Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
the largest
all-american
college semi-weekly
in the nation

Volume 50, Number 29

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Pert Coed and a Sign of Warm Weather
Betty Ann Cooke strikes an intriguing pose as she finds the first
signs of an end to the cold weather which has plagued Florida in
one of the coldest seasons in history. Betty, a sophomore from Coral
Gables, posed for Gator photographer Karl Gluck among the bud budding
ding budding trees and branches near the Southern (and warmer) perime perimeter
ter perimeter of the campus.

Peel To Ask Coundl
For New Issue Funds

By TOM HOLT
Gator Staff Writer
Orange Peel Business Manager Norwood Gay will go before the
Executive Council tonight to ask for $2,000 to put out a second secondsemester
semester secondsemester edition of the campus humor magazine.

Provocative
Posters Dot
Campus Again

The press and security are
the topics of a new, provocative
poster distributed on campus by
Jay Maurice Thai.
Thai is the author of the pro protest
test protest posters that have been seen
witli regularity on the campus
during the present school year.
His philosophy behind them is to
stii ulate intellectual thought.
In the new poster he lashes out
at infringements upon the press
by legislative and executive
branches of the federal govern government
ment government in regard to certain securi security
ty security measures. Thus he claims that
freedom of speech and the press
is in danger.
Other subjects for his posters
have been integration, the Eisen Eisenhower
hower Eisenhower administration, and the
Hungarian revolution. Complacen Complacency,
cy, Complacency, Hypocrisy, and Ignorance are
the internal foes of liberty and
freedom in this country, according
to Thai.
The posters themselves are dis distributed
tributed distributed on the campus by Thai,
and are placed on conspicuous
bulletin boards in most buildings.
In regatd to the censorship of
news, Thai states, This attempt
to have information spoon-fed to
you is not just for reasons of
security, but a blatant attempt
to hide the truth of the govern governments
ments governments functioning from you,
the public.*

**!&> r"H H i lg|§§ '% ii|Mg
<-,. : \
j|h &s*
.-. : j-SBF I^Haiafea g&
"Whos Who" Now Distributed

Two editors of Whos Who among University of Florida stu students
dents students look over the publication just returned from the printers.
Copies of the booklet are being distributed to the state press, TV,
and the 400 students active in organisations who are listed in its
pages. The Booklet, edited by Sigma Delta Chi, professional journ journalistic
alistic journalistic fraternity, Is designed as a public service and includes
names and activities of students considered as active on the
Florida campus. At left is A1 Hutchinson, president of Sigma Delta
Cfei and Tom BurchneU, treasurer. (Gator Photo by Warriner).

m FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

Gay will also seek a 20 cent
raise in the magazines allotment
from each student activity fee.
If the Council decides not to
raise the allotment, I will suggest
they do away with the Orange
Peel until such time as it can
be put out on a bi-annual basis,
Gay explained.
He said the Peels former al allotment
lotment allotment of 40 cents from student
fees was slashed to 20 cents in
1956. However, this worked out
last year because one issue was
banned and the money was used
on the second semester publica publication.
tion. publication.
It isnt right to put out the
magazine only once a year. Most
other college humor magazines
come out at least twice yearly,
Gay said.
The $2,000 is needed for this
semester if 6,000 copies are to
be printed, Gay said. He said he
realized the Executive Council
might not grant that full amount.
We have S2OO on hand now, if
that much, Gay said. If we dont
get the $2,000, a cut will have to
be made in the quality or number
of peels printed.
Gay added that he would pre prefer
fer prefer to cut the number before
changing the quality of material
and printing, because several stu students
dents students can use a single copy.
Going before the Executive Coun Council
cil Council is something never done be before
fore before to get Orange Peel funds,
Gay stated. He said if the Council
did grant the money, it would pro probably
bably probably come from the Board of
Publications Reserve Fund.

Acheson Addresses UF Convocation

Classes Out
At 10:30 lor
Weeks Climax

By ARLENE FILLINGER and
DOROTHY STOCKBRIDGE
Gator Staff Writers
Delivering the convoca convocation
tion convocation address on Moralism,
Morality and Diplomacy,
former Secretary of State
Dean Acheson will speak at
10:30 a.m. Thursday in
Florida Gymnasium as the
10th annual Religion-In-Life
Week on the Florida camp campus
us campus comes to a climax and
close on the same day. Class Classes
es Classes will be dismissed for the
convocation address.
A controversial national figure,
Dean Acheson helped to originate
the Marshall Plan of aid to de devested
vested devested Europe which has been
labeled by the Manchester Guar Guardian
dian Guardian as the most creative piece
of statesmanship in human his history.
tory. history.
Although Acheson was under
fire during most of his term as
Secretary of State during the
Truman Administration, he ren rendered
dered rendered effective the policy of
containing Communist expan expansion
sion expansion and built up a strong alliance
in the North Atlantic Community.
Within the last six months, Ache Acheson
son Acheson has emerged as a major
spokesman on foreign policy for
the Democratic Party.
Considered by many as one of
Americas truly great Secre Secretaries
taries Secretaries of State, Acheson is now
a member of the law firm of
Covington and Burling of Wash Washington,
ington, Washington, D. C.
Acheson At Luncheon
FoUowing his address on Thur Thursday,
sday, Thursday, Acheson will speak at the
University Luncheon at 12:15 p.-
m. in the Student Service Cen Center.
ter. Center. There will be a question and
answer period during which Ache Acheson
son Acheson will answer questions from
those attending the luncheon. Re Reservations
servations Reservations may be made at the
Student Religious Association of office,
fice, office, Ext. 536. Cost is $1.50 per
plate.
Religion-In-Life Week is pro progressing
gressing progressing quite well, according
to Dr. Charles McCoy, Student
Religious Association advisor.
Prof. William Muehls talk on
(Continued On Page THREE)

Seminole Posts
Selection Set

Applications for positions on the
editorial and managing staff of
the Seminole have been receiv received
ed received by the Board of Student Pub Publications.
lications. Publications.
According to George Miller, in instructor
structor instructor at the School of Jour Journalism
nalism Journalism and Communications, se selections
lections selections will be made tomorrow
by the Electoral Board of Student
Publications.
Applying fox' the position of Edi Editor
tor Editor is Fern C. Totty, 2UC, Delta
Gamma.
William E. Owens, 2UC, Phi
Delta Theta, and Saundra Moore,
2UC, Delta Gamma, have applied
for the Managing Editors position.
Sheldon Z. Maselstein, 4JM,
has applied for the position of
Business Manager for the remain remainder
der remainder of this semester. The post is
being filled for one semester due
to the resignation of former Busi Business
ness Business Manager Scott Hancock.
Application for Business Mana Manager
ger Manager for 1958-59 has been made
by John Robinson, 2UC, Alpha
Tau Omega.
The Board members are: Dr.
Eleanor Bode Browne, educat education;
ion; education; Dr. R. S. Rolles, music; and
Dr. Karl Krastin, law. The three
student members are Don Allen,
Bill Grayson and Ken Sher. as
well as Student Body President
Eddie Beardsley and Chancellor
of the Honor Court, Bob Graham.
Applicants are requested to be
present for interviews at 4 p.m.,
tomorrow.

