Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
the largest
all-american
college semi-weekly
in the nation

Volume 50, Number 47

Bermuda Wear
Set for Coeds
Liberal Regulation on Shorts
Takes Effect Here May 15
University coeds may wear Bermuda Shorts any anywhere
where anywhere on campus at any time, beginning May 15.
The new Women Students Association ruling on

shorts goes into effect on
that dty.
Faculty members of the Uni*
... But really, these ARE
regulation Bermudas!
Heidegger
Work Cited
By Graeffe
By JAY THAL
Gator Staff Writer
Holzwege, Heideggers last
book, was a modem counterpart
to Platos. Socratic Apology
Dr. A. Didier Graeffe, of the Hu Humanities
manities Humanities Department, explained
in the Friday discussion on Chri Christianity
stianity Christianity and the Existentialists
at the Presbyterian Student Cen Center.
ter. Center.
Dr. Graeffe, who studied under
Heidegger in Germany, told of
the reasons for and the explan explanation
ation explanation of Holrwege, and Heide Heideggers
ggers Heideggers place among Existential Existentialists.
ists. Existentialists.
Heidegger, who now lives in se seclusion
clusion seclusion in the Black Forest, was
once one of Europes most im important
portant important phlosophers. He was once
offered the chair of Philosophy
at Heidelburg but declined it be because
cause because he thought the position
should go to his teacher Edmund
Husserl, around whom 20th cen century
tury century European philosophy center centered.
ed. centered.
Concerns Nazism
Holrwege, which he wrote in
1950, means: a wrong path in the
forest, a dead end, according to
Dr. Graeffe, and explains his ho honest
nest honest mistake in following Nasi Nasiism.
ism. Nasiism.
Heideggers primary concern
was in the field of seman semantics
tics semantics in which only Bergson
surpassed him. Unlike the seman semantisists
tisists semantisists idea that words are for
communicating and due to some
distortions do not always repre represent
sent represent the idea they stand for,
the Existentialist Heidegger mai maintained
ntained maintained that words are a means
of thinking and thoughts do not
exist without words and that one
must look for hidden wisdom in
them.
Existentialism is, as Dr. Gra Graeffe
effe Graeffe said, a modem Ontology
which is based, as are all other
true philosophies, on doubting,
i.e. the destruction of all certain certainty.
ty. certainty. Doubting may therefore be
equated with thinking and one
may therefore reword Descartes
saying to I doubt, therefore I
am.
Liquor Soles
Seem 'Normal'
Package sales in the liquor
stores that lie just over the
county line were reported as
average to slow for the Frolics
weekend. (My one of the five
contacted said their business in increased.
creased. increased.
Storys Liquor Store, on U.S.
19 near Trenton said the week weekend
end weekend was their biggest this
Spring. Mrs. Kay Henricksen
said that Friday and Saturday
there was a steady stream of
customers ad day.
Shaugnessys in Melrose; Jims
Bar, Trenton; arid the Blue Pin Pines
es Pines Bar, Keystone Heights, repor reported
ted reported business as average. E. H.
Eland at Shaugnessys said,
Our weekly volume never var varies
ies varies much over these special oc occasions,
casions, occasions, since most of our busi business
ness business is steady customers.
Rubys Restaurant, south of
Gainesville on U. 8. 441, report reported
ed reported business off 50 per cent. An
employee, who would not give
his ngme, said that the drop off
could be attributed to the tomup
highway. U. S. 441 is now being
widened south of Gainesville.
Jim Sherpe of Jim's Bar said
that the weekend before Frolics
his business was up more than
this past weekend.

the FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

versity are being sent letters
this week, letting them know
of the new regulation. This
is being done to ascertain the
general feeling of professors con concerning
cerning concerning coeds wearing Bermudas
in the classroom.
Under the ruling, any type of
slim jeans, pedal pushers and
slacks are out, except in the rec recreation
reation recreation rooms and Coed Club.
Elastic sports clothes, Jamaica
shorts or short shorts may not be
worn in any public area.
WA Ruling
The ruling, passed by the WSA
recently, is as fllows:
A. Bermuda shorts may be
worn everywhere on campus in including
cluding including the classroom, Library,
Cafeteria, and Student Service
Center. With Bermuda shorts,
sport blouses and sandals or sport
shores should be worn. High heels
and dressy blouses, T-shirt or
jerseys are considered inapprop inappropriate,
riate, inappropriate, and are not to be worn
with Bermuda shorts. Shoes
should be worn at all time in
public areas. General appearance
shall be neat and in good taste.
B. Slim Jims, pedal pushers and
slacks may be worn ONLY in the
recreation rooms and Coed Club.
They are NOT TO BE WORN
ON CAMPUS.
C. Knit or elastic sports clothes,
Jamaica shorts or short shorts
MAY NOT BE WORN i n any pu public
blic public area.
Sunbathing
D. Sunbathing and apparel ap appropriate
propriate appropriate for sunbathing such as
halters and bathing suits shall be
confined to the sun decks.
E. For campus wear, extreme
sunback dresses and plunging
necklines are considered in poor
taste.
F. Wearing sports slothes in
the City of Gainesville is eonsi eonsidered
dered eonsidered poor taste.
G. Penalty:
1. First offense: Saturday night
restriction.
2. second offense: Friday and
Saturday night restriction.
S. third offense: Referral to Ju Judiciary
diciary Judiciary at the discretion of Hall
Council.
If the privilege that has been
extended is abused, it will mean
the withdrawal of these regula regulations
tions regulations and probable return to the
previous ones of 1957-58.
Board Given
Free Reign
In Gator Post
The Publications SI act oral
Board has been given free reign
to make its own selection of an
Alligator business manager for
next year, in a new interpretra interpretration
tion interpretration handed down by Honor Court
Chancellor Bob Graham.
The Board had asked the Honor
Court for a clarification of its
decision recently in which the se selection
lection selection of Bartow Sophomore Geo George
rge George Brown was invalidated since
Brown does not have the required
two semesters of service on the
Alligator.
Miami sophomore Martin Stei Steiner,
ner, Steiner, who was passed over in the
selection by the Board, had the re required
quired required number of semesters.
Grahasn, after consultation with
the Honor Court Board of Masters,
ruled that the Board does not now
have to automatically select Stei Steiner,
ner, Steiner, even though at the time of
selection Steiner was the only
qualified applicant.
Mart Again?
A possibility is that the Board
will reopen for applications and
begin the task of selecting a busi business
ness business manager all over again.
John Paul Jones, journalism
professor and chairman of the
Board, has not said what the
Board intends to do on the mat matter.
ter. matter.
In making its origninal selec selection
tion selection of Brown in March, the
Board by a 5-2 vote decided that
even though Steiner had the nu number
mber number of semesters, the Constitu Constitution
tion Constitution gave the Board the dis discretion
cretion discretion to select applicants on
the basis of all their qualifica qualifications,
tions, qualifications, not just the semester re requirements.
quirements. requirements.
Such a semester rule may not
be waived, is what the Honor
Court in effect ruled in a case
brought before it by Steiner.

University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, Tuesday April 29, 1958

r,
Tht Old and the New at Frolics Weekend
Ail smiles is lovely Rose Marie Meeks after being chosen 1968 Miss University of Florida at
the Spring Frolics dance Friday night. The green-eyed Wond freshman Tri Belt received a trophy
and gifts from her sorority sister, last year's Miss U. of F., Nancy Warner, a junior from Daytona
Beach. Rose Marie is the fifth member In a row of Delta Delta Delta to be chosen Miss U. of F.
The remaining four finalist comprising the Miss U. of F. court are: Katherine Finis, Daytona
Beach; Barbara Moss, Gaffney, 8. C.; Laurie Truscott, and Arlene Baltsman, St. Petersburg.

Reitz Backs
Addition to
Law School
The Law School building may
get its proposed classroom ex expansion
pansion expansion program if a proposal by
University President J. Wayne
Reitz is approved by state offic officials.
ials. officials.
The appropriation would mean
more classrooms for the new stu students
dents students in the future.
Reitz told-the Alligator last week
that the 5194,000 amount for Law
School expansion was cut by the
Board of Control as a state
economy measure, but he would
soon ask the State Cabinet to
replace the amount.
We need this Law School ap appropriation
propriation appropriation Reitz told the Alli Alligator.
gator. Alligator.
The University president said
that he would propose that the
$1,306,000 approved for mens dor dormitory
mitory dormitory construction here be cur curtailed
tailed curtailed to make way for the $194,000
Law School addition.
Several other items were also
cut by the Control Board upon an
economy re-evaluation directed by
the Cabinet, said Reitz, but all
are so expensive that to push for
any one of them would be disas disastrous
trous disastrous to any appropriation already
approved for other expansion.
Small Enough
Only the $194,000 Law School
amount is small enough to be
built without seriously impairing
approved construction. Therefore,
I will suggest that the mens dor dormitory
mitory dormitory be somewhat curtailed so
that the law students may get
this needed appropriation, he
said.
(Continued *n Page THREE)

Brooklyn College Paper Fights for Freedom

A special faculty committee
at Brooklyn College, New York,
appointed by President Harry
D. Gideonse, has been investi investigating
gating investigating circumstances leading to
the revolt against editorial re restrictions
strictions restrictions on casnpus publi publications.
cations. publications.
The revolt included the re resignation
signation resignation of four editors of the
coli'ege weekly newspaper,
Kingsman, and four faculty
members of the Student-Faculty
Committee on Publications.
As the investigating commit committee,
tee, committee, headed by Dean Abraham
Goodhartz, was preparing to
open hearings, the new editors
of Kingsman came out last
week strongly in defense of their
resigned editors.
Norman Goldstein, the new
editor of the paper, said:
I took the job to continue to

DURING FROLICS WEEKEND

Rose Marie Chosen
New Miss U. of F.
By PAT MURPHY
Gator Feature Editor
A beauty" queen who hates beauty contests is Rose Marie
Meeks, the new Miss University of Florida.

