Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
serving
4,000 students
at the university
of florida

Number 6

Students Reveal
Gripes in Survey

SG Sponsoring Questionnaire
To Determine Problem Areas
A charge that University Food Service employees
are vepr disagreeable" was one of many complaints re revealed
vealed revealed in a current survey conducted by Student Gov Government
ernment Government to determine problem areas in campus life that
should be brought to the attention of the University
Administration.

The survey was released Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday afternoon and by Wednesday
there were 13 replies returned.
The service in the Food Services
was one area that received a
great deal of criticism.
One student stated that em employes
ployes employes are very disagreeable and
difficult to deal with and that

Student Pres.
Praises Summer
SG Members
Summer Student Body Presi President
dent President Eminent Anderson praised
the members of his administra administration
tion administration as the most active summer
student government he has ever
seen, to his knowledge.
Ai this first summer Student
Government banquet Anderson
thanked all the members of his
administration for the part they
played in making this years sum summer
mer summer SG a success.
Representative 'Woody Lyles of
Hillsborough County was guest
speaker at the affair. He told his
audience of the value he had
gained from his experiences as a
member of Student Government
at the University of Florida.
He said, I feel that a years
service on the Honor Court or Ex Executive
ecutive Executive Council is far more val valuable
uable valuable than any course offered by
the University. He believed that
what he learned here at the Uni University
versity University has helped him achieve
what be felt was best for the
state of Florida.
Lyles stated that he believes
tliat immediate integration is a
mistake and could not be achieved
but that Florida should realize
that it must take positive steps
(Continued on Page THREE)

M i l El I WKfw^ : m
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jpH nB Br <% p
>* - jp *
4 #-,'*fc anailig^^fSfflSiiMSsWlaajMCTigwasSHfe
* ~ 1 jaenm^
Off Campus "Dump"
This picture is one of the many photographs shown at Tuesdays Executive Council Meeting in
rder to gain action against the unAt and unsatisfactory lving conditions that exist in off campus
a r
Mousing.
AT EXEC COUNCIL MEETING
Off-campus Housing Sited
By PAT C ALLAN
Gator Staff Witter
A resolution concerning unsatisfactory student off-c ten pus housing was passed by the Executive
Council at Tuesday nights meeting.

Off Campus Housing commit committee,
tee, committee, submitted the resolution seek seeking
ing seeking action against unsatisfactory
off-campus housing. To gain ac acceptance
ceptance acceptance of this resolution, New Newton
ton Newton presented photographs to the
council ae evidence of the unsa-i
tisfactory off campus housing
that existed. The photographs
brought out the sanitation prob problem
lem problem and fire hazard of some stu student
dent student housing.
Action Sought
The purpose of this resolution,
Newton said, is to get action from
both county and city authorities
to reconsider and revise Sanitary!
and Building Regultions which ap-i
P ly to rentai properties offered to
students.
A* an outcome of this resolu resolunon,
non, resolunon, Newton added, we hope that*
standards will be set up by the!
Off Campus Housing Office to
determine what the requirements
are for satisfactory housing for,
nil campus students. If a dwell*

they practically consider it a fa favor
vor favor to serve you.
The Infirmary was also consid considered
ered considered a problem area. The at attitude
titude attitude of many of the Infirmary
staff seems to be, it is a crime
to get sick was the cryptic com comment
ment comment of one student.
The results of this survey will
be used by various commitees
that are presently trying to im improve
prove improve and strengthen Student
Government and the University
system.
According to President of the
Student Body Joe Ripley, all com complaints
plaints complaints received will x>e forward forwarded
ed forwarded to the individuals responsible
for these specific areaa.
Student Government strongly
urges that all students interested
in seeing necessary improvement
made in campus life pick up one
of its survey forms at the Main
Library or the Campus Club or
fill out the copy below. Attach
any comments and send them to
SG at the Florida Union desk.
( ) A. Student Government
Programs k representation.
( ) B. Housing
( ) C Athletic*
( ) D. Fees
( ) E. Libraries
( ) F. Administration
( ) G. Registration
( ) H. Campus Police
( ) I. Auxiliaries (Bookstore, i
Cafeteria, linen supply, etc.)
( ) J. Telephone Service
( ) K. Infirmary.
( ) L. Policies toward student
employment
( ) M. Plants and Grounds
( ) N. Physical Education Pro Program.
gram. Program.
( ) O. ROTC and AFROTC
( ) P. Faculty Student rela relationships
tionships relationships
( ) Q. Uoiv. College (course,
books, etc.)
( ) R. Honor System
, X.) S. Discipline Policies
O T. Scholarships k Loans.
( ) U. Counseling programs
( ) V. Florida Union facilities
or programs <

log is not listed by the Off-Cam Off-Campus
pus Off-Campus Housing Office as satisfac satisfactory,
tory, satisfactory, then the student will be ad-
Campus B'nai Israel's
Oiteg Shabbat Tonight
Bnai Israel will hqld an Oneg
Shabbat this Friday at S p.m.
The synagogue is on the comer
at SW. 2nd Place and 2nd Ter Terrace.
race. Terrace. Rides will leave from
Florida Union and Yulee Area at
7:40 p.m. Transportation from
other areas may be arranged by
calling Ben Walker at FR 2-9326
or Irv Cohen at FR 2-9177.
Grad Candidates' Moating
All candidates for degrees to
be conferred In August must
attend a meeting to be held
Tuesday in the University Audi I
teriiun at 4 p.m.

SUMMER GATOR

Hi*' dl ,- 111 I
WkSbJm' nUttix
It'll Swe#p You Oft Your Foot
Bo Decker (Fred BurraH from Green Bay, Wis.) Hterally sweeps Cherie (Ruth Sims of Madi Madison
son Madison off her feet in the Forida Players Production of Bus Stop. The play will open Wednesday and
continue through Saturday.,

BY EVALUATION GROUP

Changes Considered
For SC Legislature
By SAM SAXON
Gator Staff Writer
The Student Government Evaluation Committee at its
meeting Wednesday discussed the possibility of using
new methods to strengthen and improve representation
in the legislative branch of student Government.

It was brought out that under
the present aystem of represen representation
tation representation by academic colleges true
representation is not achieved be because
cause because the majority of the students
interests concentrated in areas
other than the colleges.
Two Methods Discussed
Two possible methods of select selecting
ing selecting a legislature were discussed.
Under tho first method the legis legislature
lature legislature would be composed of one
house with representatives from
eight possible areas of community
interest in the student body.
The areas mentioned were:
Fraternity, Sorority, Religious
centers, academic colleges, mens
dormitories, Women* Dormitor Dormitories,
ies, Dormitories, off campus, and married
dormitories.
The system if adopted would

vised that the dwelling is unfit
for housing. If the student so de desires
sires desires to neglect the off-campus
housing service, then it will be
up to the student to work out
conditions with the landlord.
Without further discussion, the
resolution passed.
The Traffic and Safety Commit Committee
tee Committee submitted a resolution to go
into effect restricting the use of
motor scooters, motorcycles and
motorbikes in area one and along
stadium road during clans hours
at 8 a m. to 3 p.m. This restric restriction
tion restriction will go into effect this Fall.
Miller Newton, chairman of the
Before the cloee of the meet meeting,
ing, meeting, a motion was passed to can cancel
cel cancel next weeks Executive Meet Meeting
ing Meeting due to the nearness of final
exams

University of Florida, Gainesville, FloridaFriday, July 24,1959

allow the students to choose for
themselves which area they pre preferred
ferred preferred to be represented in and
pre-register to vote in that area
and only in that area for legisla legislation
tion legislation representation.
The second method discussed
would provide for two separate
houses in the Student Government
legislature. One house would be
based on representation according
to area residence. Method of se selection
lection selection and structure of the sec second
ond second house would closely resemble
the legislative body described un under
der under the first method.
Barring Graduates Discussed
Another inovation discussed was
the possibility of barring grad graduate
uate graduate students from formal student
government participation. One
point mentioned in favor of this
move was that without active
graduate participation the under undergraduates
graduates undergraduates would be given a great greater
er greater chance for more active partici participation
pation participation in student government.
A point raised in favor of con continuing
tinuing continuing graduate participation was
that with Graduate students in
student government higher qaulity
and greater efficiency of operation
is achieved.

Committee Debates
Class Offiter Value
By BARRY BUTLER
Gator Staff Writer
The Constitutional Revision Committee, at its second meeting
Sunday, debated whether Class Officers are a tradition worthy of
being maintained.

It was further pointed out that
to justify Class Officers, there
must be certain problems or
needs of a particular class with
which its officers could cope.
The Commitee suggested that
the potential responsibilities cons considered
idered considered might be broader in scope
and not limited to the class rep represented
resented represented by the officers. How However,
ever, However, it was again pointed out
Ciass Officers who do not repre represent
sent represent their classes should not be
maintained.
Another point discussed was
that having to justify Class Off Officers
icers Officers by assigning broader dut duties
ies duties shows their own weaknesses.
The committee felt it would also
cause a division of executive dut duties
ies duties and responsibilities best locat located
ed located elsewhere.
In considering the common
. i
Russian Woman
Speaks on Home
Ruashui youth oaten into revo revolutionary
lutionary revolutionary movements with enthus enthus|
| enthus| ism, but, with age, this enthus enthus|
| enthus| item Si replaced with discourage discouragement,
ment, discouragement, a University of Florida
audience was told this week.
Mias -Alexandra Mazurova, a
Russian-born philosopher, artist
1 and ballerina, lecturing here, said
that this vital interest of youth
nourishes the old saying, get ten
Russians together and you will
get twenty different opinions.
Presenting glimpses of Russia,
Mias Mazurova referred to Amer Americas
icas Americas knowledge of their culture
as fragmentary. -We, the immi immigrants
grants immigrants of Russia, have not done a
very good job of enlightening
America an the subject, she
said.

Summer Band
Presents Final
Twilight Concert
The University of Florida Sum Summer
mer Summer Band will present its final
Twilight Concert of the season
on the Plaza of the Americas at
6:45 p.m. Wednesday.
Featured soloists on the con concert
cert concert will include Eunice Beck,
soprano and William Albury, bari baritone,
tone, baritone, two erf Gatorlands most tal talented
ented talented vocalists. They will sing a
group of selections by Sigmund
Romberg including The Desert
Song, Deep In My Heart,
One Alone, Softly in a Morn Morning
ing Morning Sunrise and Stouthearted
Men.
Principal clarinetist, Eugene
Wyles, will appearas soloist in
the beautiful Serenade by Al Alfred
fred Alfred Reed.
In response to many requests
for including old favorites on
the program, Director of Bands,
Reid Poole, will conduct the
Pique Dame Overture by
Franz von Suppe. Other concert
selections to be heard are the
modem composition Pageant
by Vincent Persichetti, the Court
Festival Suite by William P. La Latham,
tham, Latham, selections from the opera
Hansel and Gretel, and the
sprightly Troika by Serge
Prokofieff.
Lovers of latin music will en enjoy
joy enjoy the tango Gaucho Carnival
Marches will be heard in the na national
tional national styles of Germany, Eng England,
land, England, and the U.S.A.

i bonds which would tie a group
together, the commitee felt that
the Freshman bond was the great greatest
est greatest as is evidenced by mass meet meetings,
ings, meetings, Freshman lectures living to together,
gether, together, and being new students
facing essentially the same prob problems.
lems. problems.
However, upon investigating the
other classes, the committee could
find no common needs which
would justify Class Officers. The
suggested reasons for this are
that the problems of the Student
Body, rather than being class-ori class-oriented,
ented, class-oriented, are college and living area areaoriented.
oriented. areaoriented.
Would Abolish Officers
For these reasons, the Constit Constittional
tional Constittional Revision Committee recom recommends
mends recommends that (1) all Class Officers
be abolished along with all laws
pertaining thereto, and (2) the
Freshman Council become a con constituted
stituted constituted subdivision of Student
Government to function aa the
governing body of the Freshman
Class.
The Student Government Eva Evalation
lation Evalation Committee will also evalu evaluate
ate evaluate file area of Class Officers and
will make similar recommendat recommendations.
ions. recommendations.
The Constitutional Re v i a i o n
Committee will hold its third
meeting Sunday to discuss the
redistribution of the J 29 received
by the Student Government
from the student activity fee. Re Redistribution
distribution Redistribution Is being considered
due to the fact that the Student
Government portion of the rtudent
activity fee will not be augment augmented
ed augmented along with the sl9 increase in
the student activity fee which be becomes
comes becomes effective in September.

