name of the biology depart department.
ment. department.
Clean Animals
He said that armadillos are very
clean animals, and that the one
which was thrown into the ff>ol
was especially clean.
At Gator Growl one of the arma armadillos
dillos armadillos was turned loose in the
west stands.
It ran into some Shriners who
were feeling pretty good, though,
nnd they just petted it, a prank prankster
ster prankster said. We got It back.
One caused comment in the
Hub prior to the game Saturday. It
was let loose under the table and
walked over to the water fountain.
Three Left
Three armadillos remained by
game time Saturday. Two had
been given away to a man who
raises them.
Rebecca had crawled out of the
car window in the Tolbert area
swamp, and as of Alligator dead deadline
line deadline was still on the loose.
The three remaining armadil armadillos
los armadillos were smuggled into the UF-
Tulane game inside a bag which
was inside a potato chip box.
The guy at the gate asked us
what we had in the box, and we
said potato chips, one prank prankster
ster prankster said. He motioned us
through.,
Hall Time Shows
Seating themselves behind the

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band, the boys moved up as the
band went out on the field for the
half time show.
As the band started off the field
after performing, the pranksters
started on the field through the
band ranks.
They tossed the three remain remaining
ing remaining armadillos onto the field
and then lost themselves in the
crowd.
The armadillos had been ram rambunctious
bunctious rambunctious in their burlap bag, and
once they hit Florida field they
made tracks.
Player Makes Catch
Two headed straight across the
field. One was intercepted by Flor Florida
ida Florida football players.
Cheerleader Fred Johnson chas chased
ed chased one into the end zone. He cheer cheered
ed cheered as the armored creature scutt scuttled
led scuttled across the goal line.
There was a scramble mo moments
ments moments later, however, when the

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aqnadillo tried to make a geta getaway
way getaway under the end zone stands.
He didnt make it.
We didnt know what finally
became of the three, the ring ringleader
leader ringleader said.
Armadillo* Lost
After the game we combed the
whole field area looking for them,
he said. dont know whos got
,them.
We didnt want to steal any anybodys
bodys anybodys shpw, he added. Thara
why we waited until after hal#
activities, and why we didnt real really
ly really interrupt Swimcapades.
The armadillos armor feels
rough, bony, and warm, accord-
Ing to one of the pranksters who
has had a number of biology
courses.
They make a noise like huk
huk huk pirhen they run, he said.
Theyre cute creatures with
few natural enemies in Florida.



Page 4

Gators To Go Bowling; Bob Tulane

Graves' Whiz
Kids Offered
Getor Bowl Bid
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HILP YOUR
UNIVERSITY!
HUP YOUR
NEWSPAPER!
Pat rm\%s thmt
warthQnls wh
| advtrlise
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FLORIDA
ALLIGATOR
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CALL ||

UF Converts Croon Wave Errors
Into Swoot 21-6 Conference Win

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every apportumty



Baby Gator Gridders
Tallahassee Bound
For Historita! Clash

The potent UF fresrman foot football
ball football team will close out its sea season
son season Thursday with an important
intra-state clash with arch rival
FSU.
It will be the first meeting be between
tween between the two teams in history.
The Baby Gators sport a 1-1
mark with a 16-14 upset win over
the powerful Auburn Tigercube
and a tough 15-14 setback to Mi Miami.
ami. Miami.
Lopsided Wins
The Seminole Papooses own a
3-a slate with lopsided wins over
The Citadel and Furman frosh
and a game with the Mississippi
Southern yearlings.
Coach Dave Fullers outfit, like
their varsity mates, have been
plagued with injuries. But Fuller
hopes to have the services of his
ace tackles Dalton Bray and John
Dent. Both have been slowed in
previous games but appear ready
for this big one.
Russ Brown, whos field goal
nipped Auburn, will team with
200-pound George Reinhart at

SHIVER, nJNG STAR
High Scoring Orange-White Game
Highlights UF Basketball Practice
An Orange-White scrimmage climaxed one month of
intensive practice for Coach Norman Sloan's ambitious
UF basketballers Saturday at the PK Yonge Gymnasium.

