Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
State Board of Control Approves Over-all 10 per cent Dorm Rent Jump

New Policy
Effective for
Fall Semester

By ROGER LEWIS
Gator State Editor
The State Board of Con Control
trol Control yesterday approved
increased dormitory rates
for the University averaging
approximately 10 per cent
because of increasing oper operating
ating operating costs.
The increase is due to go into
effect next September. It does
not apply to temporary dormi dormitories
tories dormitories pn the campus.
Dr. Harold Riker, Director of
Housing, commenting on the raise,
said, We have sorely needed an
increase in rates for some time
now. We had no alternative this
year but to increase the prices.
This is the first increase in
the rates since 1951 t while the
cost of equipment, personnel sal salaries,
aries, salaries, and maintenance has risen
steadily, he added.
The increase will raise prices in
aU new dormitories approximate approximately
ly approximately $5. The current price in the
Tolbert area and the girls dorm
is SBS.
In the older dorms in the Thom Thomas
as Thomas area, there are two types of
rooms which will have separate
rate increases. The three person
suites are due for an increase of
$lO from the present rate of $65,
while the two person rooms will
go up sls from $65.
Therefore, the new rates for
dormitories wiU be S9O in the new
mens and womens dorms, $75
in the older dorm suites, and SBO
in the two person rooms.
In evaluating the rate increas increases
es increases Dr. Riker stated that the policy
wa- to make comparable rooms
pay comparable prices. Before,
there had been a wide price range
between the two person rooms of
Tolbert area and Thomas. Now
the rates will be more nearly
equal.
Paint Needed
In discussing his past budgets,
Dr. Riker said, We had to cut
out all maintenance and repair
on the dorms that wasnt absolut absolutely
ely absolutely necessary in order to operate
within our budget.
The dorms have not received
a new coat of paint anywhere for
the past two years in cutting the
costs to a minimum, he added,
I think that the increase will be
a definite advantage to the stu students
dents students since we will be able to
give much better service to their
dorms.
Dr. Riker stated that in study studying
ing studying possible rate adjustments
they consulted a recent survey
of rental charges, primarily of
Southern schools, and found their
results comparable to ours. The
report more or less bore out our
ideas on the adjustments and con convinced
vinced convinced us of the fairness of the
plan, said Dr. Riker.
A note informing all students
in the dorms of the changing
rates was distributed last night
immediately after the news of
the Control Board approval
reached Dr. Rikers office.
The Board met in Tallahassee.
Dr. J. Wayne Reitz represented
the University at the meeting.
Ruffner Quits
Alligator Post
A surprise resignation by
Chuck Ruffner, business manag manager
er manager of the Alligator, added to the
activity of the Publications Elec Electoral
toral Electoral Board Wednesday after afternoon.
noon. afternoon. The electoral board was in
session in the basement of the
Florida Union to select students
for various post on the editorial
and busines taff of te Semiole.
The board accepted Ruffners
resignation and his recommenda recommendation
tion recommendation that Frank Gray, 4 JM, be
appointed to fill the post of Alli Alligator
gator Alligator business manager. Gray,
currently asst, business manager
(Continued On Page FIVE)

Tatty, Moore, Robinson
Named to Heod Seminole
By JERRY PALMER
Gator Staff Writer
Fem Totty, sophomore from Merritt Island, was selected as edi editor
tor editor of the 1959 Seminole by the Publications Electoral Board Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday afternoon. Sandra Moore, ZUC from Pompano Beach, was
appointed to the position, of managing editor and John Robinson,

Orlando sophomore, was named
business manager of the campus
yearbook.
The board elected Sheldon
Maselstein as business manager
for this semester on the 1958 Sem Seminole
inole Seminole staff to replace Scott
Hancock, who was graduated.
Maselstein takes over immediately
from his present position as asst,
business manager. His past ex experience
perience experience besides the Seminole,
includes being a member of the
Alligator business staff, 1956-57,
and an advertising salesman with
Alpha Delta Sigma advertising
fraternity for the now defunct
Peninsula.
Fern Totty, Delta Gamma, has
had three semesters experience
with the Seminole and is at pre present
sent present the literary editor, A gradu graduate

the FLORIDA AIL!BATOR

Volume 50, Number 30

Wf : t* mirm I
'WIHhBk
E'TpPlf u im-y. *
I 'JBEh 111
Dean Acheson Welcomed to the Campus
Dean Acheson Is greeted by student body president Eddie
Beardsley as he arrives on campus for the Religion in Life Week
ceremonies. The former Secretary of State spoke to students despite
a broken arm caused by a fall in one of Washingtons icy streets.
(Gator Photo by Warriner.)
SAID IN ACHESON CONVOCATION SPEECH
Standard Opinion
Not Possible Now
* By JUDY BATES
Gator Copy Editor
No consensus of opinion or monopoly of force can be found to
create and enforce standards in negotiation between nations.

Former Secretary of State Dean
Acheson emphasized that The ex experience
perience experience and condition of people
of some other states differ so
from our own that many of our
most cherished beliefs seem to
them unreal and shadowy.
Addressing the Student Body
on Morality, Moralism, and Di Diplomacy,
plomacy, Diplomacy, Acheson discussed
questions of foreign policy yes yesterday
terday yesterday at the bi-annual Convo Convocation.
cation. Convocation.
Acheson said that in discus discussion
sion discussion of foreign policy he would
not for the most part, use the
language of moral discourse or
invoke moral authority, but
would state priniples in terms
of their purpose and effect with without
out without characterizing them as mor moral
al moral or immoral.
He explained that the language
of moral discourse, is more likely
to obscure than clarify as it is
colored at. one end with fervor
and at the other with self-right self-righteousness.
eousness. self-righteousness.
The moralistic-ideological ap approach
proach approach to the conduct of foreign
affairs consists in finding in one
theme both & central evil which
is thought to dominate our time,
and also the clue to its eradica eradication.
tion. eradication.
Can Become A Crusade
With the goal thus established
and the weapon chosen, the ensu ensuing
ing ensuing operation can easily become
a crusade.
Acheson, quoting Eisenhowers
State of the Union message, said,
Note that the danger is not the
power, military and otherwise,

ate graduate of Haines City High School,
Fem has also helped put out the
Florida Union s Freshman Book Booklet.
let. Booklet.
The managing editor for 1959
is also a Delta Gamma, and is
photography coordinator for this
years Seminole.
Miss Moores other work in the
publications field includes being
member of the Alligator Business
Staff for 1957 and executive editor
of the F Book. She will also help
compile this years Florida Blue
Key Speakers Brochure.
Robinson is a member of Al Alpha
pha Alpha Tau Omega and of Alpha
Phi Omega, national service fra fraternity.
ternity. fraternity. He has worked with the
Seminole for a year ami has been
a member of the Florida Union
Publication Committee.

of the Soviet Union, which would
be simpler still to understand,
but Communist imperialism.
The real task is to negotiate
by action; sustained, wise, and
disciplined action, by ourselves
(Continued On Page FIVE)

College Students 'Lazy/
Says Acheson in Address
By ARLENE FILLINGER and DOROTHY STOURBRIDGE
Gator Staff Writers
The United States educational system is deplorable, said Dean
Acheson at his informal' address at Chi Omega sorority house Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday evening. He backed this up by saying that if the government
designated more money to the educational system, ft would improve.

Acheson feels that citizens of
the U.S., and that includes stu students
dents students as well, are intellectually
lazy . (especially on the coli'ege
level.) He cited as an example the
fact that in England a boy at 18
is ready by training for his life lifetime
time lifetime position. In contrast to this,
a U.S. student is not prepared
even at 22.
When it comes to Nobel Prize
winners, France has won 1% times
as many as the U.S., England 3
times as many and Germany 5
times as many. Does this all not
mean that we are lagging edu educationally?
cationally? educationally?
Acheson stated that 70 per cent
of the U. S. physicists and scien scientists
tists scientists were bom outside of the
United States and that we are
getting our scientific know-how
by relying on the educational sys systems
tems systems of other countries.
Wake Up and Think
People should wake up and
think, Acheson said. Instead of
mediocrity, vulgarity and Philis Philistine
tine Philistine thinking; self-realization 18
necessary.
Segregation as such was not
dealt with heavily by Acheson but
he did say that the U.S. cannot
afford to separate educational sys systems
tems systems and expect either to be good.
Acheson feels that the role of
the teacher is not given proper
re ognition and cited the fact
that in his home county of Mont Montgomery
gomery Montgomery County, Md., the teacher
makes less than the house paint painter.
er. painter. To him this is an excellent
example of the esteem Ameri America
ca America has for its teachers.
In his political-history forum
discussion Wednesday afternoon
Acheson had some advice for his
successor as Secretary of State,
John Foster Dulles. He comment commented
ed commented that Dulles would save much
time on his travels if he would
just stay aloft and refuel in
the air. This would be doubly

University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, Friday, February 21, 1958

Revision Group Seeks $3.30 Increase
For UF Activity-Fee Organizations

Biggs New 'Liberty' Candidate
As 'University' Backs Graham

By JOE THOMAS
Gaor City Editor
A series of all-night meetings early this week brought a new student body presidential candidate
into the picture and left the campus political situation in a general state of confusion.

*
But Graham
Undecided
On Running
By 808 BENOIT
Gator Asst. News Editor
Honor Court Chancellor Bob
Graham told the Alligator yes yesterday
terday yesterday morning that because of
the changing political situation
he has not definitely decided to
run for student body president.
However, when the situation be becomes
comes becomes more definite, he said he
probably would be a candidate.
He pointed out that recent
shifts of fraternity blocks have
not definitely established two par parties,
ties, parties, and future shifts are certain
to be made.
Elections are more than a
month away, and until the par parties
ties parties are officially organized I de decline
cline decline to state that I will definitely
be a candidate.
Too Early"
Graham said he could not com comment
ment comment on his chances of winning
until the campaign starts, be because
cause because any statement at this
time would be misleading."
Since the party formulates the
platform, the Chancellor of the
Honor Court said he could not
comment on any platform. How However,
ever, However, he offered some suggestions
he feels would benefit the stu student
dent student body.
(Continued On Page FIVE)

advantageous because Dulles
always gets in trouble when he
lands, Acheson said.
Acheson spoke briefly before a
group of professors and students
and spent the rest of the hour
(Continued on Page THREE)

ggna. M
I i! §
1 HI
jm&fjsat'W & SBak
I i
Two Seminole Chiefs Smile After Appointment
Seminole Editor Fern Tatty and Managing Editor Saundra
Moore smile happily following th*ir appointment to the top po positions
sitions positions by the PuMicatioas Electoral Board Wednesday. Not pic pictured
tured pictured is next year's Business Manager John Robinson and Sheldon
Maselstein, who replaces February graduate Scott Hancock as Bu Business
siness Business Manager for lids semester. (Gator Photo).

The first major change occur*
ed early Tuesday morning when
the Liberty Party which was or originally
iginally originally formed for the purpose
of running Bob Graham (present
Honor Court Chancellor) for Stu Student
dent Student Body President, chose in instead
stead instead to support Tom Biggs, past
Gator Growl Chairman as their
presidential nominee.
At a meeting Sunday night the
Liberty faction had elected their
party officers, created a new
womans division and showed
other signs of party solidarity.
The surprise shift came when
Biggs finally decided to accept the
nomination for the number-one
Student Government post which
both campus political groups had
been offering him since last No November.
vember. November.
Biggs told the Alligator that he
did not accept the bid earlier be because
cause because of personal reasons but
a series of circumstances led
up to his change of mind Mon Monday
day Monday night. .
Meanwhile, Graham returned to
his studies ind Honor Court du duties
ties duties and offered no comment con concerning
cerning concerning his I political situation.
However, Jim Martin, spokesman
for the coalition opposing the Li Liberty
berty Liberty arty, said that his group
was definitely backing Bob Gra Graham
ham Graham as a presidential candidate.
With the exception of four fra fraternities
ternities fraternities which switched factions
during the political excitement no
other party reallignments have
occured and the Liberty group
still retains a 400 block vote
edge.
Neither party now has a Chair Chairman
man Chairman and no official meetings have
been scheduled until the week weekend.
end. weekend.
Fraternities still committed to
the Liberty Party at the last Al Alligator
ligator Alligator census are: Alpha Epsilon
Pi, Alpha Gamma Rho, Alpha
Tau Omega, Beta Theta PI
Chi Phi, Delta Tau Delta, Kappa
Alpha, Phi Delta Theta, Phi Gam Gamma
ma Gamma Delta, Pi Kappa Phi, Sigma
Alpha Epsilon, Tau Epsilon Phi,
and Theta Chi.
The group in opposition to the
Liberty faction now includes: Kap Kappa
pa Kappa Sigma, Lambda Chi Alpha,
Phi Kappa Tau, Pi Kappa Al Alpha,
pha, Alpha, Pi Lambda Phi, Sigma Chi,
Sigma Phi Epsilon, and Sigma
Nu.
'Gator on the Air
The Florida Alligator has re resumed
sumed resumed its nightly newscasts at
10 oclock Monday, Wednesday
and Friday evenings on radio
station WRUF.