Petition Rumors False: Registrar

The Alligator has received se several
veral several reports that more than 2,-
000 students are petitioning for
re-entrance to the University as
a result of failure to meet aca academic
demic academic requirements.
This is not true.
University Registrar Richard
S. Johnson, when asked about the
accuracy of the rumor, leaned
back in his chair and laughed.
Ive been here 30 years, and
this is a standard rumor this
time of year.
Johnson said, the number of

Univarsity of Florida, Gainesville, FI orida, Tuesday, February 18, 1958

Acheson Reception
Tomorrow at 11:30

Officials of the University of Florida, student leaders
and members of the press will join in welcoming former
Secretary of State Dean Acheson and Mrs. Acheson
when they arrive on the 11 ;30 train in Gainesville tomor-

row.
From the train, Dean Acheson
and Mrs. Acheson will be guests
at an informal luncheon at the
home of Dr. and Mrs. Delton Scud Scudder,
der, Scudder, head of the Department of
Religion. Guests at the luncheon
will be University President
and Mrs. J. Wayne Reitz, Dr. and
Mrs. Charles McCoy, Dr. and
Mrs. Douglas Ehninger, Mr. and
Mrs. Richard B. Stephens and
the hosts daughter, Ann.
At 2 oclock, Acheson will speak
at a history-political science for forum
um forum in the Florida Union Audi Auditorium.
torium. Auditorium. At 4 p.m. he will be
the guest speaker at a law forum
in the auditorium of the Law
School.
Split Session
The Achesons will have a split
dinner session tomorrow and will
be eating a house apart.
The leading Democratic official
during the Truman Administration
and a current foreign policy spok spokesman
esman spokesman for the Democratic Party
will be eating at the Delta Gamma
house and he and the DGs are
invited for a discussion after din dinner
ner dinner at Chi Omega sorority.
Mrs. Acheson will be a dinner
guest of Alpha Chi Omega and
will speak informally to the Al Alpha
pha Alpha Chis and Zetas at 7 p.m.
At 10:30 Thursday morning
Acheson will give the University
Convocation in the Florida Gym Gymnasium.
nasium. Gymnasium. Classes will be dismissed
for the address.
Come lunch time on Thursday,
students and others interested
may join at the University Lunch Luncheon
eon Luncheon in the Student Service Center
at 12:15 and ask questions dur during
ing during a question and answer period
over which Acheson will preside.
Reservations may be made
through the Student Religious As Association
sociation Association office in the Florida Un Union.
ion. Union. Cost is $1.50 per plate. Spon Sponsor
sor- Sponsor are the Student Government
and Trianon.
Arts Luncheon
Ait the same time, Mrs. Acheson
will address those attending the
Fine Arts Luncheon at the Stu Student
dent Student Service Center. The sponsor
is the Gainesville Fine Arts As Association.
sociation. Association.
The Achesons, who will be stay staying
ing staying at the Presidents guest suite
while at the University, will re return
turn return to Washington Thursday af afternoon
ternoon afternoon by train.

Rocketeers
# OFF' Tonight
By JACK KAPLAN
Gator Staff Writer
The first Spring Semester meet meeting
ing meeting of the newly-formed Ameri American
can American Rocket Society will be held
tonight at 8 oclock in Dan Mc-
Carty Hall Auditorium.
Captain Ballard B. Small, who
is connected with the Army test
project for the Redstone missile,
will present a film of the recent
satellite firing and on the Red Redstone
stone Redstone ground handling equipment.
With the founding of a local
chapter of the American Rocket
Society, student interests on the
campus have taken a new direct direction-straight
ion-straight direction-straight up.
Before Sputnik
The society was started many
years before Sputnik and Mut Muttnik
tnik Muttnik were even a gleam in the
Russian eye.
It was in 1930 when a small
group of scientists became in interested
terested interested in the practical develop development
ment development of rocket and jet propul propulsion
sion propulsion for the conquest of space.
These far-seeing men formed the
American Rocket Society which
has since grown into the leading
professional organization concern concerned
ed concerned with rocket propulsion.

'YEARLY RUMOR'

suspensions, as of Feb. 3, was
570, and since then about eight
have been re-admitted.
Five hundred seventy is a far
cry from 2,000.
Johnson suggested that inven invention
tion invention of such rumors strings from
the idle gossip of petitioners who
seek consolation in numbers.
Since 1991, when the University
began to set more rigid entrance
requirements, the average per percentage
centage percentage of students on suspension

By ARLENE FILLINGER
Gator Staff Writer

Liberty Faction
Strengthens; 'U'
Group 'Not Real'
By JOE THOMAS
Gator City Editor
The Liberty Party has solidified
considerably since it was officially
formed last Wednesday night with
the aid of two more fraternities
which joined the new group Thurs Thursday
day Thursday night and the creation of a
Womens Division at a meeting
Sunday evening.
Meanwhile the campuss se second
cond second party has held no official
meeting since last Wednesdays
informal conclave. Fred Ber Berger,
ger, Berger, past University Party spoke spokesman
sman spokesman said that his group really
isnt organized as a Party.
Were more or less a group
of fraternities who are just dis dissatisfied
satisfied dissatisfied with the present politi political
cal political situation and what it holds for
Student Government, Berger
commented.
The Pi Lambda Phi political
representative added, weve
taken no action but have five
or six weeks which in political
terms is a long time, particular particularly
ly particularly when the other side is so sha shaky.
ky. shaky.
Dan Hackel, Liberty Party
chairman, felt that with the addi addition
tion addition of Delta Tau Delta and Sig Sigma
ma Sigma Alpha Epsilon, which official officially
ly officially committed themselves to the
Liberty faction at a meeting in
the Beta Theta Pi house Thurs Thursday
day Thursday night, his Partys block vote
edge had increased to 550 votes.
Further checking with the po political
litical political representative of Georgia
Seagle and C. L. 0., independent
off-campus housing organizations
which are also committed mem members
bers members of the Liberty group, show showed
ed showed that the actual block edge
approached 700 votes.
The Liberty Party chairman
emphasised that to my know knowledge,
ledge, knowledge, the new womens division
is the first of its kind in the
history of co-education at Flori Florida.
da. Florida.
Margie Abrams, Alpha Epsilon
Phi representative, is the new wo womans
mans womans co-chairman and Hackel
stated that he expects to get a
great deal of support from the
coeds through the womens divi division.
sion. division. ,
Fraternities
Fraternities officially commit commited
ed commited to the Liberty Party are: Al Alpha
pha Alpha Epsilon Pi, Alpha Tau Ome Omega,
ga, Omega, Beta Theta Pi, Chi Phi, Delta
(Continued on Page THREE)

Cast Chosen for Players'
'Caucasian Chalk Circle'

By SALLY STEWART
Gator News Editor
Casting has been completed tor the next Florida Players pro production,
duction, production, Bertold Brechts Caucasian Chalk Circle.
Florida Players director," Dr. L. L. Zimmerman, said the play
boasts one of the largest casts ever selected for performance on
the Florida stage.