Florida Players Open
On Wednesday Night
With 'Bus Stop' Show

-FOR FBK BANQUET

Fairdeth Named
HC Toastmaster
By AL ALSOBBOOK
Earl Faircloth, prominent Miami attorney and former
president of the University Student Body, will be toast toastmaster
master toastmaster at the 30th Anniversary Florida Blue Key Ban Banquet
quet Banquet to be held during the Homecoming weekend, Oct.
23-24.

In announcing Faircloths se selection
lection selection as toastmaster, Florida
Blue Key president, Tom Hen Henderson,
derson, Henderson, Tallahassee law student,
said that FBK was pleased to
have such an outstanding speaker
and Florida Blue Key alumnus on
the banquet program and feels
that his contribution will insure
a successful end enjoyable ban banquet.
quet. banquet.
Each year Florida Blue Key,
sponsor of the University
Homecoming celebration, invites
one of its outstanding alumni to
serve as toastmaster for the ban banquet.
quet. banquet.
Distinguished Student
Faircloth, who was graduated
from the University of Florida
College of Law in 1950, is a nat native
ive native of Chiefland, Florida.
While a student at the Univers University
ity University he distinguished himself in
- v Wm
HL* iaSi
Uy
EARL FAIRCLOTH
Cochran Resigns
Fla. Union Post
Bill Rion, Director of the Flor Florida
ida Florida Union announced the resigna resignation
tion resignation of Miss Joan Cochran Hast
Friday.
Miss Cochran has worked for
the Union since 1965. She has
served ae Program Director for
the Union for there years and as
Acting Director for a year.
Miss Cochran came to the Uni University
versity University of Florida from the Uni University
versity University of West Virginia where
she had served as Social Direc Director
tor Director for their student union.
She has accepted a position as
Assistant Dean of Women at the
University of Illinois and will be
in charge of sororities at the
University.
Coeds Top Male
Grade Average
The men must doff their acad academic
emic academic hat to the women again at
the University of Florida, recent recentstatistics
statistics recentstatistics show.
A list of 639 University students
maintaining a 3.5 or better scho scholastic
lastic scholastic average darii* the 1969
spring semester, reveals that,
on a percentage basis, the women
outnumber the men almost two to
one 9.0 to 5.6 per cent.
Out of 2,443 eligible women
students, 221 were named an the
list about nine per cent at the
total. Hie 416 men sutdents list listed
ed listed represent about per cent
of the eligible male enrollment of
7,411.
Not unlike records of the past,!
this years percentage is only
slightly below that of last spring
semester for the men students sad
slightly above that of women stu students.
dents. students.
hTe 5.5 average rsprsssnts the
midpoint between B and A
grades. In order to qualify for
the outstanding student Ust
students must he an undergrad undergraduate
uate undergraduate and must carry a mini mam
[of 13 hours per semester.

several fields of endeavor. He was
active in Student Government be being
ing being elected to the executive coun council,
cil, council, the vice-presidency of the
student body and the only student
in the Universitys history to ser serve
ve serve two terms as student body pre president.
sident. president.
He is a member of the Hall of
Fame, Florida Blue Key and was
president of the Debate Society.
In the field of public speaking,
Faircloth was a champion debat debator
or debator at the University and was cho chosen
sen chosen one of the top 10 collegiate
debaters in the country. He was
the Southern oratorical champion
in 1948 and was also the Southern
after-dinner speaking champion.
Former Associate Os
Claude Pepper
For a time, Faircloth was as associated
sociated associated with the law offices of
former Senator Claude Pepper in
Tallahassee before moving to Mi Miami
ami Miami wh?e he now practices law
with the firm of Hector, Faircloth
and Rutlege.
He is presently serving as
chairman of the Committee for
Fair Representation and has ser served
ved served as chairman of the Dade
County Bar Association Speakers
Bureau and the Dade County Bar
Associations Educational Televis Television
ion Television Committee.
The Florida Blue Key Banquet,
scheduled for Saturday afternoon,
Oct. 23, is an annual event begun
in 1929. Since that time it has
grown to be one of the states lar largest
gest largest gatherings attended by Flor Florida
ida Florida Blue Key alumni, members
of the state legislature, governors,
former governors and other prom prominant
inant prominant state citizens.

r .tv
i mmSr
a
f V/JpflnV
{QfIEFI rnOfm
Cool Cood in Cliillod C Horn bar
Charlotte Ford, ILC from Jacksonville, flashes a smile to
let you know her way at keeping cool. Charlotte works part time
In Journalism office located in the air-conditioned stadium hsUd hsUdtog*
tog* hsUdtog* This Is the Kumar Gators sixth coed to heat the heat.

the nation's
largest weekly
summer school
college newspaper

Four Poges This Edition

Curtain Time
Set for 7:30
In Norman Hall
By FBED BURRALL
Gator Staff Writer
Bus Stop, written by
William Inge and directed
by John Kirk, will open
Wednesday night at 7:30
in the Norman Hall audi auditorium.
torium. auditorium.
When first presented at the Mu Music
sic Music Box in New York in 1955 Bus
Stop was hailed as the best play
weve had all season by the
broadway critics.
The New York Daily Mirror de described
scribed described the play as Boccaccio's
Decameron ... in salty pres present
ent present day speech, and the World
Telegram and Sim said it was
hard cored and hilarious ab about
out about what it has to say.
The play opens in the midst of
a Kansas snowstorm which brings
an interstate bus to a halt in a
small town. Into a diner, which
also serves as a bustop, come
a cheap night club singer, a
rambunctious young cowboy, Jiis
tobacco chewing side kick, an
alchoholic professor, and a
smooth talking bus driver.
Together with the owner of the
restaurant, a waitress, and the
local sheriff they wait for a bliz blizzard
zard blizzard to stop.
Love Blossoms
The slightly soiled singer,
Cherie, has been pursued, made
lovo to, and finally kidnapped by
Bo Decker, a romantic cowboy
with a ranch of his own and the
savoir faire of Khruschev at a
cocktail party.
Bos sidekick tries to give him
lessons in courtship, but he only
slows down when the local sher sheriff
iff sheriff gives him lessons of a more
concrete nature.
In the meantime the professor,
who has been run out of Kansas
City for molesting high school
girls, tries to add to his conquests
(Continued on Pago THREE)



SBfflfflS M?0B

Page 2

Students Form Crux

Once again students become the
crux of a major problem confronting
the city of Gainesville. It makes little
difference what solution w find to
this problem, students hold the key
to the answer.
This problem, as presented to the
Executive Council at Tuesdays meet meeting
ing meeting is:
What should Student Government
do about the unfit, unsanitary, and
unsafe off campus living conditions?
Since this problem pertains to a
minority, a resolution was passed re requesting
questing requesting the County and City Com Commisions
misions Commisions to reconsider and revise the
Sanitary and Building Regulations
applying to rental properties that are
connected with students of the Uni University.
versity. University.
A record enrollment this Fall has
amplified this problem. Forty-five per percent
cent percent of the student body will room
off campus, causing a great burden
cm the Off-Campus Housing Office.
However, students can cooperate
with the Off-Campus Housing Office
and help this problem. Some students
when looking for off campus housing
during the Fall rush accept unfit
living accommodations in fear of not
finding available space elsewhere.
This is partly where the answer to
the problem lies.
The students are willing to live in
dumps rather than risk the chance
of not finding a suitable place to stay
during the first few weeks of the
semester. They pay in advance and
commit themselves to the lease.
Once in the unsuitable dwelling,
students dont bother to file a com complaint

THE BABBLING BROOK

Gainesville Bites the Feeding Hand

By AL ALSOBROOK
Usually I try and I repeat
try to be funny. But today I
dont feel very funny. Some Something
thing Something happened this past week
that brought out a very real
truth about the fair University
City of Gainesville that would
make a person feel unfunny.
A University
B studentA guy
whos name X
dont even
know went to
ment, to trans transact
act transact business.
time came,
and this Unl-
Atadbrook verstty student
begun writing
a check for
the service rendered, this bus business
iness business establishment, The Uni Univereity

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Columnist's Outlook Immature
Modern Man Doing Very Well

EDITOR:
Having read the July 10 copy
of the Alligator, I feel that X
would like to comment on cne
es toe editorials written by Har Harold
old Harold Alderman.
Mayfte Harold Alderman sees
man as a lonely tvfry head headed
ed headed frightened slave to modern
society, but I cant agree with
Mm. Man, from my point es
view, looks as If he to doing
very well. I dont see any of
this weeping, wailing and gnash gnashtag
tag gnashtag es teeth that to so vividly
described by Alderman. When
man Is looking into the eye es
the "Cyclops t dont think he
Is worried about anything, un unless
less unless It to how Matt Dillon
Shoots hto way out es a saloon.
X dont think that man to
worried about falling Into toe
abyss either. He seems to feel
that he to going to die anyway
sd that the Bomb would be
as exciting away to die as any.
X must be blind, for I have
foiled to see man assume his
natural position' unless may maybe
be maybe to take toe reins of a crap
gums.
There are more churches now

The Summer Gator
Member Associate Collegiate Press
vim man oatoe i* m mM mm
el n(Me aeA Is selHsfcsl mi? WtkUy Ms Ms| MMepa.
wisHni ma 4 axamlaatiaa pittete. Tha mOOti OATOE Is setara4 as
sssae* aUss Matter a* Um Psii States Past OfAea at OaMaiaWii. FterMa.
OOlaaa ara laaata* te aaai S, M, ael IS te tha PlartSa Uatea lithe |m
asset. Talaphaas PEwnlty el PlsttSe PB SEME. Ext. M aeA tafeast attest
aSMaital atflas as IsilitM effles.
Editor-in-Chief JOE THOMAS
Managing Editor ARLENE ALLIGOOD
Business Manager LOIS ADAMS
EDITORIAL STAFF
assets. lee Paartatae. Mparta SAMeri Dteft UM
BUSINESS STAFF

The Editors Extend An Invitation
To All Monitors of tto Faculty and Administration
To ixprtss Ttoir Views On Any Matter of Interest
To tto Student Body or tto University in General.
IN A GUEST EDITORIAL COLUMN
. .i COPY DEADLINETUESDAY 5 P.M.