Jf If
No Shifts
Before Vote,
Says Biggs
By JUDY BATES
Gator Copy Editor
Tom Biggs, Liberty party can candidate
didate candidate for Student Body presi president,
dent, president, told the Alligator Wednes Wednesday
day Wednesday night there would be no re realignments
alignments realignments in the party between
now and elections.
This (Liberty) is a good,
strong party, he stated, and I
definitely plan to stay with
them.
Biggs said the Liberty party
began to offer him the nomina nomination
tion nomination as early as November, but
he wasnt able to give a definite
answer at that time. His nomin nomination
ation nomination became official Monday
night.
When asked about his prospec prospective
tive prospective running mates. Biggs said,
Nothing# definite as yet, but
a lot of names have been men mentioned.
tioned. mentioned.
He then admitted that Jim Ade,
a member of the Student Govern Government
ment Government Finance Committee, had
been mentioned as a candidate
for Secretary Treasurer; and
that the name of Dick Burke had
come up as a possible candidate
for Chancellor of the Honor Court
Burke is a Law School Justice
on the court this year.
(Continued On Page FIVE)

Board of Student Publications Uses
'Open Policy'; Others Meet Secretly
CONCLUSION OF AN ALLIGATOR SERIES ON 'SECRECY'

One important committee of the University
prides itself on its policy of admitting the press
and public to its sessions.
Chairman John Paul Jones feels that the Board
of Student Publications, which meets each month,
ought to be conducted tel open session. The Board
follows this policy except when interviewing can candidates
didates candidates for editor and business manager of the
fee-supported publications.
Several members of the seven-member board,
including students and faculty, are in the School
of Journalism and Communications. They real realize
ize realize the advantages of a well-informed public and
guard the right of admittance to sessions.
The result is that students on the fee-support fee-supported
ed fee-supported publications have the confidence that a Board
will carry forth on its deliberations without se secrecy.
crecy. secrecy.
Jones has pointed out that under a Univer University
sity University policy, the Board of Student Publications
could if it desired justify closing its doors, but
will not do so.
The Board exercises no editorial control over
the fee-supported publications; it acts primarily
in signing pay requisitions and discussing com common
mon common problems and finances.
Most important is that the Board is the only
one of the dozens of faculty-student committees
of the University which regularly meets in open
session; and its members do not seem bothered
by the fact that a member of the press may be
present.
If the Board of Student Publications meets
openly, why cant these other committees, es especially
pecially especially ones dealing in routine session, push
aside their desire for hush-hush secrecy?
Groups Named
Many of these groups are such as: Board of
Managers of Florida Union; Memorials, Necrol Necrology,
ogy, Necrology, and Naming of Buildings; Inter-American;
University Libraries; Student Organizations and
Social Activities; Space Allocation; University
Constitution; Board of Directors of Clinical Ser Services;
vices; Services; Commencement Marshalls; Foreign Stu Students;
dents; Students; Size of Classes; Fulbright Scholarships;
Campus Drives; Nuclear Project Design Com Committee,
mittee, Committee, and dooens more.
Minutes of most of these groups are also
closely guarded. An Alligator staffer was de denied
nied denied access to the minutes of a recent meeting
of the University Policy and Planning Commit Committee,
tee, Committee, and decisions vitally effect the college
community,

Beardsley to Meet Beaty
In First Finance Step
By PAT MURPHY
Gator Feature Editor
Student Body President Eddie Beardsley will request
Administration backing Monday on a proposed increase
in the per cent of student activity fee allocated to or*
ganizations.

Beardsley will seek the sup support
port support of Dean of Student Person Personnel
nel Personnel Robert C. Beaty on a $3,30
increase in the $29.0C total now
granted to campus groups in the
$l5O yearly activity fee for in instate
state instate students.
If the student body president
obtains Administration support,
the proposed increase will be pre presented
sented presented to the Executive Council
in the form of finance increases
for almost all campus groups
now sharing In th' activity fee.
Following a favorable two twothirds
thirds twothirds vote by this group, the
proposed increases will be voted
on in the form of constitutional
amendments by the student body
in the spring vote.
Increase and re-allocation of
student activity fee is only one
of the many changes that are
being considered by the recently recentlyformed
formed recentlyformed committee on student bo body
dy body constitutional revision.
Any such increase in student
activity portion to organizations
must ultimately be decided by the
State Board of Control, with Uni University
versity University President J. Wayne
Reitz approval.
Student leaders will push ahead
on the amendments with a pro promise
mise promise of Administration backing,
in order to meet the deadline
specified by the student body con constitution.
stitution. constitution.
Published
AU proposed amendments must
be published in the Florida Alli Alligator
gator Alligator within a period of one to
three weeks before campus elec elections.
tions. elections. Between now and that time,
the amendments must be back backed
ed backed by the Executive Council
vote. To insure passage by that
group, the amendments must be
initiated next week.
Thus State Board of Control
approval will have to be counted
on rather Rian actually obtained

All faculty members to these committees are,
appointed by the president, usually for stagger staggered
ed staggered terms. Student members, (few are owes
which students are represented on,) are appoint appointed
ed appointed with the consent of the president.
If the Board of Student Publications can meet
in open session, why not these other groups?
The answer in most cases seems to be that
administrators have grown up in an atmosphere
of secrecy, like the protection that it affords
from possible censure and/or publicity, and
therefore encourage it whenever they can.
The old bugaboo that If the press were ad admitted
mitted admitted news would be blown-up out of propor proportion
tion proportion doesn't hold the majority of the time; tho
benefits of a well-informed public and a student
body to know when policy is being decided upon
greatly outweighs the possible results of an oc occasional
casional occasional careless article.
It is true that members of a committee might
not say as much if the press were present.
But which is more important, the reluctance of
individuals to take a public stand, or releasing
of information to a tax-paying public?
Students and faculty members at a recent
Faculty-Student Advisory Committee Meeting, of
which President Reitz is chairman, felt that
meetings should not be open to the student and
state press, nor should names be released.
Their feeling seemed to be that protection
of the individuals in criminal cases was more
important than letting the public know what
some mature college students committed
and why.
The belief that members of committees might
feet more free to comment on issues without a
member of the press present was cited.
Not Entry Everyttme
The editor of the Alligator replied at this ses session
sion session that the conscientious newspaper did not
seek entry to all meetings; only when discus discussions
sions discussions and decisions were being made which had
a direct bearing and influence on other Individ Individuals
uals Individuals or areas of the University.
IFC President Al Millar agreed that when mat matters
ters matters of public importance were being discussed
the public and press should be invited. Other*
present, including Blue Key President Jack Shor Shorstein,
stein, Shorstein, WSA President Charlotte Mayes, and deans
of the administration, headed by President Reitz,
felt differently.
(Continued On Page FOUB)

serving
11,000 students
*'* i _> ' T;
at university
of florida

Six Pagts This Edition

in order for the committee to ho
able to present these changes to
the student body In the spring
election.
According to Beardsley, chair chairman
man chairman of the committee, the addit additional
ional additional funds are necessary o keep
student organisations in operation.
Every one of the organisations
will be hit if ,we dont get
(Continued On Page FIVE)
Gator Accepting
Nominations For
'Man of the Year'
Nominations from students and
alumni for the Florida Alligator#
third annual Florida Man of the
Year selection are now being ac accepted
cepted accepted in the Alligator office,
Editor-in-Chief Dave Levy an announced
nounced announced this week.
The award, made on the basis
of service to the University of
Florida, will be announced in
March. Students, alumni or state
leaders are eligible for consider consideration,
ation, consideration, Levy said, but students will
be given preference in the selec selection.
tion. selection.
The Man of the Year was ori originated
ginated originated in 1953 by former Alliga Alligator
tor Alligator Editor-in-Chief George bay bayless,
less, bayless, The final selecUon of the
candidate will be made by the Al Alligator
ligator Alligator staff.
Nominations should Include the
name, address and accomplish accomplishments
ments accomplishments of the nominee and a list
of his or her service record in or
for the University. Letters must
be addressed to the Man of the
Year, Florida Alligator, Univers University
ity University of Florida, Gainesville, or left
at the Florida Union desk. Dead Deadline
line Deadline for nominations is March 1.



Page 2

!The Florida Alligator, Friday, Feb. 21,1958

SOCIALLY SPEAKING

Up on Studies, Greeks Party

By GRACE HINSON
Gator Social Editor
The Greeks, who are naturally
up with their studies, this new
semester, piAn parties, socials,
and rushing- lor this week.
Participation in Religion in*
Life week activities has been im impressive.
pressive. impressive.
Religion-in-Life week speaker
Rabbi Shalman spoke to the
AEPis and DPhiEs at the AJEPi
house Wednesday night. The AE AEPis
Pis AEPis began socialising in their
brand new house with the Caval Cavalettes
ettes Cavalettes Tuesday evening. They plan
a record party tomorrow night
to really get things 'swinging.
The SAEs party tonight fea features
tures features the Versatones. Tomorrow
nights festivites feature the hi-fi
and patio proceedings.
The neophytes of Beta Theta
Pi and Delta Gamma will have
a social to celebrate their new
status Sunday afternoon at the
Beta house.
New officers of AOPi are: Peg Peggy
gy Peggy Sheehan, president; Shirley
Hudson, vice president; Gerrie
Thomas, treasurer; Marilyn
Mann, recording secretary; Joan
Lane, cort-esponding secretary;
Nancy Longbottom, social chair chairman.
man. chairman.
A fireside party with refresh refreshments
ments refreshments is in store for KA gentle gentleme
me gentleme tonight.
Red doors and red hearts com combined
bined combined to set the stage for the
Theta, OMe valentine party last

MARY CARTER SAYS:
PAINT NOW FOR HALF PRICE
ONLY Per Ga| |NP RY
MARY CARTER PAINT STORE
501 N.W. Bth Avenue Gainesville FR 6-7588

* "*
The Men Who Are Building The
ATOMIC CARRIER
may have a
JOB FOR YOU!
i
fc* mm .'W -m
ENGINEERS
I 1
. ; . .. i :
i
Unusual Opportunities
to Participate In History-
Making Events!f
For design and building of Nuclear Warships
Commercial Vessels and other diversified work
at Newport News including Water Power and
other heavy industrial equipment.
-*T- e
Enjoy pleasant working conditions and generous
Employee Benefits in one of the world's largest com*
mercial shipyards.
Enjoy the suburban-type life of the historic Virginia
Peninsula. Mild winters for year-round sports and
outdoor life. Recreational activities include boating,
hunting, fishing and beaches.
A wide variety of positions available, including the
following categories;
NUCLEAR... STRUCTURAL STEEL... ELECTRONICS...
HYDRAULIC... MACHINERY... PIPING... ELECTRICAL...
AIR-CONDITIONING... TECHNICAL... STAFF TRAINING
INTERVIEWS
FEBRUARY 27
Room 300 Engineering Building
NEWPORT NEWS SHIPBUILDING
AND DRY DOCK COMPANY
Nwnport tan, Virginia

Saturday night to mark their first
of the semester.
The ADPis and Kappa Sigs
socialized at the KB house Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday night. Tonight the Kap Kappa
pa Kappa Sigs pla n program of study
dates. Entertainment cm tape
stars at their party 4 tomorrow
night plus refreshments and dan dancing.
cing. dancing.
Informal rush gatherings jvttl
take place at the Delt house this
weekend. Bachelor sports day
tomorrow will begin with games
and physical feats.
The Sig Ep*i plan a hi-fi party
tonight A steak fry will precede
their hobo party tomorrow night
The AChiOs had Mrs. Dean
UF ROTC Student
Wins Rifle Match
Larry Brugh, a junior and mem member
ber member of the Army ROTC rifle team,
fired first in his class and second
among 40 competitors in the
National Rifle Association sect sectional
ional sectional matches held in Miami.
Firing for his first time in this
type match, Brugh scored 758
points out of a possible 800 total.
The only member of the Army
rifle team from the University of
Florida to make the trip, Brugh
received a gold medal, three
bronze medals end a silver spoon
for his efforts.