The play is scheduled for pres presentation
entation presentation March 19 through 22.
The satirical drama, written by
Germanys most controversial
playwright, describes the struggle
of an average man who becomes
involved in a political web and
attempts to unscramble himself.
Cast members include: Bill
Gross (the Governor), Pat Lands Landsdell
dell Landsdell (the Governors wife), Dick

and probation has been 4.39 per
cent. Last semester the percen percentage
tage percentage was 4.96.
Last year, out of a 10,997 en enrollment,
rollment, enrollment, 766 students were put
on probation. Out of that num number,
ber, number, 469 students met their re requirements,
quirements, requirements, 109 students were left
on probation, and only 198 were
dropped from school.
Last semesters breakdown will
be compiled in a couple of weeks
Johnson said. And according to
recent figures, there has been no
striking increase in petitioners.

ALLIGATOR MANAGING EDITOR LEE FENNELL ...
. . examines Russian flag, placed on Law School flag pole by unidentified persons yesterday morn morning.
ing. morning. Campus Police have taken custody of the hammer and sickle. (Gator Photo by Warriner).

'Spring Fever
Pranks Keep
Campus Lively

By JACK KAPLAN
Gator Staff Writer
A preview of Spring fever
has enacted on the Florida
Campus last weekend in a ser series
ies series of pranks that kept Campus
Police hopping.
Yesterday morning at 7:10 the
caretaker of the Law School re reported
ported reported a flag flying from the
top of the flagpole. It was not
the familiar Stars and Stripes
that waved in the wind, but a
hammer and sickle. Attached
to the flag was a note which
said, Regards to Charlie Johns.
The note was obviously writ written
ten written in regard to the Legisla Legislative
tive Legislative Investigating Committee
headed by State Senator Charlie
Johns which is currently prob probing
ing probing Communist activities in
Florida.
This probe may extend to the
Florida Campus, Johns said
last week.
All ropes had been cut and
the pole was greased.
The flag was retrieved by an
unidentified student who finally
managed to climb the pole after
great difficulty.
Saturday, 1:20 a.m. The
large iron anchor usually found
on the Delta Gamma Sorority
house front lawn was reported
missing by the housemother,
Mrs. A. M. Cunningham.
After a brief search, police
found the object being unloaded
from a hired truck in front
of the Lambda Chi Alpha Fra Fraternity
ternity Fraternity house.
The Lambda Chis spotted ad ad(Continued
(Continued ad(Continued on Page THREE)

Jacobs (Simon), Sonja Coker
(Grusha), Ron Dobrin (Grushas
brother), Lynn Stephenson (Gru (Grushas
shas (Grushas brothers wife), Joy Floyd
(Grushas mother-in-law), Lou
Kapner (Fat Prince), Henry Mill
(Judge Adzak), Jim Rothinberg
(Corporal of the Iron Shirt), Phil
Gurrea and Randell Robins (two
palace guards), Odel Skinner
and Rodney Remus (two archi architects),
tects), architects), Ken Jacobs (Governors
Adjudant), Wayne Cobb (palace
groom), Ted Srygley and Lanny
McCullers (palace guards), David
Rogers (the princes nephew),
Art Nathanson (village monk),
Phil Rudman (stableman), Bar Barbara
bara Barbara Bailey (milk seller), Lee
Blank (farmers wife), Rhoda
Zimmerman (doctors patient),
Diane Ayers (inn keepers daugh daughter),
ter), daughter), Zelda Warsaw (old woman),
Laurel Gordon (palace cook), and
Barbara Scheoppel (palace ser servant.)
vant.) servant.)
According to Dr. Zimmerman,
the 23 cast members will play
the parts of over 45 characters.
Some of the members will double
for four or five different char characters.
acters. characters. he added.
Assistant director for the pro production
duction production is Zelda Warsaw. Techni-
Ical director is John Kirk.

BY CAMPUS, CITY POLICE

Crackdown Ordered
On Bike Violators

A crackdown on illegal practices of bicycle owners and riders
began on campus yesterday by members of the University Police
Department.
This move was taken in the interests of safety and prevention

of thievery.
Policemen will be on the
watch for bicycles travelling the
wrong way on a one-way street,
riding on sidewalks and going
through red lights and stop signs.
Bicycle riders will be tried by
the student traffic court if stopp stopped
ed stopped by campus police and the city
court will handle the cases of those
who are stopped in Gainesville.
Offenders will be fined, and the
penalties are to be issued by the
courts.
Other offenses include riding
double, riding on the wrong side
of the street, and riding a bicycle
not equipped with a light shining
on the front and a red reflector on
the rear fender.
Chief Shuler reminds the stu students
dents students that these rules were
adapted for their safety and con convenience.
venience. convenience. Common sense rules
of traffic safety, said the Chief,

SECRECY EXTENDS TO
LECTURES, SPORTS
(Port" 111 of an Alligator Survey)
The results of a comprehensive Alligator survey on all phases
of secret sessions in the Administration, faculty, and student agen agencies
cies agencies indicates that the lvy Curtain is falling more and more
on matters which a tax-paying public and students have a right
to know.
Furthermore, surveys among the students indicate that a large
segment would unveil some of the wraps currently on com committees
mittees committees of the Administration, faculty and student body Govern Government.
ment. Government.
In this series, the Florida Alligator has not proposed that
this newspaper or the state press enter each and every session
of the committees of the University. Only when official bodies
of the University are about to, or have made, decisions of pub public
lic public interest and importance, does a conscientious press have the
right to enter.
Likewise, when students break the law and a judicial body
imposes sentence whether of the Administration or Student Gov Government,
ernment, Government, all has the right to know whom was convicted and why.
Only in this way can a public be well informed and at the same
time protect the rights and privileges of the accused, as explain explained
ed explained in Part IT.
Releasing of information has been a sore-spot on the campus
for some time and seems to be increasing. The Florida Alligator
sought to examine the records of why the University Bookstore
last year iost SIO,OOO in book sales while off-campus shops were
making money.
A large financial book on all campus agencies is distributed to
interested parties inside the Administration Building. Unfortunate Unfortunately
ly Unfortunately the University Business Manager would not let this booklet out outside,
side, outside, his office, and therefore the Alligator was restricted in t r
opportunity to examine the records and compare the information
with other bookstores.
The Business Manager's office has not aided the Alligator
or student officials in securing information to the student in
many other areas. Former Student Body Secretary-Treasurer
Dick Kerrlns a year ago was denied access to many routine fi financial
nancial financial statements on distribution of the activity fees to ath athletics
letics athletics and other organizations.
The Athletic Department a week ago denied to Secretary-Treas Secretary-Treas-1
-1 Secretary-Treas-1 urer Bob Shaffer right to an audit report on athletics for the year.
The Business Manager of the University should aid in releasing
information, since a weil-informed student body and public ought
to know how state and student funds are being spent.
Lecture Series
The University Lecture Series Committee is (me of the many
faculty-student bodies which determine public policy, but keej
most of such information secret.
One student is on this 21 member body, with the remainder fac faculty
ulty faculty members and Administration. Only about $5,000 is appropriat
ed a year to pay the expenses for lecturers who come to th4
(Continued On Page THREE)