Editorials

plaint complaint to the Off-Campus Housing Of Office
fice Office when they find that their land landlords
lords landlords will not repair the dumps to
meet the minimum requirements set
by the city.
As long as the students continue
to show little resistance to this prob problem,
lem, problem, the landlords will do nothing to
better the accommodations.
The City Commission has a strong
Housing Act that has put many of
these dumps on the condemned
list, but all of this takes time.
The Off-Campus Housing Office
has a full time inspector that will
follow through complaints and bring
them to the attention of the City and
County Officials if the landlords re refuse
fuse refuse to remedy the situation but
students must file complaints first.
On the other hand, the landlords
blame the students for the unfit hous housing.
ing. housing. A few students have been respon responsible
sible responsible for this blackmark against the
Student Body. The students misuse
and distroy property and sometimes
cause suitable housing to become un unsuitable.
suitable. unsuitable.

The problem of unfit off campus
housing conditions is an old one, and
will continue to exist in the future
unless the students become aware
of their responsibility as renters; a
responsibility to report unfit condi conditions,
tions, conditions, and a responsibility for the re reapect
apect reapect for private property.
The students should follow this
cliche, Dont feed it and it may go
away. That is, dont accept and sup supply
ply supply these dumps with money to
grow on, and in time they will soon
cease to be a major problem to con contend
tend contend with. P. C.

vereity Univereity Chevrolet Co., refused
ts take the check. The student
Showed Ms ID card like all
of us must, but still the com company
pany company refused to cash or accept
the check.
Realizing that the amount of
k\L ' - W'V ->\l.
the check was large and there therefore
fore therefore that the business might
have some grounds for want wanting
ing wanting further assurance that the
check was good, the student
asked the local company to call
the bank and have his account
checked. This was
Still the establishment re refused
fused refused to honor the check.
The student then went to the
bnk and cashed the check and
brought a bag of change con containing
taining containing a large amount es pen penniesback
niesback penniesback as payment.
The manager then called the
police department and reported
a suspicious white male was
bothering him.

than ever before. Even if God
is deceased, He has a lot of fol followers.
lowers. followers. Really it doesnt mat matter
ter matter whether there is a God or
not The important thing to for
man to believe that there to
one.
Man has always been on the
edge of the abyss. War seemed
just as bad to the Romans in
SOO AD as it does to us today.
It to no great discovery to find
that man may destroy himself
tomorrow.
After all, he has been trying
to do so for the last 5000 years.
It is also no hard task to criti criticise
cise criticise toe actions of man. But
just think of aH the things that
modern man has to be thank thankful
ful thankful for.
Mr. Alderman has a very im immature
mature immature outlook on life. If every everyone
one everyone felt the way he does,
who would nm the show? He
has bo corner on thought, and
he to just one of tot many ag agnostics
nostics agnostics that inhabit the globe.
He should wake tip to the fact
that he is no better than the
Bomb. They are both destruc destructive.
tive. destructive.
Bob Levall

Friday, July 24,1959

The student was pulled in.
At the police station he was
treated in a most discourteous
manner to say the least. Tele Telephone
phone Telephone booths, the authorities
said, had been robbed lately
and the student was led to be believe
lieve believe that he was a suspect.
When the student tried to ex explain
plain explain or point out that the bag
of money contained a large am amount
ount amount of pennies and that phone
booths were not equiped to take
pennies, he was accused of be being
ing being a wise guy.
The matter was brought to
the attention of student govern government
ment government and a check was begun
to get the local business side of
the story.
All that could be found out
from the local establishment
wa# that the matter was confi confidential
dential confidential in nature and nothing
else can be said.
This is, perhaps, an extreme
example of the treatment the
students get from Gainesville
merchants, but in theory it is
typical.
Rent rates are high, housing
conditions in some cases way
below par, gasoline and food
prices seem to be above nor normal.
mal. normal. This is a necessary evil
of a college town. Perhaps there
is nothing that can be done ab about
out about the situation.
Some say, what would the
merchants and working people
do if the University were to
move out over night. . Thats
not going to happen naturally
so there isnt much basis in
making a statement like that.
But, someday, somehow some something
thing something will have to be done. Peo People
ple People can be pushed so far.
The actions of some students
on this campus in the past have
been a cause for Gainesville ci citizens
tizens citizens to rightly call us a bunch
of irresponsible kids. Riots,
parity raids and the like are
not acts that would Inspire ad admiration
miration admiration from the local citizen citizenry.
ry. citizenry.
But, since the local attitude
is one of money and material
gain at the expense of the stud students,
ents, students, the trouble caused by
students at the University of
Florida doesnt compare with
the tremendous amounts of mo money
ney money that pour into the cash reg registers
isters registers of Gainesville merchants
each day as a result of the
University of Florida.
Who knows. Someday that
student whos legal check was
refused, and caused much un undue
due undue embarrassment and trouble
might be In a position to help
or hinder the business element
of this fair city.
He might even be in a posi position
tion position to locate another Sperry
Plant or a Department of Agri Agriculture
culture Agriculture Laboratory in Gaines Gainesville.
ville. Gainesville. He might just have a very
good memory and remember
the day that a Gainesville mer merchant
chant merchant went out of his way to
make things uncomfortable.
Gainesville, you know you've
got a good deal, the University
knows youve got a good deal.
. everbody knows a good thing
when they see it
Dont let the expression, the
fair city of Gainesville, con continue
tinue continue to be a mouthful of mean meaningless
ingless meaningless words.

"Hit rant'watn't too high unril they put tha door on"
THE AUDIT

The # Good # and the Good University

By HAROLD ALDERMAN
Thought for the day: A racist
is someone who propagates the
specious.
One way a tb.n- *' : 'V *::?>
able is to determine what char characteristic
acteristic characteristic is peculiar to the
thing being de dell
ll dell fined. That is
when you are
H. aWe lso
|late the dtotin dtotinguishing
guishing dtotinguishing factor
when you are
- able to see
what the thing
has that is un-
Scommon to any
Alderman other class of
things, you
then know what the thing is.
Proceeding in this manner it
soon becomes apparent that the
one function unique to a uni university
versity university is the nurturing of the
intellect. (True, other institu institutions
tions institutions in our society contribute
to this function, but none can
claim it as their defining char characteristic.)
acteristic.) characteristic.)
(Recent trends in education
might indicate that universities
are forgetting that it is their
unique function.)
But it is theirs and there therefore
fore therefore it is the one on which they
should concentrate their ener energy
gy- energy
But why should any institu institution
tion institution devote Its energy to its
unique function? Because in do doing
ing doing so it contributes something
to society that nothing else can.
TOON TALES

How to Write a Letter to the Editor

By DON ADDIS
To paraphrase a darling old
adage, If you cant think of
anything nice to say, write a
letter to the editor.
Editors print many letters that
reflect sound reason and inform informed
ed informed opioion. A few writers even
have something nice to say.
But we all know the letters that
make the best reading are the
angry ones.
Someone has pointed out that
there are more synonyms for
bad guy In the English lang language
uage language than there are for good
guy H we look hard. Im sure
we can find some connection be between
tween between this and the fact that edi editors
tors editors get more angry letters than
pleasant or complimentary one*.
People seldom do more than
hoist their lips in a half-masted
smile if they approve of some something,
thing, something, but are ready to dis disembowel
embowel disembowel those responsible H
they disapprove.
Also, theres a little of the au author
thor author in all of us, or so we like to
think. Nothing brings out this la latent
tent latent talent quite as well as an anger,
ger, anger, for when the old glands are
stirred up we are at our most
eloquent, or so we like to think.
We aH like to complain, and
a letters column in a newspap newspaper
er newspaper to all the more inviting be because
cause because it gives us a chance to
complain, not just to the guy
next to us, but to every body
within miles!
Among the airiest letters are
DON CRUSE

Gray or Mostly Black and White

By DON CRUBE
Black ia black and white is
damn rare, but who* the guy
in the Gray Flannel Suit? It'a
you, of course, and though may maybe
be maybe your rags arent wool, your
cloth, whole or otherwise, is as
dull and dismal as a aoap op opera
era opera heros dialogue.
And so you like black and
white.
But saints and sinners are
fine in fiction and hard lo find
in fact. Someone once told me
that Batiste la a very person personable
able personable person. He probably is.
Hitler was a hero too to
some people.
And there Is gray and there
is gray and if they are gray
its dark Indeed.
But Hitlers are rare.
And the mass media doesn't
like half tones because you want
your heros served up in whining
white armor.
You, of course, are good and
bad. You live and preach per perverted
verted perverted versions of the Golden
Kean. But it bores you.
And it should.
But the newsmen of this
country are the moat effective
propaganda machine ever de devised.
vised. devised. Their palette# contain on only
ly only two colors which all too

And at this point another
definition is imperative.
Life is interesting to man on only
ly only when h# can call things eith either
er either good or bad'! And the
defining of a thing on the basis
of its unique characteristic
gives ue a criteria for deter determining
mining determining goodness and bad badness.
ness. badness.
A thing is good if it per performs
forms performs its unique function, and
it is better the nearer it gets
to the Meal of perfect func functioning.
tioning. functioning. A good knife is one
that cuts well, a good cigarette
is one that causes lung cancer,
and etc.
A good university is then one
which devotes its energy to the
nurturing of the intellect, the
unique aspect of man. And a
good man to one who cooperates
actively in this endeavor.
And what about the Univer University
sity University of Florida? Is it a good
university judged by the only
standard a university should be
judged by?
First, on the negative side
there is the fact that the foot football
ball football team is getting bigger and
better. And it Is obviously true
that there is a negative cor correlation
relation correlation between the success of
& universitys football team and
the degree of success it
achieves in fulfilling its unique
capacity. Evidence to this ef effect
fect effect is abundant.
Then of course there to toe
Johns committee.
And as general evidence es
what might be a trend there to
the fact that a proposed honors

those written by Name With Withheld,
held, Withheld, who atoo might sign him himself
self himself Angry 1-UC or Campus
KKK. Personally, I consider
this writer a little cowardly,
hooded as he to in anonymity,
and this takes the edge off his
argument right away. If hes
really so concerned with "spar "sparing
ing "sparing everyones feelings by re remaining
maining remaining anonymous, why does
he write the letter in the first
place?
A writer to TEEN Magazine,
pressing a quarrel with another
reader, closed with, If she
wants to argue the point further,
my phone number to Empire 4-
8339, and my address to 1716 12-
th Avenue SW Now this gives
me the impression that this boy
him some confidence in hto ar argument.
gument. argument.
Some of the more vicious let letters
ters letters may wind up snarling, I
bet you wont print this!
Freely translated, this means,
I want my name in print, even
if my letter's so lousy I have to
dare you to print it! I wish
this guy would win his bet more
often.
I think one of the most effec effective
tive effective angry letters to the one
written in poetry form, although
the language to usually less ve vehement.
hement. vehement. The object of the crit criticism
icism criticism knows his attacker was
sore enough to put a lot of work
into it, and gentle ridicule often
can cut deeper than the sharp sharpsat
sat sharpsat malediction, anyway. In

often add up to yellow Castro
is GOOD or he is BAD. And not
necessarily your concept of
GOOD and BAD. Castro has
came to lead his people to the
Promised Lend. (Thru the pow power
er power vested in him by some dlety.
. .a voodoo priest, perhaps?)
Or, Cuba is full of communism.
(The reporter doesn't know
what Communism is.)
Its all great good sport,
but the world news aepms a
poor place to play the game.
Like IN and OUT, GOOD and
BAD has no mean. Worse (or
better), the rules for detorming
what ia IN and what Is OUT
are rigid those for govern governing
ing governing GOOD and BAD are not.
A thing ia not GOOD because
it'a GOOD for the country as
a whole. It's BAD because it
takes away mythical 8 tales
Rights. National aid to educa education.
tion. education.
And a thing Is not BAD be because
cause because it destroys an individuals
freedom. It's GOOD because a
majority group demands It
Blue laws.
And a book isnt GOOD be because
cause because its good. Its BAD be because
cause because it uses four letter-words.
And everyone knew why John
Foster Dulles was BAD until

course for seniors to be called
An Appraisal of Human
Achievement was shot out at
the saddle because of a 'lack of
funds.*
And how much did the ath athletic
letic athletic department receive for
Scholarships this year? Such a
fiasco indicates a distorted sense
of values on the part of the
powers that Will.
Then there is the failure of
the legislature to grant money
for faculty raises.
Then there are the schools in
the university whose subject
matter doesnt require any in intellect,
tellect, intellect, and consequently they
cant be expected to cultivate
anything.
Then there is Anderson Hall
which more or less houses the
Humanities.
But positively we do have the
increase of honors sections and
programs. (This primarily in indicates
dicates indicates that there are people
in the university who would like
to see the university do what it
is supposed to do.)
And there are the new
physics building, the atomic
reactor, and the medical school.
All of these are healthy signs.
But they can be construed as
very unhealthy signs in that
they might be an indication
that the powers have forgotten
the people who study people.
The point of all of this is to
have you think about what a
university should be, and to
have you ask yourselves what
you are doing to aid the ought
to become an Is.