Sophomore Ronnie Poh was the
only Gator to miss the scrimmage,
being out with "bruised ribs.,.
Were looking a lot better,
said Sloan. The score of the
scrimmage was 105-86 and I was
very well pleased. We dont use
regular patterns and we had.
very few lulls in the game where
it was necessary to stop, regroup
and set up a new play.
Our players are catching on to
the individual expression style of
play and there Is more continuity,
be added.
The young coach was impressed
with the play of captain Bobb Shiv Shiver.
er. Shiver.
Shiver Looks Good
Shiver looked exceptiona 11 y
good, said Sloan. He had one of
the quickest head and shoulder
movements Ive seen. On a one oneand-one
and-one oneand-one situation, Shiver will
make it hard for anyone to guard
him effectively. His fine shooting
has continued to be tops.
' The surprise of the practice has
been the play of 6-7 senior forward
George Jung.
Jung has shown the most
Improvement,** said Sloan hap happily.
pily. happily. He hit nine of 12 shots
from the field in the fin*t half
land eight of 13 in the second
Half. He algo got 21 rebounds,
lie added.
The Orange unit consisted of Shi Shiver
ver Shiver and Jung at forwards, Cliff
Luyk at center, and Lou Merchant
and Paul Mosney at guards.
The White team had Joe Metz Metzger
ger Metzger and Joe Meigs at Soreward,
Carlos Morrison at center, and
Neal Cody and Buddy Bales at
guard.
Practice Change
Looking ahead to their upcoming
season, Sloan announced a change
in the UF practice pattern.
Well bring up the freshm a n
team this week and well have dai daily
ly daily scrimmages, he said.
There are less than three
weeks remaining before the op opener
ener opener in Winston Salem, North
Carolina against powerful Wake
forest.
Gators have also been invit invit-131
-131 invit-131 to test out the new Jacksonville
Oolleseum floor said Sloan. The
Cators will appear there for regu regular
lar regular season clashes with Duke and
Georgia and the Gator Bowl tourn tournament
ament tournament where the UF will meet
1 m
No need to be, really. If thoughts
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the ends. Dent and Bray will
start at tackles and little Jack
Thompson will be opposite 210-
pound Parts Jones at the guard
spots.
The center spot, also hampered
by injuries, may be at its strong strongest
est strongest peak for this game.
Ready To Go
High school All-American Thad
Green, tape and all, should be
ready to go offensively and Jim
Bernhardt will get the call de defensively.
fensively. defensively. Bob Thompson, slowed
by injuries, might be ready to go.
Fuller will call upon 146-pound
Ken Russell to guide the Baby Ga Gators.
tors. Gators. The Midland, Pa., signal signalcaller
caller signalcaller is a rugged blocker and
play caller.
Pat Willingham will alternate
with Russell.
Triple-threat star Haygood
Clark and fullback Jim ODon ODonnell
nell ODonnell will be the key to the frosh
offense. Clark has accounted for
two TDs, one by running, and
one by passing, in the two prior
games and has averaged over

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GEORGE JUNG
. . Pleasant Surprise
Jacksonville university in the
first round.
Floridas first home basketball
game will be Saturday night, Dec.
10, against the strong Texas Tech
Raiders of the Southwest Confer Conference.
ence. Conference.

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40-yards per punt.
O'Donnell, a 190-pound speed speedster,
ster, speedster, reminds Gator boosters of
Don Godman with his power run running
ning running up the middle and his speed
in the open field.
Russ Mercer, a tough defen defensive
sive defensive back, completes the start starting
ing starting backfield. Ken Bowen, ham hampered
pered hampered by injuries and ready for
his first game action, will help
the team with bis speed and ball
carrying ability.
Jim Elliott and Pete Smith are
two other backs that the FSU
defenders will have to watch.
Seminole Stars
The Baby Seminoles of form former
er former UF grid star Charley LaPradd
have some outstanding individ individuals
uals individuals of their own.
Ronnie Dixon, Vidalia, Ga., star
and former Miami Southwest ace
Richie Weber are the top running
threats for the Seminoles while
Charlie Calhoun, ex-Florida High
(Tallahassee) quarterback and
Georgian Doug Wheeler, are the
pass masters.
Big Charlie Kneipp, 260-pound
center from Miami Jackson is
the standout in the FSU Une.
Fuller hopes to offset the attack
with the all-round ability of Rus Russell
sell Russell and Clark and the hard run running
ning running of ODonneil. Clark has av averaged
eraged averaged over 5 yards per carry
and has completed three passes
for more than 40-yards apiece.
Russell executes the option play
well and ODonnell is a hard man
to stop on the draw and off tackle
bursts.

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register.

The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, Nov. 15, 1960

Page 5



Page 6

VHb
I |Sb
IjH w mm m hi
E I E IB B
SAVE UP TO SO I *-
%
Hundreds of Brand New Editions from Leading Publishers
Come Early for Best Selection [ I

Edwin sot* munch nr
PLAYERS, by B. Buggies. Lift
tad tones of the greatest genius
of the American stage. Ulus. Pub.
at *5.00. Sale *1

9) PORTRAIT OP JKSUS, by H.
King. Famous paintings and en engravings
gravings engravings showing 27 important
events In His life. King James
version. Pub. at 12.75. Sale *1

S) SPKINOS OP ADVENTURE, by
W. Noyce. Explorers from Cohiro Cohirobus
bus Cohirobus to Hillary motivate their bold
and dangerous deeds. Pub. at
*4.00. .S*Jf 91
a
4) CHARLES DARWIN, by P. B.
Sears. Understanding his lift and
thought. Pub. at *2.50. Sale 91