Preview Slated
On Education TV
A sneak preview at the type
programs to be aired over the new
University of Florida educational
television station will be stag staged
ed staged this week, School of Journalism
and Communications officials an announced
nounced announced yesterday.
The programs, similar to those
which will be telecast when Chan Channel
nel Channel 5 goes on the air in the fall,
will be transmitted over a closed closedcircuit
circuit closedcircuit system and may only be
watched in receiver-outfitted class classrooms
rooms classrooms in the stadium.
All of the programs will be
live productions so that problems
associated with that type of tele telecast
cast telecast can be studied. Among the
programs to be rehearsed are:
a program on water management,
a college level first year French
lesson, a family finance program,
and a mathematics instructional
program.
The Federal Communications
Commission recently authorized
the University to proceed with
construction of transmitting facili facilities
ties facilities in Gainesville. Studio facili facilities
ties facilities and equipment have been in
use at the University for some
time in teaching closed circuit
journalism courses.

FOUR EDITORS RESIGN-

fight for the ideals for which
those editors resigned.
In the first issue after Gold Goldstein
stein Goldstein and his associates took
over, the Kingsman spoke out
editorially in their defense.
Fought for Beliefs
They fought for the basic
right to print their beliefs inde independently
pendently independently and'without fear of
reprisal, the editorial said.
They fought to accept the res responsibility
ponsibility responsibility that comes with those
privileges.
Only when further harsher
restrictions were placed on them
did they lose all hope of achiev achieving
ing achieving those rights. They showed
their self-respect meant more
to them than a leading position
on this paper.
We applaud their resignation.
We have replaced them with a
view toward carrying on their
struggle for independent expres expression

Rose Marie is a blond, green greeneyed
eyed greeneyed freshman from Miami who
la majoring in secondary edu education.
cation. education. She moved to Miami with
her parents from New York
11 years ago.
Her reasons for disliking beau beauty
ty beauty contests are, I get so scar scared.
ed. scared. I guess I just dont have
enough confidence.
Rose Marie says she was sur surprised
prised surprised when chosen Miss Univer University
sity University of Florida this weekend. It
seems like a dream, thats all.
she remarked.
The peppy Tri Delt lives on
second floor, N. W. Broward.
Her favorite activity is danc dancing.
ing. dancing. She has appeared in U.S.O.
shows in Nassau and Cuba and
has taken dancing lessons since
she was 11 years old.
Her entry in the talent divi division
sion division of the beauty contest was
a modem dance from Tommy
Dorseys Boogie Woogie/
Rose Marie also lists painting,
swimming and travelling as
enjoyable pasttimes. She is also
an earnest student who made a
2.5 average last semester.
When asked about her post postcollege
college postcollege plans, Rose Marie said
she hopes to get married and
then teach her children how to
dance.

sion expression and personal responsibili responsibility.
ty. responsibility.
Dean Goodhartz said his com committee
mittee committee would make a study of
the complete student-faculty re relationship
lationship relationship in the matter of cam campus
pus campus publications.
"We have no pre-conceived
recommendations, he said. We
plan to begin weekly hearings.
We invite interested parties to
bring some enlightened opinions
before us.
Dean Goodhartz said the com committee
mittee committee would continue to hold its
hearings until it came up with
recommendations.
No Punishment
We are not concerned with the
contents of any specific edi editorials,
torials, editorials, he said. We are not
going to seek out a culprit. We
are not going to determine pun punishment.
ishment. punishment.
We are going to study our

END-OF-YEAR-REPORTS FILED
Cabinet This Year
Active in 'Spurts'

Work Not Distributed on
Even Basis: Beardsley
By JOE THOMAS
Gator City Editor
The thirteen members of the President's Cabinet
submitted their annual reports to Student Body Presi President
dent President Eddie Beardsley last week.
Commenting on the Cabinet in general, Beardsley
felt that the workload in many cases was disproportion-

ately distributed and that
many of the posts were ac active
tive active only in spurts with
little to do most of the year.
This year, Beardsley said,
Ive tried to equalize the quan quantity
tity quantity of work by assigning other
tasks to Cabinet members be besides
sides besides the specific duties outlined
for them in the constitution.
Beardsley also pointed out that
many students didnt realize how
time-consuming some of the Ca Cabinet
binet Cabinet posts were, A lot of them
(Cabinet members) work hard,
the president added, "but don't
do anyting flashy and get very
little publicity.
The Cabinet met with Beards Beardsley
ley Beardsley semi-monthly at the begin-
Atkinson to
Head SRA
For 1958-59
Richard Atkinson, 6AS, was
elected president of the Student
Religious Association in an elec election
tion election meeting Sunday afternoon.
Other officers elected were
Vice-President, Margo Reitz, 3AS;
Secretary, Joanne Weiss, 2UC;
and Treasurer, Sanford Mayo,
2UC.
Atkinson, chaplain of Sigma Nu
Social fraternity, is the president
of the SiRA Fraternity Sorority
Council. A graduate student from
Capital University in Columbus,
Ohio, Atkinson is a member of
Tau Kappa Alpha, speech honor honorary;
ary; honorary; and Phi Alpha Theta, his history
tory history honorary.
In discussing plans for the SRA
for the coming year Atkinson sta stated,
ted, stated, I think the SRA is at a
significant developing point on
this campus. The next few years
would show the position that it
will continue to hold on campus.
This University has one of the most
active Student Religious associa associations
tions associations of any campus Ive seen
and I hope it continues to remain
active.
Atkinson also indicated an in interest
terest interest in renewing religious activ activity
ity activity among the fraternities and so sororities
rorities sororities on campus in the light
of the stated ideals of these
groups.
I thank the SRA delegates for
selecting me to hold this high
office and I will atempt to live
up to the standards ot past SRA
leaders, Atkinson said.
Writing Session
All students desiring to join
the Alligator staff are invited
to a newswriting session to tomorrow,
morrow, tomorrow, Wednesday at 2:30 in
the Alligator editorial offices,
basement of Florida Union.
Present staff members are
also invited to the session, to
be led by journalism instruc instructor
tor instructor George H. Miller.

constitution for possible flaws.
Our object is to try to determine
the best possible setup. When we
feel we have all the available
data and opinions we will make
our recommendations.
Editors of the Kingsman indi indicate
cate indicate they have been running in into
to into increasing difficulties in re recent
cent recent years. The resignations
were in protest against having
a faculty advisor at editorial
board metings and against be being
ing being compelled to print opposi opposition
tion opposition editorials and features.
We would find the presence
of a faculty advisor at our meet meetings
ings meetings uncomfortable, Goldstein
pointed out.
"And we do not believe we
should be forced to print oppo opposition
sition opposition editorials and even fea features
tures features such m we had to
in regard to a sports feature
recently.*