moat cases, however, the poetry
is so bad that It be-funs its own
author more than its subject.
Perhaps ihe best letter to an
editor was written by me. First
it is applicable to any situation
and any publication. Second, it
was written rapidly in blind
ragecramming all I had to
say into printable lengthand re
suited in sort of a composite of
all angry letters ever written to
editors. Ive had it printed up in
800 copies and I sent one out
every week to any editor I con consider
sider consider deserving:
"Youve been caught with
your pants calling the kettle
black this time trying to pull
the wool over our eyes right un under
der under our noses but youre
clutching at acorns to think
casting pearls before our sow's
ears at this stage of the game
will justify carrying coals to pay
you! You wont get away with
shaking hands with the public
eye while stabbing it in the
back because we keep our eyes
to the grindstone! Its too late
now to burn a bridge of another
color, Mr. Editor, because the
hand that feeds you is tired of
having its leg pulled and your
strangle hold on our attentive
ears is being nipped in the
grapevine before its hatched,
in away that will stand your
back on end! Boon youll be
sorry you put all your sour
grapes in one basket, and youll
be laughing out of the other
side of your little red wagon."

he died.
Christian Herter gave a
GOOD speech on the Berlin si situation.
tuation. situation. He didnt say anything.
A characteristic phenomenon
of the GOOD and BAD game is
its inherit instability. It would
be Interesting to compute how
long It takes the average GOOD
thing to become BAD.
Because everything that is
BAD is BAD BAD it is impos impossible
sible impossible to compare a BAD con concepts
cepts concepts intensity with Its Use
span.
But most things are only
GOOD or BAD for a few year*
The early reviewers of Hem Hemmingway
mingway Hemmingway knew that here was
the most abominable author
that the twentieth century had
spat out He was BAD.
How long will it be before
Hollywood films the "Trop "Trop*
* "Trop* ies"?
Maybe the Good Ole Days
wars good because what is BAD
now was GOOD then.
I wonder how many of the
blaeka of ltM are white today,
and bow many of the whites are
black. I wonder if more of them
have changed than have re remained
mained remained stable. And if you
mixed them all together what
color would you get?

POTPOURRI

Americans Too Flippant
With Charges of'Commie'

By DICK MERCER
I had originally intended to
write about student leaders that
many of us could well use as
examples: instead, 1 want to
teifc a little bit about Commun Communism.
ism. Communism.
I left a meeting recently
grumbling to myself about ma many
ny many conditions in general. I was
overheard by a professor en-
I gaged in the
profession of
k moulding
W minds here at
pi the university.
p| He asked me
%: what the trou trouble
ble trouble was tell-
Pp tog him, I em em*j|
*j| em*j| phasized the
|y| need for a
great many
Meroer changes in
the administra administration
tion administration and to student government.
The answer he gave was a
startling one. He said, Be care careful
ful careful son, you know its the Com Communists
munists Communists that have caused so
much trouble in the world by
trying to change it I could
not believe that I heard the
man correctly, but the sad part
of it was that I did.
This world is certain to be
confronted for a long time to
come by world communism;
both from Russia and Red Chi China
na China and each of their respective
sattelltes.
For this reason we need to
think about what Communism
is, and also WHAT IT IS NOT.
People in the United States
have too many conceptions of
Communism. For this reason
we need to be careful in what
we think and say about it In Individuals
dividuals Individuals and groups here de describe,
scribe, describe, at will, persons they dis disagree
agree disagree with as Communists.
Recently an association es
Baptist individuals meeting to
Lakeland made some furious
and devious insinuations that
any minister who says Gods
house should be open to all who
come to worship would be guil guilty
ty guilty of promoting Communism.
Repeatedly the same charge is
heard flung out against those
who say that this is a nation of
law and we must accept the
Supreme Court interpretations
of our Constitution.
This type of thing does no
good in a real fight against
Communism and its evils. The
only thing it does is to promote
confusion and in the final ana analysis
lysis analysis is a great aid to Commun Communism.
ism. Communism.
It is for this reason that our
policy towards Fidel Castro is
a dangerous one. Too often we
equate any eort of reform mea-

THE WIRELESS

Music Lovers Differ
In New Canadian Gome

By CLIFF ARQUETTE
So you think yoore clever
and imaginative, hah? Boheme
and different? It you think yes,,
then listen to what they're do doing
ing doing in exotic places ("exotic
meaning any place but Gaines Gainesville).
ville). Gainesville).
In Canada, where I was hut
a few days ago, the local youth
passed the time involved in
such impetuous little games as
"Steal the Piano, "Red Rov Rover
er Rover (a game about a Russian
dog) and "Smash the Hard Hardware
ware Hardware Store Window (as played
with motorcycles)."
Steal the Piano is a game of
skill to be played by between
two and twenty -two persons
of either sex (ie. male, female),
depending on their strength.
The Canadian group began
their little funsey late one after afternoon
noon afternoon with the traditional
"Tilt, which is actually organ organised
ised organised drinking that ceases only
when the individual begins to
tilt, or feel as though he ie walk walking
ing walking at a 4* degree angle.
Next, the group boards a
launch and barge and heads
down the lake at a ripping
speed in search of an old, aban abandoned
doned abandoned house containing an oid
abandoned piano. This may
seem a little redlculous at first,
but after a few futile attempts
and two or three days search searching,
ing, searching, the Intrepid little band fi finally
nally finally pads into a fine old, ab abandoned
andoned abandoned house on little cats
feet (this is one heckuva draw drawback
back drawback in the game as many kit kitties
ties kitties must necessarily sacrifice
their lower extremities).
After the piano has been
sighted it is carefully tested to
make sure it is in terrible con condition.
dition. condition. This Is easily accom accomplished
plished accomplished by beating the keyboard
testily with a sledge hammer
and plucking the strings with
wire snipe.
Next, while the multitude is
hauling the piano to the lake and
the waiting barge, a musically
talented individual (usually a
person) plays the traditional
Piano Stealing theme song.

TM Alligator Wt leamas
Letters to die Editor
Pis sign all Isftort
Koines withheld on request

sure with Communism. The po power
wer power mad senator from Missis Mississippi
sippi Mississippi recently added fuel to the
fire by sneaking Dias Lans in
to testify before his committee
as though the United States
would give credence to all that
he said.
Lanz told the senators ne be believes
lieves believes Castro is probably a
Communist because be heard
him say that he planned to take
land away from the big com companies
panies companies and banks and give it
to the people. Also he says that
there are many Communists in
the armed forces. He doesnt
say how many or how he knows
they are there Just that they
are there.
Even if they are and we
do not know thatwe should
let Cuba handle their own piob pioblems.
lems. pioblems. No country meddled In
our internal affairs when Sena Senator
tor Senator McCarthy brought bis char*
ges of Communism.
We are treading on danger dangerous
ous dangerous ground by saying that Cas Castros
tros Castros agrarian reform and other
programs are Communist in inspired
spired inspired or that they are left leftwing,
wing, leftwing, etc. If the peasants come
to equate these reforms with
Communism all the work of the
United Slates will have been in
vain.
Today there is no country in
the world where ten or fifteen
people own all the land that
will be able to put off a program
of redistributing the land for
very long. If they delay very
much longer it will be done for
them, and it will be done With
violence.
If the peasants of the wprld
come to believe that necessary
land reform is the same thing
as Communism they will be become
come become Communists; there is ro
doubt about that.
Recently certain members of
the Florida Legislature lablcd
slum clearance as Commun Communism
ism Communism at work, other people have
tabled the Metro Government
of Dade County as Communism
and some states have at times
tabled such movements * the
T.M.C.A., Communism.
We play into the nands es
the Communists of the world
each time we attack those who
want to help the poverty strick stricken,
en, stricken, those who fight prejudice,
and those who seek to end mis misery
ery misery and wretchedness.
So then, the free people must
be careful when they consider
every idea that attacks the sta status
tus status quo as Communist inspired.
By labeling these things Com Communism,
munism, Communism, we will never be able
to really know, and certainly
will never be able to fight the
dangers presented by this fcdeo fcdeology.
logy. fcdeology.

"When the People Beat Their
Feet on the Mississippi Mud.
The first time I saw this ri ritual
tual ritual being performed, the brain
behind the group had heinously
misjudged the weight of the pi piano
ano piano and displacement of the
barge. So as the gleeful little
group was placing the piano on
the vessel and playing and sing singing
ing singing "Mississippi Mud, the ail ailing
ing ailing piano bubbled twelve feet
to the bottom of the lake. Sunk.
Os course, the crowds mood
changed immediately from
carefree abandon to seething
hate as they gased as one at
the bottom of the lake, at the
prised piano and at the strug struggling
gling struggling lad still seated on the pi piano
ano piano stool down there play playing
ing playing "Mississippi Mud, where
no one could hear. (His foot had
accidentally become wedged
under one of the pedals).
In a mass show of bitter dis disgust
gust disgust the party moved down
to a muddy put of the shore
and defiantly beat their feet.
But, after a few more days
of searching, the group found
an even better specimen, pro procured
cured procured a sturdier baoge. and
proudly headed back down the
lake with their trophy, which
they later donated to a needy
open-air church.
The following Sunday the
group sat reverently in their
pews in the quaint little, needy
open air church on a point
of land which jutted out into
the placid lake. The far off
hum of an outboard eould be
heard by all above the rtnky rtnkytink
tink rtnkytink of the piano.
As the boat drew sear, aU
breathed an alcoholic sigh of
relief: it was Charlie, the bo j
ha the water who had miracul miraculously
ously miraculously freed his foot of the wan wanton
ton wanton pedal.
He had come as the piece de
resistance of Plano Stealing, tor
he stood up in the Mttie boat
wearing nothing but a baby babybonnet
bonnet babybonnet (no social significance),
waving sea weed and drinking
from a large an-nlppled bottle.
He was tilting.



