Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Homecoming
On The Move
SEE PAGE 2
' 4 9

Volume 53, No. 13

Forum of Frosh
To Incite Honor I
By NATALIE RAGONE
Gator Staff Writer
Delegates to the second Freshman Forum in September |
banned together Monday night in a new project to create a |
feeling of increased respect towards the Honor System in their |
class. i
Hie program of the Forum is for these 140 members of
the freshman class to know the details of the Honor System and |
to act as representatives to their class in enlightening them |
as to the values of such a system.
Spread The Word
According to Joe Chapman, director of the forum, these ]
freshman will talk to their fellow students in the dormitories, |
the hub, and any other place where the Honor System is brought |
up. |
This is one of the most potential groups to help create |
new feeling of responsibility for the Honor System, Chapman §
said.
Nucleus Os Contact
According to Chapman, This forum of 140 freshman is the |j
nucleus of student governments contact with the freshman |
class. S
He said this was a good way to give information to a class |
which is so large. : §
Chapman termed the response to such a program by these |
freshman as enthusiastic and stated that both he and Bob 1
Park were happy with the attitude and general reaction of ;
these freshman to such a project.
New. Project
The present Forum is a new project of student government |
this year which took a combination of high school graduates |
chosen by high school principals on mentality, character, and |
moral ability, the Freshman Council, and all students who ran g
for any kind of a freshman office.
These students are to meet periodically to discuss every I
phase of student government and transmit this knowledge
personally to other students.

Free Cuban Christmas
Prediction Made at UF

A flree Christmas for Cuba was,
the prediction made Monday night nightat
at nightat a meeting oi the Democratic
Revolutionary-Front members by
Heriminio Portell Vila, visiting
research professor at the Univer-1
sity of Florida, head of the Uni University
versity University of Havana history de department.
partment. department.
A revolution rising in Havana
and spreading throughout the is island
land island of Cuba to overthrow the Fi Fidel
del Fidel Castro regime is coming soon
according to Portell Vila.
He addressed the group which
has been active for almost four
weeks now having organized them themselves
selves themselves in Miami on the weekend of
the Florida Rice football game.
To Inform Students
The DRF is an organization to
inform university students of
the Communistic state widch
now exists in Cuba and it is a
branch of various movements
stemming from underground ac activities
tivities activities in Cuba, according to
Fernando Gimenez, Secretary of
Propaganda for the new group.
The University of Florida group
while getting organized itself is
helping to organize similar groups
on other southern campuses and
is presently corresponding with
budding groups at FSU, Georgia,
Georgia Tech, Tulane, and LSU.
Meet UF In November
The first real contact with Flor Florida
ida Florida students has been planned
for November 7 when the group
will sponsor a speaker to talk on
The Cuban Situation Today.
Other DRF committees are plan planning
ning planning lectures and are attempting
to obtain NBC fllm3 on Cuba to
show to students.
There will be a panel discussion
so that students will be afforded
a chance to ask questions.
Speakers Bureau
A speakers bureau is being
formed which will send mem members
bers members on request to fraternities, sor sororities,

Ford Foundation Awards
Biggest Grant Ever to UF

A grant of $696,000 was award awarded
ed awarded the UF by the Ford Foundation
to improve engineering education
at the doctorate level.
It is the largest single founda foundation
tion foundation grant ever received by the
University.
University officials said part of
the money would be used for cer certain
tain certain other related scientific ac activities.
tivities. activities.
President J. Wayne Reitz, an announcing
nouncing announcing the grants award, said,
HS-UF Engineer
Going Exchange
A three-day exchange program
involving 86 Miami high school
seniors and 26 UF engineering stu students
dents students was conducted this week.
The high school students arrived
on Tuesday for a series of tours of
the UF College of Engineering and
science department.
The UF students in Miami visit visited
ed visited the Miami branch of the Flori Florida
da Florida Power Ught Company, a co cosponsor
sponsor cosponsor of the program, and other
places of interest to engineering
students.
Transportation was provided by
another co-sponsor, Eastern Air*
lines.

. ..
a 4*l*J*J*

orities, sororities, and other interested
groups.
New Cuban Beginning
All Cuban history now starts
from January 1, 1959, said Gi Gimenez.
menez. Gimenez. Thats the date that Cas Castro
tro Castro began issuing proclamations.
He went on to say that history
texts in Cuba now had been revis revised
ed revised so that Cuban children, which
ire state-educated from the age 3
Os eight to 18, will be taught Castro
engineered propaganda.
Gimenez stressed that Cuba is
right now a Communist state and
is clearly giving the U.S.S.R. the
toe-hpld it needs in the Western
hemisphere.
5,000 Old Books
Go to Cleaners
From Library
Completion of Browsing Room
alterations, second floor main lib library,
rary, library, within ten days, was fore forecast
cast forecast by Stanley L. West, direc director
tor director of libraries.
An addition to the balcony which
contains the rare book collection
will add space. The formerly
three sided walk way that was
formerly three sided will now go
completely around the room.
Limited space resulted when a
large number of rare books were
moved from the library vault to
the balcony shelves.
The books were moved because,
Where there is no air circulation
the books will tend to deteriorate,
stated John Buechler, department
head of special collections.
Pages yellow, fragile bindings
become more brittle and the gen general
eral general condition pf the volume will
worsen, he continued.
After the work is completed the
approximately 5,000 rare volumes
will be dusted and vacuum clean cleaned.
ed. cleaned.

We greatly appreciate this splen splendid
did splendid grant from the Ford Founda Foundation.
tion. Foundation. It will enable us to immed immediately
iately immediately move forward in further
strengthening the graduate pro program
gram program in engineering and the
quantum chemistry project.
Covers S Tear Period
To be administered by the Grad Graduate
uate Graduate School and the College of
Engineering, the grant will be dis distributed
tributed distributed over a three-year period.
The breakdown of the grant fund
consists of $70,000 for additions
to faculty; SIOO,OOO initially, and
up to SIOO,OOO in matching funds
for professional development of
present faculty; $60,000 initially
and up to $160,000 in matching fel fellowship
lowship fellowship fundi for increasing the
quality and numbers of graduate
students; a lump sum of SIOO,OOO
for forgivable loans; and $35,000
for engineering and $50,000 for the
Institute of Quantum Chemistry
for discretionary expenditures of
importance to the doctoral pro program
gram program as approved by the Grad Graduate
uate Graduate School.
Forgivable loans, explained
President Reitz, are funds which
are allotted to doctoral candidates
who will not be required to repay
the loan if they continue in teach teaching.
ing. teaching.

I Debaters
To Support
UF Cause
Fagan Promises
Tour for Support,
By MARY ANNE AWTRJEY
Gator Staff Writer
A tour of the state by the
Alachua County legislative
delegation to seek support
for the University was
pledged Tuesday night by
State Representative Osee
Fagan if he is re-elected.
The pledge came during
a debate between Fagan
and State Representative
Ralph Turlington vs. write writein
in writein candidates Ed Peck and
Don Schenck.
Fagan said the proposed tour
would be similar to the one un undertaken
dertaken undertaken to support the Univer University
sity University Medical School several years
ago.
Remove Firetraps
Fagan expressed the need of
removal of ramshackle, fire firetrap
trap firetrap buildings comprising thir thirteen
teen thirteen per cent of University facili facilities.
ties. facilities.
He .went on to say, More
than 300 professors and the en entire
tire entire College of Architecture and
Fine Arts are housed in these
firetraps, and immediate steps
must be taken to improve con conditions.
ditions. conditions.
Fagan pointed out that Flori Florida
da Florida professors salaries are woe woefully
fully woefully low, S2IOO lower than twen twenty-one
ty-one twenty-one institutions they have been
compared with.
Pay Near Bottom*
The salaries are near the bot bottom
tom bottom of the scale for the South;
however, they are higher than
those in Arkansas, said Fagan.
Some controversy over the
Miller Memo arose. A member
of the audience asked, Would
you be in favor of mandatory
legislation allowing teachers to
take part in politics?
Peck replied, I believe run running
ning running for office is one of an
Americans basic rights. I think
granting of this right to Univer University
sity University professors would improve
University city relations.
Supports Faculty
Rep. Fagan said, I am in favor
of doing something to make UF
employees more than so-called
second-rate citizens. It would not
be entirely proper for a state em employe
ploye employe to hold a state office.
The State Board of Control
should be urged to rescind the
Memo, perhaps allowing teach teachers
ers teachers to take a leave of absence
W'hile holding office, said Fa Fagan.
gan. Fagan.
All four candidates expressed
their belief that the University is
the largest industry culturally and
financially, and the greatest eco economic
nomic economic factor in Alachua County.
They were all in favor of doing
something in the interest of the
University, but Tuesday night
Peck and Schenck had no definite
proposals to offer.
(See DEBATORS, Page 2)

To Find, Fulfill Needs'
Independents United

By MARY ANNE AWTREY
Gator Staff Writer
Discovering, analyzing and ful fulfilling
filling fulfilling through appropriate pro programs
grams programs the needs of students is the
next order of business for the Con Congress
gress Congress of United Independents, the
organization was told by Vice
Chairman Paul Hendrick in the
fifth CUI meeting Monday night.
Along this line, the CUI will
sponsor a street dance this Satur Saturday,
day, Saturday, assist in combining results
from the student government eval evaluations
uations evaluations sheet on infirmary service,
Florida Union activities and Food

CUI Street Hop
Starts Activities
Congress of United Independents
activity will be centered around
student interests for the next few
weeks, starting with a street
dance, Saturday night by the side
of the Florida Union from 9 to 12
p.m.
This is the first venture into a;
project of this sort by an organ organized
ized organized group of independents, and
comes after only four weeks of
CUI organization.
The dance is sponsored by the
Student Government through the
auspices of the CUI, and will fea feature
ture feature the Quintones, a student
band composed of several area
band members.
The CUI felt that this is a big
weekend, and since there is no
Gator Hop scheduled, an activity
should be provided for interested
students, independent or other otherwise,
wise, otherwise, said Marty Plaskoff, en entertainment
tertainment entertainment chairman.

University of Florida Friday, October 28, 1960

Faculty Pay Backing Pledged
- -* A |
By Control Board Chairman

J^MKg

BURMESE WELCOMED The Uni University
versity University of Mandalay's physics head, Dr.
Ali Ah men, center left, and Dean of
Science Attar Singh, center right, are
visiting the UF campus for the next
three weeks to study science depart departments

SYMINGTOM JR. ON PLAZA

Senator's Son To Speak for Jack

James Symington, 32- y ear
son of the Missouri senator, will
speak in the Florida Union Audi Auditorium
torium Auditorium Monday at 4 p.m. in behalf
of the Democratic presidential
ticket, the Students for Kennedy-
Johnson committee announced
Thursday.
The speech is part of a statewide
tour by the young lawyer and for former
mer former diplomat which will take him
from Tallahassee to Miami.
Motorcade Planned
Plans are now under way for a
motorcade to greet Symington as
he arrives in Gainesville at 3 p.m.
All students are invited to assem assemble
ble assemble in cars at the Tic Toe night
club, N. W. 13th St., at 2:45 to es escort
cort escort Symington into the campus.
Following tne speech a re reception
ception reception for Symington will be
held in Johnson Lounge of the
Florida Union.
October marks the second month
of speechmaking for young Sym Symington.
ington. Symington. He is a partner in his fa fathers
thers fathers law firm and was attached
to the United States Embassy in
London when, in September, he
was called home by the Democrat Democratic
ic Democratic National Committee to cam campaign

Service, and work closely with the
Academic Affairs Committee.
Invites Academic Action
Marty Plaskoff spoke to the CUI
at the Monday night meeting on
tlie programs of the Academic Af Affairs
fairs Affairs Committee. He invited parti participation
cipation participation by Cm members on the
Personal Contact Bureau, revision
of the honors program, and expan expansion
sion expansion of study places within the Uni University.
versity. University.
The Cm is presently working on
a program to provide study hours
in Walker Auditorium, with facili facilities
ties facilities for C-5 music listening. A let letter
ter letter from the CUI has been sent to
the Registrar, and the project has
been referred to Dean Lester L.
Hales advisory committee.
Asks Need Shown
Dean Hale has said, If the CUI
can show sufficient need for the
additional study space, the pro program
gram program will receive our backing.
Dean Hale spoke to the CUI
Monday night, commending the or organization
ganization organization for their accomplished
programs, and stressing the need
for further activities.
The CUI will fill a void by an answering
swering answering the needs of the campus,
said Hl- Seventy per cent of the
student body has no unified group
to provide for their interests.**
Responsible for Majority*
The ratio of fraternity and so soorority
orority soorority members to the rest of the
student body is very small,** con continued
tinued continued Hale, and the CUI must
provide programs of academic
progress for the large body of stu students.
dents. students.
Dean Hale said the CUI will pro provide
vide provide contact with off campus stu students
dents students and other organizations, and
offered his support and advice in
future planning.

ments departments and gather ideas for similar pro programs
grams programs to be adopted soon at the Univer University
sity University of Mandalay. They are being
welcomed by UF President J. Wayne
Reitz, right, and Dean Ralph Page of
the College of Arts and Sciences, left.