*> WILLIAM JAMES, by L. Morris.
The significance of his ''philoso ''philosophical
phical ''philosophical pragmatism." Pub. at
*2.50. Sals 9t

) HEROES BEHIND BARBED
WIRE, by H. K. Hansen. Why
80.000 Chinese and Korean POWs
chose Western freedom. 46 pho photos.
tos. photos. Pub. at 95.95. Sale 91

T) THE CONFLICT OP RELIGIONS,
by P. H. Ashby. How the world's
major religions differ and what
they have in common. Pub., at
93.50. Sale 91

9) Herman Melville's TYPES. The
classic South Seas adventure
novel. Pub. at 91-90. Sale 91

9) SINAI VH3TORY, by Brig. S. L. A.
Marshall. Brael's 100-hour con conquest
quest conquest of Egypt, nius. Pub. 95.00.
BMe 91

10) THE LOTUS EATERS, hi* Ger Gerais
ais Gerais Green, author of "The Last
Angry Man." Bizarre cast otchar otcharacters
acters otcharacters in n Florida resort. Pub.
at 94.95. 8al 91

11) LIVING MAGIC, by R. Rose.
ESP to miraculous cures among
aborigines of modern Australia.
Pub. at 93.75. Sale 91
i.
19) THE ELEGANT OAKEY, by B.
Bowen. Blog, of A. Oakley Hall,
"gentleman Mayor" of N. Y. C.
during the qprrupt Tweed era.
Pub. at *5.00. Sale 91
#
19) THE MEXICAN VENTURE, by
T. C. Call. From strife-torn be beginnings
ginnings beginnings to modem times, nius.
Pub. nt 94.50 Sale 91

14) THE PISTOL, by James Jones.
Latest novel by the author of
"From Here to Eternity. Pub.
at 13.00. Sale 91
e e e
19) THE SPIRIT OF THE SPANISH
MYSTICS, ed. by K. Pond. An-
Biology of 16th and 17th century
writings. Pub. at 93.95. Sale 91

19) PRACTICAL PROSE STUDIES,
by R. O. Bowen. Advice and mod models
els models of good prose writing by Ed Edmund
mund Edmund Wilson, Margaret Mead,
Othere. Pub. at 93.75. Sale 91

ft) RENAISSANCE CAVAUEB, by
J. S. White. Character structure
of Renaissance man. Ulua. Pub.
at 93-50 Sale 91
see
19) FROM THE HORSE'S MOUTH.
23 great historic figures describe
the events in their own words.
Pub. at 93.95. Sale 91
see
19) MONEY, MEN AND MACHINES,
by Catehinga A Roos. Critique of
Federal Reserve Board and its
policies. Pub. at 93.50. Sale 91
see
19) PROUD PORTRESS, by A. An Andrews.
drews. Andrews. Complete history of Gi Gibraltar
braltar Gibraltar through centuries of sieges
gnd wan. Hlus. Pub. at 93.75.
Sale 31
ft ft
21) THE PATH TO HOME, by Hilaire
Belloc. Classic narrative of the
great author's pilgrimage on
foot. Pub. at $3.75. Sale 31

22) BUDDHISM AND SEN. by N. Sea Sears
rs Sears ki A R. McCandless. On the
phlloeophy-rdiglo that is sweep sweeping
ing sweeping the West Pub. at 33.75.
Sale 91

29) THE PROBLEM OF JESUS, by
J. Guitton. The historical evi evidence
dence evidence for the content of the Gos Gospels.
pels. Gospels. Pub. at 93.75. Sale it

24) MADAME da CHANTAL, by H J.
Heagney. Interesting phases of
French ecdestical history. Pub.
at 93.59. Sals 91

251 BEER FOR A HERO, by W. G.
Schofield. Incredible story of
John Boyle O'Reilly. Irish 19th
century rebel. Pub. at $3.96.
. .
21) NAPOLEON AND MADAME
GEORGE, by K. Saunders. Greet
actress who was the First Con Consuls
suls Consuls mistress. Pub. at 94.50.
Sale 91
e
27) WOMEN OF PARIS, Andre
** '

file Florida Alligator, Tuotdoy, Nov. 15, 1960

90) REVOLUTION OF THE LONELY,
by P. J. Bouman. Kaleidoscopic
history of the past, agonizing 50
yean. Pub. at 94.00 Sale 91

31) FILM ANB EDUCATION, ed. by
G. M. Elliott. Symposium on non noncommercial
commercial noncommercial film-making. Pub. at
17.50. Sale 91

32) DEVELOPMENT AND LEARN LEARNING,
ING, LEARNING, by W F. Bruce. Emotions,
social patterns in childhood and
adolescence. Pub. at 92.75.
Sale 91

33) MATHEMATICAL TABLES AND
FORMULAE, by F. J. Camm.
Standard tables useful desk ref reference.
erence. reference. Pub. at 92.75. Sale 91