NINE YEARS AT UofF

Colonel Rhudy Cuds Career
After 31 Years of AF Service

001. Ralph Rhudy, Professor of Air Science at the University of Florida since 1960, will retire
July 10 after 91 years in the Air Force.

ft Replacing Col. Rhudy as top
ft Air Fore* officer on the Florida
R camptoi will be Col. Vernon S.
Bmlth, Jr. who arrived here this
?,week from Dallas, Tex.
Col. Rhudy has served as Mili Military
tary Military Coordinator for the Univer University's
sity's University's ROTC program since 1953.
Shis position will be filled by 001.
Klenn A. Farris, professor of
Military science and tactlos.
m During his 31 years in the Air
Korcs, 001. Rhudy has logged
sour hours of flying time each
ftnonth. He was at Pearl Harbor
he day of its attack and later
nerved in Europe during World
Warn.
ft The Air Force Commendation
Medal was given to Col. Rhudy in
Kay 1999 in recognition of his in initiative,
itiative, initiative, cooperation and consci conscientious
entious conscientious performance of the many
Ind varied tasks which earned
Kim the utmost respect of stud-
Knts. fellow officers and airmen.
Kle was a member of the Faculty
K>iscipline Committee and was an
Undergraduate at the University
Kn the 19205.
W Col. and Mrs. Rhudy now make
f their home in Mlcanopy.
JM Prof Named
To 'Law Center'
Dr. L. John Martin, professor
of Journalism at the University of
Florida, has been appointed con consultant
sultant consultant to the World Rule of Law
center, Duke University, Dur Durham,
ham, Durham, N. C, Dr. Arthur Larson,
director of the Center announced
this week.
Dr. Larson, former presiden presidents
ts presidents aide and head of the United
States Information Agency, is dir directing
ecting directing a project that will endea endeavor
vor endeavor to produce a code of ethics to
control worldwide propaganda ac activities
tivities activities by governments and priv private
ate private organisations.
Working on various facets of
the project is a distinguished
group cf legal and propaganda
experts both in this coun country
try country and abroad. Dr. Martin is a
consultant to that group and also
member of an advisory committee
comprising leaders in the news
media, government and in educa education.
tion. education.
Groundwork for the project,
which was sparked by President
Eisenhowers proposal last year
that a system of controls be set
up governing inflammatory broad broadcasts,
casts, broadcasts, was laid at a conference
in Durham.
Dr. Martin is author of Inter International
national International Propaganda, which rec recently
ently recently won the JHgma Delta Chi
research about journalism.

I l^l
FRIDAY, JULY 24
"FORK CHOF HILL"
Gregory Peck.
"ENCHANTED
ISLAND"
Jone Powell
SATURDAY, JULY 2S
"MAN OF THE
WEST"
Gory Cooper
"OHMAN
OHWOMAN"
Done Dailey
"THREE STOOGE
FUN-O-RAMA"
"HOUSE OF
BAMBOO"
Robert Stoke

SUN., MON., JULY 24-27
"HOUSE ON A
HAUNTED HILL"
Vincent Price
"COLE YOUNGER YOUNGERGUN
GUN YOUNGERGUN FIGHTER"
Frank Lovejoy
TUB., WID., JULY 24-29
"SEPARATE TABLES"
David Niven
"GIGI"
Leslie Coran
TMUR.. FRI., JULY 10-11
"YOUNG
PHILADELPHIANS"
*eul Newman
"LIVING SWAMP"
True Life Adventure)

Freshman Forum Forms
For Second Years Work
By BARRY BUTLER
Gator Staff Writer
Plans for the year-old Freshman Forum art wall under way for
the September program, according to Skip Crawford, assistant chair-

man of operations.
The program was introduced
as an effort to remedy the lack
of school spirit and loyalty pre prevalent
valent prevalent among the students. The
committee felt that this lack was
due to the students unawareness
of the extra curricular oppor opportunities
tunities opportunities available to them.
Forum Designed to Inform
The Freshman Forum was thus
designed to Inform incoming
freshmen about the history of the
University and good Florida
men and women.
The committee feels that the
success of this program depends
upon the success of its three ob objectives.
jectives. objectives. Its aims are to introduce
freshmen to students and faculty
already committed to making
this university great; to provide
them with information about the
past, present and future of the
University; and to dramatize for
him the dependency of the Univ University
ersity University upon his individual deci decision.
sion. decision.
Gaia to be Two Fold
The outline of the 1959 Forum
includes skits, slide lectures, tal talent
ent talent productions and speeches
which will show rather than talk
about, extra curriculare and

IN THI DARK

Disney's 'Sleeping Beauty'
Captures Romanticists
By VAL THOMAS
Entertainment to satisfy almost anyone's taste is Slated for
this weeks movie-goers.
For the Romanticist a moot persuasive love tal preserved from
medieval mythology, Sleeping Beauty, is now playing at the
Florida Theatre.

Termed a Disneys greatest un undertaking,
dertaking, undertaking, it took 900 artists, six
years end >6,000,000 to complete
the fihn.
Interg rating Tchaikovskys
Sleeping Beauty Ballet was one
of the most difficult tasks in the
production. Contrary to the usual
animation procedure, the music
in this case had to be adapted to
the story action the melody ad adjusted
justed adjusted to toe figures and scenes

Friday. July 24,1959

L Bill PR 6-6604
SI I* I U Ope U;S P.IL
FRIDAY fir SATURDAY
RANDOLPH SCOTT
'WESTBOUND'
IN TECHNICOLOR
SUN. MON. TUES.
in The Wayne Tradition
f*at Wayne la eneatlenaH"
ttWETfTm**
mEYocm^m
Also"TWO HEADED SPY"
WtdiMiday fir Thursday
ALEXANDER KNOX
AS PRESIDENT
'WILSON'
STARTS FRIDAYJuIy )l
FLORIDA
NOW SHOWING
STARTS WEDNESDAY
I Offiew l Switwwn lit
,sfg

their benefits, said Crawford. He
further stated that the result of
this program would be a two-fold
gain in that the extra currlculars
on campus should benefit directly
because of increased enthusiasm
and participation in these activi activities.
ties. activities.
Students interested in working
on the sub committees for the
Forum are urged to apply in the
Student Government office.
Gov't Praised
(Continued from Page ONE)
to prevent the unfortunate situa situation
tion situation that has arisen in other
Southern states.
Service key* and certificates of
appreciation for service to the
student body ware awarded to
members of the group who have
served in student government this
summer.
Anderson thanked the reoepients
of the awards for their contri contribution
bution contribution to the University and its
student body as he presented their
keys.

on the story boards. Generally it
is the other way around.
Weston Fare At State
The following shows should ap appeal
peal appeal to thooe who like a bit of
the West in their movie diet.
Westbound* stars the veteran
cowboy, Randolph Scott. Virginia
Mayo to the beautiful scenery.
State Theatre, Fri. Sat.
Pet Wayne, (Johns little boy)
heads the cast in The Young
Lead set for the State, Sunday
Tuesday.
The turbulent first trial held
under American law for the slay slaying
ing slaying of a Mexican by an American
is the story theme. It really
shows American justice on trial
in a young land, the California
of more than a century ago. Star Starring
ring Starring with Pat are Yvonne Craig
and Demtii Hopper.
CSoak and Dagger fame should
enjoy The Two- Headed Spy
featuring Jack Hawkins and Gia
Scala. Its the tale of a British
Intelligence agent who spent 25
yearg working his way up into
the German High Command. Also
at the State, Sunday Tuesday.
Wilson, the story of the
famous World War I president,
is for the PGL majors. Charles
Oobume, Mary Anderson and
Alexander Knox cooler. State
Theatre, Wednesday and Thurs Thursday
day Thursday
Laugh to Lewis
Batten dawn the laugh-hatches,
oocnedy fans. Jerry Lewis is at
it again in Dont Give Up the
Ship. It seems that Jerry was
the last one to sign out a World
War II destroyer that cant be
found. A Congressional commit commitrefuses
refuses commitrefuses to grant the Navy an ad additional
ditional additional appropriation until the
missing destroyer to located and
poor Jerry gets stuck for the hunt
right before his honeymoon
which to enough to get anyone
buggy. Another rib tickler by
Bollywoods madcap Begins next
Wednesday of the Florida Thea Theatre.
tre. Theatre.

Page 3

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fIHSEuSCSiWra i 4 [
BUTLER'S RADIATOR
SERVICE
1041 SOUTH MAIN STREET
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA
PHONE FR 6-4710 or PR 6-7645

Col. Ralph Rhudy...
'Bus Stop' Opens
This Wednesday
(Continued from Page ONE)
by talking the young waitress in into
to into a weekend in Topeka. While
this is going on her boas, Grace,
is upstairs consumating a love loveaffair
affair loveaffair with the bus driver.
True Love Rebuked
In the role created by Kim
Stanley on Broadway, Ruth Sims
as Cherie, a singer from a Kan Kansas
sas Kansas City clip joint, cant under understand
stand understand why Bo wants to marry
her just because they've been fa familiar.
miliar. familiar. She slaps him, complains
to the sheriff, and even tells him
of her many past affairs all
to no avail.
Mias Sims, 6ED, is a music
teacher in Lake City Florida.
Fred Burrall plays her unwel unwelcome
come unwelcome suitor, Bo Decker. Bo has
just returned from a rodeo where
he won about every prize there
was, and he cant understand
why any girl wouldnt he in love
with him. Even after tang tangling
ling tangling with the sheriff, getting told
off numerous times by Cherie,
and not making any headway at
ail, hes still determined to
marry her.
Burrall, a student in Journal Journalism,
ism, Journalism, is from Green Bay, Wise.
Shakespeare Appears 1;
Dr. Lyman, a PhD- from Har Harvard
vard Harvard is perfectly content with his
lechery and a bottle of rye whis whiskey,
key, whiskey, until he learns a lesson from
Shakespeare, is played by Alan
Ents, SJM, from Sebring, Flori Florida.
da. Florida.
Laurel Gordon, 2UC, St. Peters Petersburg,
burg, Petersburg, plays Grace, the resturant
owner who likes a man with big
hands, and he finds one in the
bus driver.
The two go up to Graces
apartment for a love affair and
are found out by Sheriff Will
Masters played by A1 Wehl Wehlburg,
burg, Wehlburg, 2UC, from Holland. Hard Hardfisted
fisted Hardfisted Sheriff Will to also a major
factor in the education of 80.
Lively Dialogue
Virgil Blessing, Bos confident
and side kick, to played by
George Crolius of Gainesville.
Ole Virge strums his guitar,
spits tobacco, and gives such
homespun advice to Bo as Youre
virgin enough for the both of us.
Elma, played by -Harriet
Thompson, 4ED, Live Oak, is the
naive young waitress who he
comes highly flattered at her ev ever
er ever eo-slight love affair.
The big handed bus driver,
Carl, is played by Doug Fields.
Fields hometown is Gainesville
and hes in the College of
Arts and Sciences.
Tickets are free for university
students with an ID card, and
may be obtained in the informa information
tion information booth across from the Hub.
Reservations may be phoned in
to extension 426.
The play will run July 29 and
80 at 7:80 p.m., and July 31 -Au -August
gust -August 1 at 8 p.m.
Outdoor Square Dance
Sponsored By Flo. Union
Hie Florida Union will sponsor
an outdoor Square Dance at 8
p.m. tonight on Union Drive next
to the Uhion.
Denton Houk, an outstanding
square dance caller, will be mas master
ter master of ceremonies.
The dance is free and open to
everyone. Free refreshments will
be served. In case of rain, the
dance will be moved to the social
room of the Union.
Chess Team Bags Prizes
Hie University Chess Team
last week won several prizes at
the Southern Chess Tournament
held at Birmingham, Alabama.
Team members from the Uni University
versity University were: Joel Chalifoux.
Tom Lucas, Ned Hardy. Bobby
Bailey, Nick Lanni, and John
Jacobs.