ning of the year and switched
to monthly meetings this semes semester.
ter. semester. However, Beardsley said
that from the experience he gain gained
ed gained this year he believed it best
for the president to meet with
his cabinet weekly in order to
create a closer and more effi efficient
cient efficient administration.
The following is a list of the
Cabinet members and a summa summary
ry summary of their reports:
INTERIOR: Truman Skinner,
main duty is to supervise Fall
and Spring elections.
In addition to this, Skinner
proposed an ammendment to the
Executive Council whirfi recom recommended
mended recommended the unrestricted posting
of "poop sheets during a cam campaign.
paign. campaign. But it failed to pass.
During the recent controvercy
concerning the distribution of
"filthy poop, Skinner worked
with a committee which suggest suggested
ed suggested that Student Government create
an investigating elections board
to penalise persons responsible
for such occurrences.
Skinner also served as Chair Chairman
man Chairman of the Student Government
Spring Orientation forum.
FINANCE: Norman Upoff,
keeps records of the financial
standing of all organizations sub subsidiary
sidiary subsidiary to Student Government.
Lipoff gave the Finance portion
of the Orientation forum. He
worked out, in conjunction with
the Secretary-Treasurer, a new
system of requisitions for Stu Student
dent Student Government funds. And his
office compiled and distributed a
new finance manual to business
managers of all organizations.
The Finance Secretary worked
on the constitutional revision com committee
mittee committee which redistributed some
of the student fees. And he also
served as an ex-officio member
of the Budget and Finance com committee.
mittee. committee.
ORGANIZATIONS: Jerry
Browder, acts as liaison officer
between Student Government and
its subsidiary organizations, work working
ing working with the Advisor to Organi Organizations.
zations. Organizations.
Browders staff worked with
Dean McClellands office to re rewrite,
write, rewrite, print, and distribute the
Official Directory of Student
Government and Student Orga Organizations.
nizations. Organizations.
As secretary of organizations,
Browder is a member of the Flo Florida
rida Florida Union Board of Managers,
the committee for Organizations
and Social Activities, and the sub subcommittee
committee subcommittee on Fraternities, Socie Societies,
ties, Societies, and Clubs.
P-rowder was in charge of plan planning
ning planning the Student Government
Banquet to be held Thursday
night.
LABOR: Joe Bondi, endeavors
to aid student employees and
their employers in promoting
good working conditions.
Bondis staff has provided a
file on summer employment and
listings of on and off-campus jobs
in the Student Government of office
fice office and has kept office hours
every weekday afternoon to make
them available to students.
The Secretary of Labor has al also
so also met several times with Food
Service officials in an attempt to
obtain a general wage increase
and set up some sort of a stu student
dent student seniority plan.
INSURANCE: Gil Goshom,
runs the Student Government
health and accident insurance pro
gram.
SOLICITATIONS: Fred Ward,
controls all charity drives on
campus.
The main work of Wards com committee
mittee committee centered around making
plans for the fall Gator Chest
Drive which collected $2109.27.
Proposed plans for a second se semester
mester semester drive were discarded af after
ter after considering all the hinderen hinderences
ces hinderences to this objective.
PUBLIC RELATIONS: Dave
Chapman, tries to promote bet better
ter better relations between the students,
faculty members, and the gener general
al general community and state.
Chapman handled the drive ini initiated
tiated initiated by Blue Key to acquire an
alligator mascot. His office has
remained responsible for the
care and feeding of the alligator.
Chapman was also a member
of the Student Government anti antiriot
riot antiriot committee working with Dean
(Continued on Page THREE)

serving
10,000 students
at university
of florida

Four Pages This Edition

:
* i- ?
CLAUDE PEPPER
Full Schedule
Set Here for
Claude Pepper
Thursday, the Student Body may
get an opportunity to find out
whether one of the most contro controversial
versial controversial figures in Florida politics
plans to run for re-election.
Former United States Senator
Claude Pepper will be on the Flor Florida
ida Florida campus for a series of talks
in the afternoon and evening.
He plans a public address at
6:30 subsequent to a reception in
Bryan Lounge at 4:30. Both events
are open to the public in Florida
Union.
At 7:80 p.m., Pepper will be
featured speaker before the an annual
nual annual Student Government banquet.
Pepper has not given any indi indication
cation indication as to whether he will
break his plans for re-election to
the Senate during his University
stop-over. Members of the for former
mer former senators staff say, however,
that he will be a candidate for
the Senate against incumbent
Spessaa-d Holland in the Sep September
tember September Democratic primary.
Pepper is slated to arrive in
Gainesville Thursday afternoon.
His topic in the address at 6:30,
first public lecture to be spon sponsored
sored sponsored by the newly formed
Committee on Special Events, is
"Vital Issues of the Day, in Par Party,
ty, Party, State and Nation.
Students and faculty are invited
to attend.
A native of Alabama, Pepper
was admitted to the Florida Bar
in 1924 after graduation from the
University of Alabama, where he
secured an A. 8., and Harvard
Law School, where he obtained
his L. L. B. He practiced law in
Perry and Tallahassee until 1957.
Pepper became United States
Senator from Florida in 1936 after
having served in the Florida Leg Legislature
islature Legislature and several other ad administrative
ministrative administrative positions. The sub subsequent
sequent subsequent 16 years saw Pepper
become a storm center of contro controversy
versy controversy in both state and national
politics.
In 1950 Pepper was defeated In
his bid for re-election to the
United States Senate by George
Smathers in one of the hottest po political
litical political campaigns in the history
of Florida politics. Pepper then
returned to the private practice
of law.
Campus Thefts
Spark Weekend
A bicycle that had been sto stolen
len stolen from M. W. Matchett, 131
Sledd Hall, was recovered by
the University Police Depart Department
ment Department early Sunday morning,
and a West Palm Beach man,
was arrested and charged with
petit larceny.
Patrolman Julian Smith found
the stolen bike in front of the
Waffle Shop on West University
Avenue at 4:20 a.m. He arrest arrested
ed arrested the man who started to ride
away on it.
Stanley Wayne Reid, 20, of
West Palm Beach, was lodged
in the city jail on a charge of
petit larceny and held under
$l5O bail. Reid is not listed in
the student directory compiled
by the registrars office.
Lt. Vernon K. Hollman re reported
ported reported that a number of new
thefts were reported over Fro Frolics
lics Frolics weekend, but that the num number
ber number of complaints received by
police was no larger than on a
"normal weekend.
A daring thief with a flair
for the unusual took a 36 inch
drill flag on an eight foot pole
from the drill field at 1:30 Thur Thur-sday
-sday Thur-sday afternoon.



' FLORIDA ALLIfiATOR
Our 50th Year of Publication

Page 2

THOUGHT FOR THE DAY
Real education must ultimately be limited to men who insist on knowing; the rest is mere sheep sheepherding.
herding. sheepherding. Esra Pound.
Compelling Reasons

GREEKS ON CAMPUS annually de debate
bate debate the question Should there be a sys system
tem system of delayed rushing or not ?
As the Fall semester rolls around, the
question fades into insignificance as the
fraternities and sororities look more to
the pocketbooks of the rushees than the
stand-offish question of whether or not
to push for delayed rushing.
5 The Alligator, after viewing the hocus hocuspocus,
pocus, hocuspocus, and hectic activity of freshmen
and Greeks each September, has come
to the conclusion that perhaps a system
of delayed rush might not be such a bad
idea after all. It might have the following
results:
1) The Greeks would have a semester,
or a full year, depending on the length
of the delay, in order to fully examine
which rushees they desired and which
The Florida Alligator
Ali-AiMrican Rating, 1953-57
Oftolw wona to the Lett to the Editor sad atoned
columns appearing on this pace are not necessarily those
Os the Florida Amcator. Only the editorials are the official
optnlea of the aewtpeper.
The Florida AUlfatar Is published each Tuesday and
Friday exoept daring holidays, vacations and examination
periods. Entered as second class matter at United States
Foal Office. Gainesville. Florida. Offices in Florida Union,
F* MMI, extension 096. Subscriptions $1.50 for the remain.
der Os this eemaeter.
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Managing Editor LEE FENNELL
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ART, NEWS EDITOR; ROGER LEWIS, STATE
EDITOR; PAT MURPHY, FEATURE EDITOR;
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SISTANT ASSISTANT EDITOR; 808 BENOIT, ASST. NEWS
EDITOR; GRACE HINSON, SOCIAL EDITOR.
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Business Staff: Joe Beckett, Martin Steiner, John
McDowell.

MURF'S COLUMN

'B' (for Bermuda) Day Arrives Here

By FAT MUEUPHY
Gator Feature Editor
May 15th has been sgt u
"B Day (that "B standing
for Bermuda*) for women on
this campus.
00-eda will stroll to their
B:4o* in walking short* for the
first tfcne, enjoying comfort in
the hot weather and kidding
short-wearing male* who sport
typical bony knees and hairy
legs.,
Although B Day is more

than two weeks
away, it seems
to be the right
time to explain
the reasons be behind
hind behind these new
rules for the
benefit of co coeds
eds coeds who will
wear Bermu Bermudas
das Bermudas and for all
male students
and faculty

I
1
MURPHY

members surmembers who
art not familiar with the new
regulations.
To sum up the rule briefly,
it states coeds can wear Ber Bermudas
mudas Bermudas on campus at any time,
in any place. This ruling ap applies,
plies, applies, however, only to BERMU BERMUDA
DA BERMUDA shorts, and does not in include
clude include any other type of sports
clothes.
Two general reasons lie be behind
hind behind the Bermuda regulations:
1. It gets uncomfortably hot
in Gainesville from April to Oct*
ober. Bermudas will be more

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Editorials

they did not. The students academic pro progress
gress progress could be reviewed, and he would
have to prove himself academically be before
fore before gaining the right to pledge.
2) The new Students, on the other
hand, would have ample time to decide
whether or not they really desired to join
a fraternity or sorority. If it was decided
in the affirmative, this delay might give
the new student better perspective about
which group offered him more advant advantages.
ages. advantages.
Delayed rush has been debated more
often than we care to relate. What it
boils down to is this: the student, given
a semester or two to really see what
college life is all about, would be a bet better
ter better student, and a better fraternity man
in the long run.
The present system is doing the Uni University
versity University of Florida a great disservice disserviceeven
even disserviceeven harm, we would say.
The Greeks gobble up the typical fresh freshman,
man, freshman, he is introduced to the caste sys system
tem system of fraternity life in which he meets
few others than the same group of fel fellows
lows fellows or coeds day in and day out; he
or she is not exposed to other segments
of campus life as well as if a semester
or two intervened before pledging.
One has only to look around and see
the increasing numbers of independents
who are participating in campus activi activitiesand
tiesand activitiesand the declining interest in the
fraternity-controlled Student Govern Government,
ment, Government, to come to the conclusion that
something is needed to further increase
participation on campus.
Fraternities, which presently hinder
student activity on campus more than
they help it, are largely to blame.
We know that the financial reasoning
of getting the pledge in quick and empty emptying
ing emptying him of his dues is a compelling rea reason
son reason for the Greeks retaining the present
system of immediate rush.
But even more compelling is to give
the new student more than a few weeks
breather between the time he arrives in
Gainesville and makes a decision that
will affect his college life for four suc succeeding
ceeding succeeding years.