34) Letters of Mary Shelley MY
BEST MARY, ed. by Spark ft
Stanford. Selected correspondence
of the poets life. Pub. at 93.75.
Sale 91

35) THE AMERICAN COLLEGE, ed.
by P. F. Valentine. Survey of
leading institutions. Pub. at 910.00.
Sale 91

39) D. H. Lawrence POSTE RE RESTANTE,
STANTE, RESTANTE, by H. T. Moore. The
influence of. locals on Lawrence's
writings. Pub. at 93.50. Sale 91

37) MARIE. OR BLAVERY IN THE
UNITED STATES, by Gustave de
Beaumont. First English transla translation
tion translation of classic French novel Pub.
at 94.95. Sale 91

33) THE RACIAL THINKING OF
RICHARD WAGNER, by L. Stein.
Pub. at 94.75. Sale 91

39) THE THEATRE OF AUGUSTIN
DALY, by M. Felheim. America's
first real impresario and his fam famous
ous famous stage. Pub. at 95.00. Sale 91
T
40) AMERICAN CONSTITUTIONAL
CUSTOM, by 8.. C. Rodiek. Ori Origins
gins Origins and development. Pub at
93.50 gale 91

41) GODOY Master of Spain,
1792-1808, by J. Chastenet. With
contemporary portraits by Goya.
Pub. at 94.00. Sale 91

42) WHAT B CREATIVE THINK THINKING?
ING? THINKING? by C Patrick. With sugges suggestions
tions suggestions for stimulating productive
thought. Pub. at 93.00. Sale 91

43) GERARD DE NERVAL: Poet,
Traveler, Dreamer. By S. A.
Rhodes. A literary biography.
Pub. at 94.75. Sale 91

44) MUBIC OF THE AMERICAS,
NORTH AND SOUTH, by P. H.
Apel. A survey, from tribal chants
to jazz and 12-toners. Pub. at
93.96. Sale 91

45) FROM PILLAR TO POST, by A.
Mehdevi. Madcap adventures of
New Yorker magazine writer and
Persian husband. Pub. at 93.75.
Sale 91

46) JOURNEY FROM THE ARCTIC,
by D. C. Brown. Mystery and
magic of the Land of the Mid Midnight
night Midnight Sun. Pub. at 94.50. Sale 91

47) THE RISE OF THE HOUSE OF
DUVEEN, by J. J. Duveen. The
fabulous art dealer and his mil millionaire
lionaire millionaire patrons. Illus. Pub. at
95.00. Sale 91

48) THE WORLD AT HOME, by Anne
OHare McCormick. Best articles
by the noted N. Y. Times for foreign
eign foreign correspondent. Pub. at 84.50.
Sale 91

49) HOW TO DO NOTHING WITH
NOBODY ALL ALONE BY
YOURSELF, by Robert Paul
Smith. More "Where Did You
Go. Illus. Pub. at $2.95.
Sale 91

50) WOMEN OF ROME, text by Al Albeto
beto Albeto Moravia, photos by S. Waag Waagenaar.
enaar. Waagenaar. 110 remarkable pictures.
Only 91

51) Van Wyck Brooks SCENES AND
PORTRAITS. Memoirs es intel intellectual
lectual intellectual America. Pub. at 94.50.
Sale 91

52) FRANZ BOAS: The Science e#
Man In the Making, by M. J.
Herskovits. Contributions of the
great anthropologist. Pub. at
92.54. Sale 91

53) CAMR TO OXFORD, by Sr Muir Muirhead
head Muirhead Bone. 33 large exquisite
drawings, text on the beautiful
city. Pub. at 94.90. Sale 91

54) EDWARD EVERETT HALE, h>
friend es Emerson. Hawthorne!
Whitman. Pub. at 94.95. Sale 91

55) THE ART OF THE LOGOS, by
J. A. K. Thomson. The stecyteets
es ancient Greece and their narra narratives.
tives. narratives. Pub. at 92 59. Sals 91
.
59) THE AMERICAN FESTIVAL
CHIDE, by He & Ovtr
ortrtffttiinf Pube tt
.e e

19) THE MIRROR OF CONRAD, by
E. H. Visiak. The great writer
as seen in his own writings. Pub.
at 94.00. Sale 91
e
50) THE WAY OF THE CONDUCTOR,
by Karl Kruger. What the orches orchestra
tra orchestra leader does and why. Pub.
at 93.95. Sale 91

80) The Tropics WHERE WINTER
NEVER COMEfs, by M. Bates.
Fascinating study of the hot coun countries
tries countries from Mexico to Africa. $3.50.
Sale $1

91) LABOR ECONOMICS AND PROB PROBLEMS
LEMS PROBLEMS AT MID-CENTURY, by
Suffrin ft Sedwick. Legal and so social
cial social studies from Syracuse U.s
famed Maxwell Research Center. >
Pub. at $5.75. Sale 91
V
52) American Art and RUSSELL
SMITH, by W. E. Lewis. 19th
Century life and art. 62 plates.
Pub. at 95.00. Sale 91