paign campaign for the partys nominees.
One Os Fifteen
He is one of 15 speakers serving
on the Democratic National Speak Speakers
ers Speakers Bureau.
Kennedy Johnson Committee
Chairman Jon Johnson said*
We are very happy to have this
outstanding speaker and great
American visit our University
campus. I expect several thou thousand
sand thousand students to turn out in
greeting for Mr. Symington.**
Symington's speech is the high
point of three days of intense
wrap-up campaigning by the
Democratic student organization.
Saturday, Democratic support supporters
ers supporters will meet in Bryan Lounge at
1 p.m. to collect poop Sor distribu distribution
tion distribution at the stadium prior to the Au Auburn-Florida
burn-Florida Auburn-Florida football game.
Final Meeting
A final meeting of the committee
wil take place in the Union build building
ing building Sunday at 2 p.m. Stretch
plans will be announced and addi additions
tions additions to the honorary committee
will be made at that time.
Debate Planned
The Welsey Foundation Student
Center will be the scene Sunday
night of a Kennedy-Nixon debate
as Fred Frohock, graduate student
in international relations, and Bill
Biegelow, UF debate team trophy
winner, pair off for the Democrats
against Republican backers Joe
Ripley, former student body presi president,
dent, president, and Charley Weils, cnairman
of Florida Students for Nixon.
Following the Symington ap appearance
pearance appearance Monday, Dr. George
Wolff of the UF political science
department will umpire a second
Student Admits
Nervous Habit
Os Whittling
C&mpus police put an end to
a two-week mystery late Wednes Wednesday
day Wednesday when they captured the Wor Worried
ried Worried Whittier of the Florida Un Union.
ion. Union.
Rene Jose Tamargo, Jr. (1
UC) has confessed to damaging
15 chairs in the Unions television
lounge. He said the act was not
deliberately malicious, but was the
result of a nervous habit. Ta Tamargo
margo Tamargo was released after being
held for questioning.
The exact extent of the damage
has not been determined, but sev several
eral several of the chairs will have to be
| replaced.
The trouble was first noticed
by Camp Wauburg Director Syd Sydney
ney Sydney E. Matthews, who notified
! authorities.
A constant watch waa kept until
Tamargo was apprehended by
George Snyder, of the Florida
Union maintenance department
The case will be turned over to
Dean of Men Frank Adams, who
will determine course of action.
Ervin Speaks Ham Sat.
Students are invited to a
breakfast Saturday, 8:30 a.m., at
the Holiday Inn to hear Florida
Attorney General Richard Ervin
apeak in behalf of his own re reelection
election reelection and also for the Demo Democratic
cratic Democratic national ticket. Cost of the
meal is $1.25.

debate, this one at the Episcopal
Student Center.
Squaring off in this one, f ttich
starts at 8 p.m., will be Bttsdent
Body President Bob Park for the
Democratic side against political
science senior Bruce Louden for
the GOP.
All students are invited to the ac activities.
tivities. activities.
Publications
Board, Hale
Discuss Role
A committee of the Board of Stu Student
dent Student Publications met with Dean
of Student Affairs Lester L. Hale
Wednesday to try to define the re responsibility
sponsibility responsibility of the Board.
The role of the board in the Uni University
versity University and with student govern government
ment government was discussed at the explor exploratory
atory exploratory meeting, which also touched
on topics such as business manag managers,
ers, managers, selection of editors, and re reserve
serve reserve funds.
The meeting was called by new
members of the Board who want wanted
ed wanted their positions defined after
hearing the history of the boards
relations with student government.
Board member Dave Levy said
there wasnt a power struggle but
that members didnt want to be
held responsible for publications
and not have general supervision
over them.
He said the board wasnt a cen censoring
soring censoring agency and no publica publication
tion publication was ever censored although
the Orange Peel was once banned.
The board committee agreed to
meet again with Dean Hale and
Student Body President Bob Park
to continue the discussion.
Members of the committee were
professors Hugh Cunningham,
Mandell Glicksberg and Ralph B.
Thompson.

VRitn \

(EDITOR'S NOTE: In
advance of the first pro production
duction production of the year by the
Florida Players, Barbara
O'Brien has prepared this
special report for the Alli Alligator.
gator. Alligator. Miss O'Brien is press
agent for tha Players.)
By BARBARA OBRIEN
Os Florida Players
This book win wound and
anger people deeplyparticu deeplyparticularly
larly deeplyparticularly those at home. If I write
this book, and I must write it
for I must write, and it is all I
have to work with, theyll never
let me stand here again.
With this knowledge Thomas
Wolfe wrote the almost autobio autobiographical
graphical autobiographical account, Look Home Homeward
ward Homeward Angel.
Who was Thomas Wolfe? To
this question many answers

UF Professors Better
Than Can Be Expected
With Low Pay-Daniel

Full backing for salaiy hikes and faculty financial
needs were pledged Tuesday by Board of Control Chair Chairman
man Chairman J. J. Daniel.
I will, with the Board of Control, actively support
the salary requests of the University Budget Committee
before the state legislature, 1 said Daniel.

Daniel assured the UF chapter
of the American Association of
University Professors at the Law
Auditorium that he would support
higher education in Florida.
Must Offer Salaries
As the supply of faculty tal talent
ent talent becomes an increasingly
scarce commodity, your ability to
bring the men and women of your
choice here as your collegues will
depend up on the salaries you can
offer to them, said Daniel.
The Chairman said that reoent
studies show the UF, in com comparison
parison comparison with leading education educational
al educational institutions in the country, j
does not otter salaries lucrative
enough to induce top-notch pro professors
fessors professors to teach here.
Climate, our unprecedented
opportunities, good fortune and
the attraction that is Florida hava
indeed combined to bring us more
than we have a right to expect,
Daniel said.
Appropriates Funds
Chairman Daniel commented
that he thought that the state ap appears
pears appears to be more receptive to
the idea of appropriating more
money when they think that
the objectives of the University
are effective.
Daniel emphasized that qual quality
ity quality education demands qualified
personnel but higher salaries
alone cannot assure high quail quaillty.
lty. quaillty. As long as the program is
In the hands of the faculty It Is
up to them to provide a quality
program.
Daniel pointed out the increase
in the number of gifts and grants
by Foundations as a result of the
Sputnik hysteria.
Exclusive Grants
These grants have been made
exclusively in the field of science
and engineering, he said, and
these Foundations are neglecting
the all important field of human humanities
ities humanities and the liberal arts.
Higher education most provide
a wide range of studies and
must manage education so thfct
it will deserve support. This
will, in turn, aid society in un understanding
derstanding understanding the purposes of
higher education. The net re result
sult result of this process will be a
society better able to make wise
choices with respect of their
leaders.
We have never knowingly been
satisfied with less than the best
In education, Daniel said, and
it is not our intention to provide
lees than high quality services in
our state universities.
Working Well
Daniel noted that any program
isn't just good, but it must be

-PLAYERS PONDER PONDER

Thomas Wolfe, Mysterious Tarheel,
i *"- ' \
Reflected Self in Controversial Works

could be given, among them: i
Eugene Gant, of Look Home-;
ward Angel, the sensitive ado adolescent
lescent adolescent living under the rule;
of a domineering mother;j
or George Monk Webber, the;
young author of You Cant Go
Home Again, a book so sorely ;
misunderstood.
These are supposedly fiction fictional
al fictional characters created by Tho Thomas
mas Thomas Wolfe.
Wolfe was born in Asheville,
North Carolina and educated at
Harvard, and later became one
of the foremost novelists of our
time, but this lost of the mile milestones
stones milestones In Wolfe* life is but a
skeleton which doesnt touch
upon the man man he really
was.
Lost in that account is his
vivid memory, which explains
the resemblance to actual peo peop

Six Pages This Edition

By LOU FERRIS
Gator Staff Writer

p peop _____ j
good because it does something
well and efficiently.
The development of an institu institution
tion institution is the business of the faculty
and the business of the Board of
Control and, through the Board,
of the people of Florida.
We have long felt that any
nation which expects to be igno ignorant
rant ignorant and free expects what nev never
er never has been and never will be,
Daniel said.
The educational level of the
past cannot serve as a basis for
a dynamic free society in the
years out front. Modern society
needs widespread education but it
also must be a higher level of
education.
Voices Support
Daniel voiced support for the
community junior college pro program.
gram. program.
These colleges should be able
to send to the Universities pro properly
perly properly qualified students who will
be ready for advanced courses In
degree programs, Chairman
Daniel said.
Everyone looks to the new dec decade
ade decade In inticipation of things to
come. It is with this in mind th;.l
societys needs will be fulfilled
only if people realize the import importance
ance importance in educating the whole man, (
he said.
A society cannot be built upon
a foundation of technicians.
Daniel commented.
The first AAUP meeting of this
academic year was* attended by
an estimated 200 faculty mem members.
bers. members.
Traffic Tabs
On Upswing
Student traffic and parking viola*
tions for this semester have in increased
creased increased ten per cent over tha
same period in 1859 and may reach
a record high in fines.
Traffic court records show 1,198
offenses as compared to 1,028 from
September through October of last
year.
Ann Rosenberg, deputy court
clerk in charge of fines, predicts
that unless students are made
more aware of regulations the
fines this semester will pass the
$5,971 mark set last spring,
Weve been averaging about
$75 a day and it will probably go
higher, she said.
Most of the new ones are decal
violations for parking out of zone,
said Campus Police Chief Schuler,
but its the faculty and adminis administrative
trative administrative officials as well as stu students.
dents. students.
Bicycle and scooter tickets have
risen despite new racks placed in
various spots on the campus.

pie of all his characters por portrayed
trayed portrayed in the various novels.
Overlooked is his mistrust of
people leads the reader to be believe
lieve believe Wolfe was completely cyn cynical.
ical. cynical.
Lost, too, is the deep sensitivi sensitivity
ty sensitivity of Wolfe shown by the deep
hyrt he felt when his hometown
banned his books from its. lib libraries,
raries, libraries, and charged him of being
an autobiographist thereby,
Wolfe, robbing him of all cre creativity.
ativity. creativity.
The town of Asheville believed
Wolfe was a "revealer of family {
secrets." An obituary written
of Wolfe stated, "large of body,
robust of mind, he wag a..man,
who matched our mountains."
What was Thomas Wolfe real realhr
hr realhr like? Perhaps the answer
lies in the Florida Players
forthcoming production of "Look
Homeward Angel T*
IHi

You're
Missing Out
SEE PAGE 4



Page 2

Parade Committee Seeks To Pre sent
Two-Hour Continuous entertainment

Two hours of continuous enter entertainment
tainment entertainment is the,goal of the Home Homecoming
coming Homecoming parade committee.
The end of the parade will be
just as entertaining as the begin beginning,"
ning," beginning," said Ton LaGrone, -parade
chairman. K
The various units in the parade
. will be placed for the best possible
effect. We wont bunch all of the
bands or all of the marching units
- togetherLaGrone said.
HC Sweetheart
.Leading the parade will be the
Homecoming Sweetheart float. Fol Following
lowing Following it will be bands, high school
marching units, floats, the two
ROTC drill teams, cars containing
the HC honored guests and Shrine
marching and novelty units. 5
Deadline for applying to partici participate
pate participate In the parade is today.
More than 40 political, alumni,
and student leaders will ride in the
parade as honored guests of Flor Florida
ida Florida Blue Key.
Classes Suspended
On Nov. 11, the day of the pa parade,
rade, parade, classes will be suspended at
12:30 p.m. The parade will begin
at 1:30 p.m. when the unit# leave
111 ID We sell tickets 7
Mill for all major |
sea and air 3
T.V tines at official *3
SEA rates 1
wen mcmwr i~*
TICKETS §
WORLD TRAVEL SERVICE 5
SOS W. Univ. Aye.
Phene FR 6-4641

(BRAKES RELINED $8.95, PARTS
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AND BALANCING.
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111 S. Moin St. FR 2-5871
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TUESDAY
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Spaghetti (Served with Salad)
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SI.OO
608 N.W. 13th ST. FR 2-1546
WHAT'S NEW IN PAPERBACKS
, *' \
SHAKESPEAREAN TRAGEDY
A. C. Bradley
HOW TO STUDY & TAKE EXAMS
Lincoln Pettit
: THE UNITED STATES IN 1800
_ Henry Adorns
5 THE RESTLESS ATOM
. Alfred Romer
- HORNS, STRINGS & HARMONY |
Arthur H. Benade ft
; OUENTIN DURWARD
Sir Wolter Scott I
: BABYLON REVISITED I
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: INVITATION TO POETRY l
[ Lloyd Frankenburg ?
PRAYER |
FRANKENSTEIN
Mary Schelley
BROWSE SHOP {
AT THE
Campus Shop and Book Store r
Located in the Student Service Center

The Florida Alligator, Friday, Oct. 28, 1960

- the marshalling area on the ROTC
- drill field.
The parade will take the tradi tradie
e tradie tional course east on University
- Avenue to Main Street, in down down-3
-3 down-3 town Gainesville, where it will
turn north and diperse.
Honoring the University faculty
j and administration, an area along
; University Avenue east of Mather Mather-3
-3 Mather-3 ly Hall will be reserved so that
faculty and their families will be
assured of a view of the parade.
Float Competition
- Float competition is divided into
* four categories: Blue league, Or Or-1
-1 Or-1 ange league, sororities, and other

Smothers, Scholarship Granting
To Highlight 1960 Alumni Reunion

The presentation of a SIOO schol schol
schol arship and a talk by Sen. George
A. Smathers will highlight the
1 iB6O Alumni Reunion, Nov. 12.
The reunion, which fs part of
Homecoming activities, will be
designed after a political conven convention.
tion. convention. Sen. Smathers will deliver
a keynote speech and members
of the Universitys 13 colleges
will act as delegates. 7
Rep. Syd Hurlong will emcee
the rally.
The scholarship will be pre*
sented to the college with the
largest percentage of alumnae re return,
turn, return, according to Nelson De Decamp,
camp, Decamp, assistant chairman of the
reunion committee. The UF Alum Alumni
ni Alumni Association donated the schol scholarship.
arship. scholarship.

UF student organizations. First
second and third place trophies
will be awarded in each of the four
categories.
Judges for the parade will be
Dean of Women Mama Brady, for former
mer former alumni loyalty fund chairman
Robert C. Beaty, and News Bu Bureau
reau Bureau Director Allen Skaggs Jr.
The units in competition will be
judged on the basis of ingenuity,
originality and crowd response.
LaGrone said the grading will de deemphasize
emphasize deemphasize costly spectaculars.
Float Judging
LaGrone announced details of

The Alumnae Reunion is de de
de signed to create more interest in
2 HC activities, said Nelson.
In the past each college has put
on individual reunions, he says,
E but by giving them a central
5 place to meet more alums are
expected to return, he added.
The reunion will begin at 8:80'
i a.m. Nov. 12 with registration in
i the Plaza of the Americas. Each
college will have a booth for regis regisi
i regisi tration purposes with the name
and symbol of the college. Coffee
and donuts will be served.
The program will begin at 9:30
a.m. After an introduction and
welcome by President J. Wayne
1 Reitz, Sen. Smathers will give
his brief Keynote speech.
Alumni Association President
Jimmy Kynes will present the
I scholarship.
Faculty and students are invit invited
ed invited to the Plaza of the Americas
to welcome the alums.