comfortable tor classwear for
coeds who have suffered from
the temperature in the ten years
the University has been co-edu co-educ&tional.
c&tional. co-educ&tional.
3. The present rules about
campuswear are almost impo impossible
ssible impossible to enforce effectively.
These rules specify certain tim times
es times and places Bermudas may
b* worn, and are generally
confusing to the coeds.
*
The rales have also been dif difficult
ficult difficult to administer because Fla Flavet
vet Flavet wives, visitors and high
school students are not bound
by their limitations. It is diffi difficult
cult difficult to tell if the girl walking
across the Plasa in Bermudas
is a student hers or a visitor.
Addsd to this is the feeling
by coeds that if other women
can wear shorts they should
be allowed to wear them also.
The bony-kneed, hairy-legged
males on this campus who wear
Bermudas have been an addi*
tional source of envy to coeds
who sweat through the day in
shirts and bulky crinolines.
Many of the faculty members
have allowed shorts to be worn
to their classes, especially in
the Art Department and Archi Architecture
tecture Architecture Building. The feeling has
arisen that Bermudas should be
made a universal privilege If a
few can already wear them.
Backing up the claims of
coeds at Florida is the fact that
Bermudas have been worn at
many colleges and universities

Tuesday, April 29, 1958

throughout the country for
years with no bad effects.
Coeds have been working an
Bermuda rules for years through
the Women Students* Associa Association.
tion. Association. The rale that will take ef effect
fect effect May 15 has been discuss discussed
ed discussed and reworded for over a
year.
In passing the Bermuda rat rating,
ing, rating, WSA felt it was making a
decision backed by most of the
women on this campus, because
the girls who participated in the
vote represented all womens
residence halls, sororities and
off-campus residents. Although
thj vote was not a unanimous
one fa\ oring the new provision
a large majority voted their ap approval
proval approval
* *
Why specify Bermudas for
classwear? The answer is that
Bermudas are a compromise in
length and cut of sports cloth clothing
ing clothing wcm by women today.
Although some opposition may
arise concerning Bermudas, one
thing 1g remember Is that not
all coeds will immediately start
wearing shorts everywhere. The
charade will come gradually, and
profetsors who cannot accept
this :u,e still retain the right
to prohibit Bermudas in their
individual classrooms
The general opinion of coeds
and males, however, is one of
approval, and now all eyes
are turned towards May 15th
and the dawn of B Day at
this University.

fHE CHANCELLOR SPEAKS OUT

Graham Suggests Changes for 'Rejuvenation' of Honor Court

(Editor's Note Honor Court
Chancellor Bob Graham pre presorts
sorts presorts here his views on improve improvement
ment improvement of the Honor Court and the
Honor System. This la the first
of a series, the second install installment
ment installment of which will appear in
Fridays Alligator.)
By 808 GRAHAM
Honor Court Chancellor
la a recent conversation with
one of the better known campus
student leaders, we had occas occasion
ion occasion to discuss a proposed change
in Student Government. Hie
opinion wae that he wae not so
much opposed to the specific
proposal as he was to the gen general
eral general idea of change.
This appears to be a rather

prevalent view
among the
group which
should be sup supplying
plying supplying leader leadership.
ship. leadership. However,
if I might be
allowed to pa paraphrase
raphrase paraphrase Geor George
ge George Kennan, if
we can excuse
ourselves into
idolatry of our
past, we can

iv. r ***
GRAHAM

similarly excuse ourselves into
permanent mediocricity and
stagnation in Student Govern Government.
ment. Government.
Os the many institutions of
this campus which appear sub subject
ject subject to this Inertia, none is so
guilty as our most cherished
tradition, the Honor System.
However, the Honor Court sur surmembers

CAMPUS PROFILES
If
I
II If 11
"Fine Arts"
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Legislators Won't Vote
For State Below Alachua

Editor:
I read with interest the col column
umn column by Dan Hackel which ap appeared
peared appeared in the April 25th edition
of the Alligator, and it has
moved me to write this letter
in an attempt to explain how
the division of the State of
Florida could come about and
why the division line would
have to be drawn as far up as
Alachua County instead of in
the manner Mr. Hackel describ described.
ed. described.
Before the state could be become
come become divided it must first be
approved by the State Legisla Legislature
ture Legislature and by popular vote in
that order. The latter of the
two would probably be in fa favor
vor favor of such a bill because of
the greater population concen concentrations
trations concentrations in south Florida, but
in order for such a bill to pass
in the State Legislature there
must be some provisions in the
bill that would create a majori majority
ty majority vote in it* favor.
The representatives of the less lesspopulated
populated lesspopulated central counties fully

in Ute form of a realistic %p*
vey of this winter indicates
that this sacred cow might
need some major rejuvenation
praisal of its position in the
1958 University of Florida.
This is going to require the
acceptance of the fact that our
University today is a far differ different
ent different one than that In which the
Honor Bystem was originated.
Two major changes appear to
be the Univereitya increased
numerical size, and the more
subtle corrolary of growing stu student
dent student impersonality.

These changes have affected
the Honor System in two parti particular
cular particular areas The growth of the
Unversity has left the Honor
Court with the same functional
apparatus for a 10,000 Student
body as formerly was used for
1500. This has left the opera opera|
| opera| tion of the Court open to the
charge of justice delayed being
justice denied. This is most as assuredly
suredly assuredly not due to the desire
of those on the Court but by
the several limitations of aca academic
demic academic work and time. The time
has long passed that a major
re-organisation of the Honor
Court need be undertaken.
The Impersonality of the pre present
sent present University has withdrawn
the strongest pillar of our Sys System,
tem, System, the social pressure on the
potential cheater by his fellow
students. It also reduces the
average students feeling of re responsibility
sponsibility responsibility to the System.
(This is well illustrated in -he
recent Honor Court survey
which indicated that only 2 per

realize that if the line should be
drawn south of them their In Income
come Income would be cut almost in
half, whereas if the line wer*
drawn north of them their in income
come income would almost double. Un Under
der Under these circumstances no re representative
presentative representative south of the line
would vote against it.
This is the reason why the
line has been drawn to include
Citrus, Marion, Alachua, Put Putnam
nam Putnam and St. Johns Counties; to
receive the majority vots such
a line would afford.
Gerald E. Warrlner

LETTERS WELCOME
The Alligator welcomes let letters
ters letters to the editor. Short letters
are preferred- Name will be
withheld only on specified re request.
quest. request. Address letters to edi editor,
tor, editor, Florida Alligator, Flori Florida
da Florida Union, campus.

cant of those who had seen
cheating had exercised their re responsibility
sponsibility responsibility toward the System.)
Accepting these new condi conditions,
tions, conditions, I would like to suggest
two alterations as possible solu solutions
tions solutions for the present situation.
The first of these would be the
elimination of the Honor Sys System
tem System from the University College
C-coursea. This realistically ac accepts
cepts accepts the present conditions whi which
ch which make this the area of Uni Univarsity
varsity Univarsity work in which the great greatest
est greatest amoust of cheating takes
place. In the past two years, 44
per cent of the cases brought
before the Court were C-course
violations.
We are expecting far too
great a metamorphosis from
the average high school gra graduate
duate graduate when we assume that all
hie past habits will pass away
when he comes undsr the in influence
fluence influence of the Honor System.
*
Unfortunately, when the stu
dent finds that cheating is pre prevalent
valent prevalent in hie first courses at
the University, his feeling of
cynicism at the Honor System
is justified. This is a feeling
which might well Influence his
attitude toward the Honor Sys System
tem System when he moves into an
upper division college.
"Hie freshman student, and
particularly the sophomore, who
takes a schedule with a mix mixture
ture mixture of C-course and upper divi division
sion division work will have an oppor opportunity
tunity opportunity to view the great dif differences
ferences differences between the advantag advantages
es advantages of the Honor System and the
limitation of the proctorad

PUNCHIN' JUDY

Uncle Tom's Cobin; A Mellow Dramo

By JUDY BATES
Gator Copy Editor
This is a drama for the stu students
dents students .
SCENE. Third floor of the
Florida Union. At the center of
the stage is a raised platform..
There are three tables on the
platform and several chairs
are placed behind them so the
main characters will be fac facing
ing facing the audience. Right stage
is another table and two chairs.
These chairs are facing left
stage and are for the secretary
and a reporter. There is a door
ieft stage through which the
characters enter and exit.
AT RISE. The stage is empty.