93) THE HALF-NAKED KNIGHT, by
A. Francois. Over 200 audacious
cartoons, Gallic comment. Pub. at
93.95. Sale 91

94) MODERN SCIENCE AND THE
NATURE OF LIFE, by W. S.
Beck. The life process and at attempts
tempts attempts to create matter in the
lab. Hlus. $5.75. Sale $1.49

65) MYSTERIOUB MARRIAGE, by
E. G. Howe. Compulsion and in individual
dividual individual freedom conflict and
resolution. Pub. at $4.25.
Sale 91.49

66) WALTER DE LA MARE: A Se Selection
lection Selection From His Writings. A fine
anthropology. Pub. at 94.50.
Sale 91.49

67) TAINES NOTES ON ENGLAND,
by Hippolyte Taine. Gallic expose
of Victorian morality. Pub. at
96.00. Sale 91.49

68) The Yangtse RIVER OF THE
GOLDEN SAND, by T. Wood Woodrooffe.
rooffe. Woodrooffe. Adventures along Chinas
greatest waterway. Pub. at 94.50.
Sale $1.49
ft
69) THE SOURCES OF WESTERN
MORALITY, by G. Harkness. The
growth of moral Ideals from Meso Mesopotamia,
potamia, Mesopotamia, Greece, Rome to pres present.
ent. present. Pub. at $3.75. Sale $1.49

70) SUBTERRANEAN CLIMBERS, by
P. Chevalier. Exciting story of
explorations in southern France.

71) PUT OFF THY SHOES, by E.
Hamilton. Brilliant picture of Pal Palestine
estine Palestine today sacred Bethlehem,
modern Tel-Aviv, tourism, etc.
Pub. at $3.50. Sale $1.49

72) WORLDS APART, by T. Edwards.
Life in famous cloisters around
the world. Highly Interesting.
Ulus. Pub. at $4.50. Sale $1.49

73) WELFARE OF NATIONS, by M.
Fiore. Tracking down sources of
friction. 708 pp. Pub. at $6.00.
Sale 81.49

74) THE RUSH TO GLORY The
Story of "The Rough Riders," by
E. P. Westermeier. Teddy Roose Roosevelt
velt Roosevelt and the cowboy cavalry regi regiments
ments regiments of the Spanish-American
war. Photos. Pub. at 96.00.
Bale 91.49

75) BUFFALO COUNTRY, by B. Dun Duncan.
can. Duncan. American folklore and his history
tory history the majestic animal and
the men who hunted it Ulus.
$4.00. Sale 91.49
'
76) THE TURN OF THE TIDE, by
Arthur Bryant. The defeat of the
Axis in Europe as seen in the
diaries of Lord Alanbrookc,
Churchill's Field Marshall. Pub.
at 96.95. Sale $1.49

77) HALF HORSE HALF ALLIGA ALLIGATOR.
TOR. ALLIGATOR. ed by W. Blair ft F. Meine.
Folktales about Mike Fink, fron frontier
tier frontier hero. Illus. Pub. at $5.00.
Sale 91.49

78) FREDERICK WILLIAM I OF
PRUSSIA, by R. A. Dorwart.
The monarch's sweeping political
and economic reforms. Pub. at
94.00. Sale $1.49

79) Emile Zola ZEST FOR LIFE.
A masterpiece of naturalistic fic fiction.
tion. fiction. Pub. at 93.75. Sale 91.49
ft
80) ORPHEUS IN AMERICA. Jacques
Offenbachs charming diary of
his 1876 Journey to the States.
Ulus. Pub. at 93.95. Sale 91.49

91) FORMS Hf PROCESS, by P. Bart Bartlett,
lett, Bartlett, Milton. Blake, Keats. Poe,
Auden, others how they wrote
Mate best poems. Pub. at 94.50.
Sale 91.49
V2s &
92) WINGS OF THE FOREST, by
W. teg listenteg to the world of the birds.
' Blue. Pub. at 94.00. Sale 91.49
*
93) PART OF A LONG STORYi Eu Eugene
gene Eugene ONeill ns a Young Man to
Lews, bar Agnes Bolton. Pub. at
944*. Sale 31.49

94) Beard-Boyar's Guide to W
CHAMBER ft SOLO INSTRU INSTRUMENT
MENT INSTRUMENT MUSIC, by H. C. Sc lum lumbers.
bers. lumbers. Pub. at 93.50. Sale 91.49
. O' a
9> Reeortf-Bayers GMe to LP VO VOCAL
CAL VOCAL MUSIC, by P. L. Miller. Pub.
ad 94.50. Sale 91.4*

96) BUCKSKIN AND SATIN, by
H. C. Logan. Indian-fighter "Tex "Texas
as "Texas Jack Omohundro and his ad adventurous
venturous adventurous life and times. Pub. at
$3.95. Sale $1.49