Debaters Pledge
Univ. Support
In State Capital
(Continued From Page ONE)
Peck stated repeatedly that
Mr. Schenck and I were forced
into this campaign by ruthless
action of the part of the elected
oficials. Therefore we have not
had time to study all the legisla legislative
tive legislative issues completely.
During the rebuttal. Rep. Tur Turlington
lington Turlington observed, Mr. Peck
seems to have chosen to run
against Mr. Fagan, as most of
his questions have been direct directed
ed directed to him.
Turlington called attention to
his record in the State Legisla Legislature,
ture, Legislature, his record of achievement
for the University, and stated,
I think a man in my position
with my experience is better suit suited
ed suited to represent the community
and the entire county than some someone
one someone who is wholly starting out
new.
The debate, sponsored by the
League of Women Voters and the
Gainesville Junior of Commerce,
was well attended.
Radio Stations WRUF and
WGGG broadcast most of the de debate.
bate. debate.
Ike's Brother
To Visit' Campus
Dr. Milton S. Eisenhower, presi president
dent president of Johns Hopkins University
and brother of President Dwight
Eisenhower, was recently named
to keynote the 25th anniversary
meeting of the Florida Academy
of Sciences to be held Feb. 16 to 18
at the UF.
Also chosen to speak was Dr.
A. M. Winchester of Stetson Uni University
versity University at Deland.
Scientific papers on biology, so social
cial social science, and medicine will be
presented in a general assembly to
delegates during their campus
stay.
The first meeting of the Acad Academy
emy Academy was held on the UF campus
23 years ago. .Since then, conven convention
tion convention meeting places have rotated
among state universities. The or organization,
ganization, organization, composed primarily of
medical doctors and science pro professors,
fessors, professors, Jias a membership of 450.
CLASSIFIED
WILL SELL CHEAP: 100', i cash cashmere
mere cashmere coat. Size 12-Call FR 6- I
1110.
FOR SALE: Baby bed with mat mattress.
tress. mattress. Good condition and Mo Moped
ped Moped fair condition. Reasonable
prices. Call FR 2-0931.
FOR SALE: Lloyd 800 1938. 12,-
000 miles. German economy
car. Price $445.00. Would like
to take good motor scooter in
partial payment. Call FR 2-
1117 after 5:30.
FOR SALE: 3O Model A Ford.
Excellent running condition.
S2OO. Call 2-0809.
$5 REWARD for lost car keys in
red leather case. Case lost on
old track. Call FR 2-5561.
RENTAL EQUIPMENT: Tools.!
Ben:. Party Equ p. UNITED
RENT M>LS. 625 NW Bth Ave.
FR 6*2835.

the five points the judges will
grade floats on:
1. MOVEMENT The impres impression
sion impression of movement and action ac accomplished
complished accomplished by mechanization,
people on or near the float, or by
banners, streamers, etc. on the
float.
2. ORIGINALITYNoveIty, ori originality
ginality originality and ingenuity of theme,
presentation, construction tech techniques
niques techniques or other facets of the float.
3. AUDIENCE REACTION l lnterest
nterest lnterest and amusement shown by
the audience.
4. PRESENTATION The ef effectiveness
fectiveness effectiveness with which the floats
theme is carried out; its success
in transmitting its message to
the viewer; and the polish shown
in the construction and presenta presentation
tion presentation of the float.
5. APPROPRIATENESS The
timeliness, relation to the spirit of
Homecoming, and appeal to alum alumni
ni alumni and students of the float and its
slogan.
FLORIDA BLUE KEY
APPLICATIONS OPEN
The deadline for submission of
applications for membership in
Florida Blue Key is 5:00 p.m.,
November 4.
To be eligible, an applicant
must have partcipated in at
least three extra-curricular ac activities,
tivities, activities, distinguishing himself in
one. Participation at colleges
other than UF will be recogniz recognized.
ed. recognized.
Applications are available at
the information desk in the Flor Florida
ida Florida Union.

Blue Key Speakers Bureau
Announces Fall Program

By GARY PEACOCK
Gator Editorial Assistant
The Florida Blue Key Speakers
Bureau Wednesday announced its
slate of speakers for the fall pro program.
gram. program.
The 36 selected to speak will
attend weekly orientation meet meetings
ings meetings until the program goes in
effect Nov. 17. At these meet meetings
ings meetings members will discuss vital
problems facing the UF with key
University personnel such as
President J. Wayne Reitz, Head
Coach and Athletic Director Ray
Graves, Director of Alumni Af Affairs
fairs Affairs Dr. Leland Hiatt, Assistant
to the UF President Dr. Fayette
W. Parvin, and other members
of the administrative staff of the
UF.
Procurement and Information
Director Don Beverly At our
first meeting Wednesday the en enthusiasm
thusiasm enthusiasm displayed by the speak speakers
ers speakers Indicated that our revised
system of selection met with suc success.
cess. success.
We all feel that with this par particular
ticular particular group of qualified speak speakers
ers speakers when coupled with the orien orientation
tation orientation program will accomplish
the goals which we set up for the
Bureau, Beverly added.
Those selected for the Bureau
are Don Anchors, Neal Brooks,
Sibley Burgoyne, Frank Clark
The POPULAR
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SG, Blue Key
To Give
Group Scoop
Student government and Florida
Blue Key are jointly presenting
an explanatory meeting on mem membership
bership membership requirements fbr Florida
Blue Key for presidents of campus
organizations.
The primary purpose of Flor Florida
ida Florida Blue Key is to serve the Uni University
versity University and we feel that many in individuals
dividuals individuals may not be familiar with
the requirements for membership
said Norm Lipoff, President of
Florida Blue Key.
Acquaint Students
Lipoff explained, This meeting
was called for students who are
interested in extra curricular ac activities
tivities activities to familiarize them with
Florida Blue Key, the campus
honorary leadership organization.
They will be told at the meet meeting
ing meeting what Florida Blue Key is and
what it seeks to promote. Through
this orientation we hope the end
result will be increased interest in
extra-curriculars to the ultimate
benefit of the University, Lipoff
concluded.
Invites Prexys
Bob Park, Student Body presi president,
dent, president, has sent a letter of invitation
to the meeting to presidents of
campus organizations.
Many students underestimate
the competition for membership in
Florida Blue Key, and many oth others,
ers, others, with the leadership ability are
never tapped because they fail to
develop experience in the breadth
of activities necessary for mem membership,
bership, membership, stated Park in the invi invitational
tational invitational letter.
Membership in Florida Blue
Key is certainly secondary to ser service
vice service to our university, continued
Park, but a strong chapter helps
coordinate and stabilize student
leadership.

Jr., Judy Craig; John Devault,
Anne Dezell, Jacquie Earley, Bill
Frederick, Donald Gammon, Ger Gerry,
ry, Gerry, Gordon, Edward Hedstrom,
Beverly Hooten, Paul Huck, Cathy
Johnson, J. R. Kirkland, Mike
Koontz, and Frederick Lane.
Others include Judie Laurent,
Bill Nelson, Eugene Nelson, Dan
OConnell, Shelia Patrick, Robert
Perry, Charles Pillans, Carol
Richards, Ann Rothenberg, Ron
Sarajian, Jan Smith, and Glen
Starnes.
Others are Charles Stuzein
Betty Tutten, Charley Wells, Hu Hubert
bert Hubert Williams, Nancy Sue Wilson,
and Sheldon Yavltz.

WANT TO SELL
SOMETHING??
, '* j I I f
THEN USE ALLIGATOR OASSIFIED
FOR THE QUICKEST, SUREST SALE.
ONLY 75* FOR THE FIRST 20 WORDS AND 3* FOR I
EACH ADDITIONAL WORD.
Phone Your Classified Ad in to
Alligator Business Office any Weekday from 1 p.m to 5 p.m.
FR 6-3261, Ext. 655,
. / I. I -i* 1

IS THAT SPECIAL
SOMEONE FAR AWAY??
Then send that someone the Florida Alligator so he won't be lost
when you talk about the University.
A Subscription costs only pennies a day. ($3.00 for the school
year). For information call the above number (about 6 inches above).

SG Conducting Evaluation Study
Os Existing UC Honors Program

By NATALIE RAGONE
Gator Staff Writer
A survey in which former honor
students will evaluate the honors
program in the University College
is being conducted by the student
government department of aca academic
demic academic affairs.
In questionnaires, students will
be asked whether or not they think
honor students should be responsi responsible
ble responsible for the regular work given in
the average sections, if they
should be required to take the ob objective
jective objective tests, if they believe it is a
program prone to guantity rather
than quality and other similar
questions.
Prompted By Reports
The survey was prompted, ac according
cording according to Gary Brooks, secretary
of Academic Affairs, because of
hearsay reports indicating that
honor students were complaining
of the additional burden put on
them, and the unfairness of being
required to take tha objective
tests.
Besides the survey, the depart department
ment department last week sent out letters to
21 different colleges to see the way
they handle superior students.
Benefits Listed
An immediate response from the
State University of lowa reported
that the tangible benefits honor
students enjoy are special facili facilities
ties facilities in the libraries, honors read-
False Name
No Game
Law Says
College students throughout the
United States desirous of obtaining
culture" without paying for| it
may be committing a federal of offense.
fense. offense.
According to official reports, a
number of cases exist where stu students
dents students use fictitious names when en enrolling
rolling enrolling in book or record clubs.
When the merchandise arrives,
they conveniently forget to remit
payment, thinking the fictitious in information
formation information will protect them.
Postal authorities warn that such
practices are a violation of federal
law, and that persons using ficti fictitious
tious fictitious names or addresses through
the mails shall be fined not more
than SI,OOO or imprisoned not more
than five years, or both.
The same holds true for the
more honorably inclined who find
to their surprise that the introduc introductory
tory introductory free gift is theirs only if
they agree to purchase a specified
number of books or records over a
stated period of time.

ing rooms, special faculty spon sponsors,
sors, sponsors, individual projects, and spe special
cial special sections of various courses. In
addition more credit is given for
these courses.
The findings of the department
will be presented to the dean of
academic affairs, Robert B. Mautz,
and President J. Wayne Reitz in
the hopes of re-evaluating the pres present
ent present system at the UP and form forming
ing forming an Honors program which will
13 Granted
Finance Awards
Thirteen students were awarded
scholarships for their outstanding
work in finance and insurance in
the College of Business Adminis Administration.
tration. Administration.
John C. Jennings, president of
Citizens Bank in Gainesville, pre presented
sented presented the awards, up to S3OO each,
on behalf of the Florida Bankers
Association.
Receiving scholarships were:
Gordon Blitch. Eugene Stephens,
Stuart Baker, Don Cornwell, Julian
Fant, Donald Myer fi EJliotte,
F rank M. King. Leon Joseph
LaChanct, Hugh Langford, Joann
MoAvena, Eugene Rossidivito,
Marshall G. Slaughter, and Ed Edward
ward Edward Woodbery.

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One of the most modern Gyms
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Wo of for special student yosr membership.

be oeparate from University Col College,
lege, College, Brooks said.
Only Fringes Quality
The present system Brooks said,
spends too much time on textbooks
keyed to the average student and
gives superior students only e
fringe of better quality work. In
addition tests are also geared to
the average student. Brooks said
that a program which would de deemphasizc
emphasizc deemphasizc details and would em emphasize
phasize emphasize concepts and ideas should
be formed. He added that since
honor students are required to fol follow
low follow regular texts plus outside
work, the present program increas increases
es increases quantity not quality.
According to Brooks superior
students are not encouraged in any
way to come to the UF. Every Everyone
one Everyone complains about academic
apathy and how there is no intel intellectual
lectual intellectual spirit on campus, but they
ignore the fact that there are no
University programs especially de designed
signed designed for superior students separ separate
ate separate from average work.
HC Deadline Today
Deadline for entering the
Homecoming house decorations
competition Is today at 5 p.m. All
organisations wishing to enter
should submit an application to
room IS of the Florida Union be before
fore before 5 p.m. today.