After a mo moment,
ment, moment, Number
42 and Num Number
ber Number 50 enter.
Number 42 if
carr yi n g a
stack of mime mimeographed
ographed mimeographed agen agenda.
da. agenda. He places
them on table
center stage.
NUMBER 60.

BAIT#'

(Thumbing through the agenda)
Those things look pretty thick.
How cqme?
NUMBER 42, Its not just the
agenda. There are copies of the
proposed amendments there,
too.
NUMBER 60, What do they
do that for? Do they think we
actually wade through that
stuff?
NUMBER 42, I think they
know we dont read it. Its got gotta
ta gotta be printed up . redtape,
you know.

(By this time, the other char characters
acters characters have begun to arrive.
They come in groups, chat chattering
tering chattering among themselves. Boon,
the room is almost full. Sud Suddenly,
denly, Suddenly, the room becomes hush hushed,
ed, hushed, and after a long pause,
Number 1 enters. He takes the
chair on the platfonm. Numbers
2,3, and 4 follow him and take
their seats with him.)

BILL GRAYSON

Grayson's Off On Another Names Jag

By BILL GRAYSON
Gator Columnist
Well, gang, here we go again
on another name jag. You have
to admit with the heat of the
summer sun that its awfully
hard to come up with new and
scintillating ideas for columns.
So this morning off we go on
that merry chase of drop that
name.
This week I should like to
dedicate my column to Rose
Marie Meeks, latest Tri Delt
Miss University of Florida
to Barbara Moss who got pin pinned
ned pinned ..... to Jane Wilson who
didnt to Penny Cobum,
the DGs answer to Francoise
Sagan to
i Tom Biggs Uie
i'ess who writes
as short a MI MIGRATION
GRATION MIGRATION u nn Ido ..
..to Pat Mur Murphy,
phy, Murphy, Trianon to the irate
letter writer who got so car carried
ried carried away he thought Vat 69
was the Popes telephone num number.
ber. number.
To Gibb Gibbons who lifts
... to Harry Mahon who
laughs.. .to Geary Martin who
loafs.. .to all the Surprise Coeds
...to the members of the Jour Journalism
nalism Journalism School at PSU...to the
crusading girl editor of the Fla Flambeau...to
mbeau...to Flambeau...to Dave Levy, our edi editor.
tor. editor.
To the six SAEs who still
have their pins...to Rita Aigner

exam. Furthermore, the ma mature
ture mature of administering C-course
examinations would make them
more readily susceptible to mon monitoring.
itoring. monitoring.
In connection with this change
would bs a supplementary re reorganization
organization reorganization of the Honor Court.
Rather than the single court,
the base would be enlarged to
include a court of five or seven
members from each of the in individual
dividual individual colleges. These would
be organized under a single
chancellor and clerk who would
supply the necessary continuity
to the courts operation.
However, while the same cha chaaneellor
aneellor chaaneellor and clerk would offi officiate,
ciate, officiate, a charge from the Col College
lege College of Agriculture would be
heard by a court which would
be composed of students from
that college.
Some of the advantages which
would accure from such a sys system
tem system would be: (1) The work
load would be spread over a
larger number of individuals.
This would not be true of the
clerk and chancellor, but one
who accepts one of these posi positions
tions positions must be prepared to sho shoulder
ulder shoulder the responsibilities. The
difficulty of the Court is oftan
finding suitable times at which
the members of the Court can
meet to hear a trial. When the
trial time reaches as much as
ten to fifteen hours a week,
this become a major problem.
(2) The fact that these men
would be elected solely from
their colleges might result in
their selection on the basis of

NUMBER 1, The meeting will
come to order. (The meeting
begins. Devotions are held.
Number 8 announces the pres presence
ence presence of a quorum and the busi business
ness business goes on . .) We have some
little matters concerning bud budgets.
gets. budgets. Number 3, will you read
the first budget?
NUMBER 8, If everyone will
turn to page four of the agenda,
you will find the April, 1958,
budget for the Key Collectors
Club. Lets see, theres SI,OOO
for a special house organ, entitl entitled,
ed, entitled, Keys, New and Old, to be
presented to all entering fresh freshmen
men freshmen in September. And theres
$4,000 for service award keys to
be given to all members. Thats
$5,000.
NUMBER 1,. Thank you. Now,
is there any discussion?
NUMBER 99, Yes, Id like to
know .
NUMBER 1, Well, if there is isnt
nt isnt any discussion, well vote
now. All in favor signify by say saying
ing saying aye.
NUMBER 99. But .
NUMBERS 2-98. Aye.
NUMBER 99, Heck.
NUMER 1. Key Collectors
Club budget is passed. (He
thumps his gavel on the ta table
ble table ) Now, Number S, would you
read the budget tor the Lec Lecture
ture Lecture Committee?
*
NUMER 8. fes, but before
I do. Id like to Uige you to
think carefully aoout their re request.
quest. request. Personally, I dont think
its warranted.
NUMBER 15, What have they
requested?
NUMBER 3, Two ninety-eight
for travel expenses.
NUMBER 1, Excuse me for
interrupting, but Id like to hand
my gavel to Number 2 in order
to discuss this matter with
you. (He hands the gavel to
Number 2.) Now, fellow mem members,
bers, members, before you vote, think
of this. The Lecture Commit Committee
tee Committee doesnt actually have to get
speakers frqm off-campus. They
could easily find excellent speak-

who enjoys Southern hospitality
...to Abbie Nails Pope who
doesnt like week-end traffic...
to the Bev Stone Fiance Clubs
of America...to Linda Lewis, vi vivacious
vacious vivacious home-wrecker from Mar Marianna,
ianna, Marianna, Florida.
* *
To all the girls at Magnolia
Ha11...t0 Bandy Simms of Tifton
Georgia fame...to Colson Mills,
future ad man...to Carolyn Coul Coultra,
tra, Coultra, Judy Senters room mate..,
LAST TIMES TODAY
Loypow-pissAyEnES
STARTS TOMORROW
'^'Marjorie
m
kelly wood
TR^)R i| NSLOANE
* o ** l ** *
** OOUCtB IT MrtTOft uttim* Kyp)
wncno >*viac hwii

merit rather than political af affiliation.
filiation. affiliation. In recant years with
the big machines, the few ex exceptions
ceptions exceptions the rule of bloc"
have been in individual colleges
where a particularly qualified
or popular individual was able
to stem the tide.
(3) Finally, the realization
that if one is accused of cheat cheating
ing cheating he will not be brought be before
fore before & throughly strange group
of Individuals, but rather before
one composed of his classmates,
might serve to re-introduce so social
cial social pressure as a force in curb curbing
ing curbing cheating.

Some work would have to be
done on the technical aspects
of handling cases such as
stealing and the passing of bad
checks which would not fall un under
der under the purview of a particu particular
lar particular college. A rather simple so solution
lution solution to this problem would be
for the chancellor to select one
representative from each of the
individual colleges courts to act
as the court for non-cheating
cases involving University Col College
lege College students. The procedural
difficulties appear insignificant
when compared to the potential
advantages of this new organi organization.
zation. organization.
I would not be so fool-hardy
or egotistical as to expect that
these proposals would soon, or
ever, for that matter, come in into
to into existence. However, I would
hope that they might stimulate
some further thought on oir
most cherished and chastised
tradition, the Honor System.

era right here on campus. I
dont think they should be en encouraged
couraged encouraged to spend this money
when it isnt necessary. Dont
you agree with me? Hmmmm?
NUMBERS 2-98. Yes, yes, we
certainly do . .Oh, yes.
NUMBER 99, I dont see .
NUMBER 1, Excellent. All op opposed
posed opposed signify by saying nay.
NUMBERS 2-98. Nay.
NUMBER 99. But .
NUMBER l, Now that thats
settled, well continue with
(In the back row, one of the
members, Number 82, leans
over to his neighbor and whis whispers
pers whispers in a low voice.)
NUMBER 82, Hey, Ive got a
date at 9:30 ... I gotta get
out of here. Look, will you
voie for me?
NUMBER 81, Sure, sneak out
the back way.

(The meeting continues for a
while. Then, suddenly, a voice
calls out from the floor.)
VOICE. Hey, we dont have a
quorum anymore.
NUMBER 8, Huh, what? begins to count heads) One, two,
three ...
NUMBER 1, What? No quor quorum?
um? quorum? You sure? I was sure there
were 28 heads here.
NUMBER 8, (who has finish finished
ed finished counting) The voice is right.
We only have 27 heads here.
Someone mustve left.
' The reporter who has been
sitting quieUy throughout the
meeting, jumps up and dashes
out calling, Scoop, scoop, oh,
f*coop, Everyone begins to talk
at once. There is general qdo
over the issue )
NUMBER i, (Thumping his
gavel on the table) Hush, please,
hush. Now, feilow members, Im
afraid weve come to a dead
end. Someone has left us with without
out without a quorum, and no business
can be co-id icted without one.
I in sorry to say well have ro
adjourn until next week. (Num (Numbers
bers (Numbers 1-98 slowly file out. Num Number
ber Number 99 is left alone, sobbing,
as the curtain fans.)

to the next Orange Peel...to Fern
Totty, girl Sminole editor...to
George Holmes who waits.
To Byron Selber, new TEP
leader...to Sue Barnes who co commutes...to
mmutes...to commutes...to Judy Hewitt who
swims...to Mike Merritt who
stands on chairs...to Jacques
Gaill&rd, ghost writer.
VACUUM CLEANER
DRAWING
TONIGHT AT 8:30
WED. AND THURS.
JOSE FERRER
Atodsmy Award Winner
AEtaa
SEE IT NOW..