Acheson as their dinner guest
Wednesday night The Zetaa
joined the Alpha Chis for an in informal
formal informal discussion with Mrs. Ach Acheson
eson Acheson after dinner.
The Snakes plan to party to tonight.
night. tonight. The Sigma Nus will dance
to the hi-fi.
Recent results of the DPhlEa
elections are: Ruth Katz, presi president;
dent; president; Beverly Malin, vice presi president;
dent; president; Deena Schiff, pledge moth mother;
er; mother; Joanne Weiss, recording sec secretary;
retary; secretary; Barbara Rothstein, cor corresponding
responding corresponding secretary; Ada Ros Rosenfeld,
enfeld, Rosenfeld, treasurer; Saranne Segal,
member-at-large; Pauline Bau Bauman,
man, Bauman, Rush Chairman; Norma
Weitzenkorn, historian; Bonnie
Harris, parlimentarian.
The TEPs are idle this week weekend
end weekend as they make plans for their
big Founders Day celebration
next week.
The DGs were hostesses at a
dinner for Dean Acheson Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday night. Other guests in included
cluded included Dr. and Mrs. Ehrman,
Dr. Eleanor Brown, and mem members
bers members of the Religion and Life
week committee.
The AEPhig have elected the
following officers for this semes semester:
ter: semester: Tami Cole, president; Lil Lillian
lian Lillian Rubin, vice president; San Sandy
dy Sandy Schwartz, corresponding sec secretary;
retary; secretary; Toby Markowitz, record recording
ing recording secretary; Toby Diwoskin,
ritualist; Cookie Kopelowitz, trea treasurer;
surer; treasurer; Audrey Mendelblatt, his historian;
torian; historian; Sara Jacobson, parlimen parlimentarian;
tarian; parlimentarian; Bobbie Hirsch, member memberat-large;
at-large; memberat-large; Rochelle Robin, house
manager.

Bridge Lessons
Slated by Union
The Florida Union is sponsor
ing beginning and intermediate
bridge lessons for the spring se semester.
mester. semester.
The first lesson is scheduled
for uesday at 7 p.m. for the
beginning group, and 8 for the
intermediate instructions. The
cost is 17.50 for 10 lessons; how
ever, the first one is free.
All lessons will be held Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday evenings in the Oak Room
of the Union under the instruction
of Mrs. Betty Jones, high rank ranking
ing ranking member of the American
Contract Bridge League.
Btudenta may register in room
orida Union or on
'* first night on instruction*

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In July of 1958, AAF will
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classroom work, under the di direction
rection direction of competent instruc instructors,
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company plants and large in industrial
dustrial industrial users of AAF products.
A representative of Ameri American
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seniors on
FRIDAY, MARCH 17, 1958
Make an appointment, now,
through your Placement Office.
American Air Filler
Company, toe
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Indian Students Plan ISO Supper
Six exchange students planning to attend a special Indian Supper to be held in the Oak Room of
the Student Service. Center Sunday, exhibit a poster reminding all students wishing to attend that
reservation* must be made by today. Left to right are: Sid Mittra, K. S. Chauhan, K. R. Rao, V.
Chapnerkar, and R. Parthasarathy.

DONT LIKE 'SACK' DRESSES
Achesons Give Views
On Fashions, Fowls

By ARLENE FILUNGER
And DOROTHY STOCKBRIDCE
Gator Staff Writers
We opened our chit-chat with
Dean Acheson by asking him
what he thought of sack dres dresses...
ses... dresses... (And he really THOUGHT
about them, too!) Yes, there was
a decided twinkle in his eye as
he recalled the days when Alice,
his charming wife, wore them in
the 19205. But as for Mrs. Ache Achesons
sons Achesons wearing them today or for
that matter tomorrow, hed rath rather
er rather she didnt as he doesnt feel
r-> do justice to the attractive
human figure.
Mrs. Acheson on the other hand,
says that the only ones she has
viewed were those shown at a
recent fashion show and they
were so extreme, even on vivaci vivacious
ous vivacious models, she told her friends
she wouldnt wear them. Her
friends replied laughingly, yes,
you will, when theyre in fashion
youll be among those wearing
them. (And MAYBE she will!)
With baseball season just around
Springs corner, the question was
posed to Acheson, And whats
your favorite baseball team?
He quickly replied, Ive always
been for any team that could
beat the Yankees. He has, at
times, tried to wax up spirit for
the Washington Senators but gave
up on them. He quickly stated
that he was speaking of the ones
that play in Griffith Stadium not
on Capitol Hill. (Although he feels
that those playing on the dia diamond,
mond, diamond, in general, do better than
those on the hill.)
Artist Wife
With his wife as an outstanding
artist in her own right, Acheson
was asked if he ever joins her
in painting. No, was the reply,
I leave that to Mrs. Ache Acheson.
son. Acheson. He, himself, is a Cabinet Cabinetmaker
maker Cabinetmaker by hobby and in his shop
on their farm in Maryland he fills
the orders that Mrs. A. puts in
for pieces for their home. He
truly keeps the home fires burn burning
ing burning as he may oftentimes be
found chopping the wood for the
fireplaces.
Mrs. Acheson says of her hus husband,
band, husband, he would be a dilemma to
a French cook. He likes clean
food food he can easily re recognize
cognize recognize and not covered up with
sauces, etc. Hes a roast beof,
steak, chops man and also enjoys
succotash, oysters and clams.
He often, when "the two of them
are alone, fixes breakfast and Mrs
Acheson is the official tableset tablesetter.
ter. tablesetter. His food must be cooked
just so and not five seconds
too long. He likes his meat pink.
As an artist and a lover of the
out-of-doors, Mrs. Acheson en enjoys
joys enjoys painting landscapes, although
she does try to catch up with all
new ideas and mediums of paint painting.
ing. painting. She prefers working with oil
and watercolors.
When asked, of all the places
you have visited with your hue-,

See It From
|Hl||;l|||l| the
111 1111 l*l Beginning!
MAT. 80cIVE. 90e

band, what stands out most vivid vividly
ly vividly in your mind? Mrs. Acheson
related a trip they once took. It
covered 24 to 48 hours in Lon London.
don. London. Berlin, Bonn, Vienna, Italy,
Southern Spain, Casablanca, Mor Morroco,
roco, Morroco, western coast of Africa,
South America and then home.
She related they spent an evening
in a French commissioner's home
in Dakar where there were no
windows and the air just seeped
in.
Lion cubs greeted them one
morning as the Achesons break breakfasted
fasted breakfasted on a terrace of a modem
home they stayed in while in
Brazil. Their trip was fulfilled,
as she had the opportunity to
constantly sketch views from the
plane.
As we left the Achesons to
continue thetr various campus
talks, we felt how grateful the
University must be for their hav having
ing having been able to participate in
our Religion-In-Life Week and how
much better we all are for it.

FRESHMAN !
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PHONE FR 6-3740
If you can't afford a new one,
come and examine our supply
of used ones.

Sorority Rush
Scheduled For
This Weekend

Formal sorority rush for the
Spring semester will be held this
weekend and bids will be handed
out to rushees next Wednesday.
Saturday parties will be held
at five specified times for the
rushee to attend. The dress is
informal, and there will be no
planned entertainment scheduled
Sunday will be formal with hats
and heels for the dress. Two par parties
ties parties will be held for the rushees.
These are the preferential par parties
ties parties for the rushes.
Sororities will turn in their
preferential lists to the Dean of
Womens Office by 3:30 p.m.,
Monday. On this same day rush rushees
ees rushees will make out their prefer preferential
ential preferential list at the reception room
(128) of the Administration build building.
ing. building.
The two preferential lists, the
sororities and the rushees, will
be matched and the bids extend extended
ed extended accordingly. The rushee is
given four choices of sororities
and must list them in order of
preference. The first sorority on
the list to give the girl a bid is
the only one she will have a
chance to pledge.

fPTTTI fri.-and
SATURDAY
ROUGH, REAL
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STARTS SUNDAY
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4Bjfa "AW
ALLIGATOR
jLTgMLL 'j NAMED
'w
IgttyWl

WSA Seeks to Lift Ban
On Bermuda Shorts Here

By GLORIA BROWN
Gator Staff Writer
W.S.A. has announced j.that a
proposal for the wearing of Ber Bermuda
muda Bermuda shorts, sport shirts and
sports shoes or sandles in class classrooms,
rooms, classrooms, cafeterias and the library
may go into effect soon. Sandy
Denison, representative from Yu Yulee,
lee, Yulee, said that the plan will now
undergo discussion by the inter interhall
hall interhall committee.
The W.S.A. Council meeting
Monday night discussed a report
from the Community Projects
Committee, constitutional chang changes,
es, changes, a future Panhellenic Council
fashion show, a report on Re Religion-in-Life
ligion-in-Life Religion-in-Life Week activities, and
an announcement of a scholar scholarship
ship scholarship banquet highlighted the bus business
iness business at hand.
It was reported by the Com Community
munity Community Projects Committee that
an opening for a volunteer work worker
er worker is available at the Gainesville
Red Cross from 9-1 on weekdays.
According to Lillian Rubin co cochairman,
chairman, cochairman, this committee has
been established in order to pro provide
vide provide girls who are not Interested
in extra-curricular campus acti activities
vities activities or who desire the exper experience
ience experience and opportunity to de devote
vote devote their time and service to
others. Before embarking upon
this plan, however; coeds must
show enough interest to insure its
success.
Constitution Accepted
A revised W.S.A. Constitution
was unanimously accepted by
those present. Major changes in include
clude include : a deleting of the Secre Secretary
tary Secretary of Womens Affairs, specifi specification
cation specification of requirements for those
who shall serve on the Budget
Committee, Publicity Committee,
and the Calendar Committee,
Committles whose chair chairmen
men chairmen shall be appointed, pol policies
icies policies concerning absentees, and
establishment of new duties for
the vice-president and secretary.
This will be the constitution that
is to go In next years Coedi Coedikette.
kette. Coedikette.
Names were suggested of girls
available to model at a Panhel Panhellenic
lenic Panhellenic Fashion show, which will
take place on March 15. Two girls
from each sorority house, in ad addition
dition addition to several girls from

fat Stefan
(f?V the Author of Rally Round the Flag, BoyeT' and
Barefoot Boy with Cheek")
i iii

THE PLEDGE YOU SAVE
MAY BE YOUR OWN
Todays column is directed at those young female undergradu undergraduates
ates undergraduates who have recently pledged sororities and are worried, poor
lambs, that they wont make good. Following is a list of simple
instructions which, if faithfully observed, will positively guaran guarantee
tee guarantee that you will be a mad success as a sorority girl.
First, let us take up the matter of housemothers. The house housemother
mother housemother is your friend, your guide, your mentor. You must treat
her with respect. When you wish to speak to her, address her as
Mother Sigafoos or Maam. In no circumstances must you
say, Hey, fat lady.
Second, let us discuss laundry. Never hang your wash on the
front porch of the sorority house. This is unsightly and shows
a want of breeding. Use the Chapter Room.
Third, meals. Always remember that planning and preparing
meals for a houseful of healthy girls is no simple task. Your cook
goes to a great deal of trouble to make your menu varied and
nourishing. The least you can do is show your appreciation.
Dont just devour your food; praise it. Exclaim with delight,
What delicious pork jowls! or What a yummy soupbonel*!
or What scrumptious fish heads! or What clear water!
Fourth, clothing. Never forget that your appearance reflects
not just on yourself but on the whole house. It was well enough
before you joined a sorority to lounge around campus in your
old middy blouse aod gym bloomers, but now you must take
great pains to dress in a manner which excites admiring com comments
ments comments from all who observe you. A few years ago, for example,
there was a Chi Omega named Camille Ataturk at the Univer University
sity University of lowa who brought gobs of glory to all her sorors.
* Camille hit on the ingenious notion of suiting her garb to
the class she was attending. For instance, to English Lit she
wore a buskin and jerkin. To German she wore lederhosen and
carried a stein of pilsener. To Econ she wore 130 yards of ticjwr
tape. Her shiningest hour came one day when she dressed as a
white mouse for Psych Lab. Not only her Chi Omega sisters,
but the entire student body wait into deep mourning when she
was killed by the janitors eat.
Finally, let us take up the most important topic of aft. I
refer, of course, to dating.
As we have seen, the way you dress reflects on your sorority,
but the men you date reflect even more. Be abeolutely certain
that your date is an acceptable fellow. Dont beat about the
bush; ask him point-blank, Are you an acceptable feflowH
Unless he replies, Yeah, hey, send him packing.
But dont just take his word that he is acceptable. Inspect
him closely. Are his fingernails clean? Is his Made leather jacket
freshly oiled? Is his ukulele in tune? Does he carry public
liability insurance? And, meet significant of ail, does he smokes
Mariboroe?
If hes a Marlboro man, you know hes a lot of man. You
know he has taste and discernment, wR and wisdom, character
and sapience, decency and warmth, presence and poise, talent
and grit, filter and flavor. You will be proud of him, your sorority
will be proud of him, toe makers of Marlboro will be proud f
him, and I will be paid for this column.