300 Teenagers
Attend Annual
Workshop
Hie seventh annual Florida
Youth Workshop conducted by
the General Extension Division
will be host to more than 800
teen-agers July 27-81 at the Uni University
versity University of Florida.
Mrs. Hazel T. Morgan, coordi coordinator
nator coordinator of the workshop, said that
the aim of- this program is to
show todays teen-agers how to be become
come become tomorrows leaders.
Baum and Demarest Main
Speakers
The main speakers for the
workshop will be Ernest Baum,
of the National Secondary School
Principal Association in Washing Washington,
ton, Washington, D. C. and the Reverend Gary
Demarest of the American Chris*
tain Athletic Association in Kan Kansas
sas Kansas City, Mo.
Baum will be the chief consul consultant
tant consultant in the high school activity
area, and Reverend Demarest
will be chief consultant on moral
and spiritual values.
During the five day workshop,
which will draw students from
all parte of state, the teen-agers
will also receive lectures from
six faculty members of the Univ University.
ersity. University.
Dean of Men, Lester L. Hale
will give the opening talk to the
youth leaders on their first night
on campus, and during the work workshop
shop workshop week, Dean Raley of the
General Extension Division will
also welcome the high school lea leaders
ders leaders to the University of Florida.
Talks on high school journalism
music, future teachers, college
requirements, and Boys and
Girls State activities will be fea featured
tured featured in the workshop program.
A picnic to Camp W&uburg and
a Pastel Prom in the Hub will
climax the Seventh Annual Flori Florida
da Florida Youth Workshop.
Asst. Professor
Awarded Grant
By State Dept-
Dr. Peter Lisca, University of:
Florida assistant professor of
humanities and English, has been
awarded a United States Educat Educational
ional Educational Exhange Grant by the De Department
partment Department of State.
Under the grant, Dr. Lisca wil>j
serve as visiting professor of Am j
erioan Literature and English lan
guege at the University of Zara Zaragoza
goza Zaragoza in Zaragoza, Spain.
His is one of a limited numbers:
of grants for the academic year
1959-60. Lecturers are recommen recommended
ded recommended for the Department of States
consideration by the Conference
Board of Associated Research
Councils.
Dr. Lisca, who grew up in Lor Lorain,
ain, Lorain, Ohio, was born on the Island
of Sardinia. He received his B.A.
degree from, the University of Cal California
ifornia California and his Masters and Ph. D.
degree from the University of
Wisconsin.
Before coming to the University
of Florida (in 1958 > he taught at
the University of Wisconsin, Wo Womans
mans Womans College of the University of!
North Carolina, and the Univers University
ity University of Washington. Author of num numerous
erous numerous publications. Dr. Lisca is
presently working on a book con concerning
cerning concerning American literature in the
1930e.
His wife, Dorothy, and two chil children,
dren, children, Andreana, 7, and Riera Bar Barbara,
bara, Barbara, 2, will accompany him to
Spain. While abroad they plan to
travel in France, Italy and Sard Sardinia.
inia. Sardinia.
Law Students
Receive Award
Two University of Florida law
j students from Gainesville, one
| freshman end one June graduate,
are recipients of the 1959 Harri Harrison
son Harrison Company awards, it was an announced
nounced announced today by James J. Free Freeland,
land, Freeland, Chairman, Law Faculty
Committee on Prises and Awards.
Paul W. Smalbein, Jr., tied
with two other students for the
Harrison Company Freshman A Award
ward Award presented annually to the
student maintaining the highest
scholastic average during his first
j 29 hours in law. Co-winners of
the award are FYederic G. Levin
of Pensacola, and Stuart Lubitz
of Miami.
Gerald William Rock, a one onetime
time onetime winner of the freshman
award, won the Senior Award. An
honor graduate, Rock maintained
a higher record during the entire
law course than any other eligi eligible
ble eligible student.
The Harrison Company of At Atlanta,
lanta, Atlanta, awards each winner a copy
of Adkins Florida Criminal Law
and Procedure. In this case
duplicate volumes will go into
the three winners of the Fresh Freshman
man Freshman Award and Rock will re receive
ceive receive a substitute volume from
the Company.
CLASSIFIED
TRUNK FOR SALE. Located to
basement of Murphree Area of office
fice office (linen room). In food oon oondition.
dition. oondition. Look it over. Will sell
for a fair price. If interested,
contact Joe Thomas iFR 2-3686).
FOR SALE: Wfl AustJn-Healey
Sprite. Excellent condition not
over 8,000 miles. White with Red |
interior. Fully equppied with: j
Heater, Whitewall tires. Win Window
dow Window screen washer Mitten, |
Some Shield. Price: SIBOO. For
further information, contact I
John Sargent, Apartment 288-1,
Cbrry Village or can FR 2-8849. |

Summer Choral Union Sets
Presentation of Two Musicals
By fimr I*AJVDt*RS
Two musical*, Menottle The Old Maid and tha Thief and Kurt Weills "Down in the Valley,
wiH ba given Thursday and Friday in the University Auditorium at 8:15 p.m. by the Summer Choral
Union of the University Department of Music.

Commenting on the unusual
points of the two works, Elwood
Ki eater, choir director said,
Thia will ba the first time
there has ever been a sum summer
mer summer musical which contains a
full-scale square dance on stage,
modernistic lighting effects, and
authentic American folk songs.
The musical to which Kiester re referred
ferred referred la Weills "Down in the
Valley, a one-act operetta writ written
ten written in 1948 for presentation by
non-professional groups. It feat features
ures features arrangements of such Amer American
ican American folk melodies aa The Lone Lonesome
some Lonesome Dove, Sourwood Moun Mountain,
tain, Mountain, The Little Black Train,"
Hop Up, My Ladies and the tlt tlta!
a! tlta! song.
According to Sarah Ann Smith,
Emory Prof Appointed
To Orthopodic Dept.
Dr. Nicholas Robert Greville
has been appointed assistant
professor of orthopedic surgery
at the University of Florida.
Dr. Qreville comes to the Uni University
versity University from Emory University
in Atlanta where he was an asso associate
ciate associate in orthopedics in the Depart Department
ment Department of Surgery.
A native of England, Dr. Gre Greville
ville Greville holds degrees from Cambri Cambridge
dge Cambridge University, and tha Univer University
sity University of Minnesota. In addition to
residency training in English hos hospitals
pitals hospitals he served a three-year or orthopedic
thopedic orthopedic residency at the May
Clinic.
His appointment was effective
July i.

WUFT Broadcasts
WUFT-TV, University of Floridas educational television station,
channel 8, loots below its five day program notea for the forthem-
Jng week. Air time is 6:80 p.m. each week day.

FRIDAY
8:30 The Friendly Giant
6:45 The Tales of Poindexter
7:00 Canadian Holiday
7 :S0 Briefing Session
8:00 Life and Limb
8:30 Community of the Con Condemned
demned Condemned
9:00 Meeting of the Minds
MONDAY
6:30 Almanac
6:45 Compass Rose
7:00 Animals of the Seashore
8:00 Meant for Reading
8:80 Last Continent Antarctica:
9:00 Two special films of fam family
ily family interest
TUESDAY
6:30 The Press and the People
7:00 Industrial Arts Education
in Florida

Campus Calendar
Tuetday NSFI Lecture, Problem of World Population,' Dr. Guen Guenther
ther Guenther Schwarz, Florida State University, McCarty Auditori Auditorium
um Auditorium 8 p.m. ; > T
Candidates (or Degrees Meeting University Auditorium
4 p.m.
Wednesday Florida Players Production, Bus Stop," Noun an Hall
Auditorium 8 p.m. continues through Friday.
Band Concert, Plaza of the Americas 8:45 p.m.
Thursday Chamber Operas Down in the Valley and A* Old
Maid and the Thief, University Auditorium 8:15 p.m.
ORDER YOUR
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stage director of the musical,
Down in the Valley can be
termed modernistic in its use of
lighting.
The square dance mentioned by
Keister will be performed by eight
couples, to the tune of Sourwood
Mountain.
Romantic Plot
The operetta centers around
Brack Weaver, who la to hang for
killing a rival for Jennie Parsons
hand in a fight at a backwoods
Alabama square dande. Jennie, a*
ware that Brack acted In self-de self-defense,
fense, self-defense, meets him after his escape
from jail. In a aeries of flash flashbacks
backs flashbacks the two recall their happy
moments together, until Brack re returns
turns returns to his captors to await his
death.
Cast members include Gary
Vamadore, Rollene Fulghum, Da David
vid David Johnson, Ed Carwithen and
Cliff Landers. A chorus of twenty
voices figures prominently in the
action.
Weill, a German composer who
fled to America to escape the Hit Hitler
ler Hitler purges, wrote the music for
the world-famous Threepenny
Opera.
Second Musical
The second musical, The Old
Maid and the Thief, can be term termed
ed termed an operetta in miniature,
Keister asserted. It contains only
four persons, and is enacted on a
fore-shortened and abbreviated
stage about two-thirds the site
normally employed.
Lighting plays an important
part in this musical also, he add added.
ed. added. One scene, for example, is
played in total darkness broken
only by a flashlight.
The operetta, composed by Pul Pulitzer

7 .30 The Case of Officer HaHi HaHibrand
brand HaHibrand
8:00 Meeting of the Minds
8:30 Lets Go Bowling
9:00 Quest for Adventure
WEDNESDAY
6:30 The Big Picture
7:00 A Prospect of Literature
7:30 Once Upon a Japanese
Time
8:00 Agriviews
8:30 The Eternal Harvest
9:00 Along the Gaape Road
THURSDAY
6:30 The Ctyjflrena Comer
7:00 The Great Ideas
7:30 Sports Almanac
7:45 Behind the GoM Ban
8:00 Heritage
8:30 Keyboard Conversations
9:00 Animals of the Seashore

itzer Pulitzer Prizewinning GUm-Carlo Me Menotti,
notti, Menotti, is a one-act comedy about
the reaction in the home of Miss
Todd, the old maid of the title,
when a handsome bum comes
looking for a handout. Subsequent
events prove that a virtuous wo woman
man woman makes a thief of an honest
man.
Cast members are Shirley Hub Hubner,
ner, Hubner, Katherine Martin, Helen Bell
Jones and Pat Hodgins.
Sets for both musicals are be being
ing being constructed by the Gainesville
Little Theatre.
Fla. Union Plans
All Day Outing
At Wauburg
Watermelon, canoe races and
skiing will be the order of the
day tomorrow when the Universi University
ty University of Florida* Camp Wauburg
stages Wauburg playday. <
An all-day event, playday is de designed
signed designed to interact each member
of the family. All University stu students,
dents, students, faculty and staff and their
immediate families are invited to
attend Playday free of Charge-
Registration at Camp Wauburg
will begin at 9 a.m. and continue
until a few minutes befor ssch
individual event.
Childrens land games, Includ Including
ing Including a potato sack race, three- leg-
ged race and greased watermelon
competition, will start at 10 a m.
A boat will be In operation for
water skiiem at Oils time.
Adult events, beginning at 1
p.m., will include mens and wom womens
ens womens skiing competition and
novelty contests. This will be fol followed
lowed followed at 8 p.m. with a water watermelon
melon watermelon e&ting contest and canoe
races for men and mixed teams.
Prises for all events of the day
will be annoimced at 4 pm.
Persons in need of transporta transportation
tion transportation may sign up at the main
desk in the Florida Union on earn earnpus.
pus. earnpus. In tha event of rain, Play Playday
day Playday will be postponed until Sun Sunday
day Sunday July 36.
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Friday, July 24,1959