serving
11,000 students
at university
of florida

Four Pages This Edition

By JERRY PALMER
Gator Staff Writer

should be observed by the stu students
dents students on their bicycles. This will
save them having to pay a lot of
expensive fines and will help
avert the disaster of an accident.
Detective, Sergeant Roy Thames
of the Gainesville Police Depart Department
ment Department told the Alligator that po police
lice police officers are cracking doWn
on offenders so that bicycle rjd rjders
ers rjders can travel the streets in safe safety.
ty. safety. He stressed the fact that ac accidents
cidents accidents can be avoided when bi bicyclists
cyclists bicyclists observe the laws and au automobile
tomobile automobile drivers can see tihem,
particularly at night.
Registration of bicycles is be being
ing being conducted by the City of
Gainesville as a protection and
convenience to the owners of bicy bicycles
cles bicycles in and around the Gainesville
area. The city ordinance provides
for a charge of $1 to any student
of the University regardless of
place of residence.



m FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

Our 50th Year of Publication

Page 2

Princetonians Speak

For the student interested in seeing
what his contemporaries at that venerable
Ivy League school, Princeton, are thinking,
a look at this week's Life Magazine will
provide interesting reading.
Entitled "t h e 'unsilent Generation',
Breaks Silence," the article seeks to refute
the present theory that college students
are "predominately inarticulate."
Consisting of several interviews with
Princeton seniors, it seeks to explain that
these "typical" college students actually
think hard about the futuredetermined
to make a success of themselves yet con concerned
cerned concerned about the uncertain future of the
world.
Mostly "progressive" students, the lot
of them are determinedly ambitious, eager
to prove themselves to the world os able
to stand on their own m whatever they ac accomplish.
complish. accomplish.
"Life, undoubtedly, is not going to turn
out exactly as we want it. But at least
we'll leave our imprint on it and it won't
be what others make it," says one un unnamed
named unnamed senior.
Comments about the draft and army life,
cutting into a male's life as they do, are
commented on by most of the young Ivy
Leaguers. All of them despise the thought
of it.
"People ask me, 'But what about the
draft?'", says a senior. "To answer that
question I have to be very blunt; the Army
represents everything that I can't stand.
It is at once a prison, a rut and a control.
If i went into the service, I'd be o slave; I
wouldn't be my own boss; I'd have to obey
people so stupid that I'd ordinarily have
nothing to do with them. So, barring a
war situation, in which I'd probably volun volunteer,
teer, volunteer, I'm going to do my utmost to avoid
having to go into the service."
The last senior in the article really
comes to the heart of the matter on why he

Suggestions for the Florida Union

From what we've seen, we're pleased
with the plans for a new Florida Union
building on the University campus.
The Union Planning Committee, Bill
Rion, Delton Scudder and others have
spent many years dreaming and planning
of a multi-million dollar structure between
Dan McCarty Hall and Radio Road.
The building is envisioned os one with
eating facilities, guest rooms, and enlarged
space for organizations' meetings, publi publications
cations publications and Student Government offices,
plus other space for student recreation and
sport.
There are still, however, many questions
to be decided. One is financing. The most
likely probability is that student funds,
loans, state money and an increase in the
student fee will be the final solution.

The Florida Alligator
All-American Rating, 1953-57

Member Associated College Press
The FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is Unofficial student news newspaper
paper newspaper o< the University of Florida and is published every
Tuesday and Friday mornings except during holidays,
vacations and examination p erlods. The FLORIDA ALLI ALLIGATOR
GATOR ALLIGATOR is entered as secona class matter at the United
States Post Office at Gaineavilie. Florida. Offices are located
in basement of Florida Union. Telephone FR 6-3261. exten extension
sion extension 655. and request either editorial or business office.
Business office hours I to 3 Toes.. Wed.. Fri. Subscrip Subscriptions
tions Subscriptions $3.00 per year.
Editor-in-Chief DAVID LEVY
Managing Editor LEE FENNELL
Business Mgr CHUCK RUFFNER
DAN HACKEL, EXECUTIVE EDITOR; JOE
THOMAS, CITY EDITOR; SALLY STEWART,
NEWS EDITOR; ROGER LEWIS, STATE EDI EDITOR;
TOR; EDITOR; PAT MURPHY, FEATURE EDITOR; JU JUDY
DY JUDY BATES, COPY EDITOR; 808 BENOIT,
ASST. NEWS EDITOR; GRACE HINSON, SO SOCIAL
CIAL SOCIAL EDITOR.
News Staff Writers: Pauline Bauman, Arlene Fill Fillinger,
inger, Fillinger, Gloria Brown, Esther Firestone, Bob Je Jerome,
rome, Jerome, Sally GaLoway, Jerry Palmer, Jean Car Carver,
ver, Carver, Sonny Warth, Grace Zinn, Jack Kaplan.
KEN BHER, SPORTS EDITOR; KENN FINKEL,
ASST. SPORTS EDITOR.
Sports Staff Writers: Charlie Pike, Bill Buchal Buchalter,
ter, Buchalter, Billy Shaw, Randy McLaughlin, Henry Gold Goldman,
man, Goldman, Stu Blumberg.
FOR SALES; RONALD SHASHY, SUBSCRIP
DUCTION; KEN CLIFFORD, ASST. BUS. MGR
FRANK GRAY, ASST. BUS. MGR. FOR PRO PROTION
TION PROTION MGR; MARTIN STEINER, OFFICE MGR;
SUSAN STATLER, NATIONAL AD MGR.

Editorials Tuesday, February 18, 1958

believes this generation has been called o
"silent" one.
"The characteristic fear of our genera generation
tion generation is our horror of finding ourselves
ludicrous . We, seeds sown in the first
planting after the Depression's dearth, see
in that decade a time when investment and
commitment, in stocks or in creeds, was
possible. We envy the dizziness of specu speculation
lation speculation that was the trope of the whole per period.
iod. period. We envywithout daring to imitate
our father's freedom to join Communist
cell groups, to cultivate dadaist fads to
commit themselves to any of the frag fragmented
mented fragmented creeds that were bound to fail.