Tha makers of Marlboro with to announca that Mr,
Shulman ha* boon paid for this column and will continua
to ba paid for bringing pom hit homalp phtloaophp through*
out tha tchooi poor.

dorms are requested to partici participate.
pate. participate. j
Margie Abrams, Secretary of
Womens Affairs and committee
head for the Religion-ito-Life Week
reception, told the council that
the reception given for the speak speakers
ers speakers on Sunday had been a suc success.
cess. success. Evaluation sheets of Rail Railgion-in-Life
gion-in-Life Railgion-in-Life Week speakers were
passed out with the wish that they
be given to others.
Plans for a Scholarship ban banquet
quet banquet to be held on Feb. 27 at
the Hub were discussed. Guests
will be the coeds ranking among
the top five, scholastically, in
their dorm or dorm section, or
off campus lodging.
Practice Starts
For Cheerleaders
Cheerleader practice start Mon Monday
day Monday afternoon at 4:30 p.m., ac according
cording according to Don Aden, head cheer cheerleader.
leader. cheerleader.
A two week practice program
will precede the selection of next
years cheerleaders in open trials
March 11.
Sessions will be held at the Foot Football
ball Football Stadium and will last about
c
45 minutes. In case of rain prac practice
tice practice v. ill be in the Gym.
All students who have an over overall
all overall 2.0 honor point average are
eligible to try out.
No previous experience is nec necessary
essary necessary and athletic ability is sec secondary
ondary secondary to spirit, Allen stated.
There will be only three mem members
bers members returning from the last
sqund, but all three will have to
try out for their positions with
the new candidates.

Those Interested
Are Cordially Invited
To Attend The
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
Campus Organization
Mootings
Sundoys At 6:45 P.M.
Florida Union
Auditorium



m FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

Our 50th Year of Publication

Page 3

No Passing the Buck

A question that seems to arise in everyones mind now and then is why student
participation is on the decline in Florida extra-curriculars.
It appears that todays college student is more politically aware as Dean Ache Acheson
son Acheson told the Alligator yesterday, and generally more sensitive to all facets of col college
lege college life than his predecessors.

But more active in extra-curriculars,
evidently not.
Organizations all over campus feel
the pinch.
Some publications have been having
difficulty recruiting personnel. The
Alligator suffered slightly at the be beginning
ginning beginning of the year, but is bounding
back.
Student Government seems to feel the
decline, as well as many of the 200-odd
organizations on the campus.
During September, we were prone to
charge this off to the added stress of
academic requirements, the higher cal caliber
iber caliber of student attending the Univer University,
sity, University, and the fear that participation
would tend to hurt a student academi academically.
cally. academically.
In February, we lean more towards
the view that these reasons may hold
some truth, but that more often the
student is just too reluctant to join
anything he knows little about or is
afraid will reject him.
Especially during political season,
everyone is accusing everyone else of
non-participationmainly political politically
ly- politically
Actually, if the politicians wanted to
analyze why students dont appear too
interested in campus elections, it
doesnt seem anything more than
apathy in other directions extended to
the election arena itself.
* *
No one reason can be isolated as to
the cause for greater student indiffer indifference
ence indifference on the Florida scene but if stu student
dent student leaders, fraternity leaders, and
politicians were really interested in a
dynamic Florida campus, they could
bring it about.
Fraternities, instead of encouraging
the secular attitudes within their halls
that they so often do, would do well
to realize that there is a lot to this
campus that the shell-covered fratern fraternity
ity fraternity man never sees.
Political leaders, instead of just fig figuring
uring figuring out ways to perpetuate them themselves,
selves, themselves, could really attempt to do
something, and thereby encourage
student alertness to the issues of the
day.

The Florida Alligator
All-American Rating, 1953-57
Member Associated College Press
The FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student news newspaper
paper newspaper of the University of Florida and is published every
Tuesday and Friday mornings except during holidays,
vacations and examination p erlods. The FLORIDA ALLI ALLIGATOR
GATOR ALLIGATOR is entered as second class matter at the United
States Post Office at Gainesville, Florida. Offices are located
in basement of Florida Union. Telephone FR 6-3261, exten extension
sion extension 655, and request either editorial or business office.
Business office hours 2 to 5 Tues.. Wed., Fri. Subscrip Subscriptions
tions Subscriptions $3.00 per year.
Editor-in-Chief ....... DAVID LEVY
Managing Editor LEE FENNELL
Business Mgr CHUCK RUFFNER
DAN HACKEL, EXECUTIVE EDITOR; JOE
THOMAS, CITY EDITOR; SALLY STEWART,
NEWS EDITOR; ROGER LEWIS, STATE EDI EDITOR;
TOR; EDITOR; PAT MURPHY, FEATURE EDITOR; JU JUDY
DY JUDY BATES, COPY EDITOR; 808 BENOIT,
ASST. NEWS EDITOR; GRACE HINSON, SO SOCIAL
CIAL SOCIAL EDITOR.
News Staff Writers; Pauline Bauman, Arlene Fill Fillinger,
inger, Fillinger, Gloria Brown, Esther Firestone, Bob Je Jerome,
rome, Jerome, Sally Galioway, Jerry Palmer, Jean Car Carver,
ver, Carver, Sonny Warth, Grace Zinn, Jack Kaplan.
KEN SHER, SPORTS EDITOR; KENN FINKEL,
ASST. SPORTS EDITOR.
Sports Staff Writers: Charlie Pike, Bill Buchal Buchalter,
ter, Buchalter, Billy Shaw, Randy McLaughlin, Henry Gold Goldman,
man, Goldman, Stu Blumberg, Jack Winstead.
FRANK GRAY, ASST. BUS. MGR. FOR PRO PRODUCTION;
DUCTION; PRODUCTION; KEN CLIFFORD, ASST. BUS. MGR.
FOR SALES; RONALD SHASHY, SUBSCRIP SUBSCRIPHON
HON SUBSCRIPHON MGR; MARTIN STEINER, OFFICE MGR;
SUSAN STATLER, NATIONAL AD MGR.
Business Staff: Virginia Lee Philpott, Brace Bate Bateman,
man, Bateman, George Brown, Frank Stephens, Harry
Squires, Bemie Pestco, King Lovinger, Phyllis
Grolljman.

n XXlft WT HUMHWO m Vu WfT OWN A. BEER MU& aUKMN- / KftWf
I xmcl m, -lie (tern ) we mcm wn wiratp on j i

Editorials

Such a policy by Student Government
would run contrary to President Eddie
Beardsleys conception of how Student
Government ought to be run.
This year, the Council and Beardsley
should have discussed such problems
as the Negro question, off-campus
housing, the new role of the student in
education crowded classes many
areas which a Student Government
ordinarily thinks itself inept to dis discuss.
cuss. discuss.
Just to sound out student sentiment
on such issues as well as the many
things which a Student Government
does in the ordinary course of events
would mark this campus as one pro progressively
gressively progressively interested in all the issues
that affect a student body.
Instead what is the case? We find a
Student Government more interested
in finding out where the Alligator got
its sources rather than the fact that
there are rather obvious inconsistenc inconsistencies
ies inconsistencies in Honor Court procedure; politi politicians
cians politicians eager to win and forgetful of
good ethical and moral taste and eag eager
er eager to forget their promises once elect elected
ed elected to office; parties announcing their
doors are open to independents but
slamming them shut once in office;
lacking the guts to admit that campus
politics is more of a game than a mat matter
ter matter of life and death.
* *
George Bayless, who by his positive
action has probably done as much for
this student body during the year as
anyone raises a good point in his col column
umn column on the editorial page. He suggests
that student politicians consider a stu student
dent student lecture series on the campus.
But in the midst of a campaign, will
anyone remember that this present
Student Government still has a respon responsibility
sibility responsibility to carry out some of its aims
to the student body?
We have had two presidents of the
freshman class this year, due to a split
term of office, but will either one fol follow
low follow through on Baylesss suggestion?
Will Student Government consider it?
Or will it just be forgotten like so
much else on this campus?
Students and student politicians claim
their rights and prerogatives are de declining
clining declining year to year. If fraternities,
sororities, and others on this campus
want the rights they so loudly claim,
theyre going to have to get a lot bus busier
ier busier to prove they deserve them.

Publications Board
Hold Open Sessions

(Continued From Page ONE)
Perhaps the group which hits the public lime limelight
light limelight the most is the State Board of Control, com composed
posed composed of seven citizens appointed for staggered
terms by the governor.
This group most usually meets in open, but
has oftentimes showed an inclination to reach
decisions either outside of the committee room
or in its occasional secret sessions.
University of Florida Vice-President Harry
Philpott was chosen in secret. So have several
leaders, at top-paying posts in the College of
Medicine, been chosen in secret session.
No Reflection
This is in no way a reflection on the Boards
choices, but indicates that secrecy even goes to
the top level of the state.
Governor Collins, modifying a campaign pro proposal
posal proposal in which he ceiled for state groups to meet
in the open, recently said he saw "certain
conditions under which secret sessions could be
called for.
He and other members of the State Board of
Education said that since the State Board must
approve Board of Control nominations, that no
publicity be released until such approval wail
rendered. 4
State newspapers and the Florida Alligator
believe that names approved by the State
Board of Control should be released before the
Cabinet Board takes action; for then an inform informed
ed informed public could voice its approval or disapprov disapproval
al disapproval education prior to final approval.

Friday, Feb. 21,195 S

"How's the Water?"

PERIHELION

Editorships for the Appl

By DAN HACKEL
Gator Executive Editor
They also serve who only
stand and wait .
The spreading decline in cam campus
pus campus extra-curriculars was des desperately
perately desperately reflected this week in
applications for some of the top
jobs in publications.
Heres the box score for the
three positions of Editor, Man Managing
aging Managing Editor and Business
Manager of the Seminole: on only
ly only five applicants, just one of
them qualified under the Student
Body Constitution.
For Editor of the Orange
Peel: no candidates.
Something ig
wrong with stu student
dent student activities
on this campus, 9
it has been get- Bpgt,,
ting worse for fMK
several years |
now and it
reac h e s its f a
most serious /,
proportions in \ J
publications. HACKEL
For the past three years at
least, the basement has been
sapped with a lack of qualified
candidates for editorial and bus business
iness business positions. Few jobs on the
campus carry more prestige
and reward than these posts,
yet they have been neglected.
Why?
Many tie this to a general
slump in extra-curricular, inter interest
est interest evident in Student Govern Government
ment Government and a thousand other or organizations
ganizations organizations that are now dy dying
ing dying on the vine.
But in publications, this pro problem

GEORGE BAYLESS

Campus Needs Student Lecture Series

By GEORGE RAYLESS
Former Alligator Editor
That friendly old cabinet-mak cabinet-maker,
er, cabinet-maker, whose wife paints better
than he makes cabinets, former
Secretary of State Dean Ache Acheson,
son, Acheson, was warmly refreshing
Wednesday in his two forums
on speaking out on all issues.
It, is regretted the University
of Florida cannot import out outstanding
standing outstanding men more often to the
campus to stir discussion and
thinking and show students that
professors arent the only ones
who read the New York Times.
It is, of course, expensive to

< i&si
n

bring men of
Acheson's cali calibre
bre calibre to this
campus, locat located
ed located as it is in
the hinterlands
of the nation.
But money
spent in this
fashion would
do more for the
students than

can be fully BAYLESS
appreciated, because it lets stu students
dents students know that there is think thinking
ing thinking outside of the Ivy Walls.
Daniel Schorr, Moscow cor correspondent
respondent correspondent for the CBS TV net-
EL GATO

El Goto Interviews Leo 111, Former "Movie Star'....

By EL GATO
Passing by the SAE house
about three the other morning
I stopped to chat with Leo,
and its amazing what this poor
cat has been thru. You might
think it unpsual for me to be
talking to a lion at S a.m.,
but Im often up at that hour
robbing birds nests and walk walking
ing walking in front of humans (Im
black and it worries hell out
of em.
Leo told me that he didnt
start out to be a stone lion

blem problem has become greatest, most
apparent to everyone familiar
with the scene.
In the "old days, there was
hot contest for Alligator posi positions,
tions, positions, even for Alligator stories
on the assignment sheet.
Now (meaning last year and
this one) the paid editors cant
find anyone else to take a story.
The Business Manager of the
Florida Alligator pro bab 1 v
makes more money than any
other student in extra-cumcu extra-cumculars.
lars. extra-cumculars. Yet the job has gone beg begging
ging begging for a lack of promising
personnel working up the ranks.
* *
The present Business Mana Manager
ger Manager compounded the problem b.v
resigning his post this week.
Luckily one qualified successor
was available.
The Seminole and Orange
Peel, former battle grounds of
the basement were dead as
Dickie Sewells Florida Union
this week. Where controversy
and competition one thrived
only the dormant institution
was left.
This is not intended as a cri criticism
ticism criticism of the hardy souls who
did apply for Seminole editor editorships
ships editorships this week. On the con contrary,
trary, contrary, they deserve the posts
through their loyalty. They
are like the church audience on
a slack Sunday: its not they,
but the stay-at homes who
should be preached to about at attendance.
tendance. attendance.
The fact of the matter is, we
have seen only four people work working
ing working in the Seminole editorial of office
fice office all year: the present edi editor,
tor, editor, the present Manag in g

work, will appear at the Univer University
sity University Auditorium on March 4th at
8 p.m. sponsored by the Uni University
versity University Lecture Series. This is a
Tuesday night engagement, but
burning the midnight oil should
be worth it for the next days
studies to hear this man.
We have been toying with the
idea that since both the Uni University
versity University and the faculty have a
lecture series, why dont we
have a student lecture series?
Choose student speakers from
this campus.
Some students, and I dont
necessarily mean all debaters,
are certainly around who can
get up and sound off with their
views.
This student lecture series
could easily be a part of Stu Student
dent Student Government or one of its
subsidiary organizations.
Perhaps the two campus pre presidential
sidential presidential candidates can be become
come become available to kick off such
a student lecture series.
Just because the great men
are talking about the great is issues
sues issues does not mean students are
not thinking as well about them.
A student lecture series might
easily show what students are
thinking.

and was, in fact, once a movie
star.
"I was sitting at a soda foun fountain
tain fountain on Sunset and Vine hav having
ing having a chocolate double-dip de delight
light delight when a movie producer
spotted me and gave me a
screen test. It Was my hand handsome
some handsome mane that attracted him.
Anyway, I made the big time
by introducing the flicks at
MGM. We had a fallout when
it came time to pick up my
option.
"Confidential was ready to do

icants...