87) THE GREEN AND THE RED
Sean OCasey and His Plays, by
J. Koslow. A play-by-play analy analysis.
sis. analysis. Pub. at $3.90. Sale $1.49

88) COMPOSERS, CONDUC TORS
AND CRITICS, by C. R. Reis,
Lively essays on music in Amer America.
ica. America. Ulus. Pub. at $4.25.
Sale 91.49

89) INVENTORS PROGRESS, by
J. G. Leit. The revolution in tech technology,
nology, technology, great inventors and their
struggles. Ulus. Pub. at $4.50.
Sale 91.98

90) NEW LIVES FOR OLD, by Mar Margaret
garet Margaret Mead. What the noted an anthropologist
thropologist anthropologist found on her return
to New Guinea after World War
11. Ulus. Pub. at $6.75.
Sale 91.98
ft ft e
91) THE IMPROPER BOHEMIANS
Greenwich Village in Its Heyday,
by A. Churchill. Americas Left
Bank and its colorful members.
Pub. at 95.00. Sale 91.98

92) MAN INTO WOLF, by R. Eisler.
Anthropological investigations of
lycanthropy, sadism, etc. Pub. at
94.25. Sale 11.98

93) THE HISTORY OF MONEY, by
A. Groom. World currencies from
Babylonian times to the present,
mus. Pub. at $3.50. Sale 91.98
ft ft ft
94) THE ARCHITECTURE OF SAN SANITY,
ITY, SANITY, by G. G. Haydu. What are
the values which make us "hu "human?
man? "human? Pub. at $5.00. Sale $1.98

95) WOODROW WILSON ft THE
BALANCE OF POWER, by E. 11.
Bnehrig. The prophetic concept
of collective security. Pub. at
$5.00. Sale $1.98

96) THE STRANGEST CASES ON
RECORD, by J. A. Duncan. Odd Oddball
ball Oddball legal occurrences and mis miscarriages
carriages miscarriages of justice. Ulus. Pub.
at $3.00. Sale st.9B

97) SAINTS OF SAGE AND SADDLE
An Anthology of Mormon Folk Folklore,
lore, Folklore, by A. ft E. Fife. Stories,
songs, superstitutions, etc. Pub.
at $6.00. Sale $1.98

96) THE PAPERS OF CHRISTIAN
GAUSS, ed. by Katherine Gauss
Jackson. The diaries of Prince Princetons
tons Princetons famous Dean, letters to pu pupils
pils pupils F. Scott Fitzgerald, Edmund
Wilson, others. Pub. at #6.00.
Sale $1.98
ft ft
99) TREASURE HUNT, by Jacques
Helft, 70 years of fun and "finds
in the world of fine antiques.
Illus. Pub. at $6.25. Sale $1.98

100) DAHLAK Under the Red Sea.
by G. Roghi ft F. Baschiare. Ad Adventures
ventures Adventures with camera and
spear gun. 50 photos. Pub. at
$6.00. Sale $1.98
*99
101) INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSO PHILOSOPHY.
PHY. PHILOSOPHY. by M. Rosenberg. The
thought of the greatest minds
through the ages. Pub. at $3.75.
Sale $1.98

102) THE WORLD IS YOUNG, by
Wayne Miller, 206 superb photos
of the secret, wonderful world of
ehildren, with captions. Pub. at
10.00. Sale $1.98
ft ft ft
103) Floating Hell THE ENGLISH
PRISON HULKS, by W. Branch-
Johnson. History of the -prison
ships which provided chean labor
for the dockers until 1857. Ulus.
Pub. at $4.50. Sale $1.98
ft ft
104) A HENRY ADAMS READER, ed.
by E. Stevenson. Cross-section of
the historians best writings. Pub.
Ot 95.00. Sale 91.98

105) ENGLAND Past, Present and
Future, by D. Jarrold. Compre Comprehensive
hensive Comprehensive new approach to British
history. Pub. at 84.00. Sale 91.98
ft ft ft
106) TREASURE-SEEKER IN CHINA,
by O. Karl back. Tracking down
art treasures and rare bronzes
and jades, nius. Pub. at $5.25.
Sale $1.98

107) THE QUEST FOR AFRICA
2,860 Years es Exploration, by H.
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the Nile to present expeditions,
mus. Pub. at 95.00. Sale 91.98