"With us the dizziness is necessarily
gone. A Federal Reserve System of the
imagination is with us to protect us from
our parents' glorious flop. Hindsight is
a mixed blessing.
"Conformity is the name most often
given us. Statistics are cited to prove that
we are marrying earlier than our predeces predecessors,
sors, predecessors, that we are less adventurous than our
forebearers, that we are more wiljing to
accept secure jobs and settle down in the
cool suburbs than we ought to be. The
statistics are probably true. But the fact
that we recognize them as true, and are
becoming increasingly sensitive to escape
the predictions set for our futures.
"We talk about conformity more than
anyone else in history; we read and write
books on the subject. As a result of all
this talk, increasingly large numbers of
us are taking measures to protect ourselves
from it."
It is an interesting article, one which
everyone ought to read. It will provide
new insight into an institution where every everyone
one everyone is supposedly the "intellect," and more
wealthy than averageyet students with
thoughts which are protxibly not far dif different
ferent different from the youth in any other uni university.
versity. university.

It would be wise, we believe, for the Uni University
versity University to investigate the possibility of using
athletic funds to help finance the new
structure. If that department has enough
money for a new track field and other ex expensive
pensive expensive additions to the athletic program,
perhaps they are in a position to return to
the students some of the money by con contributing
tributing contributing to the structure.
Secondly, we definitely are against the
decision to push for only a 1200 seat audi auditorium.
torium. auditorium.
This has been decided upon as a "com "compromise"
promise" "compromise" between the Player groups who
desire a small theatre, and others who seek
an expanse to feature large orchestras,
Frolics, and other attractions of size.
The excellent response students gave to
the Detroit Symphony and other concerts
on the campus this year indicate that the
student body might welcome an auditorium
instead of a gymnasium for these attrac attractions.
tions. attractions.
If the Players still desire a smaller
theatre, a large auditorium could be par partitioned
titioned partitioned off for the events, or better yet,
build a separate theatre.
Guest rooms, cafeteria and other fea features
tures features are excellent to think about. But if
it is a choice in finances between adequate
cultural facilities and services which can
be obtained elsewhere, we prefer the
former.

No Poop Sheet

As the heot of a political campaign ap approaches,
proaches, approaches, and campus politicians grasp
wildly for an issue on which to make hay,
the Alligator is always a prime target.
Such is the attitude of many key-dang key-danglers
lers key-danglers on campus the past week as the Alli Alligator
gator Alligator has been accused of playing "par "partisan
tisan "partisan politics" on our Honor Court trial in information,
formation, information, and other editorial comments.
The Alligator wishes to say for the infor information
mation information of all students that we are not in interested
terested interested in playing "politics". This news newspaper
paper newspaper for the past few years has stayed
clear of political entanglements, and we
plan to stay this way for the remainder of
the academic year.
We plan to give fair and impartial cov coverage,
erage, coverage, and independent editorial comment
at all times; this will be true regardless of
which party, which personalities, or events
arise.
Those who seek to turn student atten attention
tion attention to this newspaper instead of realizing
their own shortcomings had best clutch an another
other another straw; this paper is no politicial poop
sheet, hasn't been and won't be.

LITTLE LOUIE AND AL murf's column

'School's Only A Week Old
But I'm Already Two Months Behind"

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Blacknosed Gator Critic
Said 'Bigoted' Individual

Letter to Great Swamp Writ Writer:
er: Writer:
Dear omnipotent, all know knowing,
ing, knowing, all just, great Whitenosed
Alligator: (aliasName With Withheld
held Withheld or Strategic Retreat Sam or
whatever name you desire to
call yourself and others that peo people
ple people might conceivably call you).
Your moving little tale of Vir Virgil
gil Virgil the Blacknosed Alligator was
indeed a demonstrative oneit
demonstrated several things ex excellently.
cellently. excellently. 1) That your story
was probably not only written
for a four year old audience,
but also by a member of that
mental age group. 2) That you
apparently are not a member
of the University of Florida, for
I cant believe that such bigotry
can exist on a university level,
but maybe you missed the C
courses, oh well, they dont
catch everyone. They surely
should have caught you though.
The list of things that you
demonstrated could be extended
almost indefinitely, but to what
avail? The questions that real really
ly really entered my mind when I read
your ginger peachy little take takeoff
off takeoff on an Aesop Fable were
these: Who failed with you, are
you sickmentally, physically physicallydejected,
dejected, physicallydejected, deprived, or didnt you

Issue of Race Integration
Can't be Forced on Whites

Editor:
I would like to see this pub published
lished published in protest and disgust
to the Letters to the Editor
article about Virgil Hawkins.
Mr. Hawkins is as human and
much more humane than the
human who refers to him as
a creature of low origin.
I am a Southerner by birth,
and yet I believe that in integration
tegration integration will amd must eventu eventually
ally eventually be peacefully solved. Cer Certainly
tainly Certainly the issue cannot be forc forced
ed forced as Mr. Hawkins is possibly
attempting by his steadfast

Independents Get Hung
By Fraternity Cliques

Editor:
I read with interest in last
Tuesdays Alligator about the
pre-campaign activities of the
fraternity controlled political
parties on the campus.
Although all parties claim that
they welcome the participation
of independent students, the only
participation they want is the
students vote for their party
candidates.
But who selects these can candidates?
didates? candidates? None other than the
fraternity cliques who meet in
the proverbial smoke filled
rooms. The candidates are se selected
lected selected by compromisecompro compromisecompromise
mise compromisecompromise that eliminates independent
student participation, as they
are not organized and cannot of offer
fer offer a block of votes. Are

Food Service Meal Prices
Too Expensive, Says Student

Editor:
Question: Is it true that Food
Service is a non-profit organi organization?
zation? organization?
A wonderful, new, delicious
world was opened unto me last
week. I started eating off cam campus.
pus. campus. It is amazing to me that
a profit-making enterprise can
offer a cheaper .neal, tar su superior
perior superior in quanity and quality,
than a reportedly non-profit
service organization.