SOCIALLY SPEAKING

Greeks Get 'Great Pumpkin

By SUZY STETSON
Gator Society Editor
Social activities this weekend
will center mainly around pump pumpkins,
kins, pumpkins, ghouls, and goblins. Follow Following
ing Following the Auftnxm game will be big
Halloween parties with The Big
Pumpkin being the dominant
theme.
SAEs will pick up dates in a
hearse. At their house they will at attempt
tempt attempt to find their dates by look looking
ing looking under sheets on the floor. The
gruesome activities will include a
federal procession and punch ser served
ved served in a casket. Dancing will be
to the ewigin R Dells on Satur Saturday
day Saturday night, and the dress will be
semi-formal.
The Tljis and their dates head
for a little ranch and barbecue
party tonight, via hayride, at Ar Archer.
cher. Archer. Saturdays football game
and a dinner at the house will pre prelude
lude prelude a Halloween type costume

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party accentuated by 1 Little
Johnny Ace and his band.
Lambda Chis are planning a
great pumpkin party and the
great pumpkin will be there.
The Sig Eps are planning a hi hifi
fi hifi party tonight and will attend the
game and return to the house for,
dinner. Saturday night will rock rockout
out rockout with a Haunted House party,
with music supplied by the Grave
Digger and his Five Ghouls.
The Phi Ep house will be the
scene of a Ghost and Pizza Par Party
ty Party on Saturday night. Featured
will be Phi Eps newest pledge, L
Hanan, better known as Mr.
Lee. A stereo set will provide the
dance music.
A party will be held between the
Pi Lams and the Phi Delts. The
party Friday will be at the Phi
Delt house in the Halloween man manner
ner manner to the sounds of Mansy Har Harris.
ris. Harris. Saturday at the game the two
groups will sit together in the

same bloc. After dinner at the
Pi Lam house the men and their
dates will step to the jazz of Fat
Daddy Hill.
Music from the electric guitar of
the Rockers filled the Theta Chi
house last weekend. The men
behind the red doors also played
host to the D Phi Es at a social
Wednesday. A Halloween party, in
planned Friday night, and the
Rhythm Rockers will return to the
scene tomorrow night.
The AEPis will swing this week weekend
end weekend with a rocking band Bim
Bam Booze. After the football
game the Apes will entertain
their dates at a buffet dinner, and
later swing at the Fun and Joy
party.
The Sigma Nus are featuring
Terry and the Pirates both
nights- A candlelight Halloween
party with Terry as plain ghost
is set for both nights.
Phi Mu will hold coffee hours on
Tuesday nights, from 9:15 to 10:30.
Phi Mu pledge class officers are:
president, Patty Welach; secre secretary,
tary, secretary, Ross MacDonald; treasurer,
Pat Delany; social chairman, San Sandy
dy Sandy Kilgore. New Phi Mu initiates
are Duane McNair, Merilyn Mac-
Donald, and Ellen Pfieffer.
The ADPi and AEPhi sororities
are giving a tea Oct. 30, from 2 to
4 p.m. in honor of their new
housemothers, Mrs. Virginia Skin Skinner
ner Skinner and Mrs. Thomas. The ADPis
are proud to claim the 1960-61 Sig Sigma
ma Sigma Chi Sweetheart, Ginny Sell Sellner.
ner. Sellner.
Seven newly initiated sisters of
Alpha Delta Pi were honored
at a country club banquet.
The Sigma Kappas enjoyed an
exchange dinner with the Sig Eps
Wednesday night, followed by a so social
cial social hour at the fraternity hoilse.
The Chi Omega had an exchange
dinner with AEPi fraternity Mon Monday
day Monday night. Cora Randall and Jean
Hardin pledged Chi Omega last
week. New chapter initiates are
Ann Groehe, Flo Alfred, Jane Heil Heilbron,
bron, Heilbron, and Mary Williams. Scottie
McCormick is Chi Os entry in the
Orange Bowl Queen contest.
The DGs had a swinging time
last Saturday as they celebrated
their annual Raunchy Randy Par Party.
ty. Party. Dates were picked up in a
hay wagon drawn by two horses.
The house Was decorated in a
ranch theme, and everyone had

IN THE DARK

Screens Subscribe to Mnanmm,
Spiced With French in ess, Tartars

By BOBBIE IJ.KISIHMA>
Gator Staff Writer
A rather heady concoction, con consisting
sisting consisting of such varied ingredients
as Tarzan, Marilyn Monroe, Jules
Verne, and Francoiee Sagan, will
be fed to movie-goers this week.
Lets Make Love is now be being
ing being shown at the Florida. Its
a widely ballyhooe*d piece of
diversion starring Marilyn Mon Monroe
roe Monroe and Yves Montand.
MM plays a showgirl who falls
for an entertainer; only, hes
really a multi-billionaire in dis disguise.
guise. disguise. By the time the young
lady decides whether or not to
let the guys dollars count
against him the cast has sung,
danced, snuggled, and had a
jolly time in general.
Tarzan On Screen
Beginning Sunday, the Florida
will show Tarzan the Magnif Magnificent,
icent, Magnificent, starring Gordon Scott,
Jock (Yancy) Mahoney, and Bet Betta
ta Betta St. John.
These once primitive Tarzan
pictures are becoming more and
more involved. In this one Our
Hero is trying to bring a killer
to justice despite the actions of
some rather violent objectors'.
Admire Apes
Viewers are given an oppor opportunity
tunity opportunity to admire Scotts tree treeswinging
swinging treeswinging ability, along with views
of physical violence, racial prej prejudice,
udice, prejudice, and young love in bloom.
The State is featuring a twin
bill this week.
Goings-On Questionable
Bonjour Tristesse is the
work of Frances worldly-wise
teen-ager, Francoise Sagan. It
tells of the vacation escapades
of a young girl, her father, and
their guests, and is filled with ail
sorts of questionable goings-on.
The stars are Deborah Kerr,
i David Niven, and Jean Seberg.
Jules Vems Michael Strogoff,
starring Curt Jurgens, is a semi-


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on pretty ranchy clothes. A Hal Halloween
loween Halloween Coffee Hour will be held on
Monday night from 9:30 to 10:30.
Everyone is invited.
New pledge officers for the ZTAs
are Ginny Marconi, President;
Shirley Queen, Vice President;
Kate Reilly, Secretary; and Paul Pauline
ine Pauline Covert, treasurer. Mrs. Mercer
J. Henry, ZTA province president
visited the UF chapter last week.
During her stay, Mrs. Henry took
part in the observance of Found Founders
ers Founders Day and other chapter activi activities.
ties. activities.
KD diamonds are now being
worn by newly initiated mem members
bers members Gail Spencer, Martha Taylor,
Maria Trespo, Sandra Hibbs, and
Carolyn Tamplin.
The Tri Delts were proud to
initiate seven neophytes, Anna
Clift, Joan Dodge, Sibley Burgo Burgogyne,
gyne, Burgogyne, Ivette Gonzales, Sue Martin,
Jane Perceful, and Frances Tor*
raca.
D Phi Es are proud of three new
pledges. Friday night they are
having a suppressed desire cos costume
tume costume party.
I Campus l
I Calendarl
* Y
CONTINUOUS EVENTS
Sign up in room 315 of the Flor Florida
ida Florida Union for the Russian Supper,
sponsored by the International
Suppers Committee of the Florida
Union Board for Student Activities,
to be held on November 6.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28: Some
Recent Developments in Pertur Perturbatin
batin Perturbatin Theory will be the topic of
the speech by Jan E. Linderberg
at the Physics Colloquim In Walker
Auditorium at 2:40 p.m.
The Three Faces of Eve is the
Cinema Favorite showing in the
Florida Union Auditorium at 7 and
9 p.m.
The Thing is the movie show showing
ing showing in the South Hall recreation
room.
Show Boat is the movie show showing
ing showing in the Florida Union Auditor Auditorium
ium Auditorium at 7 and 9 p.m.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 29: The
Thing is the movie showing isl
the South Hall recreation room.

historical tale dealing with the
Tartar invasion of Russia.
She-Demons
Those fond of she-demons, riv rivers
ers rivers of flame, bloody tortures,
grand dukes, and czars, should
not miss this one.
Beginning Sunday at the State
will be 39 Steps. It is a spy
thriller, and is chock full of sin sinister
ister sinister lugs, frightening footsteps,
and the like.
Kenneth More and Taina Elg
star.
Beginning Tuesday, 400 Blows
will be shown. Its a study of the
misfortunes of an unloved child
who finds thrills, then terror in
a world beyond his understanding.
The child is played by 13-year 13-yearold
old 13-yearold Jean-Pierre Leaud, who was
discovered in a home for delin delinquent
quent delinquent boys.
JULES VERNE
ADVENTURE!
fjtS&l'*
SAT. LATE SHOW
fciiiiirnieinavtiir
[Sunday & Monday
"THE 39 STEPS"

CENTER NEWS

Varied
Activities
Planned
By SUE ALLEN CAUTHEN
Gator Staff Writer
Parties planned for tonight and
tomorrow night at student religi religious
ous religious centers will include dancing
and decorations which capitalize
on the Halloween theme.
featured activity this weekend
will be the political debate held
at the Wesley Foundation Sunday
evening.
BAPTIST STUDENT UNION:
Friday, October 28th: Halloween
party tonight for students at
7:30 p.m. Morning Watch is held
Wednesdays at 7:00 a.m., and Ves Vespers
pers Vespers is Tuesday and Thursday at
5:30 p.m. in the chapel. Another
important social function, this one
for married students, is scheduled
a week away, November 4, at 6:00
p.m. when a pot luck supper will
be served.
CATHOLIC STUDENT CEN CENTER:
TER: CENTER: A Hallowing Dance will be begin
gin begin Saturday night at 8:30 p.m.
Assisting with the fun will be Lit Little
tle Little Jake and The Blenders. Cos Costumes
tumes Costumes are optional. Prizes will be
awarded for the best ones. Infor Informal
mal Informal dress will be acceptable also.
.The Newman Club meets Sun Sunday
day Sunday at 7:30 p.m. to plan an initia initiation
tion initiation program. Monday evening,
Father Henry J. Miron will deliver
a speech entitled What About
Evolution? He is visiting from
the Florida State student center.
HILLEL FOUNDATION: Fri Friday,
day, Friday, October 28: Religious ser services
vices services will be held at 7;So p.m. To Topic
pic Topic for the evening is Legends in
The Bible, the second in a series
of lectures. Sunday, October 30:
Brunch, 11 a.m. 12:15 p.m. A
forum series will be conducted at
12:30 p.m. The topic is Ethics in
Our Business World. The talk and
discussion will be led by Dr. Fe Felix
lix Felix Muehlner, College of Business
Administration. The Council will
meet at 7 p.m.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CEN;
TER: Weekend activities will high highlight
light highlight the Halloween Party Friday
at 8 p.m. for Lutheran students.
Refreshments, games, and dancing
will he on schedule. Guests are
Invited to come in costume. A Sun Sunday
day Sunday night supper will be served at
5:30 p.m. Dr. Glenn Hoffman will
speak on The Political and Econo Economic
mic Economic Background of Lutherans.
Everyone is invited to attend.
PRESBYTERIAN STU DENT
CENTER: Planned for tonight at
the Center is a Halloween Party
plus trimmings, those being re refreshments
freshments refreshments and dancing. On Sun Sunday,
day, Sunday, a six oclock evening service
will present Dr. Hervey Ross,
medical missionary to Mexico who
is currently studying at the Uni University
versity University Medical Center. Dinner
will be served at 5 p.m. and the
worship service begins at 6:45 p.m.
WESLEY FOUNDATION: A Hal Halloween
loween Halloween Party at 8 p.m. featuring
Dr. Ernest Bartley of the Political
Science Department as square
dance caller is open to students
who may come in costume if they
wish. Supper will be served Sun Sunday
day Sunday at 6 p.m. for fifty cents per
person.
BEATAUBURN!
Florida
THEATRE
Lost 2 Days!
iflMHiifDS
JEwruurs sMr jp
ffMCKtra
giggly
- FRANKIfc VAJ3HAN
Starts SUNDAY!
COLOR
jfc i mm nag
Beat Auburn!
t

'Mrs.' Contestants Show Skills

By ELEANOR kEAGER
Gator Staff Writer
Its so nice to have a woman
around the house, were the cries
echoed by husbands in the audi audience
ence audience of the 1960 Mrs. University o:
Florida contest.
Homemaking skills of each of
the contestants were judged
Wednesday night in the University
Auditorium from cooking to
making Christmas decorations.
Sponsored by the Engineering
Dames, the contest will be judged
in three phases. The first phase is
poise and personality, which was
judged last Saturday. EacH contes contestant
tant contestant spent a certain amount of
time talking with the judges to
determine their score for this i
event.
The winner of the homemaking
skill was chosen during the judg judging,
ing, judging, but will not be announced un until
til until Friday night when tie final 1
phase of the contest is presented.
The itlnal phase consists of per personal
sonal personal appearance, the contestants
being judged in bathing suits and j
cocktail dresses. It will be held
Friday night at 8 p.m. in the Uni-1
versity Auditorium.
A possible maximum of 35 pointsj
may be received in each of the
three events by a contestant. The
winner will receive a large silver j
tray In addition to many gifts and
gift certificates donated by Gaines-
ville merchants.
I I
The 27 contestants in the contest I
are the Mrs. Lois Bailey, Joanne;
Caldwell, Anne Dykes, Suzette Ep-
WaZSZSTt
WtVHH THUTM H
FRIDAY, OCT. 28
sl-A-CAR-LOAD
NIGHT
THE SEARCHERS
JOHN WAYNE
THE NUN S STORY
AUDREY HEPBURN
SATURDAY, OCT. 29
THE BLACK
DAKOTA'S
GARY MERRILL
NORTH BY
NORTHWEST
CARY GRANT
THE FIRST TIME
ROBERT CUMMINGS
STARTING SUNDAY
THROUGH THURSDAY
OCT. 30 NOV. 3
PSYCHO
JANET LEIGH
Two Showings Nightly!
You must see it from
the beginning.
Show* ot 7:30 10 P.M.