Editor, and the two girls who
applied. Testimony before the
Board of Student Publications
Wednesday substantiated this,
with the top estimate of work working
ing working staff placed at eight.
Eight! This for the entire staff
for a publication the size of the
Seminole is ridiculous. The Al Alligator
ligator Alligator is just as badly fixed.
The Orange Peel has no one.
*
Some attribute it to the con constant
stant constant pressure of publications,
and the comparative anonymi anonymity.
ty. anonymity. Yet the interested student
can find few areas which offer
more rewarding constant fun
and eventual campus knowledge.
The pace of publication is
hard. This was further demon demonstrated
strated demonstrated before the Board this
week by the fact that only one
applicant was classified above.
2UC. The hard worker is in inclined
clined inclined to flake out during his
second year unless greater re rewards
wards rewards are immediately forth forthcoming
coming forthcoming ...
So the qualifications of the
Student Body Constitution were
waived. Why not? There was no
one else. A long-time struggle
to set up qualifications for pub publications
lications publications officers and have them
picked by the Board (instead
of elected) was abandoned.
We feel sure the two girls
selected will come through with
a Semniole next year. But will
they have any help, any staff?
Next years Seminole Elector Electoral
al Electoral Board may have find them themselves
selves themselves with an even more re restricted
stricted restricted choice. For the Orange
Peel, that time is already here.
Editorships, anyone?

And if a student ccraes
plumb out for integration of
Florida schools, it would be
only the individual student pro proposing
posing proposing this, not the student
body. I think critics of such a
plan that allows complete stu student
dent student independence in selecting
subject material will fade away
when they consider what their
own ranks say everyday.
For that matter, segregation segregationists
ists segregationists will probably become happy
because I am sure there are
still many people that feel very
strongly about this issue on their
Side.
In other words, I think the
student lecture series would be
a good thing, and that racism
wont disrupt the purpose of the
series. Certainly student lec lecture
ture lecture series cannot do any worse
than other types of lecture ser series
ies series in regards to attracting an
audience. Then again they
might do quite poorly. I think it
is worth a try. This may be a
new method of bringing the stu student
dent student body together more often.
It would be a challenge to a
student selected, and it would
be a challenge to find the stu students
dents students to speak.

a story about me and a chee cheetah
tah cheetah from the Tarzan set, sup supposedly
posedly supposedly making time at a hide hidea-way
a-way hidea-way in La Jolla, and with
the constant parties and all, I
decided to quit show biz.
"I thought it was time then
to quench my thirst for know knowledge,
ledge, knowledge, so I anrolled at UCLA/'
Did you get a degree?" I
asked.
Just a Ist degree bum in
the chemistry lab. No, Im af afraid
raid afraid I didnt last long. At ev every
ery every turn I was bombarded with
this propaganda. BE A SCIEN SCIENTIST,
TIST, SCIENTIST, BE A SCIENTIST. My
professorK means compre comprehensive,
hensive, comprehensive, theyre progressive you
knowtried to high pressure me
into becoming an electrical en engineer.
gineer. engineer.
*
M I wouldnt go along with
that, and when I failed to iden identify
tify identify place "A three times in
a row, he shouted E equals
Me squared, then turned me into
a stone lawn piece with his Han Handy
dy Handy Jim Dandy Change the Mo Molecular
lecular Molecular Structure Do it Tour Tourself
self Tourself Kit. Most degrading, I can
assure you old chap.
Say, dont I detect a bit of
British accent?
Indeed you do. I was once
* Frogman, I mean Froglioo,

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Justice Defends Secrecy
Os Honor Court Trials

Permission to print the at attached
tached attached letter is granted only on
the condition that it be pre presented
sented presented merely as one students
opinion. It may not be used
with any implication that it
represents the views o t the
Honor Court or any of its other
members.
You might even state that the
views expressed in the letter
are my own and are not ne necessarily
cessarily necessarily shared by any other
members of the court.
* Thank you for your time and
consideration. I hope you will
honor my conditions and print
this simply as an argument sup supporting
porting supporting the secrecy require requirements
ments requirements of our constitition.
Charles R. Moose, Jr.
Editor:
I think it is appropriate and
commendable that you are cur currently
rently currently presenting a series of
articles concerning secrecy on
our campus. I hope you are only
attacking the disadvantages of
secrecy and not secrecy in gen general.
eral. general. Secrecy can be beneficial
or had.
Os course we must never al allow
low allow secrecy to be used as a po political
litical political or personal weapon for
eliminating enemies. We hope
it will never be used to cover
up errors or bad deeds of per persons
sons persons who have the privilege of
using it. Secrecy only for the
sake of secrecy is also objec objectionable.
tionable. objectionable.
On the other hand, secrecy is
often desirable and even neces necessary
sary necessary at times. It is mandatory
in our national security, and I
would hate to see the results
if jury deliberation and voting
were made public. Public opin opinion
ion opinion and pressures would soon
be deciding cases instead of the
conscience of the jurors.
* *
Please note that I am not de defending
fending defending the Honor Court for its
secrecy since this is required
by the Constitution of the Uni University.
versity. University. If I am defending any anything,
thing, anything, its the constitutional re requirement
quirement requirement of secrecy.
First, I would state some
basis on which I hope we agree.
1. The honor system is desir desirable.
able. desirable. 2. The accused must be
given the benefit of doubt and
must be proven guilty beyond
all reasonable doubt before be being
ing being found guilty. 3. The rights of
the individual should be protect protected.
ed. protected. even to the extent that it is
better to let a guilty person go
free rather than risk punishing
an innocent one.
With these as a beginning, I
would like to state some of the
safeguards which I believe give
our existing system good pro protection
tection protection from the dangers of sec secrecy.
recy. secrecy. (a) Under our Honor Sys System,
tem, System, an accused person is in informed
formed informed of the charge and evi evidence
dence evidence against him, that he is be being
ing being investigated, and that he
may have whatever counsel he
may choose including a sen senior
ior senior law student furnished at no
obligation.
If an accused feared an unjust
trial, he could have a number
of persons (within reason) sitt sitting
ing sitting in on his trial as assistant
defense counsels as witnesses in
the event of an unfair trial, (b)
At least two days before a
trial, a justice serves a sub subpoena
poena subpoena in person, and the ac accused
cused accused is given a copy of the
trial procedures, has his rights
explained and his questions an answered.
swered. answered.
* *
(c) Under our trial system,
there is no prosecutor. The in investigating
vestigating investigating justice presents all
facts in the case both for and
against the accused. He does
not cross-examine or challenge
the defense, its witnesses or its
arguments. This may seem un unfair
fair unfair to the interest of justice,
but I imagine it is intended to
eliminate the possibility of an
over-aealous prosecutor bent on
a conviction from taking advan advantage
tage advantage of the defendant or brow browbeating
beating browbeating witnesses.
A student should not have to
defend himself from a prosecu prosecutor
tor prosecutor as well as from the evidence
against him. (d) The court is

for the Royal Navy.
Man, like youre coming on
crooked. A Froglion?
Its no more unusual than
a black cat writing for an Alli Alligator.
gator. Alligator.
Touche.
Gesundheit;
got a cold?
No, but I
bet youre cold.
Y es,
gB been cold as a
witches some something.
thing. something. Thank
wB Ake 1 a, for
those consider considera
a considera t e children
who throw
paint on me. Every little bit
helps keep me warm.
Tell me Leo, do you have
to stay stoned, I mean, like,
you know?
"No little one. I could be
blown to bits like my fortunate
predecessor, but the only thing
that will return me to my na natural
tural natural state is a kiss on the Ups
from a maiden coed, 2UC, at
the zenith of a waxing gibbous,
with Johnny Mathis singing,
Ive Grown Accustomed to
the Place, in the background.
Little chance indeed.
Whats this waxing gibbous

not likely to be taken in by It
shrewd defense counsel. The
court knows more about law
than you may think, and the
Law School Justice will contest
anything improper or mislead misleading
ing misleading from the defense.
(e) The court NEVER de-
dares a person innocent. A.
person is found NOT GUILTY
when there is insufficient or
inconclusive evidence to prove
their guilt beyond reasonable,
doubt, even though we may be believe
lieve believe him to be guilty, (f) Once
a trial has begun, it must pro proceed
ceed proceed to a verdict without ad adjournment.
journment. adjournment. (g) All guilty ver verdicts
dicts verdicts may be appealed on
grounds of either unfair trial
or excessive punishment, and
double jeopardy Is prohibited.
(h) In the event any member
of the Honor Court (including
the Chancellor) acts improper improperly,
ly, improperly, he may be compelled by a
majority of the justices to act
properly, (i) Jurors may be
challenged for cause.

These facts seem to me to be
adequate safeguards against the
dangers of secrecy. Now let us
look at some of the advantages,
I belieye it is a fallacy to
assume that because our courts
are effective although not
secret, that the Honor Court
could be also. This would be ig ignoring
noring ignoring the fact that the Honor
Court does not have the pow power
er power to subpoena witnesses and
depends upon students them themselves
selves themselves to report violators be because
cause because of danger of being brand branded
ed branded a troublemaker in the event
that the person was found not
guilty.
No one wants to run the risk
of having an honest error or an
unsubstantiated observation
made public, or even risk the
"stool pigeon title from friends
of the accused. Students report reporting
ing reporting violations invariably express
their reluctance to do so, and
do it from a sense of duty.
Also witnesses would be reluc reluctant
tant reluctant to testify if it were publicis publicised,
ed, publicised, since all would know they
were there voluntarily and not
by subpoena.
One advantage of secrecy is
that it protects the innocent
from bad publicity and pro protects
tects protects the guilty from excessive
punishment in the form of os*
tricization resulting from public publicity.
ity. publicity. Abolish secrecy and you
destroy the courts ability to
specify appropriate punishment.
I believe that I have shown
some good reasons for retain retaining
ing retaining secrecy, and in addition
would like to add one great
danger that I believe would re result
sult result from open trials. It is of
Wie utmost importance that a
juror look to his own consci conscience
ence conscience and convictions when he
votes, and not be pressured by
what the other jurors or public
might think. After all, he has
heard all admissable evidence
in the jury deliberation. This
and his own conscience should
decide his vote.

With open trials, jurors would
be voting with the thought in
mind that individually or as a
group might be criticized if
they fail to oome up with the
finding expected by the public,
and the public tends to judge a
case by what it believes about
the accused and not what has
been legally proven beyond all
reasonable doubt.
To sum up, there are some
good arguments for open courts,
but they are few compared with
those for secrecy in an honor
system. I personally know of
no one who has had direct As Association
sociation Association with the Honor Court-
law students, Honor Court mem members,
bers, members, nor students involved in
trials who would prefer open
courts.
Abolish secrecy and students
will not support the system;
without their support, the sys system
tem system will fail.
Charles R. Moose, Jr.
(I am a senior in Electrical
Engineering, an Honor Court
justice, have had some legal
training in Military Justice as a
Naval Officer, was defense coun counsel
sel counsel in courts-martial)

bit? I always thought that all
those swinging transformations
and magic spells took place at
midnite on a full moon.
Fairy tales boy.
Gee Leo, I wish there was
something I could do for you.
Dont concern yourself, lit little
tle little one. Im not too bad off.
I get to see many nice legs
and things, and Ive picked up
many words from passing stu students.
dents. students. Gamete, sygote, hema hematite,
tite, hematite, isobars, galena, gangue...**
Crazy man, but what good
are these words?
I dont know and I doubt
tha/t anyone across the street
could tell you, but it passes
time.
Speaking of time, Ive got
to split.the scene. Have to so sober
ber sober up for my 7:40. It was
nice talking to you. If I see
any stone gazelles Ill send
them your way. By the way
Leo, I might want to quote
you in my column, whats your
last name?
Morris.
Thanks.
Later, man, said Leo. Ae
I headed for the Waffle Shop,
I heard him humming, When
the Swallows Come Back to
Capistrano.