106) THE SOCIAL SELF, by P. E.
Pfuetze. The influence of George
Mead, Martin Buber, other phil philosophers.
osophers. philosophers. Pub. at 94.50.
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109) THE CBOSBING OF ANTARCTI ANTARCTICA.
CA. ANTARCTICA. by Sir Vivian Fuchs ft Sir
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Commonwealth Trans arc tic Ex Expedition.
pedition. Expedition. nius. in color. Pub. at
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110) THE PROSECUTION OF JOHN
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tle battle with the Church. Pub. t 94.06.
tele 81.96
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111) GEO RG E WASHINGTON IN
AMERICAN LITERATURE, by
W. A. Bryan. Be ifts-lettres, ora oratory
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112) GOETHES IMAGE OF MAN AND
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113) BALLOONS TO JETS, by H. L.
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114) VICTORIAN PEOPLE, by A.
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115) HARLEY GRANVILLE BARKER,
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116) Mary McCarthys MEMORIES OF
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117) THE YEAR 8000: A Biography of
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118) LAW WRITERS AND THE
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119) GREAT STORIES ABOUT SHOW
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120) THE MESSAGE OF MUSIC, by
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121) LYTTON STRACHEY, by C. R.
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122) MR. FRANKLIN His Personal
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123) Himmlers Strange "Confessor
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124) The Story of Fort SumterFlST
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125) A Fine Anthology THE RO ROMANTIC
MANTIC ROMANTIC READER. 621 choice
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H. E. Hugo. Pub. at $4.95.
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126) SCHUMANN AND THE ROMAN ROMANTIC
TIC ROMANTIC AGE, by H. Brion. The man
and his contemporariesBrahms,
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127) U. S. CAMERA 1958, ed. by T.
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128) ANXIETY AND STRESS, by H.
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chemistry. biochemistry. psychiatry and psy psychology
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129) PRESENT PHILOSOPHICAL
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130) Indo-Chtna FROM A CHINESE
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131) Passwords to HistoryEXTINCT
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132) EVOLUTIONARY THOUGTT IN
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133) IN SEARCH OF MAN, by Andre
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134) THE APOCRYPHA, ed. by M
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hooka of the Bible often absent
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135) Championship CHESS AND
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ala BL9B

136) THE LETTERS OF FRANZ
LISZT to Marid zu Sayn-Wittgen Sayn-Wittgenstein.
stein. Sayn-Wittgenstein. Ed. by H. E. Hugo. 215
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137) Western AmericanTHE GREAT
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Ranchers, rustlers ad sheriffs,
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138) HANDWRITING ANALYSIS, by
M N. Bunker. Interpretation of
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139) Vincent Van Gogh PASSION PASSIONATE
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140) CHARLES V, Father es Europe,
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141) HINDU PHILOSOPHY, by Theos
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142) Patriot ArtUtTHE AUTOBIOG AUTOBIOGRAPHY
RAPHY AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF COL. JOHN TRUM TRUMBULL,
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143) WYNDHAM LEWIS Portrait of
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144) THE YEARBOOK OF PSYCHO PSYCHOANALYSIS,
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and. Lorand. 15 contributors, including
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II Pub. at 87.50 Sale 81.99
145) THE YEARBOOK OF PBHCHO PBHCHOANALYSIS,
ANALYSIS, PBHCHOANALYSIS, ed. by Sandor Lor Lorand.
and. Lorand. Contributions by Fenichel,
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DI Pub. at 97.50 Sale 91.98
146) BROOKS *ADAMS, by Arthur F.
Beringause. Biography of the
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147) MY SECRET DIARIEB OF THE
DREYFUS CABE, by Maurice
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148) THE WRITERS *OF ALBRECHT
DURER, ed. by W. M. Conway.
A true modern whose life and
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149) Wendell PhUUpeIpROPHET OP
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lition, abolition, free public education, trade
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150) THIS IS OUTER SPACE, by Lloyd
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cusses Discusses Einstein's theories, the
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151) THE ATOM AND* THE ENERGY
REVOLUTION, by N. LansdelL
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152) THE NEW PSYCHIATRY, by N.
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153) The Story *f PREHISTORIC MAN,
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154) DICTIONARY OF MOUNTAIN MOUNTAINEERING,
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155) EPI GRAMM AT A,* by P. Fried Friedlander.
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156) SOCIAL LIFE* STRUCTURE AND
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157) THE GREAT* AGE OP DUCOY DUCOYEET.
EET. DUCOYEET. by P Herman. From too
Santa Maria to KonTlki. Bias.
508 pp. Pub. nt 94.06
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159) FOUNDEEB OF AMERICAN
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a* 16.00 Sate 9X49