Attention Skin Divers!!
UR3 Regulator . Regular $37.50 Special $27.95
UCR-1 Regulator Regular $65.00 Special $48.40
UCR-2 Regulator ReguFar $75.00 Special $55.85
PNR Tank . . Regular $50.00 Special $37.25
NR Tank . Regular $60.00 Special $44.65
SNR Tank . Regular $65.00 Special $48.50
CR Tank . . Regular SBO.OO Special $59.55 I
SCR Tank . Regular $85.00 Special $63.25
COMPLETE STOCK OF ACCESSORIES
Four new Voit Delux Back-pack Regular $19.95
The first four complete units sold may have one for $5.00!
ADDITIONAL SAVINGS OF $14.95!!
EXAMPLE
UCR 2 Regulator Regular $75.00 Special $55.85
SCR Tank ... Regular $85.00 Special $63.25
VBP delux back-pack Regular $19.95 Special $ 5.00
Total $179.95 Total $124.10
SAVINGS OF $55.85
WE FILL TANKS
JIMMIE HUGHES
SPORTING GOODS
" ; I c

Tho Florida Alligator, Friday, Oct. 28, 1960

I H ii
SANDRA SINGER ..
... Mrs. UF Contestant
stein, Carol Gatchell, Harriet
Haines, Edith Herwlg, Kay Hoff Hoffman,
man, Hoffman, Geraldine Houck, Mary Ina
Jones, Pat Jones, Phylis Levitt,
Kay Mahaffey, Judy McCann,
Clara McCroan, Regina Meares,
Sandra Menendez, Jacqualine Or Orlando,
lando, Orlando, Marilyn Parker, Taz Pierce
Evelyn Sapp. Rita Schnupp, San Sandra
dra Sandra Singer, Huguette Stefien, Bon Bonnie
nie Bonnie Tharpe, Lynn Weeks and Nan Nancy
cy Nancy Yaggy.
One of the unusual homemaking

REOPENING UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28
TIC TOC
STEAK HOUSE
You're only minutes away from hours of play
... DANCE Iks
EVERY FRIDAY & ('/|v ;
SATURDAY fff\
NIGHT UP :
IN THE Ml :
PENDULUM LOUNGE
("It's The Swingin'est)
TO THE FABULOUS FIVE.
THE CARR-TUNES
SET-UPS AVAILABLE
Call FR 6-9125 after 4 p.m. for reservations.
The dining room will be open in early November.
Located on Northwest 13th Street
where "The Dungeon" used to be.

| skills consisted of Mrs. Sandra Sin*
Iger who cooks outdoors in flower
I pots. She says its an inexpensive
way to grill food outdoors over
I coals. Her flower pot menu con consists
sists consists of shish ka bob, skewered
vegetables, donut holes, broiled ba-
Inanas. and peaches.
I Mrs. Phyllis Levitt said the way
to keep a home happy is to have a
balanced budget. She emphasised
this with drawings of income /id
expenses itemized. It was pointed
out oddly enough that income a. d
expenses matched.
A cherry pie was entered in t i
contest by Mrs. Taz Pierce, wuo
?placed second in the IC' 1
Cherry Pie Contest in Chicago.
Mrs. Jacqueline c n
make and design a wool dress, jac jacket
ket jacket and overskirt for $16.26.
Other skills consisted of home homemade
made homemade pictures and trinkets, home homemade
made homemade clothes for all members of
the family, cooking any of the
husbands favorite foods, and un unusual
usual unusual interior decoration.
Chairman of the contest is Mrs.
! William L*. Dillon, and co-chair*
I I man is Mrs. Carl Fielland.
Judges are Dr. Ruth Abrecht,
: W. Ellis Jones, Rogert Laoie, Mrs.
Josephine McSwlne, Mrs. J. Hil Hillis
lis Hillis Miller, Mary Ann Savage, and
Capt. William Taylor.

Page 3



THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

Page 4

.
Member Aiiociittd Collogioto pmi
The FLORIDA UUGUOI 1. the -IhU "***' * * ."**?.* U .-****
, Tender ud FrUej moraine eieep* derin* helMen al l SJ^Jie. 1 !H M £f. l Lo G iJ 0 5 uAu to
el matter at the United States Pest Office at OaiaesTilU, Florida. Offices are ieeated in Seems
the FlerMa Union Building Basement. Telephone Unirersit J of FlerMa F MBli *** > regnest either editioria.
. office or kusiness office.
Editor-in-Chief J'" Moorheod
' Managing Editor '*
Assistant Editor Cilley
Business Msnsger R n J B *
EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS
Kirk Callahan, Nancy Mykel, Gary Peacock. Pet TunstalL
STAFF WRITERS
Office Manager Eleanor Yeager ~ .. .
_ eij,. AnHr*a Arthur Marv Anne Awtrcy. waiter Bercer, Gloria Brown, Caro! Buller, Sue Allen Cautnen,
Cleve Cleveland, Tony Comitos, Bill Curry. Suzanne Diamond, Priscilla Estes, Lou Ferris, Bobbie Fleischman, Louise Foster,
Sharon Foster Steve Gaddum, Harvey Goldsteir.. Robert Greene, Sarah Greenbuif, Charlene Helton, Nancy Hooter, Linda
Hurd Tdsh Johnson David Dick Laughinghouae, Jared Lebow, Roger Lewis, Benton Marder. Natalie Ragone,
Sa Rfmwy 5 Richie, Jim Rosenfield, Ronald Saltzman. Karen Shachat. Le.U. Sokolaky. Ben Seigle. Linda Tatum.
Roy Walker, Jonathan Williama, Sam Zorn.
SPORTS STAFF
Bill Buchalter, sport* editor; Mike Cora, intramurals editor; Fran Warren. *Porte features; Robert Green. Fay*
Haver, Jack Horan, Gary Howard, Jared Lebow, Marty Schram. George Solomon, Ed Witten.
BUSINESS STAFF
Carl Griffith, Assistant Business Manager j
Ail *i*ifnit Rtinh McMillian* Mickey Short* Rob Wtlktr; Circulation Manager* Ray Wataoni Classified Ads ssd
ntfir* wiatttr Julie McClure; Layeut Manager, Beanie Ueedstelu; Natienal Advertising Manager. Rennie Rothatein; Office
CMrdlnato? f Tom J Claybonrnei Office Staff. Dottle MaeDoaaM, DeEtte MePherea, Jaae Miller, Barbara Nessler, Jaa WatUas*
Subscription- Managers, Chria Lelbfried, Fred Marguls.

Speaking of second class citizens,
its good to know a few individuals
have recognized the second-class
treatment afforded oiir foreign stu students
dents students by the majority of the student
body and decided to do something
about it. :
Its long been one unpleasant side of
the UF that local student-foreign stu student
dent student relations have been at best indif indifferent,
ferent, indifferent, at least on the majority side.
* *
THIS HOME-FRONT'snohbishness,
or whatever it is, has not only fed on
itself from one four-year college gen generation
eration generation to the next for too many years
its even manifested itself in the ri ridiculous
diculous ridiculous and widespread assertion
that foreign students ar a single,
homogeneous group who, left to them themselves,
selves, themselves, will get along Just firte. .
Or maybe thats the reason for the
indifference in the first place.
At any rate, its a puzzle where
college-level people could ever get the
idea that a couple hundred kids from
umpteen different countries, all
thrown together in one place, are sup supposed
posed supposed to comprise one big, happy,
congenial and self-sufficient family.
*
WHAT DO THEY have in common
. . rejection?
Two organizations Mortar Board
and Florida Blue Key have taken
note of our un-democracy at work and
set some wheels in motion to try and
assimilate foreign students into the
student body and destroy the status
they now 7 hold in the eyes of many
that of an unnecessary appendage*

IRE FROM EIRE

So, Who Wants A Frog, Awreddy?

By KIRK CALLAHAN
Lionel Lemon and Yuma
Yuck were lovers.
(Contrary to biological find findings
ings findings toads and frogs are a pas passionate
sionate passionate breed.)
On clear October evenings, the
two would sit on the bank of
their favorite
pond and Lion-
1 lei
Yuma would
bring her. La Later,
ter, Later, Lionel CALLAHAN
would thrust
out his long tongue and amongst
other things, would catch a fat
fly to share with his lover.
* *
BUT ONE DAY a crisis arose
in their romance.
Yuma suddenly discovered
that she was different from
Lionel. Lionel was a bullfrog
and Yuma was just a tree toad.
Neither had considered the
consequence otf these differ differences
ences differences for Lionel had assumed
that Yuma would eventually
adjust to the environment of
the pond and Yuma just
thought Lionel would someday
take to dry land.
But things didnt work out
that way.
Lionel would not learn to hop
around on dry land and Yuma
THEM

/be tocjcAt, Harriet/ jve proved so what if my candidate resorts s
raj WfiON6 on EVERY Point VWVF I*> MW-SUN6IU6 and NAME-CALLING? f \AWY? J 1 / GEE... I never THOO6HY OFN
MADE.' WVE YW CANDIDATE DOES IT Too/ / xr \ BECAUSE.] \IT THAT WAY BEFORE r

You're Missing Out

would not learn to take to wa water.
ter. water.
00
ONE NIGHT, as the pair sat
at the edge of Lionels pond,
a young horned toad came hop hopping
ping hopping by. Being a young horned
toad, Yuma instantly caught
his eye.
After spying the newcomer,
Yumas warts stood on end and
she went wild with desire.
"Such horns!
Lionel was busy finishing up
the rest of a box of chocolate
covered laxatives and didn't no notice
tice notice the horny intruder. When
he turned around, Yuma was
gone warts and all.
o
THE MIGHTY BULLFROG
let forth with a croak that was
heard clear across the pond.
He had to find Yuma.
"Such warts!
However, before Lionel could
begin his search for Yuma, a
wild band of hollaring col collegiants
legiants collegiants stormed the pond car carrying
rying carrying another human over their
shoulders.
This human ritual, parallel paralleling
ing paralleling the rain dance of three threewinged
winged threewinged dragon flies, put great
fear into the creatures of the
pond who scattered and hid.
It wasnt until the following
morning that Lionel could be begin
gin begin his search for his promiscu promiscuous
ous promiscuous lover, but eventually he
found her.

PERCHED AGAINST a giant
oak, Yuma and her toady boy
friend were exchanging mes messages

CALLAHAN

Editorials

But commendable as the Mortar
Board and FBK programs are, the
foreign students are sure to recognize
them as limited organizational ex expressions
pressions expressions of friendliness, and Hhey
certainly wont delude themselves into
thinking theres any great change in
the overall climate of indifference
among their fellow students.
* *
WE FEEL SURE the root of the
problem mainly lies in that old nega negative
tive negative quirk of human nature that what
is unfamiliar is to be avoided. Indif Indifference,
ference, Indifference, overt or hidden, is the result.
Then theres the general but super superficial
ficial superficial observation that many of the
foreign students are clannish any anyway
way anyway and dont seem the least bit an anxious
xious anxious to reciprocate in any exchange
of acquaintances. Wei, in the absence
of smiles from the homelanders, who
anfe they supposed to pal around with
... Albert?
* *
WE HOPE the two organizational
movements just started will spur a
popular epidemic on the campus, a
contagious realization of the rewards
that await the student who doffs the
mantle of indifference toward- his fel fellow
low fellow collegians from other lands.
A lot of fun and interest in getting
to know new and different people is
simply laying away unstirred on this
campus, sealed up in the dulled no notions
tions notions of thousands of minds.
A lot of fun and a lot of interest
not to mention, the enriching experi experiences
ences experiences contained therein.

Friday, October 28, 1960

sages messages of love that only the
slimy, spring footed creature*
of the swamps would under understand.
stand. understand.
Lionel went wild with rage,
thrust out his enormous tongue
and grabbed the young horned
toad that had tried to seduce
his loved one.
Lionel banged the unfortunate
creature against the oak until
all that was left was a pile of
warts.
Now Yuma was no foolish
toad. She appeared to witness
the occurrence with an air of
indifference. She knew now that
there were plenty of other male
toads in the neighborhood.

LATER THAT NIGHT, Yuma
joined the triumphant Lionel by
the side of the pond, but instead
of munching on the fresh pack package
age package of lim burger cheese Lionel
had brought, she suggested that
they "spring around the pond.
On the other side of the pond
Yuma stopped and Lionel
hopped up next to her. Lionel
was so engrossed in his love
for Yuma that he didnt hear
the sound of humans who had
come to gig frogs as Yuma
had guessed.
Suddenly Yuma leaped to a
cypress knee growing nearby
and then it happened. A gig
pierced Lionels proud heart and
he was onhis way to the din dinner
ner dinner table.
But Yuma wasnt sad. Who
wants to marry a frog when
there are plenty of your own
kind in the Forest?

INTERNATIONAL CORNER
Says With Fidel, Colleges,
Are 'Captive Universities'

(EDITOR'S NOTE: Pro Professor
fessor Professor Portell-Vila is pres presently
ently presently associated with the
UF Deportment of History.
He is head of the depart department
ment department of history at the Uni University
versity University of Havana.)
By HERMINIO PORTELL-VILA
Visiting Research Professor
People talk about captive na nations,
tions, nations, that is to say, the nations
taken over by Soviet imperial imperialism,
ism, imperialism, but not much is said about
captive universities, as we must
call the universities seized by
communist gangs, as it has just
happened in Cuba under the re regime
gime regime of Fidel Castro.
* *
ALL THE dictators of Cuba, as
well as the corrupted rulers who
did not become dictators, have
had the opposition of the Univer University
sity University of Havana. During Spanish
colonial times, up to 1898, the
University of Havana was a cen center
ter center of political unrest, and in 1871
the Spaniards had eight young
students, freshmen, belonging to
the School of Medicine, sen sentenced
tenced sentenced to die before a firing
squad after a mock trial.
The mass execution took place
on Nov. 27, 1871, and this sad
event is year after year remem remembered
bered remembered by Cuban students.
* *
IN MORE recent years other
students killed by Cuban dicta dictators
tors dictators had their names added to
the list of the martyrs, the last
one just 10 days ago, when the
Communist regime of Fidel Cas Castro
tro Castro held a mock trial, very much
like the one conducted by the
Spaniards in 1871, against Porfi Porfirio
rio Porfirio Ramirez, the president of the
students of the Central Universi University
ty University at Santa Clara, and in less
than two hours had him sen sentenced
tenced sentenced to death and executed by
a firing squad. His "crime was
denouncing the Communist dicta dictatorship
torship dictatorship established in Cuba by
Fidel Castro.
Notwithstanding stories print printed
ed printed in this country by American
newspapermen, the fact is that
,Fidel Castro was never a leader
among Cuban students, when he
attended the University of Ha Havana,
vana, Havana, from 1945 up to 1949, until
he became a lawyer with a very
poor academic record.
*OO
I AM IN a position to know, as
I had Fidel Castro in one of my
courses in 1947 and he was at the
bottom of the class. He wanted
very much to be a leader, but he
never succeeded in winning an
election.
He never made the varsity
teams in any sport. It is true,
however, that he was all the
time demoninated by a driving
political ambition; he wanted to
have power and his failures em embittered
bittered embittered him very much against
the University, the students and
the professors.
Being a dangerous paranoic,
he looked outside the University
for the realization of his ambi ambitious
tious ambitious dreams and for some time
he was a small-time politician
trying to become a congressman
and even a "trigger-man in lo local
cal local gang wars.
* o o
IN 152, the former Cuban dic dictator,
tator, dictator, Fulge nc i o Batista,
seized power in Cuba and with
the Cuban people opposing the
new dictatorship, Fidel Castro
joined the opposition and fought
against Batista. He was the chief
of just one of the factions op opposing
posing opposing the dictator, but he be betrayed
trayed betrayed the other four a few
weeks after the downfall of Ba Batista
tista Batista and then set up the Com mu-