Reitz to Push for New Law Addition

(Continued From Page ONE)
Reitz felt that the State Cabinet,
under direction of Governor Col*
Una, would formally consider in
its Tallahassee meeting today the
amounts suggested for approval
recently by the Board of Control.
These include: the dormitory
construction, at $1,806,000; util*
lities expansion, $1,835,000, three
additions to existing agriculture
facilities, $177,000; additions to
Agricultural Extension Service
Laboratory, $177,000.
Four amounts, for the law
building, classroom and auditor auditorium

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ium auditorium building, architecture build building,
ing, building, and pharmacy wing of the
Medical Schoool are each in
the SBOO,OOO or above class.
Therefore, these will have to
wait some time before they can
be approved, Reitz said.
To ask for anything more than
the Law School expansion would
seriously curtail the ap pr v e d
amounts, he said.
He did not indicate exactly
when the Cabinet would be peti petitioned
tioned petitioned for the $104,000 appropria appropriation,
tion, appropriation, but he Mid it would not be
at today's session.

CULTURAL CALENDAR
Violin Concert Tonight
| Highlights Week's Fure
A VIOUN CONCERT BY EDWARD C. PREODOR
will highlight music activities on campus this week.
The concert is scheduled for tonight at 8:15 in the
Medical Center Auditorium.

Preodor, am instructor in the
Department of Music, studied at
the Eastman School of Music in
Rochester, New York. He has
also worked professionally in the
recording field in Los Angeles,
and has done some concert work.
Preodor is presently conductor of
the University Symphony Orches Orchestra.
tra. Orchestra.
Selections in tonights program
include: Sonata for Pianoforte
and Violin by Beethoven, Son Sonata
ata Sonata for Violin No. 1 in G Minor
by Bach, "Three Madrigals for
Violin and Viola by Martinu,
Nigun by Bloch, Caprice No.
24 by Paganini, La Fontaine
dArethuse by Szymanowski, and
Danse Espagnole by deFalla.
SCHEDULED SPEAKER AT
THE UNITARIAN FELLOW*
SHIP next Sunday morning will
be Dr. Robert F. Davidson, head
of the Humanities Department.
The Fellowship meets at 11 o
clock in the auditorium of the
Florida Union.
Dr. Davidson is the third of four
speakers whose topic is concern concerned
ed concerned with religion in an age of sci science.
ence. science.
In previewing his talk, Dr.
Davidson said I feel that it is
impossible for science to ever
provide any dependable picture of

Theft Charge On 3 Dropped

Charges of petit larceny against
three School of Architecture stu students
dents students have been dropped by the
University police and their cases
have been turned over to the Dean
of Men for action.
Robert Vernon Taylor, 304 E.
University Ave.; Willard N. Bow Bowman,
man, Bowman, 116 NW 12th St.; and Don Donold
old Donold Richard Morgan, Keystone
Heights, Florida were arrested
last week and charged with steal stealing
ing stealing paint from the southwest
side at the Administration Build Building.
ing. Building. They were released on $l5O
bail each and were scheduled to
appear this morning in court to
answer the charges.
The three admitted taking the
paint, said Lt. V. K. Holliman
of the University Police Depart Department.
ment. Department. They said they took lt to
uee in the up-coming Home Show
put on by the Architectural
School, Holliman said.
Involved were four one-gallon
cans that were left by painters
working in the Administration

Florida Alligator, Tuesday April 29, 19581

Applications for Editor, Managing Editor, and Business
Manager for the Summer Alligator will be received in
the office of the Board of Student Publications until
3 p.m., Friday, May 2. See F Book for qualifications.
IWmy 18 /H [I
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Get a *ll3
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saving sll3< round trip. (See box below for new
fares.)
Clipper Thrift Service offers complimentary sand sandwiches
wiches sandwiches and light beverages plus full luggage allow allowance
ance allowance of 44 pounds. And every mile of your trip is
flown and serviced by the most experienced crews
in the world.
New Clipper Thrift Service is available from the
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the Midwest (Chicago and Detroit); and also from
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mans relation to God. David Davidson
son Davidson represent* the point of
view of people who call them themselves
selves themselves neo-orthodox.
A MUSICAL COMEDY, Seven
Brides for Seven Brothers is the
Florida Unions movie-of-the
week. Starring Jane Powell and
Howard Keel, the movie will
run at 7 and 9 oclock Friday
and Saturday night in the audi auditorium
torium auditorium of the Florida Union. Ad Admission
mission Admission is 25 cents.
REHEARSALS FOR MISALLI MISALLIANCE.
ANCE. MISALLIANCE. Florida Players upcom upcoming
ing upcoming play by the British playwright,
George Bernard Shaw, are con continuing
tinuing continuing this week in the P. K.
Yonge auditorium. The play, a
comedy, Is directed by John Van
Meter and is scheduled for pro production
duction production May 7 through 10.
REHEARSALS FOR* THE BER BERLIOZ
LIOZ BERLIOZ "REQUIEZ, sponsored by
the Music Department, are also
In progress. Students and inter interested
ested interested persons are invited to ob observe
serve observe rehearsals which are sche scheduled
duled scheduled every Monday night from
7:30 tc 9:30 and Thursday after afternoons
noons afternoons from 4:40 to 5:40. Rehear Rehearsals
sals Rehearsals are staged in the band room
of the Music building. The per performance
formance performance is scheduled for May
20 in the Florida gymnasium.

Building. The three had just come
back from a break, picked up
the paint and took it into Building
tt, according to Holliman.
Listed as witnesses by city po police
lice police were E. N. Bell, Maintenance
Department, and a Mr. Grigsby
of the Janitoral Department.
UF Gets $15,000 Grant
For Cancer Research
A grant of $15,000 has been
awarded the University of Flor Floridas
idas Floridas Cancer Research Laboratory
to finance the search for a new
drug effective in slowing down
the growth process of cancer
cells.
The grant was made by the
American Cancer Society through
the Alachua County Division of
the Society.
The work will be conducted by
Dr. Muriel Dahlg&rd, assistant
research professor.

Cabinet Files Reports

((Continued from Page ONE)
of Men Lester Hale, and another
committee working with the Gain Gainesville
esville Gainesville Chamber of Commerce to
create better relations between
the Gainesville merchants and
the University students.
RELIGION: Don EzeUe (fall
semester), Bill Crews (Spring
semester), works with the head
of the Department of Religion,
the Student Religious Organiza Organization,
tion, Organization, and the various religious ho houses
uses houses in the area to coordinate
religious programs.
Zelle worked towards giving the
post an effective program of work
"so that the Secretary of Reli Religion
gion Religion wont have to spend his first
few months in office looking for
something to do."
Completing Eze 11 e s plans,
Crews succeeded in making the
Secretary of Religion an automa automatic
tic automatic member of the Religion in
Life Week committee, placing him
in charge of arranging the annual
Christmas on Campus and Presi Presidents
dents Presidents message.
He now is also responsible for
the handling of the Student Re Religious
ligious Religious Associations annual elec elections,
tions, elections, and plans are under way for
providing Sunday School in the
Flavets and a campus bus service
to all churches.
MENS AFFAIRS: Jim Martin,
promotes the welfare of male stu students
dents students and coordinates the activi activities
ties activities of mens organizations.
This year the new Mens coun council
cil council has been organized and the
revised constitution finished thr through
ough through the combined efforts of Mar Martin's
tin's Martin's staff and Dean Hale's office.
Proposals have also been made
to compile a journal of informa information
tion information concerning the required pro program
gram program of military service for men
and distribute it through the Dean
of Mens office.
WOMENS AFFAIRS: Margie
Abrams, advises the president on
problems of the coeds on cacnpus
and works for their welfare.
Miss Abrams initiated an "Ac "Activities
tivities "Activities Week program in an at attempt
tempt attempt to encourage and give in information
formation information concerning participa participation
tion participation in extracurricular activities
to the women students both on
and off-campus.
She also attended meetings of
W.S.A., Panhellenic Council, Stu Student
dent Student Organizations and Activities,
and Sororities, Fraternities and
Clubs. As Secretary of Womens
Affaire she wan appointed by W.-
9.A. to act as tri-chairman on a
Religion and Life Week commit committee.
tee. committee.
LEGISLATIVE AFFAIRS: Bob
Patemo, responsible primarily
for keeping the charters of sub subsidiary
sidiary subsidiary organizations of Student
Government up to date.
Paterno formulated and presen presented
ted presented to the Executive Council for
Square Dance Set
A square dance is set for Fri Friday
day Friday night at 8 p.m. in the Pres Presbyterian
byterian Presbyterian Student Center. The
dance is being held under the
sponsorship of the Freshman
Council of the Student Religious
Associations.
CLASSIFIED ~~
FOR RENT: Across from camp campus,
us, campus, three choice rooms for sum summer
mer summer school Two single, one
double. Apply 321 S.W. 13th St.