\ it Will Knock m W wiu le l&t*H anp therc wia K WKiNO
/ CKMK9 (JJNMh \ COte FtiDM COLLET# UFO! THE 10 VtHUtf WiTH TV. IftMcAL imm 10 O&lUMi'. / Aflp SUBfiHG IN \
/ u mcAXimk\! HWP.feRSONAL ATTENTIONS Os THE / W iU ]
TELEVfSION / INSTRUCTOR Wilt PrWFEAZf N f M |3?PAifc> AjNT l VASTLY SiMPUfiEP! )
V : WJL SCON ft / f £*& \ l comp b y WiWf / V S
V *fStSS£ PAY/ #85.79/ J > -/A 1

get the toy you wanted for
Christmas, or perhaps you did didnt
nt didnt get a Chime?
It is a pity that letters such
as yours should ever consume
any college newspaper space, or
anybodys time, for an article
such as yours certainly gives the
UF a bad name and assuredly
does not represent the opinions
of any half thinking student
of the University.
Where did you get so mixed
up, so intolerant, so narrow?
Education is supposed to be a
broadening and an enlightening
process, a process that stimu stimulates
lates stimulates good clear thought. I can
only come to one conclusion,
and that is that you are al almost
most almost wholly ignorant. Ill leave
it at that.
One final question, O great
judge and maker of values.
Isnt it fortunate that you were
born a Whitenosed Alligator in instead
stead instead of the Blacknosed strain,
yet the same type of blood
would have coursed through
your body, and dropping the
.sickly allegory, you would have
still been a human beingan
end in itself, the most Important
thing in the world.
Frank J. Strahsmeier 3AB

battle to dissolve the barriers
of blind bigotry and racial su supremacy
premacy supremacy of the whites.
There are some of our glori glorious
ous glorious white race who are just
as low on the moral, economic,
intellectual level as people of
other nationalities. If we would
allow the Negro race to give to
our culture their good qualities
as other races have done and
thereby fused into a powerful
nation: then perhaps we would
begin to realize true humani humanity
ty- humanity
Disgustingly yours
Name Withheld

their votes worth any less than
fraternity votes?
Watch the nominating conven conventions
tions conventions in the next few weeks. If
they are handled as they have
been in the past, (and the ones
I have seen remind me of an
express train, not stopping to
pick up independent candidates
if they do not have a block of
votes) then independent students
will again wind up on the short
end of a rope.
Without independent interest
and participation, the majority
of the student body will find
themselves with no power in
Student Government, hung by
the rope of non-interest.
DISGUSTED
(Name withheld on request)

A typical meal of a large pork
chop, a man-sized helping of
mashed potatoes, a dish of string
beans, slaw, two hot, soft rolls
and butter costs only $.85. The
food is hot, the slaw fresh and
the drink cold. I have found
nothing on campus to compare
with it.
Since this is such a vital dis discovery,
covery, discovery, I think it is my duly to
society to share it.
A1 Steu&rt

WSA Needs

By PAT MUBPHY
Gator Feature Editor
A shot in the armthat's the
remedy needed for several cam campus
pus campus organisations which year
after year sink into the cate category
gory category known as figurehead in institutions*
stitutions* institutions* at the University.
Through lack of organization,

I leadership, or
I student support.
I each semester
I finds one or
I two groups fall-
I ing Into the rou rou[tine
[tine rou[tine of dull, pro-
I cedural meet meetlings
lings meetlings and a
I weak e n i n g
I voice in the stu-
I dent body.
Rojuvenat i o n
comes tampor-

niiL m
fIIIKPHY

arily when these groups hold
elections, then the whole thing
collapses again into a ho-hum
atmosphere where it remains un unless
less unless something drastic is done.
An organization suffering at
present, and unrightly so, is the
one institution on campus de designed
signed designed by and for co-eds alone,
that is, the Womens Student
Association.

WSA has existed on campus
since women first walked
through the halls of Peabody
with books under their arms.
Founded to represent and guide
co-eds at Florida, WSA has
played an invaluable part at this
University in the past.
Yet today, with few except exceptions,
ions, exceptions, WSA has lost any great

BILL GRAYSON

Dr. Libido Examines Grayson's 1d...

By BILL GRAYSON
Gator Columnist
One of the most fascinating
schools at the University of
Florida is the psychology de department.
partment. department. This reporter was
honored and privileged the oth other
er other day to meet Dr. Leon L.
Libido, director of the depart department.
ment. department.
Dr. Libido was quite cor cordial
dial cordial as we entered his office.
Upon entering the office one Im Immediately
mediately Immediately noticed the surround surroundings
ings surroundings of a well-balanced mature
individual. The orchid colored
walls were highlighted by a
large painting of Sigmund
Freud with candles and incense
burning beneath. Next to the
painting of Mr. Freud was a
large embroidered sign that
read: Hows your id, kid?
I informed Dr. Libido that I
was sent from the Alligator to
interview him

GkAVSON

and gather in information
formation information for a
feature story.
My first ques question
tion question concerned
how long he
had been with
the University.
He listened in intently
tently intently for a few

moments and then said, Why
do you hate your mother?
Sir, I replied, I have come

POLITICAL OBSERVATIONS

Much Interest Declines os Vote Near?

By AL MILLAR
Gator Political Analyst
As of last Thursday night
when the Delts and SAEs join joined
ed joined the Graham machine, the
Liberty Party moved to the
front by a staggering estimated
1000 votes. To the best of my
knowledge this Is the largest
political machine ever assemb assembled
led assembled at the University of Flori Florida.
da. Florida. The opposition seems to be
a concentrated faction of seven
houses voicing Jim Quincey,
outstanding agriculture student
as their possible presidential
nominee and several more hou houses
ses houses as yet unaffiliated.
The question now is will it
hold? There are several com comparisons
parisons comparisons that can be made with
elections of past years. In al almost
most almost every instance where par parties
ties parties have been formed consist consisting
ing consisting primarily of Orange League
fraternities and backing a pre presidential
sidential presidential nominee from one of
these large houses, the results
have been somewhat consistent
in that the large blocs have
never held as well in the election
machines as it did on pre-elect pre-election
ion pre-election paper.
The reason, a rather obvious
practicality. Political represen representatives
tatives representatives from these large houses
can boast of more than one
hundred votes in the party
meetings but when it comes to
getting the votes from the
house it is a different story.
Many fraternity men, not parti particularly
cularly particularly interested in campus campuswide

Some Rejuvenation

meaning to the average co-ed
as a representative body. It
has become in general terms, a
name which assumes reality on only
ly only w'hen the co-ed breaks one
of its rules and is punished by
Hall Council.
As a result, co-eds are miss missing
ing missing something of value, and
more sadly, WSA is suffering.