Page 4

CATCHERS MITT
Red Schoendienst Sets
Return For September;
Aid To Slumping Braves?
By MAC IRVIN
Assistant Sports Editor

The best news weve heard lately is that Red Schoendienst,
Milwaukee second baseman, has a good chance Os getting back into
play this season. Red, who has been out of action with tubercu tuberculosis,
losis, tuberculosis, is practicing and hopes to return to the lineup in September.
However, it is always difficult for a sidelined player to regain
his top playing ability when he makes his comeback. You can be
sure that the Milwaukee Braves are pulling for a successful return
bv Schoendienst.
Braves Hurting At Second
The big weakness in the Braves lineup has been at second base.
In an attempt to bolster their attack, the National League champions
have acquired Bobby Avila from the Boston Red Sox. Avila, who is
hitting a dismal .212, does not offer much hope to the batting at attack.
tack. attack.
With such a poor outlook at second base, some solid hitting by
Schoendienst during the last month of the tight National League
pennant race would be a great asset to the Braves chances for
regaining the title.
All-Time Cardinal Great
A star for the St. Louis Cardinals for many years, Schoendienst
has had a very distinguished career. He is always ranked among
the top second sackera in the history of the senior circuit. His
.290 lifetime batting average is not at all indicative of his hitting
usefulness. In addition to being an expert at the hit-and-run play,
Red is adept at drawing walks and coming up with the timely hit.
In fielding ability, there are few Who can match Schoendienst.
One of the many defensive records he holds was set when he ac accepted
cepted accepted 320 consecutive fielding chances without an error.
Thousands of baseball fans, regardless of team affiliation, will
be pulling for Red when he once again dons the uniform. Perhaps
Ms leadership and playing spirit will spark the Braves to another
pennant. Indeed, it will be another of baseballs outstanding mira miracle
cle miracle jf, after fighting off tuberculosis, Red Schoendienst can return
to a position of stardom.
Old Man Hits Long Ball
One of Schoendiensfs former Cardinal teammates had quite
a day at the plate last weekend. Enos Country Slaughter, the 43-
year-old outfielder who seems to never grow old, hit a pair of
homeruns as the New York Yankees beat the White Sox in a
doubleheader. Slaughter, who has a lifetime average of .302, con continually
tinually continually aays that he has made no plans for quitting baseball.
It is a tradition of baseball to award any player who competes in
20 ieasons with a lifetime pass to any major league baseball game.
Slaughter qualifies for the honor this year.
One begins to wonder when he will hang up his spikes in favor
of less strenuous activity. His defiance of old-age is rapidly becom becoming
ing becoming a legend to baseball fans.
Curt Simmons Sent Down
We noticed that Curt Simmons, the injury-plagued Philadelphia
Phillie lefthander, has been sent to the minors. This brought to mind
When Simmons was considered to be one of baseballs brightest
prospects. He was signed in 1947 at the age of 18, for 365,000 and
was apparently headed for a bright career.
However, during his best season when he had compiled a 17-6
record, he was called into active duty by Uncle Sam. Simmons next
bad break occurred when he cut Ms toe with a lawn mower, thus
keeping him out of action for some time. His latest injury is a
fcjiipped elbow which has rendered Biril ineffective as a pitcher.
Curt Simmons will probably come back to the majors when he
can recover and get back Into shape. If there is a law of averages,
ft seems that it is about time for him to get seme good luck.

mL- alf Ira.
Ttnnit Champ
Bert Muller, at left, congratulates Terry Cooke on Ms victory
fee the All-Campus final singles tennis match.
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jmiwt'' - !Vv*wN|l ibi
Four Powerful Fullbacks
Four powerful fullbacks, shown above, will participate in the
North-South All-Star football game a* Florida Field, Aug. 6.
North fullbacks, top row, left to right, are Eugene Green of
Columbia and Willie Lager of Daytona Beach Seabreeze. South
fullbacks, bottom row, left to right, are Ted Saussele of Coral
Gables and Gene Tomlinson of Sebring.

Murals Golf Tourney Complete

Head Baseball Coach Dave
Fuller scored an ace on the par
3,134 yard 14-hole course, at the
Gainesville Golf and Country Club
to take third place in the 1959
Summer All-Campus Golf Tour Tournament.
nament. Tournament. Fullers hole in one was
the third for him in the last 18
months at the local course. Fuller
was playing in the foursome of
University of Florida Golf Coach
Conrad Rehling, Freshman Bas Basketball
ketball Basketball Coach Jim McCachren and
Varsity Cross-Country Coach Wal Walter
ter Walter Welsch.
The Intramural golf tourney
was divided into two brackets this
year. One bracket for golfers
shooting over 90 in the qualifying
round and the other for those who
shot under 90 in the qualifying
round. In the qualifying round 16
shot under 90 and 27 shot over 90.
Willie ? Turner, University of
Florida golf team member, led
qualify-round for those under 90
with a three under par 69. He
was followed closely by Jim Mac-
Fadyen who came in with a par
72. In the above 90 group, Gator
Football Star, Bobby Joe Green,

Cooke Is Tennis Chump

By DEL MOSER
Gator Sports Writer
The intramural tennis program
this summer was highlighted by
an All-Campus tennis tournament.
The limited summer session stu student
dent student body presented a high level
of interest. After a week of con continuous
tinuous continuous tournament play, the
finals brought the tounrament to
a close and handsome trophies
were awarded to the winners and
runnersup of the singles and dou doubles
bles doubles competition.
First Round Singles
Terry Cooke, number one seed seeded,
ed, seeded, advanced with a bye; Harry
Anstead defeated Pat Guiteras
6-2, 6-4; Kendrick defaulted with
a bye; Barney Kane advanced
with a bye; Bill Dowdel defeated
Joe Ripley 6-3, 6-1. Jim Milton
defeated David McMullen 6-1, 8-6;
Dr. Wright over Bob Allen by de default;
fault; default; Walter Herbert Jr., fourth
seeded, advanced with a bye;
Blair Mathew's, second seeded and
advanced with a bye; Ken Bullen
defeated Alvin Cohen 6-0, 6-0;
Dick Forster advanced with a
bye; M. B. Chafin advanced with
a bye; Tom Deita defeated Jim
Ward 6-1, 7-5; Walter Herbert
Sr. defeated William Dozer 6-2,
6-2; Mike Kessler over Kirby
Stewart by default; and Bert Mul Muller,
ler, Muller, third seeded, advanced with
a bye.
Second Round Singles
Cotrice defeated Anstead 6-2, 6-4;
Kane advanced with a bye; Dow Dowdel
del Dowdel defaulted to Milton; Wright
defeated Herbert Jr. 6-4, 6-2;
Mathews defeated Bullen 8-6, 6-3;
Forster defeated Chafin 6-0, 6-1;
Herbert Sr. defeated Deita 6-1,

Summer Mural Standings
Won Lost Pet.
NINE OLE MEN 8 1 .889
OORRY COUGARS 6 2 .750
WILD DEEDS 6 8 625
THETA CHI 5 8 625
PHI KAPPA TAU 5 8 625
QUAFFERS 4 3 .571
REDNECK WHOOPIES 4 5 444
FLAVET m 3 375
CHEMICAL BOMBERS 3 6 .333
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Bruce Spare and Walter All e r
came in with 92s. They were fol followed
lowed followed closely by Bill Weachter
and Roger Kennedy who had 92s.
In the final round in the below
90 group Willie Turners 75 was
low enough to hold on to first
place with a 36 hole total of 144.
Jim MacFadyen was second with
a 36 hole total of 148. Dave Fuller
was third with 153, Hank Allers
was fourth with 155 and George
Smith took the final medal with
a 157 for fifth place.
In the above 90 bracket Roger
Kennedy came back with an 80
to ease past Bobby Joe Green who
had 82. Kennedy finished with 172
and Green with 173. Third place
went to Florida Footballer and
Baseball er, Dave Fannin with
a 36 hole total of 195. Bumper
Watson, former Gator Track Star
and All-American, was fourth with
196. Joe Rivers and Phil Larson
tied for sth with 211s.
Winners may pick up their me medals
dals medals in the Intramural Office,
Room 229 in the Florida Gym.
The office is open from 8:30 a.m.
to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Fri Friday.
day. Friday.

6-2; and Muller defeated Kessler
8-2, 6-1.
Quarter final Singles
Kane defaulted to Cooke;
Wright defeated Milton 6-2, 6-2;
Mathew defeated Forster 6-1,
6-0; and Muller defeated Herbert
Sr. 6-3, 6-1.
Semi-Final Singles
Cooke defeated Wright 7-5, 6-3,
and Muller defeated Mathews 6-1,
6-1.
Finals Singles
Cooke defeated Muller 7-5, 6-0.
First Round Doubles
Cooke and Mathews, first seed seeded,
ed, seeded, advanced with a bye; Chafin
and Guiteras defaulted to Kane
and McMullen; Ward and An Anstead
stead Anstead defeated Ripley and Park
6-3, 6-4; Muller and Bullen, thuu
seeded, advanced with a bye;
Eschbach and Wright, second
seeded, advanced with a bye;
Allen and Stewart defaulted to
Cohen and Deitz; Kessler and
Forster advanced with a bye;
and Herbert and Herbert, fourth
seeded, advanced with a bye.
Quarter Finals Doubles
Cooke and Mathews defeated
Kane and McMullen 6-0, 6-1; Mul Muller
ler Muller and Bullen defeated Ward and
Anstead 6-2, 6-0; Eschbach and
Wright defeated Cohen and Deita
6-1, 6-0; and Kessler and Forster
defeated Herbert and Herbert 2-6,
6-3, 6-4.
Semifinals Doubles
Muller and Bullen defeated
Cooke and Mathews 9-7, 7-5, and
Eschbach and Wright defeated
Kessler and Forster 6-4, 6-8, 6-1.
finals Doubles
Muller and Bullen defeated
Eschbach and Wright 7-5, 6-2.