159) THE COMPOSER AS LISTENER
A Guide to Music, ed. by I.
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160) OTTO RANK, by Jessie Taft.
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161) Who Was Shakespeare?THlS
STAR OF ENGLAND, by D. ft C.
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162) BUFFALO BILL AND THE WILD
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163) THE COLUMBUS ATLASReg ATLASRegional
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164) SELECTED FABLES OF LA
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165) DICTIONARY OF PHILOBOPHT,
ed. by Dagobert D. Runes. Every
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166) POPULAR MATHEMATICS, by
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167) Far Thousartd Tears of Beauti Beautiful
ful Beautiful Women: THE CHANGING
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168) BEETHOVEN ENCYCLOPEDIA,
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169) THE HISTORY OF HERODUTUS,
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life and customs. 544 pages.
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170) THE PEOPLES PLATO, by H.
L. Drake.. The basic concepts in
edited annotated form. 633 pp.
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171) INITIATIONS ft INITIATES IN
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172) DICTIONARY OF MODERN
CHESS, by B. J. Horton. Neariy
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173) CHRIST AND THE AFOSTLEB,
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174) Cecil Beatons THE FACE OF
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173) Dates THE DIVINE COMEDY,
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176) THIRTY THREE TEARS AMONG
OUR WILD INDIANS, by CoL
Richard I. Dodge. Intro, by Gen.
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the plains and Rocky Mountains,
a superb reprint of the original
1893 edition, mus. 659 pp.
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177) DICTIONARY OF ANTHROPOL ANTHROPOLOGY,
OGY, ANTHROPOLOGY, by C. Winick. 16.000 en entries
tries entries r.n early man, and capsule
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pologists, anthropologists, as well as definitions
of all essential anthropological
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179) THE ANATOMY OF MELAN MELANCHOLY,
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sian Rabelaisian wit and humor.
a Special 99.99

179) THE PLAINS OP THE GREAT
WEST, by Col. Richard I. Dodge.
Reprint of the 1877 source-book
on natural wonders, game, In Indian
dian Indian life. etc. Illus.
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180) HISTORY OF AMERICAN
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181) MODERN GERMAN PAINTING,
by H. K. Roethel. 80 Illus. 60 In
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182) A PRIMER OF MODERN ART,
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best one-volume guide to contem contemporary
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183) MR. DAVIS* RICHMOND, by S
Klmmel. The Capitol of the Con Confederacy
federacy Confederacy converted overnight Into
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184) THE GOLDEN BOUGH, by Sir
James G. Frazer. Arranged in a
one-volume edition by Sir James
himself. World-famous account of
magic, wizardry, taboos, sacred
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man human gods, and hundreds of other
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185) ENCYCLOPEDIA OF RELIGION,
ed. by Vergilius Ferm. Ph. D
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186) COMPLETE WORK# OF WIL WILLIAM
LIAM WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, ed- by
A. H. Bullin. The famous Shake Shakespeare
speare Shakespeare Head Press Edition. 37
immortal plays. The Sonnets,
Venus and Adonis and all other
poetry. The First Folio's "life of
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187) BULLFIGHT! 100 Photos and
text by Peter Buckley. 24 hours
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private moments of fear and
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ing during the "Dorainio", fanatic excite excitement
ment excitement at the "moment of truth**.
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188) A Pictorial Treasury of THE
AMERICAN WEST With more
than 10000 drawings, photos and
prints. By Lucius Beebe and C.
Clegg. The wild and woolly west
from Kit Carson to the fall of
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189) TREASURY OF WORLD LITER.
ATURE, ed. by D. D. Runes. I,*
450-pages, 300 entries from Homer
to Joyce, Greek tragedy to con contemporary
temporary contemporary Japanese theatre, the
"Songs" of the Judean Kings to
Gide, Sarte, Hemingway and
Faulkner. Pub. at $15.00.
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190) DAUMIER LITHOGRAPHSLAW
AND JUSTICE. Ed. by Julien
Cain, Daumier's scathing denun denunciation
ciation denunciation of the inadequacies of the
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productions. reproductions. 9-5/Bxl2%* Special
85.88

191) MASTERS OF PHOTOGRAPHY,
ed. by Beaumont and Nancy
Newhall. Over 150 reproductions
of the finest work of Cartier-
Bresson, Steichen, Stieglitz, Wes Weston,
ton, Weston, 15 other masters. Portraits
of Longfellow, Bernhardt, Baude Baudelaire,
laire, Baudelaire, Chaplain, Garbo, many oth others.
ers. others. 9%*xll** Pub. at sl2 50
* Sale $5.9$

192) THE WORKS OF GEOFFREY
CHAUCER. This Kelmscott Chau Chaucer
cer Chaucer in fasimile edition contains
the complete original text and
the $7 engraved woodcuts, bord borders,
ers, borders, decorations and initials by
Brune-Jones. Sumptuous binding,
all-linen paper, complete glossary.
12%"x8%* Pub. at $17.50
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193) PEOPLE PLACES THINGS
IDEAS, ed. by Geoffrey Grig Grigsc£
sc£ Grigsc£ k C. C. Gibbs-Smith. The
culture and imagination of man mankind-magnificently
kind-magnificently mankind-magnificently presented in a
set of four lavishly-illustrated
volumes, each 7%**xloxl% hi
size. Each volume contains 469
pages of vividly alive text, up upwards
wards upwards of 200,000 words, illustrat illustrated
ed illustrated with 176 full-page halftones, 19
in full color. Boxed in a majes majestic
tic majestic full color sllpcase. Pub. at
924.95. The 4-vol. set
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