The framework of WSA is
widespread to cover all dorm
areas and sorority houses. Hall
Council, Interhall Council and
meetings in the houses are the
roots of WBA, for It is here that
the opinions of co-eds are voiced
by their representatives.
But WSA is like a match
house built on a stone founda foundation.
tion. foundation. Its roots are fairly se secure,
cure, secure, but it can easily fall
apart at the topmainly through
lack of student interest and sup support.
port. support.
The real workings of WSA, the
point where greatest decisions
are made, and final views are
voiced, is the general meeting
held twice a month. Co-eds who
speak up vehemently while
lounging in the comfort of their
dorms are never seen at these
meetings where such opinions
are so valuable in policy policymaking.
making. policymaking.
WSA has asked to the point
of pleading female students to
show some interest in their own
organization!. Invitations to these
meetings have been sent out
personally, special agendas
have been planned and speeches

to get a story about you for the
Alligator. Now would you tell me
how large the department is?
Dr. Libido looked very sad
and then mumbled something
about a suppression of the id.
Sir, I said, "I havent he
slightest idea in the world what
an id is.
*
Suddenly he jumped up be behind
hind behind his desk and screamed, A
simple two letter word and you
dont know what it means. My
Lord, how long have you been
in school? Now just stretch out
on this couch.
I hastily swallowed a Mil Miltown
town Miltown and said, Sir, would you
please tell me about your de department.
partment. department.
He picked up his pad and
pencil and began to write. Now
how and when did you first start
hating your mother?
Sir, I dont hate my mo mother.
ther. mother. I dont hate anyone. Ive
just come to do a feature story
for the Alligator ...
Alligators! How often do
you dream of them? This sounds
very serious. Now when did you
first start hating alligators?
Sir, Im afraid there must
be some mistake. I have come
to get an interview for out sru srudent
dent srudent newspaper. Now if youll
please . .
*
Mistakes? You feel like your
entire life is composed of mis mistakes.

wide campuswide activities but who are deep deeply
ly deeply concerned with the internal
affairs of their fraternity, rea realize
lize realize that by electing a student
body president from a large
house they are putting their
house at a decided disadvan disadvantage
tage disadvantage when it comes time to
rush. This is striking at the
very source of a fraternitys
existence.
Gene Spellman, Sigma Nu in
1952 lost with a pre-election bloc
edge of 800 votes, Bob McClure,
SAE in '55 dropped from a 700
bloc edge to a 150 victory. Even
Eddie Beardsley lost some 300
votes in the machines.
This year, however, there are
many factors at play. The in interest
terest interest of the student body in
the election is at an all-time
low, almost to the point of apa apathy,
thy, apathy, why, probably an interplay
of many reasons.
First we have the poop sheet
boards. Although they keep the
campus relatively free of de debris
bris debris for some three weeks in
spring, they certainly do not
lend themselves to a spirited
campaign. The issues are not
as effectively presented and the
students are not as incessantly
reminded of the qualifications
of the people they are expected
to elect, consequently they pro probably
bably probably wont even remember
his name after election. (Do
you know who you elected to
represent you in the Execu Executive
tive Executive Council last year?)
Even the fraternities lose in interest

have been made. Yet no in increase
crease increase in the attendance la evi evident.
dent. evident. and week after week, WSA
continues along its way, basing
its decisions on generalizations
from representatives.

Communication in this organi organization
zation organization is lacking. A proposal
made at a general meeting may
often go through three channels
before reaching co-ods in the
dorms. As a result, a month
to six weeks may go by befors
any results are returned to the
leaders of WSA.
Lack of leaders presents a
problem. Year after year, there
are some who devote their time
to WSA. But what is really need needed
ed needed in the organization is new
blood to take hold of the reins
when present members gradu graduate
ate graduate or intern. And the greatest
plea is being made for strong
independent leaders from the
dorms and off-campus.
Bermuda shorts on campus campusa
a campusa controversy that has caused
commotion among Florida wo women
men women for yearswill soon be
voted on at the general meet meetings.
ings. meetings. Reports from dorms and
houses are not enough. Now
more than ever, the leaders of
WSA need active response
from student groups at the gen general
eral general meetings, groups who
will stand up for their ideas
and give support continuously.
A stronger voice in WSA Is
needed on campus. That shot of
enthusiasm is necessary to put
WSA back on its feet.

takes. mistakes. When did you first no notice
tice notice signs of this inferiority
complex?
Sir, wont you help me with
this interview? All I want 10
know .
Well, at least you realize you
need help. That means there
is hope. Its all this strain of
college. Why just the other day
I had a boy come in hera who
walked around with mud in his
pockets.
Really?, I replied. Is he
cured now?
Dr. Libido smiled and said,
No, but at least he doesnt f*el
guilty about it. Now, at what
age was your first nervous
breakdown?
Sir, I have never had a ner nervous
vous nervous breakdown. I just . .
Its those tranquilizers. You
shouldnt take them mv boy. I
knew a man once . .
I headed for the door and
remarked, Well thank you
very much for your valuable
time. I certainly enjoyed the
chat.
Dr. Libido replied, You r#
welcome, son. Now what time
is your next appointment?
"Im not sure. Ill check w.th
your secretary.
Alright but dont take too
much stock in what she says.
Electra complex you know.
I left the psychology depart department
ment department and walked to my hotel in
the rain.

terest interest in trying to find a space
to tack up erne sheet on one onehalf
half onehalf of a board, asking a pledge
to put up fifty sheets is now
almost asking the impossible.
All in all, there are too many
controls.
The best thing Eddie Beards Beardsley
ley Beardsley could do to preserve the
interest in elections and Stu Student
dent Student Government would be to
repeal the election law at to tonight's
night's tonight's Executive Council meet meeting.
ing. meeting. The old Gator Party, now
essentially the Liberty party
still holds a rather clear
majority in the Executive Coun Council.
cil. Council. Hats off to you Eddie.
Another factor concerns the
lack of interest in independent
organizations. Either we have
too many independent leaders
or no leaders at all, in any
event, the effective organiza organization
tion organization of yore is not readily
apparent.
Finally, the increased em emphasis
phasis emphasis on scholarship at the
University makes It extremely
difficult to find qualified candi candidates.
dates. candidates. Students can no longer
afford the great expenditure o<
time it takes to wage a suc successful
cessful successful presidential campai campaign.
gn. campaign.
In essence, if there are no
radical changes in the present
bloc edge or in the general at attitude
titude attitude of the students in the
coming election, the outcome
will be decidedly one-sided.



*
* Gs fl
.. *** a- VKSflESsfl
H| : 8 li fi Jd^wlofif :v
I Whlp HKfcr/' Hr

Members of Alpha Epsilon Pi fraternity, pictured preparing to complete the transition from old"
to new', moved into a new residence on Fraternity Bow. The AEPis moved out of their house on
West University Avenue hurt Saturday.

News Staffers Meet
Students interested in writing
on the news or feature staffs of
the Alligator are invited to at attend
tend attend a meeting tomorrow, Wed Wednesday,
nesday, Wednesday, at 7:30 p.m. in the Alli Alligator
gator Alligator office, Florida Union.

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Pranks Keep
Campus Lively
(Continued from Page ONE)
mitted their guilt and explained
it was all a joke.
The anchor has been returned
to its proper resting place, but
anyone contemplating taking it
again had better plan on a very
large truck. The anchor is now
securely embedded in con concrete.
crete. concrete.
Friday, 6:12 a.m.A fire was
reported on Florida Field. Po Police
lice Police officers arriving on the
scene found no one there, but a
fire, evidently started with gas gasoline,
oline, gasoline, was burning briskly.
After stomping out the blaze,
police could easily read the
letters formed by the burned
sectionFSU.