The Florido Alligator, Friday, Feb. 21, 1958-

FBKSpeaker to Learn
AHFatts About Campus

By HUGH WATERS
Gator Staff Writer
Students attending this years
Florida Blue Key Speaker* Bu Bureau
reau Bureau tour* will learn everything
from the Millhopper to the Cen Century
tury Century Tower about the University
In a training program during the
week of April 14, the speakers
elected by the Florida Blue Key.
will be given a cross-sectional
view of the University. This is
in preparation for the speeches
they will make to various high
schools and civic clubs in the
State April 14*16.

Organ Concert
Set for Sunday

Claude L. Murphree. Univer University
sity University organist, will present a
program of concert music Sun Sunday
day Sunday afternoon at 4 oclock.
The concert, under the spon sponsorship
sorship sponsorship of the Department of
Music, will be held in the Uni University
versity University Auditorium, and is one
of the faculty concert series.
Selections on the program
will include A Stronghold
Sure,*' and "Jesu, Joy of Mans
Desiring, by J. S. Bach; Con Concerto
certo Concerto for Organ in F Major,
Opus No- 13, by G. F. Handel;
Two Ritornels, by J. P. Ra Rameau,
meau, Rameau, Variations and Fugue
on a Theme by Beethoven,
by Norman Coke Jephcott;
B erc eu s e," by Marcel
Dupre; Scherzo in G
Major, by Arthur Dunham;
The Chapel of San Miquel,
by Edwin Stanley Seder; Al Allegreto
legreto Allegreto in F, by Katharine
E. Lueke; Rimembranza,
by Pietro Yon; Rural Sketch Sketches,
es, Sketches, by Gordon Balch Nevjn;
and Vexilla Regis, by Rich Richard
ard Richard Purvis.

WWNMAMD WITMTHtt AO / )l|>l
,toS It Owr Mtw *- /
\ toil Idiitiat
Alkvtt g TflrfC: I*II
toft Om d.r ttuit sufki
JIM DANDY FILM SERVICE
Best. S Nmirr}, S.C.

CALL FR XZ!
409 West University Avenue

111 j/r JpiMasg /
The case of the typing paper
that erased without a trace or,
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The speakers will learn what
the different Department* of the
University are doing here and
throughout the state. They will be
informed about the University s
Extension services, its Agricul Agricultural
tural Agricultural Experiment Stations, th* re research
search research services offered to busi businesses
nesses businesses of the state, its atomic
and engineering programs and
many of its other field* which
offer service to the people of
Florida.
According to Harold Eisner,
j chairman of training, thi apeak apeakjers
jers apeakjers will gain much training and
experience which may be benefi beneficial
cial beneficial to them in their college car career
eer career and in later life. Eisner stat stated
ed stated that these students will be
given individual counciling in the
techniques of public speaking and
speech preparation. This train training
ing training will be conducted by th* mem members
bers members of the University Debate So Society.
ciety. Society.
More important, Eisner con continued,
tinued, continued, they will be given a;
chance to air these techniques!
under situations similar to those j
they will face in the future; that |
of speaking before clubs and 1
civic groups.
The Speakers will also be given |
opportunity to travel through the!
state and meet prominent citizen*
of their own and other communi communities.
ties. communities.
Students interested in applying
for this year* Speakers Bureau
can still do so. Application Wanks
can be obtained in the Blue Key
office in the Florida Union. The
deadline for applications is 9 p.m.
Tuesday.
Florida Union Holds
'Bop Hop' Tonight
The Bop Hop, sponsored by
the Florida Union Dance Com Committee
mittee Committee and featuring MANZY
HARRIS and his band will be
held in the Hub tonight from 9
til 12.
Admission is 2§ cents stag or!
drag and dress is casual.

Page 4

.r rv \
HE BUZZES BY ONCE EVERY SIX MONTHS

SOME DEAN ACHESON COMMENTS

'Quotable Quotes'
To statement teat Secretary of State John Foster Duller
was ne of four beep* whizzing around space, who busses by
Washington every six months, Mr. Acheson replied: If he would
stay aloft and refuel in air, he would be in less trouble. He al always
ways always seem* to be in trouble when be lands ... I havent thought
of sending teat to him in a statement.

Hobbs, Locke, Bentham, MacbiaveUi . read teem instead
of rushing to your newspaper. They connect all human thought
on the question of political science. Some of them know more
than Walter Lippman and all of them put together know what I*
going on in tee United States Government.
* *
Disengagement is Kennans (former ambaasador to Russia)
idea of Russian-United States relatione ... it wont work, its no
good, . it comprises separating troops a few hundred miles apart
In Europe.
* *
Our leadership in Washington is going by lth Century Met Metteraich
teraich Metteraich policies. ... I dont think Ike is entirely interested in our
policies and teat is why I single out Mr. Dulles for my criticism.
*
Suez was as silly a performance as anyone could put on, in including
cluding including our actions teat led up to it
*
Brazil is in the same shape a* United States at the end
of tee Civil War. we should help these countries (Os Europe
and South America) economically, militarily, and other ways. .
Brazil has the potential of being one of tee biggest power* in
tee world.
*
If I had to vote on a World Government and whether Preri Prerident
dent Prerident Eisenhower or Queen Elizabeth would be the head of It. .
X wont comment on whom I would vote for.
*
M X*v# never heard of sue Communist peasant in Yugo Yugoslavia.
slavia. Yugoslavia. .**
A *
Race problem* in tee United States greatly affect diplomacy
In the Far East. It is probably our Archllles heel.
*
I think Russia dees net want Communist China in the United
Nations. cant see why we fight so hard for a result teat
Russia wants.

General (George C.) Marshall was one of toe greatest men
ia ear history, a true patriot, who loot two thirds of his reputation
while Secretary of State ... he eras a greater general than Eisen Eisenhower,
hower, Eisenhower, who was never very much of one anyway. .

Alpha Lambda Delta
Application Deadline Set
All Freshmen and first aemes aemester
ter aemester sophomore women who have
made a 1.5 average or better, with
a minimum of 15 hours, are eli eligible
gible eligible for Alpha Lambda Delta,
Freshman Honorary Sorority for
Women.
Those eligible may sign up in
Dean Bradys office by Feb. 28.
ISO to Hold Elections
The International Student Or Organisation
ganisation Organisation will hold elections
Monday at 7 p.m. in room 822,
Florida Union.

MATES, DtG THAT M6NCRUSH-PROOF BOX P+

Student 'Laziness'
Is Criticized In
Acheson Address j
(Continued From page ONE)
and one-half answering questions
raised by the audience.
Emphasized Power
Regarding our present State De- j
partment policy, Acheson em- 1
phasized the importance of hav having
ing having a strong and powerful nli-1
tary position, a growing and ex expanding
panding expanding economy, and political
policies which would bring cohe cohesion,
sion, cohesion, not division, in the Free
World.
Acheson observed that the U S.
cant carry out these policies on a
declining budget. The budget, he
maintains, should be increased $3
billion more a year until it is
$lO billion above our present
budget. Much of this increase is
needed for capital investment
overseas and for help and sub subsidies
sidies subsidies for other countries.
Cohesion of the Free World is
of utmost importance, Acheson
feels,

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National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics
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FEE ALLOTMENT MAY BE RAISED

Peel's $2,000 Passes Council

By TOM HOLT
Gator Staff Writer
Orange Peel Business Manag Manager
er Manager Norwood Gays appeal for $2.
000 for a second-semester edition
of the campus humor magazine
passed its first reading in the
Executive Council meeting Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday night.
Gay was informed that the
Constitutional Revision Commit Committee
tee Committee would recommend raising the
Peel's student fee allocation to
40 cents instead of its present
20 cents yearly per student.
Passing the first reading does
not mean the Peel will get the
money now, explained Secretary.
Treasurer Bob Shaffer, It is
required that all budgets and spe
cial requests for funds have two
readings.
Gay said he had asked the
Board of Publications if they would
be in favor of the $2,000 being
taken from their reserve fund, ad adjding
jding adjding that he had received a vote
iof confidence from them.
Student Body President Eddie
Beardsley and other members
of the Council asked that Gay
get this affirmation in writing
from the Board before the second
reading on the measure is voted
in two weeks.
Vice President Ron McCall sug suggested
gested suggested that representatives of the
Seminole and Alligator be pre present
sent present before continued discussion
on the matter is heard, since he
said they are affected by the em emergency
ergency emergency fund.
Gay told the Council that he
would prefer the Orange Peel be
suspended if its allocation is not
raised to a level where it cam
be published each semester.
I know of no college humor
magazine that is put out only
once a year, he said.
The reserve fund In question
is one into which each publica publication
tion publication is expected to pour 10 per
cent of its profits, according to
Shaffer,
Approximately $6,500 has been
taken from the fund in the INSI INSIST
ST INSIST year, Shaffer stated. The
total in the fund is about 932,000."
Sec-Treas. Shaffer commented

after the meeting that the council
had been more apathetic to the
sugg -tlo* han he would expect
where such a large sum of money
is involved.
Request Denied
Denver Sherrys request for per permission
mission permission to reallocate money in
the Choral Societys budget to pay
for a banquet was denied by the
Council.
Sherry explained that the Choir
has used only $762 of its $1,140
fund for transportation, having
already done the bulk of its travel travelling.
ling. travelling.
He asked that $l4O of this be
transferred to pay for the ban banquet.
quet. banquet. Beardsley. McCall and other
members spoke against this shift
because the Choir is on a $360
deficit budget and should try to
repay this money first.
Beardsdley referred to a note
from Sec. of Labor Joe Bondi that
public typewriters would be avail available
able available in room 314 of the Florida
Union as soon as possible.
More money is necessary if stu student
dent student services are not to be curtail curtailed,
ed, curtailed, Beardsley said in the report of
the Constitutional Revision Com Committee.
mittee. Committee. He said the committee will
meet Dean Beatty Monday with
figures on the needs.
"It looks like we have a pretty

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good case. Beardsley said. lWe
will probably need three or four
dollars more from the student
fees.
Appointments Made
Appointments made to the coun council
cil council included Charlie Wilcox and
Phil Smith. Pharmacy; Bill
Swain, Freshman Class; and Sue
Wright. Arts and Sciences.
Leonard Anton was appointed to
the Traffic Court and Manuel Ron Rondon
don Rondon was given the post of Com Commissioner
missioner Commissioner of Foreign Affairs.
The following committee ap appointments
pointments appointments made were: John
Higden, Board of Managers; Blair
Culpepper, Budget and Finance;
Mary Pearce, Tom Pitcher and
Phil Smith, Charter Revision.
Several budget requests Were
passed on first reading. Among
them were; Intramural; Florida
Union; Alligator revision; and the
Debate Society budget.
Blue Key Speakers Bureaus re request
quest request for SIOO was approved, as
w r ere> for Student Religion Associa Associations
tions Associations SSO special fund revision and
the Lyceum Councils revision
asking $24 for police fees at their
programs.
The Poultry Judging Teams re request
quest request for SIOO to finance a trip
Memphis, Tenn., was also ap approved.
proved. approved.