Nine Ole Men Lead
Murals Softball

By PHIL. LABSON
Gator Sports Writer
The Nine (Me Men took undis undisputed
puted undisputed possession of first place in
the summer softball league by;
defeating Theta Chi 8-0 on Mon- 1
day afternoon. The win left Theta
Chi with two defeats and the only
Other possible challenger, Phi
Kappa Tau, lost to the Chemical
Bombers 8-2.
The Ole Men have gained at
least a tie for the summer cham championship
pionship championship even if they should lose
their next game. They face the
Quaffers on Monday. The other
games scheduled for the last week
of play are, Monday: Phi Kap Kappa
pa Kappa Tau vs. Flavet 3 at 4:15 on
field 1, the Redneck Whoopies vs.
Sigma Nu at 5:15 on field 1, the
Quaffers vs. the Nine Ole Men
at 4:15 on field 2 and the Wild
Deeds vs. Pi Lambda Phi at 5:15
on field 2. Play winds up on
Tuesday with three games on
tap: Corry Cougars vs. Chemical
Bombers at 4:15 on field 1, Pi
Lambda Phi vs. Theta Chi at 5:15
on field 1 and the Wild Deeds vs.
the Quaffers at 4:15 on field 2.
The Nine Ole Men, aided by the
no-hit pitching of Gary Phipps,
defeated The-ta CM 8-0 r ; y
moved to their Bth straight win
in the summer softball program.
The win was a relatively easy one
as they scored five runs in the
first inning and two in the second
to jimp out to a quick 7-0 lead.
Theta Chi managed to get only
three base-runners all on walks
by Phipps. Phipp struck out
eight bringing his total to thirty thirtysix
six thirtysix for the season.
Meanwhile the Nine Ole Men
were collecting four well-placed
hits, three singles and a double,
to produce eight rune. Love was
the losing pitcher for Theta Chi
With walks being his downfall as
he issued 11 free passes. Hall,
Deason and Goff had singles for
the Nine Ole Men and Wollfenden
collected a bases-loaded double in
the first inning.
In other action during the past
week the Redneck Whoopies im improved
proved improved on their season record by
defeating f*hi Kappa Tau 5-4 and
winning a forfeit from Pi Lambda
Phi 9-0. The Whoopies dashed the
championship hopes of Phi Kappa
Tau in a thrilling upset win on
Thursday, July 16th. The game
went seven innings, the longest
game of the season, before the

} o, I I -. \
another solid hit PI
.... In Mural Softball Play

FSU Makes Bid For SEC Spot

Florida State University bid
once again Saturday for admis admission
sion admission to the Southeastern Confer Conference.
ence. Conference.
For some time, FSU athletic
officials and supporters have had
ambitions for us to become a
member of the SEC President
Robert M. Strozier said in a let letter
ter letter to the Presidents of the SEC
schools.
Freshman Golfers Signed
University of golf coach
Oonrad Rehling today announced
the signing of four outstanding
Florida high schools.
The future freehman golf squad
members given grants-in-aid are:
Harry Root Jr. n, Tampa; Mar Marlen
len Marlen Jeffrey Vogt, Daytona
Beach; Robert Anderson, Saraso Sarasota;
ta; Sarasota; and Frank Mize, Panama
City.
These four top golf prospects
will enter school in September.

McGriff Chosen For Pan-Am Nine

Perry MoGriff, the University
at Florida's All-American first
baseman, has been selected by
the Olympic Baseball Committee
as a member of the United States
team to represent the United
States in the Pan-American
games, starting in late August.
McGriff, a senior from Gaines Gainesville,
ville, Gainesville, was recently picked on the
All-American baseball team. The
185-pounder hit .350 for the Gators
last year and was an All-South All-Southeastern
eastern All-Southeastern Conference selection. He
never made an error during the
entire season.

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Whoopies could push across the,
winning run. It came on as Char Charlie
lie Charlie Pike singled to lead off the
inning, advanced to third on Joe
jKersy'g double and scored on a
single by Charlie Strawman.
The run climaxed an uphill
struggle by the Whoopies who i
trailed at various points in the j
game by 2-0, 2-1, 3-1, and 4-3
scores. The Whoopies shelled Phij
Kappa Taus Ralph Kinney for
ten hits with Pike leading the |
way with three in four trips to 1
the plate. Pike also limited the
Phi Taus to only three hits, two
! in the first frame and a double
j by Stu Geiger in the fourth.
I Theta Chi salvaged what was
(i the whole a disastrous week of
two heart-breaking defeats by
beating the Corry Cougars 13-2 in
three innings. The game was j
shortened because of the 10-run
rule in summer softball. Theta
Chis other loss was at the hands
of the Wild Deeds 16-9. After lead leading
ing leading 6-0 in the first inning, Theta
Chi let the Wild Deeds come
back and get one run in the
third and fifth frames, four in
the fourth, two in the sixth, which
Theta Chi matched, and eight in
the seventh. Harris hit two home homeruns
runs homeruns for the Wild Deeds and
Moyle hit one.
Other action saw the Corry Cou Cou;
; Cou; gars even their record for the
j week with a 9-5 win over Flavet 3
| and the Chemical Bombers
: dropped Phi Kappa Tau 6-2 for
their third win of the season.
In Wednesdays action Corry
Cougars dumped the Wild Deeds
4-3. The hitting of the Wild Deeds
was led by Jon Moyle who got
his second homer in two days.
Roger Devore led the Corry Cou Cougars
gars Cougars hitting With a homer in the
j fifth.
Other action Wednesday saw
the Chemical Bombers get
smashed by the Quaffers 5-0. The
winning pitcher was Stan Lang,
the losing pitcher Tom Pavlock.
The Nine Ole Men finally fell
from their undefeated record
Wednesday when they lost 4-0 to
Phi Kappa Tau. This game was a
close one and almost hitless with
the exception of McCamey who
got a single for the Nine Ole Men
and Kinney and Finch who got a
single and double respectively for
Phi Kappa Tau.

I snare hi these hopes and will
appreciate in your consideration
of our interests.
Strozier said FSU is comparable
to SEC members in size and aca academic
demic academic achievements. The school
anticipates an enrollment of 8,200
this fall.
FSU also is comparable in ath athletics,
letics, athletics, he said. In dual competi competition
tion competition with SEC teams in eight
sports, FSU has a record of 147
victories against 102 losses and
four ties over a 12-year period.
UF Clash At Auburn
Already A Sellout
Auburns homecoming football
game with the University of
Florida was announced a sellout
Saturday by Athletic Director
Jeff Beard.
Earlier sellouts were announced
for games with Georgia Tech and
Alabama.

McGriff Is the second Florida
baseball player to receive such a
high honor hi as many yean.
Last year second baseman Berate
Parrish, also of Gainesville, was
a first-team All-American selec selection.
tion. selection.
His selection marks the third
such national honor to come to
a Gator athlete in the last year.
Florida tackle Val Heckman was
a first team tackle on a maga magazine
zine magazine All-American football team
last year. Senior golfer Tommy
Aaron waa also a first team All-
American choice.

MURAL MADNESS
Softball Rosters Show
Everyone Getting Into
The Intramurals Action
By LOU PEARLMAN
Gator Sports Editor

One of the most thankless jobs on campus is that of an Intra Intramural
mural Intramural official. Its rarity when an official receives any praise for
his work and generally he is the target of considerable criticism
from the losing team.
Officials, it is true, received financial remuneration in softball
this summer. Most of them agree, however, for the dollar they earn
in this respect, they can afford to take a little criticism, but at
times it is carried too far.
( Most of the criticism ccmes from the losing team and they
vent their anger on the officials. At times it is justified, but in
the majority of cases this is not so. This summer there has been
little room for undue criticism. Officials have gone through a train training
ing training period and are well versed in the rules.
If anyone thinks they can do a better job of officiating, than is
being done presently, they are more than welcome to come out
and try.
Remember! The next time youre participating in an Intra Intramural
mural Intramural contest, give the officials a word of praise if they do a
good job. If they make a few mistakes, bear with them because
they are doing the best job they can.
Softball Left In Spotlight
With intramural* golf and tennis over, softball remains in the
summer spotlight. At present, Nine Ole Men continue to bum up
the bracket with a record of 8-1.
The rosters of the summer softball teams show a definite trend
that everyone wants to participate in the murals activities. As an
example, we take the league-leading Nine Ole Men. Their roster
! shows a freshman, second baseman Robert Reiss; a senior, Business
Administration major, pitcher Roger Decker; the Assistant Director
of Housing, T. C. Carpenter; and the Head of the Economics De Department,
partment, Department, C. H. Donovan. As evidenced by the various jobs of
these people the summer softball league has done its purpose in
providing an opportunity for everyone to get into the act.
It is largely due to the excellent pitching of Roger Decker and
Gary Phipps that the Nine Ole Men have been able to crush their
opponents. Other outstanding members of their team include: G. E.
Woolfenden, a C-6 instructor; W. V. Wilmot, Management Depart Department
ment Department Head; and E. B. Deacon, a graduate student in Education.
It can be safely said that this team exemplifies a smooth run running
ning running machine. Here is a group of men who seem to know what every everyone
one everyone else on their team is thinking.
Another accomplishment of summer softball, has been to pro provide
vide provide fun and recreation for all. The perfect example of this can
be seen in the team from Flavet HI. They have exhibited perfect
sportsmanship and it can be readily seen that they are out thero
to have themselves a good time as well as win a ball game.
Recognition Given Where Due
We have heard it said that we take up too much space patting
people and organizations on the back. Well for the clarification of
the uninitiated we would like to say that the majority of these
people and clubs never receive recognition for the work they
do and its high time that someone took the trouble to give them that
recognition.
A constructive attitude in our opinion is more instructive than
continuous fault-finding. It is very easy to find the wrong things and
just as difficult to find the good. We have never sat on tb*
when we thought a cause was hurt, but to crusade just for the sake
of crusading doesnt appeal to us.

13 Days to Star Came

The 1959 Florida High School
All-Star football game is only 13
days away and the coaches of both
the North and South teams are'
starting to plan their attacks.
Fullbacks on both teams;
should play an important part in
the annual game. The South has.
two fine fullbacks, including Coral
Gables Ted Saussele, rated by
many to be the states No. 1 high
school player in 1958.
Saussele, a 5-11, 180-pounder,
gained 1,030-yards last year. He
was All-City, All-State and made
several All-American teams. Ted
will play college football for the
University of Miami.
Gene Tomlinson of Sebring is
the other Rebel fullback. Gene
was Little All-State last year as
wfell as making All-Ridge Confer Conference.
ence. Conference. He scored 20 touchdowns
and 10 extra points.
The North squad has four full fullbacks
backs fullbacks on the roster. They are
Gene Roberts of Sante Fe, Willie
Lager of Daytona Beach Sea Seabreeze,
breeze, Seabreeze, Myers Hand of Quincy and
| Gene Green of Lake City Colum Colum:
: Colum: bia.
Roberts, a 185-pounder, was All-
Conference, All-Area and All-State
|in 1958. Gene will attend Florida
UF Signs Frosh
Cage Prospects
University of Florida basketball
coach John Mauer today announc announced
ed announced the signing of two outstand outstanding
ing outstanding freshman basketball prospects I
from Greenbriar Military School*
in Lewisburg, West Virginia.
The future Gator freshman are;
Charles Bales of Beckley, West;
Virginia and Carlos Morrison of;
Huntington, West Virginia.
Bales is a 6 0, 155-pound guard
who played high school basketball
for Woodrow Wilson High in Beck Beckley.
ley. Beckley. There he had a 15-point aver average
age average and was All-Regional in 1937
'and 1958. Last year at Green Greenbriar,
briar, Greenbriar, Bales averaged 12-points aj
game and was chosen on the All- j
Sectional team. He had the honor]
of being chosen on both the 1958;
1 All-State and All-American teams. {
Morrison is a 63\ 205-pound
! forward who played his highl
school basketball at Huntington
I East before going to Greenbriar. I

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State tliis fall.
Lager gained over 2,000-yards
last year for Seabreeze and aedr aedred
ed aedred 20 touchdowns. He will play
college football for the University
of Florida.
Florida State will gain the ser services
vices services of Quincys top back, Hand.
Myers was All-Southern, All-State
and Little All-State last year. Ha
scored 111 points and gained 1,528-
yards.
Columbias Green was one of
the best back 3 in Nor tit Florida
last fall. He scored 25-points in
one game last year. The 5-10, 185-
pounder will attend the University
of Florida in September.
Advanced tickets may be
acquired by sending a check or
money order to Box 2787, Univer University
sity University Station, Gainesville. Advance
ticket prices are $1.50 for adults
and $.50 for children. Gate tickets
sold the day of the game will
cost $2.00 for adults and $.75 for
children.
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