nist dictatorship ruling Cuba
with an iron and bloody hand
and according to the orders re received
ceived received from Moscow.
Fidel Castro knew very well
that he was going to have the
opposition from the University of
Havana and his initial plan to
forestall this was to try to move
the University to a place called
Bocas de Jaruco, some 30 miles
away from Havana and with dif difficult
ficult difficult communications, so that
students protest could not be ef effectively
fectively effectively heard in Havana.
The plan failed because the
students did not like it and be because
cause because the reckless destruction of
Cuban resources made by Castro
did not leave him with money to
build the new university.
* *
THE NEW PLAN, agreed up upon
on upon by the Castro brothers and
their boss, Ernesto Guevara, the
Argentinean physician represent representing
ing representing Moscow in Cuba, called for
the formation of a university mi militia,
litia, militia, made up by the professor#
and students, who thus were go going
ing going to be subjected to stern mili military
tary military discipline along communis communistic
tic communistic lines and including not only
the drills, but also the indoctrin indoctrination
ation indoctrination so that the teaching would
conform to the pattern of com communistic
munistic communistic regimentation.
There were numerous protests
all over the university. The stu students
dents students magazine, Trinchera
(Trench), came out openly
challenging the plan of the Com Communists,
munists, Communists, and its editors were at attacked
tacked attacked and beaten by Communist
goons taken into the Universi University,
ty, University, they were accused of being
counter revolutionaries de deserving
serving deserving capital punishment,
many Os them were thrown into
jail and even their parents and
other relatives were persecuted
and considered as hostages for
the submission of the students in
the opposition.
*
BY THEN, last June, it wa
quite obvious that Fidel Castro
and his gang were considered to
be enemies of Cuban liberties
and out of 20,000 students en enrolled
rolled enrolled at the University of Ha Havana,
vana, Havana, only 300 joined the hated
militia set up by Castro.
The same thing was happening
among the professors, al although
though although there were some who
tried to save their academic skin
by praising and flattering the
dictator, as it happened in June
with a certain professor of an ancient
cient ancient history having the extraor extraordinary
dinary extraordinary idea of presenting in class
a parallel between the cam campaigns
paigns campaigns of Alexander the Great
and the campaigns of Fidel Cas Castro!
tro! Castro!
*
IN JULY the goons serving
Fidel Castro, one of them a ma major
jor major in the Army, acting as head
of the students body, armed to
the teeth and surrounded by
bodyguards, took over the Uni University
versity University of Havana and started to
purge it from counter-revolu counter-revolutionaries
tionaries counter-revolutionaries OR PEOPLE OPPOS OPPOSING
ING OPPOSING THE COMMUNISTS.
Professors, some 416 of them,
were fired even if they had a, life
tenure; students by the thou thousands
sands thousands were expelled and the
purge even reached the adminis administrative
trative administrative personnel when they also
refused to sign an oath of alle allegiance
giance allegiance to Castro.
A few weejcs later the same
thing happened at the Central
University of Oriente. The pri private
vate private universities are closely
watched and about to close.
In Cuba, under the Communis Communistic
tic Communistic regime of Fidel Castro there
are only captive universities for
totalitarian indoctrination.

etters * th* Editor

Doting Is A
Problem
EDITOR:
Concerning the letter which
appeared in the Alligator Oct. 21,
I have a few brief observations
to make on the subject.
First, this issue is more ser serious
ious serious and pressing than most
students realize. The dating sit situation
uation situation here at the University is
really in a sad state.
The real problem rests with
students who have no fraternities
or sororities to fall back on.
These organizations provide so social
cial social activities at which one
could meet members of the op opposite
posite opposite sex, but many students
are not even interested in these
organizations.
WHY must a fellow be in a
fraternity to meet prospective
dates?
* *
THERE ARE PLENTY of
guys who have good personali personalities
ties personalities and are just as much fun
as the fraternity men, yet they
must sit back and watch while
the frats do all the dating.
The author of the previous let letter
ter letter said the classroom is the
only place students really have
a chance to meet future dates.
I feel this offers little opportuni opportunity.
ty. opportunity.
This leads to the question of
fix-up dating. This type of
practice is very common and
very inadequate. Often the stu student
dent student has a blind date that he
Would have to be blind to date.
Students need some kind of or organization,
ganization, organization, independent of fra fraternities
ternities fraternities or sororities, to provide
a dating atmosphere. Perhaps
the dorms should sponsor parties
and activities to bring this pro problem
blem problem under control.
The student body must first
realize this problem is impor important,
tant, important, and is a problem not to be
taken lightly.
CHUCK ROGERS
AFROTC
V. Castro
EDITOR:
An enterprising group of
AFROTC fresh men keenly
aware of the world situation was
overheard fervently discussing
the Cuban crisis.
After it was agreed that Sena Senator
tor Senator Kennedy was wholly in favor
of shipping the Marines into Cas Castros
tros Castros hacienda heaven should he
be elected king, the question
arose as to whether or not this
would be wise, in view of the
fact that the Monroe Doctrine
expired in 1959.
* *
BEFORE THESE Air Science
I lads insisted that the current
events conversation be discarded
so that they might proceed with
chapter four of ORGANIZATION
FOR NATIONAL SECURITY,
the solution was reached that the
U. S. A. should fire missies on
Havana and blame the deed on
war-mongering Portugal.
Thus the U.S.S.R. could not
i label us aggressors and a fin final
al final utopia would come upon our
spinning little planet.
LYLE KIELLY
Honor Code
Shocks Midd
EDITOR:
When I transfered here from
the Naval Academy at Annapo Annapolis,
lis, Annapolis, I told myself that Florida is
such a big school that its honor
system will be very different. I
noted the violent argu m e n t #
about junking the honor sys system
tem system with dissatisfaction but
said nothing. I even lost five
points on a quiz for not writing
out the pledge, which I had ne never
ver never heard of, but again I said
nothing.
However, this latest column of
Frohocks is just too much. He
asserts that an honor system is
impracticable and unworkable
and that moral ideals are the
dream of starry-eyed young wo women.
men. women. I dont know how much of
the world he has seen, but I
think if hed get out of his fra fraternity
ternity fraternity house now and then, he
might change a few of his con concepts.
cepts. concepts.

THE BRIGADE of Midshipmen
are not a bunch of starry-eyed
women but they have an all allinclusive
inclusive allinclusive system that develops a
real sense of personal honor in
each individual.
One doesnt quickly write out
a pledge whenever he want# to
be trusted; he is trusted because
if he wasnt a man of honor he
wouldnt be where he is. A mid midshipman
shipman midshipman departing from the lib library
rary library (through any one of sever several
al several exits) is not searched as if he
were a potential thief.
I believe that the only way an
honor system can be made to
work at Florida i# not to de decrease
crease decrease its effectivity, but to in increase
crease increase its power and scope to
other areas besides cheating and
stealing.
e e
THIB INCLUDES of course the
actuation when an individual
knows of someone cheating but
fails to report him, thereby com comraiting
raiting comraiting the same offense himself.
I admit that a system of this
kind requires some wholesome
dismissals at certain times, such
as the one a few yean ago when

West Point lost most of its foot football
ball football team, including the coachs
son.
In the long run though, a de degree
gree degree from the University of Flor Florida
ida Florida would mean more than just
academic achievement.
FRANK FREEMON
Answers JFK
On Quemoy
EDITOR:
In view of the give-them-up
attitude of the Students for Ken Kennedy
nedy Kennedy column, I feel it is very
necessary to correct or point
out additional facts about Que Quemoy
moy Quemoy and Matsu.
First, to hold these islands we
only have to stay there, not at attack
tack attack as would have been neces necessary
sary necessary to Tibet, Hungary, or even
Cuba.

SECOND WHAT ABOUT ques question
tion question of national prestige? We
would lose a k>t of face by just
walking off and leaving some
free territory to the Commun Communists.
ists. Communists.
Third, what if they are only 6
miles from China? Is Kennedy
planning to walk out of Berlin
which is 110 miles behind the
Communist border?
And finally, why commit our ourselves
selves ourselves one way or the other?
Eisenhower has never said he
would defend the islands, but
since he has not said he would
not, the Communists have been
afraid to attack.
DON ESRY

T ransfer Ask
About Search
*
EDITOR:
Last week I, being a transfer
student, had my first occasion to
use the facilities offered by the
campus library. As I left the
building I was stopped, my brief
case was opened and inspected
in quest of stray library books.
As I hadnt accidently mis misplaced
placed misplaced any of the library vol volumes
umes volumes in my case or on my per person,
son, person, I was allowed to leave the
premises unmolested.
I look upon this search as be being
ing being a gross insult to the honor
system and more important to
the honesty and integrity of the
Florida student.
* *
ACTION SUCH as this raises
the question, Is the honor sys system
tem system good only for free apples af after
ter after all? The answer indicated
by such action seems to be,
Yes, free apples are the ulti ultimate
mate ultimate goal of the Florida system
of student honor.
After considering the problem
for a time, I find that there are
perhaps two feasible courses of
action that the university might
take regarding the library situa situation.
tion. situation.
Either put the much proclaim proclaimed
ed proclaimed honor system to work here, or
make the inspection legal and
provide search warrants for the
librarians.
DICK DAVIDSON
Saving Cents
In College
EDITOR:
Today the higher cost of educa education
tion education is of great concern to every everyone.
one. everyone. Every year college enroll enrollments
ments enrollments increase by thousands.
New classrooms, new dormi dormitories,
tories, dormitories, and new cafeterias must
be built. More teachers must be
hired.
Since we must have new facil facilities
ities facilities to take care of the students
we should look to the teachers as
a source of economy. A well-in well-informed
formed well-informed friend of mine tells me
that teachers are already dis disgruntled
gruntled disgruntled with their salaries; that
they even now hold Tneetings at
which they air, their grievances;
and, when they are able to af afford
ford afford it, give toasts to the day
when they will make as much
money as a bricklayer, or sven
a master plumber.
*
FOR THESE AND other rea reasons
sons reasons I do not believe that teach teachers
ers teachers would be cheerfully agree agreeable
able agreeable to a cut in their pay; at
least not to the extent that would
substantially aid our goal to re reduce
duce reduce the rising cost of higher ed education,
ucation, education, say 50 per cent.
So in order not to subject the
students to instruction given by
dissatisfied and hostile teachers,
we must eliminate these teach teachers
ers teachers entirely from the university
scene.
A few administrators should be
kept to handle records, letters,
diplomas, and the like; also a
dean or two would be useful to
bail the students out of jail if
they get into trouble.

Saving money by discharging
all college teachers could pre-

KIRKS GROCERY
ALL
Your Favorite Cold
Beverages Including
Milk and Soft Drinks.

sent some problems. Nona of
which however could not be re resolved.
solved. resolved. The students could be
in charge of conducting their
own classes. They would elect a
new leader every month and
gain experience in the effective effectiveness
ness effectiveness of the democratic process,
a valuable lesson.
The subjects to be taught could
be assigned by the administra administrators
tors administrators who by virtue of their expe experience
rience experience would be well versed in
the re lat iv e importance of
things.
The students could give their
own classroom tests which mere merely
ly merely would be teaching vehicles;
after four years the administra administrators
tors administrators could give one comprehen comprehensive
sive comprehensive examination, (multi (multiple
ple (multiple choice in order to facilitate
grading) and those who pasted
would receive diplomas.
*
THE DISCHARGED teachers
could go to work in the factories
at some repetitive task that aft after
er after a few years practice they
could learn to do automatically.
They could then let their m}nds
wander and contemplate the as.
fairs of the universe, while at the
same time, at last be performing
some useful function.
Knowing that there are people
who are not very economically
minded, I fear that there may be
aome who feel that the rising
cost of education is an inevitable
result of educating more people;
that well paid teachers are a
necessary and desirable aspect
of this process; and that this cost
is more than adequately offset
by the benefits received such as
advanced technology and all its
fruits of a higher standard of liv living
ing living and a better informed public.
*
TO THESE NAIVE people, I
say you are fighting a losing bat battle.
tle. battle.
The politicians will continue,
under the guise of economy, to
fail to supply adequate funds for
education; and the people will
never realize that they are reap reaping
ing reaping the harvest of past expendi expenditures
tures expenditures on education and thus owe
a debt to future generations to
continue this process.
WALTER M. BAKER 111
Does Nixon
See T rouble?
EDITOR:
If we dont examine our weak weaknesses,
nesses, weaknesses, we will never correct
them, and our enemy will be tru truly
ly truly aided. (Wall Street Journal)
I think it is imperative that our
readers have as much informa information
tion information and knowledge about the
coming national elections as they
can possibly absorb before Nov.
8.
Certainly we all have prejudi prejudices,
ces, prejudices, but the basic ideas behind
these prejudices must be explor explored
ed explored more thoroughly.
*
I ASK the question: Does Mr.
Nixon have a clear set of nation national
al national objectives and policies? If he
has this vision, it seems to be
well clouded by the indecision of!
the present administrations fu future
ture future planning.
Can we meet the Soviet chal challenge
lenge challenge of a dual war, economical economically
ly economically as well as militarily, with the
attitude that all is well while,
at the same time Mr. Khru Khrushchev
shchev Khrushchev has moved in 90 miles
from our shore line?
I say no! And furthermore,
how can we if we elect a pre president
sident president who has stated that the U.
S. is in top condition and we
should be proud of It. I think
Mr. Nixon has underrated ocr
competitor (USBR) in many
ways.
*
DOES RUSSIA squeeze budgets
when quality education is at
stake? I think not especially
since statistics prove that the
Soviets produce twice as many
engineers and technician# than
American universities.
If uncommitted federal funds
are necessary to keep our
schools up to par with Russia's,
what is wrong with placing
education above fear? There are
many gifted young men and
women who never get into col college.
lege. college. Would this happen does
this happen in Russia?
Internal strength and exter external
nal external security the battle for
mens minds cannot be pre preserved
served preserved through calm reassurance
and pleasant sleep.