Page 3

CHESTER FIELD! 9 MEN OF AMERICA:
Driving cattle I
g 'r ' " ; X Desert sun ablaze! mm
\ V/" fig Pounding leather,
* §B Rounding up the strays! |||
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* y~ - r ,~^Vv v V l '' aV7- You'll find a man |||
to taKe r.*q pie- I .= I||
When and where he can. J
V-< i, *' /* ;*s 'P ***/' a Y v <;>i\;,Y X. Saddle Mountains, Wctnh. 1
-' *' j' ! I t 1 Ki?W&: /fe: < sf- ...
Hjjj&&.:x :- : W IMI iMfcrijSW^Wx^
,. BWlaraiilM - f
I-.-
1 '"T"* m my
y my : ..... J;;: MBBK
H|i||p JHLJKP Bjgy^lSePlDsyi:l|i^t Bjgy^lSePlDsyi:l|i^t-9||pk
-9||pk Bjgy^lSePlDsyi:l|i^t-9||pk 9 Bjpi
BIG CLEAN TASTE OF TOP-TOBACCO^^

approval a "Charter Revision
Law" for the purpose of establish establishing
ing establishing machinery for and adequate adequately
ly adequately revising outdated charters.
The office of the Commissioner
of Legislative Affairs held regu regular
lar regular office hours in an effort to
aid organisations in revising their
charters and also served as an
information and counseling eld to
organizations desiring to submit
new charters to Btudent Govern Government.
ment. Government.
SCHOOL TRADITIONS: Harold
Lewis, concerned mostly with
encouraging "school spirit," and
reviving and keeping alive an ac active
tive active interest in campus traditions.
A committee under Lewis spon sponsored
sored sponsored a "welcome week" pro program
gram program which consisted of sending
all new out-of-state or foreign
students a letter offering to meet
them when they arrived in Gain Gainesville
esville Gainesville and help them to get set settled.
tled. settled.
Lewis staff was also responsi responsible
ble responsible for the selling of Rat caps
to freshmen, the staging of "Pep"
rallies prior to football games,
and planning operations o f
the card section at the games.
FOREIGN AFFAIRS: Rose Ge Gerardo
rardo Gerardo (fall semester), Manuel

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Rondon (spring aemester, work
closely with the International Stfv
dents Organization, and keeps the
president informed of the needs
and desirea of the foreign stu students
dents students on campus.
Miss Gerardo initiated a fairly
successful program for having
the fraternities and sororities on
campus invite foreign students to
dinners and so offer the visitors
a chance to get acquainted with
the social life at the University.
During Rondons term of office
he sent a letter to the United Sta States
tes States National Students Associat Associations
ions Associations requesting information on re rejoning
joning rejoning the organization.
He contacted all the campus
sororities In an attempt to ar arrange
range arrange socials with them and sent
letters to various city Chambers
of Commerce to arrange to have
a foreign student as their guest
for a holiday.

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WN MAW WITH IMS M> /
la Oar Ma /
tail latittant KIHMWI
I*m* leaf Alban
Nm On Say Mall Sarvlaa Bfl
SMI DANDY FILM SISVICS
Deft. A Rintrry, S.O.

Rondon has made recommen recommendations
dations recommendations to the president for con contacting
tacting contacting all new foreign students
and familiarising them with our
Student Government and extra
curricular activities.
VETERANS AFFAIRS: Btep Btepen
en Btepen McArther, to coordinate all
policy and activities between Fla Flavet
vet Flavet Village governments and Stu Student
dent Student Government.
All programs affecting Villsges
were directed through the Me-
Arthers committee, i.e., football
seating, all canvassing and so solicitation
licitation solicitation of funds, etc.

OUR
Toki Chairs
ARE IN
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Beech in walnut or oak finish.
Qaddum Snte\io\s
QJouiq 3w/y and Qanuh JMotUn
sns AVKNUt at irr STAtrr. n.w. v



Flordia Alligator, Tuesday, April 29, 1958

Page 4

Netters Top Flyers
To Close Out Year
By JACK WINSTEAD
Gator Assistant Sports Editor
Capturing four singles and two doubles matches,
Florida's varsity tennismen closed out the 1958 dual
match season by downing Jacksonville Navy 6-3.

Number two; singles man Dave
Shaw gained a measure of re revenge
venge revenge for an earlier defeat by
slipping past Navy netman Calvin
Karrh, 2,-6 7-5, 6-4; while captain
Hugh Waters breezed to a sin singles
gles singles win in straight sets over
Roger MacDonald, 6-3, 6-3.
Del Moser, the winningest Ga Gator
tor Gator on the team with 16 matches
to his credit, ran into trouble
before finally taking Walt Shaw
in three sets, 7-5, 5-7, 6-4. Ber Bernie
nie Bernie Friedman ended up in the
STUDENTS!
SOLES
PUT ON
15 MINUTES
HEELS
PUT ON
5 Minutes
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THE FACTORY WAY"
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Phone FR 6-5211
14 NORTH MAIN STREET
Nest to
The First National Bank
Vic Balsa mo Owner

Men HUNGRY Women
ALL YOU CAN EAT
LUNCH 60-65 C
SUPPER 75c
SINGLE ROOMS AVAILABLE HOURS 11:30-1:30
5:15-7:30
UNIVERSITY LODGE
IS N.W. 17 Stmt

I Sale Managers I
I EARN SISOO TO S2OOO I
I Summer Organizational Work I
I Ten aggressive men are needed this summer for national AAA-1 K
H rated company to handle lucrative sales organizations in Florida, m
Alabama and Georgia.
I ,i /; |jj
I No experience necessary. Complete proven sales program and m
|| management training course to begin after acceptance. H
Apply Interview room 220 Florida Union, Thursday, May Ist and
H Friday, May 2nd9 a.m. to 5 p.m. or contact University Place- K
m ment Office for appointment. If


Summer Employment Carnival
COLLEGE BRANCH OF ARCADIAN, INC.-NEWARK, NJ.
Interviewing U of F students for summer and full time employment
The following outstanding college men have accepted positions
with ARCADIAN:
U Qf P George Hourihan Bob Carnes
Earl La. F Club H "< U £l A#?T..
Phi Delta Theta .. Omega
Lanny McCuliers S Smi N FSU
Pres. Student Body Melvin Lamb Bill Roach
Sigma Nu V. Pres. Senior
Sigma Nu STETSON Art Moore Class I
CP Te?m SSCOUntry Ji Sharpton Eddie Johnson
Fla. Blue Key Pres. Men's Coun. Varsity Football Class
INTERVIEW STARTS AT 7:00 P.M. TUESDAY, APRIL 29
FLORIDA UNION ROOM 101
COME MEET OUR MEN-SEE OUR PRODUCTS
Methods of ProductionColor Films of Conventions.
POSITIONS AVAILABLE THROUGHOUT THE U.S.
PLEASE BE PROMPT

number two spot with 15 wins,
as he swept past Bob Tripp, 6-2,
6-4.
In the number one match, Bud Buddy
dy Buddy Husband lost a close one to
the Flyer coach, Dick Gaskill
6-4, 6-4; while Henry Cleare
accounted for the other Florida
singles loss, bowing to Merl Sel Sellers
lers Sellers 7-5, 6-1.
The most exciting match oc occurred
curred occurred In doubles play, where
Navys top tandem of Gas Gaskill
kill Gaskill mid Karrh came from far
behind to capture the number
one event from Husband and
Shaw, 8-6, 9-7, 6-4.
Meanwhile, the Gator combo of
Waters and Moser outplayed Shaw
and Tom Hamilton, 6-4, 7-6; and
Cleare and John Sellers won an
up-and-down battle from Tripp
and Sellers 6-0, 4-6, 6-4.
Coach Bill Potters crew will
now take a full week to pre prepare
pare prepare for the all-important South Southeastern
eastern Southeastern Conference Tournament,
which will be held hi New Or Orleans
leans Orleans beginning May 8 and
lasting through May 10.
Florida's undefeated frosh net netters
ters netters will play a pair of full
matches this weekend with Flet Fletcher
cher Fletcher and Bolles, before leaving
for New Orleans with the var varsity.
sity. varsity.
Coach Potter can take but two
freshmen on the trip, and he will
likely choose his twin tennis ter terrors,
rors, terrors, Morrill Hay and Roy Lang,
who have not lost a match either
individually in singles action or
as a team in doubles play.

v* w 1 ** m '
I
m .. +} 'A a' v' *,^
' am.
V smmJL 9 wsmm will
m
W 'it a!
- ,-K
Mr § .ill
FIRE TO ME BABE! Captain Bobby Barnes, an all
conference outfielder in 1956, missed last season because of a
broken leg sustained in an exhibition game. The veteran has don donned
ned donned the "tools of ignorance for the 1958 season and is making
a bid for a!l-SEC honors at the backstop position.
Auburn Trockmen Outrun
Florida in Dual Encounter
Auburns Pete Calhoun set a new dual meet record
for the 220-yard low hurdles as the Plainsmen downed
Florida 69-57 at Auburn Saturday.