SG Group Seeks Fee Increase

fund*, Beardsley said. They
need the money just to keep
going. The additions contain no
extras."
Figured on last semester's en enrollment.
rollment. enrollment. the increases will to tota
ta tota 1 approximately $83,800.00
from student fees.
The tentative budget increase
report was submitted at a Con Constitutional
stitutional Constitutional Revision Com mitt e e
meeting Wednesday.
Proposed changes listed in the
tentative report including in increases
creases increases and decreases in student
fee allotment for the following
groups, many of which receive j
additional funds from other sourc sources,
es, sources, including money from adver
tising for student publications:
Organisation present proposed
amount amount
Seminole $4.00 $5.25
Orange Peel .20 .40
F" Book .20 .25
Alligator 1.75 2.00
Intramurals Dept 1.95 3.00
Debate .60 .50
Student Religious
Assn. .15 .25
Homecoming .05 .10
Lyceum Council 1.35 1.40
University Choir .15 .25
Band .40 .50
Symphony Orch. .20 .25
Women's Glee Chib .20 .25

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Student Government
Special' Fund" .40 .60
Men's Glee Club .80 .40
Special Fund
The Special Fund provides
smaller organizations with opera operation
tion operation expenses.
Secretary-Treasurer Bob Scha Schaeffer
effer Schaeffer .noted that student body
growth, expansion of organiza organization*
tion* organization* and Increased operating

Ruffner Resigns Post
As Alligator Business Heod

(Continued From Page ONE)
for production, was temporarily
appointed to take over from Ruf Ruffner
fner Ruffner after Feb. 28.
No further action could be tak taken
en taken by the board at this time as
procedure for handling resig resignations
nations resignations from student publications
is not contained in the Student
Government constitution. The in interim
terim interim appointment of Gray will
stand until the next regular meet meeting
ing meeting of the board.
The letter from Ruffner, read
to the board by Chairman John
Paul Jones, stated that he (Ruff (Ruffner)
ner) (Ruffner) felt that External pres pressures

costs contributed to the need for
more funds.
The $32.30 total proposed front
student activity fees for organiza organizations
tions organizations is still below the $47 amount
apportioned to such groups at
Florida State University.
Members of the Revision Com Committee
mittee Committee include Student Govern Government
ment Government leaders and students ap appointed
pointed appointed by Beardsley.

sures pressures and the increased scope
of my office have made the hold holding
ing holding of such an office inconsistent
with my primary objective of
obtaining an education.
Ruffner also wrote, I regret
that I am forced to take such
a step but I feel that my health
and my studies demand it of me.
Chess Club to Elect
The Chess Club will hold a
meeting tonight at 7:30 in Fletch Fletcher
er Fletcher Lounge to elect officers. A new
constitution and plans for the
forthcoming spring tournament
will also be discussed.

SR** :3j}
Looking Over Union Exhibit
Dean Acheeon, former Secretary of State, is shown visiting
the Industrial Arts show in Bryan Lounge of the Florida Union.
He is accompanied by Dr. Wayne Reitz, president of the Univer University,
sity, University, on tiie left, and Dr. Charles McCoy, religious association
adviser, on his right. Ronald Hampton, Junior, is shown behind
the table explaining the exhibits. (Gator Photo).

Journalism Professor on
TV Does Not Want Set

By 808 BATE
Gator Staff Writer
Hugh Cunningham, professor
of journalism who teaches on
closed-circuit television, does
not have a T.V. set at home.
The reason, he said, contrary
to the article concerning this
fact in Sundays Tampa Tri Tribune,
bune, Tribune, is not because he hates
television.
It is probably because he and
his family dont need one; they
just plain dont have the time
for it; he desires a change
of scene and would like to get
away from the mesmeric glow
of the one-eyed monster while
he enjoys his home.
Cunningham is teaching Sur Survey
vey Survey of Mass Communications on
television because there is not

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enough space for the conven conventional
tional conventional method which he prefers.
I think that the best way of
teaching," said Cunningham, is
to have the instructor standing
before the student, the me method
thod method used since the days of
Aristotle. Television is second
best, but if properly used it can
be very effective."
He said that education is not
meant to be entertaining, but if
it can be it Is less painful for
the instructor as well as the
student.
He implied that abstinence
from commercial T.V. at home
might help him shun dramatic
effects and strive for a simple
teacher-to-student atmosphere.

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Acheson Claims
No International
Rules Enforced
(Continued From Page ONE)
and our allies. Here lies, I be believe,
lieve, believe, the best chance to convince
the Russians that they cannot
win by default, that in the end
they must come to an understand understanding,
ing, understanding, and to assure them that
the understanding, whenever it
comesand it will not be soon
is one with which we, as well
as they, can live.
Some Universal Standards
Although he stressed the fact
that moral standards differ so
between nations, Acheson said
"at least some moral standards
of right and wrong seem pretty
well agreed."
He used as an example the
threat of force, Surely, he said,
the world has condemned its use
by one state against another."
And yet, Acheson brought out
the fact that the use of force has
not been abandoned. Is it
moral, he questioned, to deny
ourselves the use of force in all
circumstances, when our adver adversaries
saries adversaries employ it?
It seems to me not only a bad
bargain, but a stupid one.
In closing, Acheson said, Here,
(in the use of methods) we can
and should aim high. There
should be no bullying, no advan advantage
tage advantage taken of the hardship of oth others
ers others to drive political bargains,
no lying or boasting in our pro propaganda
paganda propaganda or our dealings with
others, no sanctimonious lectur lecturing
ing lecturing of others on their faults, no
consciousness of our own effort effortless
less effortless righteousness, or the thank thanking
ing thanking of God that we are not aa
other men,
Perhaps what we do is less
important than how we do it.
Man should live nobly though he
does not see any practical rea reason
son reason for it, simply because in the
mysterious, inexplicable mixture
of beauty and ugliness, virtue
and baseness in which he finds
himself he must want to be on
the side of the beautiful and the
virtuous.

The Florida Alligator, Friday, Feb. 21,1958

Dean of New College
To be Chosen Soon

By HARRIET HENRY
Gator Staff Writer
The name of a dean for the
proposed College of Health Re Related
lated Related Services will be submitted
to the State Board of Control at
its meeting in March, according
to Dr. Russell Poor, Provost of the
J. Hillis Miller Health Center.
Names of possible candidates are
not available at present.
The State Board of Control
approved plans for establishing a
College of Health Related Services
at the University of Florida last
month.
The College of Health Related
Services is in the J. Hillis Miller
Health Center as are the Colleges
of Medicine, Nursing and Phar Pharmacy.
macy. Pharmacy.
When the medical building was
built, plans were not made to in include
clude include space for the new college.
Classrooms are now available, but
there is no space for offices or
research labs.
The college will offer a B.S.

Biggs
(Continued From Pago ONE)
Asked his personal reasons for
running, he said Ive always
been interested in Student Gov Government,
ernment, Government, and my participation in
it has been one of the highlights
of my college career.
Biggs withdrew from making
any predictions on the outcome
of the election. He said, "Its
pretty hard to say at this point.
Conditions are such that it would
be impossible, even ridiculous, to
try to predict now.
He said his platform will be
arranged and publicized in the
near future, and it will include
strengthening student govern government
ment government and improving relations
among the Student Body, Admin Administration
istration Administration and Faculty.

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program in physical therapy, oc occupational
cupational occupational therapy and medical
technology. A masters degree in
rehabilitation, now in the College
of Education, will be offered In
the new curriculum.
Students now in college can be begin
gin begin to take courses in preparation
such aa chemistry, biology, and
physics. Clinical work will not
begin until Fall 1959.
Enrollment in the College of
Health Related Services will be
limited by clinical material and
teachers. General range is ex expected
pected expected to be between 15 and 20
students in each of the four fields,
according to projected studies
made by Dr. Darrel Mayes of the
Florida Clinical Service.
Greatest outlet for students and
townspeople alike will be the re rehabilitation
habilitation rehabilitation counseling. Research
Is now going on in the Adminis Administration
tration Administration Building by the Florida
Clinical Services.* Director is Dr.
Mayes.

Graham
(Continued From Page ONE)
The major difficulty of Stu Student
dent Student Government is that there
is too much emphasis on govern government
ment government and not enough regard for
the students. The average stu student
dent student doesnt feel any particular
attachment to the groups elected
to represent him.
T Te also feels that Student Gov Government
ernment Government should not be a debating
society, but should represent stu student
dent student opinion and ideas.
If nominated, Graham feels
the following should be incor incorporated
porated incorporated into the party platform:
a student book exchange; month monthly
ly monthly reports by Executive Council
members; and an improvement
of the parking situation, with the
possibility of freshmen and soph sophomores
omores sophomores being eligible to borrow
cars.

Page 5



Tlx Florida Alligator, Friday, Fob. 21,1958

Page 6

Cagers to Entertain Vanderbilt,
Tech; Attempt to Break Streak

Trying desperately to break a six-game losing streak, Floridas cagers return to the friendly con*
fines of Florida Gymnasium for games with two of the Southeastern Conferences snore formidable
members tomorrow and Monday night.

The Vanderbilt Commodores,
65-61 losers to powerful Kentucky
last Monday, and upsetters of a
strong Tennessee five last Sat Saturday,
urday, Saturday, provide the opposition Sat Saturday
urday Saturday night, and the Gators will
be out to snap a losing streak
against the boys from Nashville,
that dates back to 1952.
Coach Bob Polk of Vandy lost
top-notch stars A1 Rochelle, Bob
Thym, and Jo-Jo Gibbs from last
years squad which finished sec second,
ond, second, behind perennial champ Ken Kentucky,
tucky, Kentucky, but his outfit is not exactly
rolling over and playing dead this
year.
The Commodores boast a crew
of sophomores which includes
Jack Pirrie, who, as a high
school senior A Maplewood,
Missouri, was drafted by the
St. Louis Hawks of the Nation National
al National Basketball Association. An Another
other Another outstanding soph is Ben
Rowan, who scored 16 points
against Kentucky Monday night.
Don Hinton and Jim Henry, who
also accounted for 16 against the
Wildcats Monday night figure to
see plenty of action against Flor Florida.
ida. Florida. Vandy has compiled a 5-6
SEC mark and a 12-10 overall
record thus far this season, but
despite this mediocre mark they
are considered a force with which
to be reckoned.
Face Tech
The Georgia Tech Yellow Jack Jackets,
ets, Jackets, who provide Monday nights
opposition, were dumped 84-65
by Tennessee Tuesday night, thus
shoving them into fifth place be
hind Kentucky, which has a 10-
1 league mark, and Alabama, Au Auburn,
burn, Auburn, and the Vo's, which are
tied for second with 8-8 confer conference
ence conference records.
The Jackets boast Buddy
Blemker and rerry Randall,
a pair of Junior guards, who
have been terrorizing the SEC
all season. Teen has played
Its traditional role as spoilers,
this year, upsetting Kentucky to
hand the Cats their only con*

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By KENN FINKEL
Assistant Sports Editor

forence loos. Blemker and Ran Randall
dall Randall were keys in this win.
In addition to the two back backcourt
court backcourt men, who scored 426 and
419 points, respectively as so sophomores,
phomores, sophomores, Tech has three letter letterman
man letterman forward Gary Phillips and
two-letterman forward Jim Jonn Jonnson
son Jonnson to add punch to the attack.
The remainder of the Jackets are
sophs except for letterman junior
Ham Stith.
Coach Mauer will probably open
with his line-up that opened the
season, two long months ago.
This includes captain Joe Hobbs
and Charlie Pike at guards, Dick
Hoban and Jerry Henderson in
the comers, and Big Jim Zinn at
the post.
Bow To Rebels
The Gators ran their losing
streak to six games with a last lastminute,
minute, lastminute, 67-65 loss io the Mis Mississippi
sissippi Mississippi Maroons at Oxford last
Monday night. Hobbs led all point
producers with 21, followed by
Hendersons 20.
Hobbs, who, earlier in the sea season,
son, season, personally accounted for
three close victories With clutch

Ryanmen Duel Improved
Bulldogs, Rugged FSU

By BILL BUCHALTER
Gator Sports Writer
The University of Florida
swimming squad, fresh from its
recent victory over the Georgia
Tech Yellow Jackets, this week weekend
end weekend travels to Athens, Ga., and
Tallahassee for two important
dual meets with Georgia and
Florida State respectively.
Coach Jack Ryans charges en enter
ter enter the lair of the Bulldogs this
afternoon for a return match with
the Peach State tankmen. The
Gators had defeated Georgia 67-
18 at the Florida pool. Ryan,
commenting on the meet, said
that Georgia will be greatly im improved,
proved, improved, as Jim Bankston is back
in shape. Bankston missed the
initial Florida-Georgia encount encounter
er encounter because of the flu, but will
be ready for the distance events
tomorrow.
Bob Buckley (the Georgia
backstroker) has also round rounded
ed rounded into shape, Ryan continu continued.
ed. continued. The grey-haired Gator men mentor
tor mentor also regarded Bulldog butter butterfly
fly butterfly expert Paul Bouderant as
a definite threat, and felt that
Bouderant could press Florida
co-captain Phil Drake to a new

foul shooting, stepped to the free freethrow
throw freethrow line with ten seconds re remaining
maining remaining and Ole Miss leading,
66- by virtue of center Ivan
Richmanns two free throws.
In almost unprecedented fash fashion,
ion, fashion, the Florida captain missed
both charity tosses. The Robs
Bob Williams was fouled while
bringing the ball upcourt and sunk
a foul shot, making the final tally
67-
The locals had a switch of
their usual tactics in tills game.
Instead of falling behind at the
half and staging a rally in
the second half, they held a 58-
29 lead at the halfway point, but
were outscored, 38-27 after in intermlsaion.
termlsaion. intermlsaion.
Zinn and Pike each added 10
points to the Florida total,
while Richmann garnered 19 for
Mississippi. Hobbs had one for
three in the free throw depart department,
ment, department, dropping his second-in-the second-in-thenation
nation second-in-thenation average to .853. This total
of 21 brought his seasons total
to 415 in eighteen games for a
23.1 average, third best in the
SEC.