FELLOW STUDENTS, we
need to consider the many chal challenges
lenges challenges the whole world expects
the United States to answer
whether we will lead or be led
We need to consider which of ofthe
the ofthe two men (Kennedy ,or Nix*
on) is most ready to Seriously
meet these challenges.
Which has displayed creative
planning, initiative un throttled
by outdated concepts; whieE
man thinks in terms of what is
needed and not what has been
done?
I say Senator John F. Kennedy,
What do you say?
ALLEN POOLE



Tlm Florida Alligator, Friday, Oct. 28, 1960

UF Frosh Meet Auburn Tigertubs

,' The UF freshmen travel
Plains Monday for a 2 p.m
bum Tigercubs.
It will be the second game of the
season for both clubs,, the Orange
and Blue yearlings losing 15-14 to
Miami in their opener last week,
and the Hgercubs clawing Geor Georgias
gias Georgias frosh 26-6 in their opener.
' Coach Dave Fullers charges
were dealt a severe blow when
star tackle Dalton Bray broke
a blood vessel and may miss the
game.
.... . Outstanding Frosh
Bray and ends Russ Brown and
George Reinhart and tackle John
Dent were outstanding for the
frosh against the Baby Canes.
Fuller plans no changes in t h e
starting lineup for the Auburn en encounter,
counter, encounter, provided all the boys re remain
main remain healthy.
Reinhart and Brown will open
at ends with Dent and Bray, if
hes able to play, at tackle. Fred
Pearson will replace Bray if the
238-pounder cannot go.
Pkrke Jones and little Jack
Thompson, the speedy 185-pounder,
arc the guards while either Jim
Kemhardt or Bob Thompson will
open at center.
> Gets QB Nod
Ren Russell gets the nod at quar quarterback
terback quarterback but Pat Willingham, wh o
scored the first Baby Gator touch touchdown
down touchdown of the season, will alternate
with him.
Haygood Clark, the outstand outstanding
ing outstanding UF performer against Miami,
wjjl start at left half and Tampas


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I; REGULARLY 18.98 TO 39.98
I- amhp'ERSARY sale 16.99
I Jscis* & downs
2nd Fher

1 to the loveliest city of the
. football date with the Au-
Ruas Mercer gets the nod at right righthalf.
half. righthalf.
Clark averaged over 40-yards
per punt, gained 81-yards rush rushing,
ing, rushing, and completed two passes
for over 70 yards in a stirring
all-round performance.
Jim ODonnell, & fleet 188-pound
fullback will start here. Hie for former
mer former Clearwater all-stater Is la labeled
beled labeled as a real comer.
Pete Smith will spell ODonnell.
Auburn Strong
Auburn, under the guidance of
Erskine Russell, will field one of
the strongest freshmen clubs in the
southeast. And two Florida high
school products will be in the start starting
ing starting backfield.
Jacksonvilles Jimmy Sea Seaward,
ward, Seaward, a 180-pounder, will be the
starting quarterback and Pensa Pensacolas
colas Pensacolas all-southern fullback Larry
Rawson, a bruising 205-pounder
uill be at fullback.
And the Tigercubs also have
Georgias outstanding high school
halfback from last year in Glen
(rambling) Rose.
The passing of Seaward and for former
mer former Avondale, Ga., star Frank
James will be a stem test for the
UF frosh pass defense.
Curtis Jenson' Bob Johnson, Jim
Elliott, Bill Sollee, and Tommy
Jones will spark the pass defense.
Seaward and James will do the
throwing to 6-4 Howard Simpson,
a 205-pounder from Marietta, Ga.

Page 5

Prognosticators Agree;
Look for Gator Victory
PROGNOS-T-GATOR RESULTS
W L T Pet.
Buchalter 45 16 3 .738
Solomon 40 21 3 .656

By PITJ. BUCHALTER
Gator Prognosticator
Love those last weeks results.
Eleven wins thanks to all you fine
people out there like Dick Jacobs
and Sue, Bill Shaw and Ellen, Jay
an Daryl, Ivan and Nancy, Eddy
and Nadine, Randy S., and Kay,
Mont and Suey.
This week is another big one and
we start with the Gators:
Florida over Auburn . The
gators to ambush the Plainsmen
in a close one, say 17-10. This ones
tor Sam and the dirty thirty. I
hope Florida equals this point out output.
put. output.
Kentucky over FSU . The
Cats are starting to claw and
should eat some Indian meat this
weekend. This is for Paul O. and
his ADPi harem.
Miami over Boston College .
The Hurricanes to shoot down the
Eagles like Harry was shot by the
winchester bookchester.
Alabama over Miss. State . .This
one is for the true southern belle
and their lovers, right Jerry R.,
the Zeta heartthrob.
Baylor over TCU ... Bears
really throw the Bull at oppon opponents
ents opponents ike certain boys at Broward.
Clemson over Vandy . The
Tigers to topple the sea-sick Com Commodores.
modores. Commodores. Dedicate this to fellow
Tigers Jackie, Joy and Karen and
Ed and Steve.
Duke over Ga. Tech . My
weekly upset . For Jake and
Kalish and all the sorority girls on
campus.
Purdue over Illinois. .The Boil Boilermakers,
ermakers, Boilermakers, like the Pisser, a two twotimer
timer twotimer (loser) who is now going
straight .
lowa over Kansas . Im
chicken to pick an upset here but
Id like to. The Hawkeyes are
tough like Linda H., Linda F. and
Jacquie.
Miss, over LSU . Gibbs to
guide the Johnny Rebs in a close
one.
Missouri over Nebraska .. The
Tigers send their backs West
behind a comhusker killing La
Rose.
Michigan State over Ohio State
. Upset no. 2 from East Lans Lansing.
ing. Lansing. The Spartans ,are men of
might like Mike C. A special dedi dedication
cation dedication here to the Zetas, may they
drink to their good health.
Navy over Notre Dame . My
three stooges won this for me last
week but Bellino and Matalavage
shoud be the difference this week.
Syracuse over Pittsburgh .
The Orange men shoud come back
strong Saturday (like Charlie *J.
Spuds who also deals in oranges)
to help retain their no. 2 national
rankling.
Now the predictions are finished,
here are some more dedications.
To Kaye A. and her 66-yard run,
to Eleanor and her bumper strip,
to Skip and Kit, to Mike and Di Diane,
ane, Diane, to Julie and the Betas, to
Dick Hebert and Jack Kennedy, to
the entire fightin*. Gator football
team, to H. G. Davis, who wont
read this (thank god) and to Gary
Peacock who will. To the DGs,
the AEPhis, the DPhiEs, the
AOPis etc. To Anita, Marilyn and
Toby, to Robbie and Vienna and to
Pete Z. and another type Vienna.

Engineers and scientists who will
achieve Bachelor of Science or higher
degrees by January or June of 1961
are invited to ON CAMPUS INTERVIEWS
with an engineering representative
of the DOUGLAS AIRCRAFT COMPANY on
Thurs., Friday, Nov. 17 & 18
Americas most exciting space and defense proj projects,
ects, projects, including SATURN, SKYBOLT and
MISSILEERand others of like importance importancehave
have importancehave created outstanding long range opportuni opportunities
ties opportunities at Douglas in the following fields:
Electrical Welding
Electronics Engineering Mechanics
Mechanical Physics
Chemical Mathematics
Aeronautical Astronomy
Metallurgical Astro-Physics
Openings exist at Douglas locations in Santa
Monica and El Segundo, California and Char Charlotte,
lotte, Charlotte, North Carolina.
If you are a U.S. citizen who will earn a
qualifying degree, please contact your place placement
ment placement office for an appointment. If unable to do
>o, write to Mr. C. C. LaVene,
lOUGLAS AIRCRAFT COMPANY, INC.
JOOO Ocean Park Blvd., Santa Monica, California

SELECTOR'S CHOICE

By GEORGE SOLOMON
Guest Football Expert
Florida has had a great season
thus far and had to put on a tre tremendous
mendous tremendous effort to beat LSU last
week. Auburn is here this week weekend
end weekend and the Tigers aTe plenty rug rugged.
ged. rugged. The Gators havent got an ex experienced
perienced experienced left halfback now that
Infante is hurt. Things could get
rough this week, but the home field
advantage will help.
The predictions:
Florida over Auburn . Gators
will keep on their winning ways
and get by the Tigers by 14-7 .
Keep your eye on Deal as hes due
to have his day.
Kentucky over Florida State .
. Seminoles will be beaten in this
game, 13-7.
Miami over Boston College .
Miami cant afford to lose this
game.
Alabama over Mississippi State
. . Crimson Tide may have trou trouble
ble trouble in .this game, but should take
| the measure of the Maroons, 20-7.
Baylor over TCU . The Bears
are loaded this year, but TCU has
looked good at times. Baylor will
be lucky to stay unbeaten.
Clemson over Vanderbilt .. .This
isVandys off year, and Clemson
should top the Commodores by
13-0.
Georgia Tech over Duke .
Yellow Jackets will have it tough
this weekend, but Gann, William Williamson
son Williamson and Granning are too fast for
Duke.
Purdue over Illinois . Purdue
will bounce back this week and de defeat
feat defeat Illinois in a close big Ten con contest,
test, contest, 14-10.
lowa over Kansas . lowa is
moving towards a national title
and has too much depth and pow power
er power for Kansas to handle.
Mississippi over LSU . Tigers
cant get to winning this year, but
they make things rough on the op opposition.
position. opposition. My pick would be dif different
ferent different if the game wasnt being
played in Mississippi.
Missouri over Nebraska .
Missouri has i a well balanced team
and should poweiv past Nebraska,
20-7. *-> ;
Ohio State over Michigan State
. . Ohio State has shown they can
move the b&lP&gainst anyone. .
Michigan State isnt bad this
year, but not in the same class
with Ohio State.
Navy over Notre Dame .
What happened to the luck of the
Irish?
Syracuse over Pittsburgh. .
Syracuse will win by more than
many people think. Ill say 21-7.

>*V: :
NICK ARFARAS...
. . Alternate Captain
Tickets Available
There are some 2,700 reserved
seats available for the Gator-
Auburn football game Saturday
at Florida Field.
These seats, for the most part,
are of the end-xone variety, says
Percy Beard, UF Assistant Ath Athletic
letic Athletic Director.
Tickets may be purchased in
the Department of Inter-Col Inter-Collegiate
legiate Inter-Collegiate Athletics office, located
at the South end of the stad stadium
ium stadium building.
Libertore Hailed;
Bowl Eyes UF
A chain of events was triggered
by UFs 13-10 upset victory over
Louisiana State.
Durable quarterback Larry Li Libertore,
bertore, Libertore, besides being named state
back of the week, made honor honorable
able honorable mention for the AP nation nationwide
wide nationwide back of the week.
Both mentor Ray Graves and
the Gator team were chosen
SEC coach and team of the week
respectively.
The Gator Bowl committee took
note of the Gators comeback win
and placed them on the list of pos possible
sible possible candidates for. a bid to the
post-season bowl.
Among the other schools eyed
were Syracuse, Missouri, Ten Tennessee,
nessee, Tennessee, Arkansas, and Missis,
sippi.
A change in the December clas classics
sics classics rules have been made for
future games. The teams will play
under professional football regula regulations,
tions, regulations, including free substitution
and goal posts on the goal line.
This year the nationally televis televised
ed televised bowl will be held on Decem December
ber December 28 in Jacksonville.

LUCKY ST RTK E PRE'S'E'ISmST:
DQR.DR! FrQOD:
dr. proods thought por thb day: Early to bed and
early to rise is an excellent way to avoid people.
Dear Or. FroeD; Oentyou agree thaterery college
If -Li nr man has the light, in fact, the duty, to stand up and
JIU // V I speak out for the things he beljaves in? Tomorrow
, *** I lam going straight to the college president and
Dear Dr. Frood: What should I look for first when I te *l Ppte*y W firmly, what Is wrong hare harelook
look harelook for a wife? the inferior teaching, the second-rate accommoda*
searching I do this. What do you think? n f
DEAR SEARCHING: Her husband. J /. Determined
| dear DETERMINED: I appiaud your spirit young
man j Had I been able, I would have commended
Dear Dr. Frood: Our son has been in college three || you in a more personal letter. However, you forgot
months, and we haven't heard a word from him. | to leave a forwarding address.
Not even a post card. I dont want him to think I am §
too demanding or overprotective, but frankly I am
worried. What should I do? ;|j f| >|
Worried Mother 1 p 1
DEAR WORRIED: Why worry after only three months p
in college? He's still learning how to write. ~
1 Dear Dr. Frood: lam puzzled by the Lucky Strike
(fv£ | slogan: "Remember how great cigarettes used to
I taste? Luckies still do. Ive been sitting here for
r^jjHwbl\Vv I hours, thinking, thinking, thinking, but for the life
I |i of me I cant remember. What should Ido about
_ .. 4 I DEAR FORGETFUL: I SUg- \
Dear Dr. Frood: I am six foot five, 225 pounds, i t t
handsome, tanned, muscled, a good athlete. But I | and lirfrtupa Lucky'Strike!
cant g ? along with girls because I can never think { m ,Zw it wiHall come ttmxF&kh
of anything to say. What do you suggest? back to you^w ho you are,
Brawny what you were, where you / .V
DEAR BRAWNY: "Me Tavzan, you Jane. | lived, everything. 01
mmrnmmmmmm mm m mmmmmmrnmmd Jjfef 'jffmmy.J
FROOD FAD SWEEPS COLLEGES! They laughed when Dr. Frood started the new 4j
college craze of enjoying a Lucky while hanging from a coat rack. But now every* / *y
body is doing it! Smoking Luckies, that is. Today college students smoke more * * Ml
Luckies than any other regular. Reason: With or without coat rack, Luckies deliver \
the greatest taste in smoking today.
CHANGE TO LUCKIES and get some taste for a change!
§Ur.m -f T jCatmn r r UAl