Calhoun ran the lows in 23.6,
the second fastest time in the
Southeastern Conference this year,
and also won the 120-yard highs
in 15 fiat. The Gators Tom Mi Michels
chels Michels was second in the highs and
third in the lows. Co-captain Dav Davey
ey Davey Jones was runner-up in the
lows.
Bumper Watson was the only
other double winner of the day, as
he won the 100-yard dash in 10
flat and the 220 in 22 flat. Flor Floridas
idas Floridas Don Lucey was second in
the 100 and third in the 220.
Ellis Goodloe, running for the
first time since a muscle cramp
sustained in the Florida Relays
sdielined him, did not compete
In the 100, but was runner-up
in the 220 and third in the 440.
Bobby ODare took second in
the mile run, followed by Mike
Morgan. Jack Huenekens won
the two-mile, and Larry White
finished in a dead heat for sec second
ond second in the 880 to complete Ga Gator
tor Gator scoring in the running events.
Winfield WiUis took the shot put
with a heave of 44 feet, 4 inches,
while Vic Miranda was second.
Stan Mitchell was second in the

discus. Co-captain George Penn Pennington
ington Pennington tied for second in the
high jump.
Art Foster continued his win winning
ning winning ways in the broad jump,
leaping 22 feet, 4 inches, while
Jones and Lucey took second
and third in tile javelin.
The future continued to look
bright, however, as the Baby Ga Gators
tors Gators took their third win in four
outings.
Henry Wadsworth continued his
record breaking ways, pole vault vaulting
ing vaulting 14 feet 3 % inches, an inch
and a half over his vault in Mi Miami.
ami. Miami. The former Coral Gables star
also tied for first in the high jump,
soaring over the bar at 6 feet,
1 % inches.
Tom McEachern equalled Wat Watsons
sons Watsons time in the 229, sprinting
a 22 flat; however, he finished
second In the 100 with a 9.8.
Other frosh who turned in out outstanding
standing outstanding performances were Rick
Panko, who won the 880 with
a 1:59.8; John Hale, who tossed
the javelin 189 feet; and Jim
Beaver, who threw the shot 47
feet, 4 inches.
Gator Linksmen
To Seek Crown
Par-busting Tommy Aaron will
be out to defend his Southeastern
Conference individual title as the
Florida golfers match strokes
with all SEC squads and South Southwest
west Southwest Conference teams in the an annual
nual annual Southeastern Conference and
Southern Intercollegiate Golf Cha Championships
mpionships Championships this weekend at Ath Athens,
ens, Athens, Georgia.
Aaron will lead a six man Ga Gator
tor Gator contingent including captain
Pete Trenham, Willie K. Turner,
Skip Stigger, A1 Duhaime, and
Tony Baker.
Team championships for both
the SEC and the Southern Inter Intercollegiate
collegiate Intercollegiate are decided hi the
first two rounds of the 72-hole
tournament. The combined totals
of the four low scores posted by
team members constitute the
team score, and the low team
after 36-holes cops the trophy.

Golfland
Driving Range
Daily 4*ll p.m.
Sat. £r Sun. 2-11 p.m.
441, North
Clubs for Everyone
Just Pert Intersection
N.W. 13th fir N.W. 6th Sts.
ENHHNHMENi

UF Nine Marches Through Georgia;
Parrish, Fleming Engineer Victories

By KENX FLNKEL
Alligator Sports Editor
The University of Florida
baseball team, manifesting po potent
tent potent hitting power and smooth
pitching, swept a two- game
Southeastern Conference series
from the Georgia Bulldogs last
weekend by scores of 6-3 and
10-5.
Second baseman Bemie Par Parrish
rish Parrish was the hero of Fridays
contest, collecting two hits in
four times at bat and driving
in three runs.
Right fielder Don Fleming had
four RBls on a single and a
home run in Saturdays game.
Captain and catcher Bobby
Barnes had a single and a
double, while center fielder Bob
Geissinger collected a singl

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j|b If Bi HP Mr
-

WHAT ARE THE PANGS OP LOVE?
os Archibald. Heart Smart
11. OF OREGON
WHAT IS A POOR IOSER?
ARGOT BANNISTER. Bitter Quitter
GRINNELL COLLEGE
I CIGARETTES |

LIGHT UP A tight SMOKE-LIGHT UP A LUCKYI
<4.r.CM Product of Jo&uoe& iiour middUnam

and a triple.
Hurlers Ray Oestricher and
Don McCreary were surprise
starters as coach Dave Fuller
had earlier announced that he
planned to pitch Tim Twomey
and Bubba Williams.
However, the soph sensations
came through in fine style, and
each added a win to his record.
Oestricher is now 5-0 for the
season, while McCreary is 3-1.
In Fridays contest, the Ga Gators
tors Gators picked up single runs in the
second, third, eighth, and ninth
frames, and two in the fifth.
Georgias two runs came in the
sixth. Geissinger and Fleming
also had two hits apiece, in addi addition
tion addition to Parrishs pair
For five innings, Saturdays
encounter looked as if it might

THE MENTAL MARVEL mentioned above is so studious
he made Phi Bete in his junior yearof high school!
When he walks into classrooms, professors stand. The
last time he got less than 100%, the proctor was
cheating. When it comes to smoking, he gets straight
As for taste. He smokes (All together, class!) Lucky
Strike! Naturally, our student is fully versed on the
subject of Luckys fine, light, good-tasting tobacco.
Hes well aware that its toasted to taste even better.
So when someone asks him for a cigarette, hes
happy to spread the good taste. And that makes him
a Kind Grind! Assignment: try Luckies yourself!
Dont just stand there
STICKLE! MAKE $25
Sticklers are simple riddles with two-word rhyming answers.
Both words must have the same number of syllables. (No
drawings, please!) Well shell out $25 for all we use and for
hundreds that never see print. So send stacks of em with your
name, address, college and class to Happy-Joe-Lucky, Box
67A, Mount Vernon, New York.

have been a repeat of the First
Florida-Georgia game on Perry
Field two Fridays ago. Dog ace
Wayne Minshew allowed one run
in the first inning, then settled
down to retire 14 Gators in a
row.
But the locals erupted for
three runs mi two hits in the
sixth, and they were never head headed.
ed. headed. Having tallied twice in the
second, Georgia scored again
in the seventh and twice
more in the ninth, but the Oran Orange
ge Orange and Blue picked up four big
ones in the eighth and three in
the top of the ninth to ice the
game and sweep the series.

THE GATOR SPORT SHOP'S
BASEBALL CONTEST
Lost Week's Winner: Tom Cumbie
Deadline Wednesday, April 23, at 12 noon
Winner receives one Sport Shirt
Pick the Winners of
Mutual's Major League
Baseball Game of The Day
Broadcast Doily Over
WRUF
850 On Your Dial
J Date |7l Teams |x| Teams |mnj
| Wed., April 301 | Milwaukee 1 | Chicago | |
| Thur., May 1 \ \ Kansas City | [ Boston [ |
| Fri., May 2 | ] Detroit 11 Boston ] \
1 Sot., May 3 | | Chicago 1 | Wash'ton | 1
1 Sun., May 4 | 1 Cincinnati | | Chicago 11
Total number of hits t
mode in the five games
Read Rules Before Marking
(1) Put an Xin front of the winning team.
[{2) Indicate the total number of runs scored in each
of the five games.
'(3) Predict the number of hits made In the combined
five games.
(4) The winner will be determined by the above three
predictions then chronologically.
(5) In case one or more of the games are rained out,
the contest will be based on the games played.
(6) Entry must be in the Contest Box at Gator Sport
Shop (1724 W. Univ. Ave.) by 12 noon Wednes Wednesday
day Wednesday preceeding the contest. Tear this entry out
of the Alligator and give it to clerk at the Gator
Sport Shop. Employes of the Gator Sport Shop are
ineligible.
(7) We reserve the right to use all information for our
use.
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The sweep left Florida with a
3-1 mark against the Bulldogs
this year. The Gators are now
13-3 for the season and 9-1 hi
the SEC, giving them a one onehalf
half onehalf game lead over Auburn in
the conferences Eastern Divis Division.
ion. Division.
Fullers men will host Geor Georgia
gia Georgia Tech, beaten earlier by the
locals, in a double header at At Atlanta,
lanta, Atlanta, for two games on Perry
Field this weekend. The follow following
ing following weekend will find them at
Auburn for what will probably
be the deciding games in the
race for the division crown.

WHATT A SCCONO4TMNOOT MISTAKE?
WILLIAM BOWERNAN. Scrub Flub
BOWLING GREEN
WHATT A SLOPPY RAILROAD BRIDGE?
Robert nac CAiLvs. Slack Track
U. or VIRGINIA
WHAT DO TV WRESTLERS USE?
CAROLYN NYCREN. Pseudo Judo
REN BROKE
WHAT IS A TERM EXAM IN RUSTICS?
douglas oustbrhout. Vinyl Final
MICHIGAN