pool record in the 200-yard but butterfly.
terfly. butterfly.
The race could also serve as a
tuneup for Drake, in preparation
for his race next Wednesday with
Miamis Jack Nelson who swam
in the 1956 Olympics.
Meet Seminole*
The Gators take a short hop to
Tallahassee to meet the Seminoles
of FSU tomorrow night. Florida
State has a strong squad, which
handed the Gators one of their
few defeats last year.
Kent Abbott, a sprinter and
backstroke expert, is the top
threat for the Seminoles. Abbott
has been swimming freestyle all
season, but, since State is so
strong in the sprints, they may
put him on his back.
Other FSU stalwarts are
sprinter Ryan Ray, backstroke backstrokeers
ers backstrokeers Mike Wentworth and Bob
Glancey, and diver Ron Web Webber.
ber. Webber. Webber upset NCAA div diving
ing diving champ Ronnie Smith of
Rice several weeks ago at
Tallahassee, and is considered
one of the top divers in the na nation.
tion. nation.
Ryan felt that his swimmers
will do well in the distance events
and the butterfly, and that the
outcome of the meet depended on
the sprints and other events.
In the sprints, Ryan said the
Gators would feel the loss of
Bobby Duganne, who is in the in infirmary
firmary infirmary with the flu, and that so sophomore
phomore sophomore Terry Bom would have
to tarry the load. Bom, how however,
ever, however, is doing very well, and it
should be a great race between
Bom, Abbott, and Ray.
The Gators next home meet
will be held next Wednesday
when the Miami Hurricane swim swimmers
mers swimmers invade the Florida pool.
Freshmen to Meet
St. Pete, Soldiers
St. Petersburg Junior College
will provide the opposition for
Jim McCachrens Baby Gator
basketballers Saturday night,
while the soldiers of Ft. Ste Stewart
wart Stewart of Hinesville, Georgia, in invade
vade invade Florida Gym for a rematch
Monday night.
Bill Campbell and Chuck Phil Phillips
lips Phillips are the tall men for the Tro Trojans,
jans, Trojans, while Barney McCall, Son Sonny
ny Sonny Marcum, Dennis Kissenger,
and Eddie Evans are the little
men who keep St. Petes fast,
aggressive game on the move.
The Trojans use a full court press
for much of the game, and should
keep the Gator guards, Lou Mer Merchant
chant Merchant and Paul Mosny, busy,
dribbling through the press.
In an earlier game with Camp
Stewart, the frosh eked out an
84-81 win, but the servicemen
are expected to be thirsting for
revenge against the upstart col college
lege college freshmen.
Jeff Osborn at center and
Frank Etheridge and Bob Shiv Shiver
er Shiver at forwards round out the
Baby Gator starting five.
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Greek Bowlers Near Final Round

Chi, Phi, Theta
Chi Cain Finals
In Blue Loop
Chi Phi and Theta Chi rolled
into the semi-finals of the Blue
League bowling tournament Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday afternoon, outpinning Del Delta
ta Delta Sigma Phi and Delta Upsilon
respectively.
Theta Chi gained the third
round by downing DU 1393-1296.
Bill Troth, who chipped in with
a 322 series, and Bob Golomb,
who added 290 pins to the Big
Red total, paced the winners.
Larry Croom was high man
for the match as well as DU,
compiling a healthy 332.
Steve Hinson and Bill Korst,
who posted a 325 and 288 res respectively
pectively respectively led Chi Phi to its close
victory over Delta Sig. Emilo
Cierras 295 series was not enough
to overcome the 1340-1295 Chi Phi
advantage.
Theta Chi was pitted against
Chi Phi and Delta Chi against
Lambda Chi Alpha in the semi semifinals
finals semifinals held yesterday afternoon at
the Gainesville Bowling Center.
The winners will meet in the final
round for the championship Mon Monday,
day, Monday, February 24.
Delta Chi advanced via a bye
and a strike. The strike provided
enough cushion for the Delta Chis
to squeak by Pi Kappa Phi
1484-1474. Tom Maroldy, who
rolled a 353 scries, was the high
kegler. He received assistance
from Tom Poweleit and Jim Mit Mitchell,
chell, Mitchell, who chipped in with series
of 312 and 301 respectively. Mar Marten
ten Marten Jeselma was outstanding in a
losing cause rolling a 318. Bob Pa Patemo
temo Patemo added 303 pins to the Pi
Kap total.
Lambda Chi Alpha defeated Al Alpha
pha Alpha Gamma Rho and Alpha Ep Epsilon
silon Epsilon Pi to reach the final four
team echelon. Good team
strength, paced by Bob Kellers
317 paved the way for victory.
Fred Williams rolled 310 and
Dick Cuba 312 for the winners,
While Frank Feinstein, led AEP,
with a 327.
The next sport on the Blue Lea League
gue League calendar is basketball. A
reminder to all hoop managers is
that play begins Tuesday, Feb February
ruary February 25th.

Sorority Cagers
Vie For Trophy
By JAN MOSKOWITZ
Gator Sports Writer
Sorority League basketball en entered
tered entered its final stages this week
with Zeta Tau Alpha, Alpha Chi
Omega, and Alpha Delta Pi lead leading
ing leading the way.
The Zetas, victors in the win winners
ners winners bracket, will meet the win winner
ner winner of the losers bracket finale
between the Alpha Chis and the
ADPis next week for the trophy.
A triumph over Alpha Omicron
Pi advanced the ADPis to the
semi-final round, while Zeta trip tripped
ped tripped AChiO to take the winers
bracket. \
Id Sorority shuffle board, Chi
Omega topped Sigma Kappa,
3-1 hi the days only match.
Lynne Stephenson of Chi O took
a close 37-35 win over Hilary
Hartler in the singles.
The Chi Os won both doubles
matches to cinch the win. The
Margaret Kelly Leila .John-,
son tandem swamped Fay 01-
son-Nancy Nagek, 37 to -30, and
Mary Eason-Hope Pickens scored
a 59-24 win over Charlene Potts
and Sharron Mcllvain of Sigma
Kappa.
Next sport on the crowded Sor Sorority
ority Sorority calendar is bowling, sched scheduled
uled scheduled to begin Monday.
AEPhi Leads
As the semesters womens in intramurals
tramurals intramurals began, Alpha Epsilon
Phi held the lead with 280 points,
a slim five better than AOPi.
Zeta Tau Alpha held third place
with 270, with Tri-Delt in fourth.
The AOPis won the volley volley|
| volley| ball title, with the Chi os in
second place. In table tennis,
AEPhi edged the Alpha Chis
for tile title. Tri-Delt and the
Zetas took first and second
places in tennis play.
The Independent League stand standings
ings standings find Mallory in first place
followed by Northeast and North Northwest
west Northwest Broward, the Reid Rebels,
and the Reid Raiders.

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RMINED EFFORT by Pete lulo, Alpha Tau Omega
bowler, is for naught, as the ATOs fell before the powerful Sigma
Alpha Epsilon squad In Wednesdays Orange League semi-final
matches. (Gator Photo by Warrtner).

SPRING SPORTS SCENE
Columnists Observe Cindermen
Amidst Falling Shots, Discuses
By KENN FINKEL and JACK WINSTEAD
Gator Sports Writers
Falling shots, discuses, javelins, poles, and other such equip equipment,
ment, equipment, characteristic of the sport of the thineiads, made their appear appearance
ance appearance this week on the old cinder track as practice got under way.

Ignoring the possibility of being
struck by one of these falling ob objects,
jects, objects, your writers ventured onto
the scene. Seen jogging around
the oval was Don Goodman,
former Miami Jackson hurdler
who was the state high hurdles
champ for the past three years,
and who holds the Florida Relays
high school record at 14.9.
G >dman briefly attended the
University of South Carolina last
fall before coming to Florida.
He then dropped out, return returning
ing returning at the start of this semester.
As a result, the state of his
eligibility is uncertain at this
time.
Not far behind Goodman was
seen the Gators one-two distance
punch, Bobby ODare and Miler
Mike Morgan. ODare, a senior
and rgan, a junior, are expect expected
ed expected to produce vital points in the
mile and two-mile events.
Sprinters Strong
Over on the straightaway were
the sprinters, considered by
coach Percy Beard as the track
teams strongest point. Ellis Good Goodloe
loe Goodloe and Don Lucey, a pair of jun juniors,
iors, juniors, were joined by Bumper Wat Watson,
son, Watson, owner of 9.5 hundred-yard
dash, who returned to school this
semester after a year and a halfs
absence. Missing from the group
was Don Deal, who was expected
to be the fourth man in an out outstanding
standing outstanding 440-yard relay team.
Deal is ineligible this se semester,
mester, semester, having dropped out of
school for a semester to serve
six months active duty in the
service. He will become eligi eligible
ble eligible in time for tiie football sea season
son season next fall.
All the sprinters were anticipat anticipating
ing anticipating the Florida Relays, which are
to be held March 29 on the new
track.
One of the approximately 1000
athletes scheduled to invade Ga Gatorland
torland Gatorland at that time is Dukes
Dave Sime. Sime, holder of three
worlds records, has competed in
the Relays for the past two
years and also holds the meet re record
cord record of 9.5 for the hundred-yard
dash. Recently, running in tennis
shoes on a slippery gymnasium
floor, he ran a 5.2 fifty-yard dash,
just one tenth of a second over
the indoor worlds record.
Pole Vault Prospect
Our attention was then drawn
to the pole-vault pit, where the
gravel like voice of assistant
coach Walter Welsch, was heard,
giving valuable advice to out outstanding
standing outstanding freshman vaulter, Henry
Wadsworth. The former Coral
Gables star, who was the state
prep high jump champion for
three years, concentrated his ef efforts
forts efforts last year on pole-vaulting

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Qualified Sttngl,
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and set a new state record in this
event, soaring 13 feet, 2Va
inches.
Although drills this early in
the year are limited mainly to
working on form, the husky
freshman cleared 13 feet, 9
inches in a practice session
this week. However, Wadsworth,
as a freshman, not eligible
for varsity competition; thus
vaulting hopes will fall on so sophomore
phomore sophomore Dick Romfh and junior
Herschel Parrish.
As we left the track, coach
Beard invited us to come back
when it was a little warmer to
watch the middle-distance men,
hurdlers, weightmen, high-jump high-jumpers,
ers, high-jumpers, and broad-jumpers.
The former Olympic hurdler
also reminded us that all those
who were interested in partici participating
pating participating in track should come and
try out for the team. Being of the
sedentary sort, your writers hur hurried
ried hurried off at this point to the
warmth of the Cl.

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Record-Shattering TEPs, SAEs
Vie For Orange Trophy Monday

Tau Epsilon Phi and Sigma Alpha Epsilon parlayed record-shat*
tering performances into semi-final victories in Orange League Bowl Bowling
ing Bowling Wednesday, and headed straight toward a collision in the finals,
slated for next Monday.

Paced by Sollie Safer and Dave
Hyman, the TEPs set a new in intramural
tramural intramural tenpin mark in Wed Wednesdays
nesdays Wednesdays match, as they rolled
over Pi Lambda Phi, 1744-1495.
Hyman combined games of 210
and 167 for a 377 total, and
teammate Safer added 365 to the
tally. Pi Lams Don Chaiken roll rolled
ed rolled a 200 on his first try but slip slipped
ped slipped to 138 in his second game to
net 338 pins, Jack Levine, also
pitched in a creditable 343 score
in the losing effort.
Charlie Poole and Peyton Ellis,
again consistently leading the
SAE five, bowled 396 and 370 res respectively
pectively respectively to wallop Alpha Tau
Omega 1712-1429. Dick Hellstrom
of ATO wiped 361 pins out of the
alley in vain, as his team went
down under the steady fire of the
deadly SAE keglers who broke
a 1705 record set earlier this week.
The TEPs gained entry to the
third round via Kappa Sigma,
1590-1294, with Safer keeping his
team on top in each frame to close
with 365.
The PiLams beat Sigma Chi
1522-1403 on Tuesday before los losing
ing losing out in Wednesdays semi semifinals.
finals. semifinals. Leading the PiLams to

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this encounter was Harvey Ru*
vin with 199 and 152 games.
ATO shoved Delta Tau Delta out
of the single elimination league
action in the second round on
Monday by a 1494-1385 margin.
lulo 344 on the ATO side was the
best turned in from the two
groups.
The Orange League bowling
Championship between SAE and
TEP will be decided Monday at*
temoon at 4:45 at the Gainesville
Bowling Center.

Standings
SORORITY LEAGUE
Alpha Epsilon Phi 280
Alpha Omicron Pi 275
Zeta Tau Alpha 270
Delta Delta Delta 245
Alpha Chi Omega 230
Chi Omega 205
Alpha Delta Pi 200
Phi Mu 180
Delta Gamma 155
Delta Phi Epsilon 150
Sigma Kappa 135
Kappa Delta 70