Flag-Football Begins;
Sigs Picked To Repeat

By MIKE GORA
Gator Mural Editor
Orange and Blue league flag flagfootball
football flagfootball play begins next Monday
with last seasons champions, Sig Sigma
ma Sigma Chi, getting the nod as pre preseason
season preseason favorites.
The Sigs main problem is replac replacing
ing replacing Vennie Pent, last seasons all-
Gators Bag
Three Awards;
Graves Honored
The UF football team baggei
three awards this week as a result
oS their 13-10 triumph over Louisi Louisiana
ana Louisiana State.
Bull Gator Ray Graves was cho chosen
sen chosen Southeastern Conference coach
of the week. Graves, who has guid guided
ed guided the Gators to five wins, was
appreciative of the award, but
termed the win a team effort.
The upstart Gators, for their
team efforts, were selected the
SEC team of the week. Florida
now is.tied with Mississippi tor
the league lead. Both post unblem unblemished
ished unblemished three win records.
Lil Lightin Larry Libertore,
who tore through the LSU defense
for a 66-yard touchdown run on the
first play from scrimmage, vras
honored by the state sportswriters.
The scribes picked Libertore as
state back of the week.
The deft little quarterback, on only
ly only a sophomore, accumulated 105
yards rushing, and completed one
cut of two passes. Libertore surg surged
ed surged ahead of fulback Don Good Goodman
man Goodman to lead the team in total
yards gained.
Alumni to Tour Campus
Automobile tours of the campus
Will be given to Alumni during
Homecoming by Alpha Zeta, hon honorary
orary honorary agriculture fraternity, ac according
cording according to President Ken Hender Henderson.
son. Henderson.
Alumni will be picked up at
the student (information) booth
and will be taken on planned, 20-
minute tours on Friday afternoon
and Saturday morning, Henderson
said.
y m
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campus tailback and a mainstay
in the Sig offense.
Sophomore Bob Barnett and
freshman Drake Batceleder will di divide
vide divide the chore of filling Pents
shoes and keeping the Orange
League lead for the speedy Sigs.
FlUlng The Gap ~,
Last years runner-up. Sigma
Nu, is concentrating on filling the
gap both on offense and defense
left by the graduation of all-cam all-campus
pus all-campus footballer Jim Cooney. The
Snakes are improving steadily and
hope to be ready for Mondays
opener.
The TEP offense will he slow slowed
ed slowed due to an injury to end Andy
Kronstadt in a practice game.
However, Ken Levit, TEP flag flagfootball
football flagfootball manager, believes that the
passing of Howie Rosen and the
fine hands of Ed Robbins and Paul
Cone will keep the TEP men in
contention.
Chira At Helm
With freshman Lee Chira at the
helm, AEPis football team has
high hopes of improving on their
poor showing of last year.

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We Carry A Complete Line of
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We have the largest repair department
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Welcome Class of '64
a r t it \ r |

Manager Steve Schwarts is con concentrating
centrating concentrating on defense, believing in
the old adage, a good defense is
the best offense.
A well balanced Phi Delta The The.
. The. ta squad will take the field Mon Monday
day Monday in hopes of bringing back
the second trophy of the year to
the PDT house, as well as the
lead In the Orange.
One of the teams outstanding
members is Bill Hamilton who
plays both offensive and defensive
halfback.
In the Sorority Circut the
AEPhis and the KDs met Thurs Thursday
day Thursday afternoon in the volleyball
championship game.
The AEPhis are undefeated in
four games while the KDs have
been defeated once in this, a dou double
ble double elimination tourney.
In addition to their regular
Thursday evening meeting, ths
fencing club will hold meetings on
Tuesday evenings in the basement
of the Florida Gym. Instruction is
free of charge and equipment
will be provided.



Page 6

Gambling Gators Test Tough Tigers

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MIGHTY AUBURN MUSCLE .
Fallback Ed Dya* (left) and tackle
Ken Rice supply much of the Auburn
football muscle. Dyas, a hard-running
205-pounder, is the Tiger's leading

- i
PROBABLE STARTING LINEUP
FLORIDAS GATORS AUBURNS TIGERS
NAME wm HT. POS. HT. WT. x NAME
Pat Patchen 2&D 6-6 L £ 6*l 195 Dave Edwards
Ronnie Slack 220 6-2 LT 6-2 250 Bil*y Wilson
Vic Miranda 215 6-0 L G 6-0 205 Jerry Gulledge
BUI Hood 200 6-1 C 6-2 220 Wayne Frazier
I£en Norris 215 6-0 BG 6-1 205 G. W. Clapp
Jim Beaver 216 6-1 R T 6-3 265 Ken Rice
Nick Arfaras 260 6-2 RE 6-3 105 Joe Leichtnam
Larry bertore 166 5-8 Q B 6-0 185 Bryant Harvard
Don Deal IJ6 6-9 LH 5-11 1 175 Jimmy Burson
Bob Hoover l#6 6-1 RH 6-11 180 Bobby Lauder
Jon Maceth 165 5-8 F B 6-0 205 Ed Dyas
M
j

Vital Tilts May Decide Crown Race;
Gator, Rebel Drives Begin To Jell

By JACK HORAN
Gator Sports Writer
This is the weekend which could
determine the outcome of the
Southeastern Conference race.

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*

The Florida Alligator, Friday, Oeti 28, 1960

SEC ROUNDUP

Mississippi and Florida are tied
for the loops top spot with once oncetied
tied oncetied Tennessee nipping hotly at
their heels. Should the Rebels and
the Gators win, they will have a
two game lead over the Vols.
But the two high-flying teams
could find themselves in a sticky
mess come Saturday afternoon.
Ole Miss encounters a live hor hornets
nets hornets nest in four-time loser Louisi Louisiana
ana Louisiana State. Tiger fans would like
nothing more than to spoil their
arch-rivals homecoming festivities
with an upset over the nations No.
2 team.
Back At Florida
Meanwhile, back at Florida
field, Ray Graves and staff are
busy honoring the Gator defense in
hopes of halting a powerful Auburn
onslaught.
The massive Tiger line, coached
in weight and brute strength, is
one of DixieB more feared.
Coaches cringe at the thought of
sending their prime backs against
such behemoths as 250-lb. tackles
Ken Rice and Billy Wilson.
The game may decide whether
the Gators will have a good or
superb year, and whether they
are in contention for a major
- bowl bid.
Georgia, still in the thick of the
S3EC soup, host westerner Tulsa at
Athens. The game should find the
Oilers with their heads in the air
most of the time, vainly searching
for Francis Tarkentons passes.
Wildcat Prey
Over at Tallahassee, FSU is the
prey of a gang -of prowling Wild Wildcats.
cats. Wildcats. Kentucky, a lot stronger than
their won-lost record indicates, is
lean and salty after being batted
around by their first four oppon opponents.
ents. opponents.
Alabama swirls next door to
dash with neighbor Mississippi
State. The Tide has been ebbed
only once, and is hunting for
some easy meat to fatten their
gullets.
Georgia Tech rambles into the

rusher despite missing half the season.
. He is also a talented field goal kicker,
having booted six. Rice is a 265-pound
All-American candidate. He is noted for
causing and recovering fumbles and for
coming up with the big play.

Tar Heel state to spar with Dukes
Blue Devils. The Jackets have had
rough sledding their season, drop dropping
ping dropping two tilts by a total of three
points.
Seeking Vindication
Tulane will be seeking vindica vindication
tion vindication at the hands of William and
Mary for losses incurred from con conference
ference conference foes.
The Greenies are trying desper desperately
ately desperately to avoid a disastrous, year,
having lost their last three games.
Cellar-dwelling Vanderbilt, fresh
from its first taste of victory of the
season, collides with Clemson,
fresh from an upset loss to Duke.

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UF Whiz Kids to Defend
Unblemished SEC Mark
By JARED LEBOW
Gator Sports Writer
Sporting an unblemished Southeastern Conference
record, the UF whiz kids face what may be their tough toughest
est toughest test of the season tomorrow afternoon when they
meet the Auburn Tigers at Florida Field.

The Gators, 3-0 in conference
play and 5-1 overall, are now
regarded as legitimate contenders
for the SEC crown.
This years version of the Plains Plainsmen
men Plainsmen is typical of past Auburn
teams in that it sports one of
the biggest and toughest lines in
the nation.
Bulwarking the Auburn line are
two 250 pound behemoths, Ken
Rice and Billy Wilson, who hold
down the tackles spots.
Sizeable Seven
Other starters in Auburns size sizeable
able sizeable seven are guards Jerry Gul Gulledge
ledge Gulledge and G. W. Clapp, center
Wayne Frazier and ends Joe
Leichtman and Dave Edwards.
In the backfield the Tigers are
blessed with two fine quarter quarterbacks,
backs, quarterbacks, Bobby Hunt and Bryant
Harvard, and a flock of fine run running
ning running backs, including Ed Dyas
and halfbacks, Jimmy Burson,
Jimmy Pettus and Bobby Lander.
Burson has been called by
Ray Graves one of the finest
sophomore backs in the Confer Conference.
ence. Conference.
Auburn possesses a double
threat in fullback Dyas, who in
addition to his ballcarrying abili ability
ty ability has booted six field goals this
season.
Infante Hurt
Lindy Infante became the third
UF halfback to go on the injur-
Jackets' Victors
In Cross Country
Georgia Techs cross country
harriers placed first, second, fifth,
sixth, and seventh in a meet here
last Monday to defeat the Gator
runners 21-37.
Russ Maddox and Jacob Clayton
paced the Yellow Jackets coming
in first and second. The closest
Florida man, Mike Mann finished
third with Bill Niblock of the UF
fourth.
Scoring in cross-country is diffe different
rent different than most other sports. The
first eleven men to cross the finish
line get points with the first man
getting one point, the second two,
the third three, and so on. The
winning team is the team that get
the least points. Maddoxs winning
time for the 4.4 mile distance was
23:56.

ed list when he sustained a chest
injury in the L.S.U. game.
Senior right halfback Don Deal
has been switched to the left side
of the backfield with Bob Hoover
slated to start at right half.
Larry bertore, who has roil roiled
ed roiled up 272 yards rushing to rank
as one of the leaders in the
conference, will again open at
quarterback.
Jon Maceth, who did an ex excellent
cellent excellent job defensively last Sat Saturday,
urday, Saturday, and Don Goodman will al alternate
ternate alternate at the fullback spot.
Line Strengthened
The UF line will be strengthened
by the return of guard Larry
Travis and center Bill Hood who
missed last weeks game due to
injuries.
Tomorrows contest will be the
37th meeting between the two
schools in a series that dates back
to 1913.
In the 36 games played Florida
has won 14, lost 20, with two
games ending in ties.
In last years game the Tigers
took a hard fought 6-0 decision.^
-
jail
v
-w, i' 1
m i§
GENE PAGE ...
. . Defensive Standout

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.V A
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GATOR GRID GIANTS ... End Pat
Patchen (left) and Lil Lightning Liber Libertore
tore Libertore are defensive and offensive giants
of UF footbal faithful. Patchen is one
of the finest defensive ends in the south

FRAN'S FEATURES

HB Page: Scholar, Athlete

By FRAN WARREN
Gator Sports Writer
Gene Page, athlete, scholar and
leader is the Gators defensive left
halfback from Tallahassee.
Page, a senior, stands five feet feeteleven
eleven feeteleven inches tall and weighs 185
pounds. A member oS Sigma Chi
fraternity, Gene lives in the SX
house, rooming with Buddy Hardy
and Bruce Louden.
Still thinking about the L.S.U.
game last week, Gene said it was
the greatest team effort he had
ever seen.
We went up there to win and
knew we could do it.
Sat Out
Page sat out most of the 59
season because of a broken collar
bone received in scrimmage the
week before the first game.
A defensive specialist, Page
overcame this injury to play in
lnfai \ Out for 3 Weeks;
To Play Against Miami
Lindy Infante, star UF half halfback,
back, halfback, will be out of action for
the next three weeks.
Infante has a fractured rib
which nicked his lung allowing
air sepage into the chest. The
lung closed immediately,- how however,
ever, however, and no serious damage
was done.
Infante is expected to be
ready to play against Miami in
the Orange Bowl.

the two final games of the sea season
son season and win his letter.
A standout in the recent L.S.U.
game. Page was commended for
his jarring tackles and a near in interception.
terception. interception.
The game was terrific. Li Libertores
bertores Libertores run really surprised me.
I was just going back to the bench
after the kick-off and turned
around in time to see him take
off.
Fine Running
He did some fine running and
got some good downfield block blocking.
ing. blocking.
Page stated the superstition
about the Gators winning the game
if they won the toss meant little
if nothing to the team.
We play to win, whether we
call the tows riirht or not.

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,
while Libertore, the sparkling 138-
pound QB, is the Gators leading rush rusher.
er. rusher. Patchen received national mention
for his line play against LSU as did Lib Libertore
ertore Libertore for his running against the Ben Bengals.
gals. Bengals.

Gene would say little about
the chances for a post-season
Bowl game.
Im not making any predic predictions.
tions. predictions. but I told Joe Paul Alberti,
an Arkansas fullback, not to send,
me a Christmas card to Tallahas Tallahassee
see Tallahassee because I wouldnt be there."
Pre-Med
Page, a pre med student ma majoring
joring majoring in chemistry, has a 3.7 av average.
erage. average. He is vice president of his
fraternity and president of the 'F r
Club.
His favorites are dove and duck
hunting and Bourbon Street. Frog
legs top the list of his favorite
food.
Tuesday afternoon Gene Page
was nominated for a Rhodes Scho Scholarship
larship Scholarship by a University commit committee.
tee. committee.