AEPi's Leave the Old for the New

SECRECY EXTENDS TO
LECTURES, SPORTS
(Continued from Page ONE)
campus, and in view of this the committee has done an outstand outstanding
ing outstanding job.
They have succeeded this year in signing such men as News
Analyst Daniel Schorr for a lecture March 4 and other outstand outstanding
ing outstanding speakers.
Besides the one student representative, the Editor of the Alliga Alligator
tor Alligator has been invited to discuss speakers with the Committee from
time to time.
However, we doubt that the Alligator would be allowed to
cover all meetings of this committee, most notably, when the
decision was made that Israeli Ambassador to US, Abba Eban
and Lebanon's Delegate Charles Malik would not be invited for
a debate during the present Religlon-in-Life Week because its
too controversial.
The Religion-in-Life Committee had asked the committee to fi finance
nance finance the debate due to the RlLs lack of adequate funds to pay
for the many speakers who have arrived.
The committee should have some say over who is invited to the
campus, if University funds are being appropriated.
But the reasons used by the committee to biock an interesting
discussion on the Israeli-Arab situation seem inappropriate to the
view of the Religion-in-Life Week Committee.
The Lecture Series Committee has, at the same time, sought
to extend its power over other speakers brought to the campus by
recognized student organizations.
Interfratemity Council President A1 Millar reported at a meet meeting
ing meeting of the Faculty-Student Advisory Committee last week that the
Lecture Series Group desires to check all IFC-sponsored
events and speakers except Fall and Spring Frolics.
Committee Feeling
Committee member Allan Skaggs denied that a recognised stu student
dent student organization would have to do anything but secure a mm*
conflicting date for an affair, but suggested that the committee
had expressed a desire to review controversial' speakers com*
ing before the students.
Skaggs, an able newsman himself, was just informing the
Alligator of the committees sentiments, not necessarily his
own.
. (Part IV in Fridays Alligator will deal with the State Board
of Control, and the opinions of Student and Administrative
Leaders on the subject of Secrecy.)
4

, ki MT" ** ot'
K&4 ft! fi
-jW | m B. '* if i
wml C# I 9 .m a ML

The new home of the AEPis pictured above, has been occupied by members of the fraternity. Mov Moving
ing Moving was completed Saturday, and the group is now living In the modem house, the sixth to be
constructed on Fraternity Row.

Classes Suspended Thurs.
For Religion Convocation

(Continued from Page ONE)
Sunday afternoon posed the pro problems
blems problems that are being discussed
in fraternities, sororities, dormi dormitories
tories dormitories and religious houses this
week. His stimulating address
formed an excellent beginning
to Religion-In-Lif e-Week, said
McCoy.
The entire campus radiates
interest in the topics being dis discussed
cussed discussed as evidenced by the at attendance
tendance attendance at meetings.
Speaking on Conviction or Con Conformity
formity Conformity in a World of Conflict
Sunday afternoon, Muehl stated:
Our choice is not between con conviction
viction conviction and conformity but be between
tween between conviction and annihila annihilation.
tion. annihilation.
The conformists, Prof. Mu Muehl
ehl Muehl said, are men who believe
in nothing beyond what they can
see. They cannot stand freedom
and make other men bow before
humble and humiliated confor conformity.
mity. conformity. Conformists become the
authors of tyranny.
Men of conviction, Muehl con continued,
tinued, continued, are men of faith who
see a pattern to life and have

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the flexibility to deal with a
changing world of problems.
Dr. Muehl Illustrated his theme
with a scripture from Romans
12:2, . .and be not conformed
to this world: but be ye trans transformed
formed transformed by the renewing of your
mind, that ye may prove what
is that good, and acceptable, and
perfect, will of God.
A man who sacrifices convic conviction
tion conviction in return for support of life
falls as soon as the temporary
support leaves him, Muehl feels.
Conformists perish: only men
of conviction survive.
"The great tyrants have been
those who believed in no absolute
truth and saw only an "em "empty
pty "empty cosmos. But Muehl believes
that "God who created us to be
free works to keep us free.
President J. Wayne Reitz wel welcomed
comed welcomed the audience to the key keynote
note keynote address. Dick Wintersteen
of the Religion-In-Life Week Ex Executive
ecutive Executive Committee was master of
ceremonies. The invocation and
benediction were given by Herb
Harrison, BRA president.

The Florida Alligator, Tues., Feb. 18, 1958

Liberty Party Streigthens, 'U' Waits

(Oontinued from Page ONE)
Tay Delta, Kappa Alpha, Phi Del Delta
ta Delta Theta, Pi Kappa Phi, Sigma
Alpha Epsilon, Sigma Chi, Sigma
Nu, Tau Epsilon Phi, and Theta
Chi-
The six sororities that joined

Choir Concert Set
The University of Florida A
Cape 11a Choir will present its
annual concert Thursday night
at 8:15 in the University Audi Auditorium.
torium. Auditorium.
Under the direction of Dr.
Elwood Keister, the Choir will
present choral works varying
from Kadalys "Evening to mo modern
dern modern compositions such as "Dry
Bones and "Lover.
Soloists for die concert will be
Ray Anderson, bass, and June
Card, soprano.

"3 STARTS
3 TODAY
i
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AHJT
s*imerzeh

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the Liberty group Sunday are:
Alpha Chi Omega, Alpha Delta
Pi, Alpha Epsilon phi, Chi Ome Omega,
ga, Omega, Delta Delta Delta, and Kap Kappa
pa Kappa Delta.
The "dissatisfied group of Fra Fraternities
ternities Fraternities referred to by Berger
are: Alpha Gamma Rho, Delta
Tau Delta, Kappa Sigma, Lamb Lambda
da Lambda Chi Alpha, Phi Gamma Delta,
Phi Kappa Tau, Pi Kappa Alpha
Pi Lambda Phi, and Sigma Phi
Epsilon.

NOW SHOWING
DAVID O.
SELZNICK prtiMts his production of
idefct iiruiucuf avc
ROCK JENNIFER VITTORIO
HUDSON JONES DE SICA
CiNMAcooe touiirK us
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hENonEUy Ey EEM HECRT is
PMsessU ky SOR esstwryUss IGgn
UTSRSORIIOWIU SOUND
ADULT
ENTERTAINMENT!

Page 3



The Florida Alligator, Tue*., Feb. 18, 958

Page 4

Unique New Track
Nears Completion

A new track, currently being constructed at the west end of the
campus is reputed to be the nations most unique and practical run-

ning track.
Running surface of the new
oval, which will be completed
within a month, is an asphalt pre preparationa
parationa preparationa mixture of asphalt
and shreded fibrewhich will be
about a quarter-inch thick. This
will cover an asphalt base simi similar
lar similar to that used in construction of
highways.
The revolutionary track is the
brainchild of Floridas Track
(Jo;k ii Percy Beard, former
world record and Olympics hur hurdler
dler hurdler in the 120 yard and 110
meter high hurdles, who is also
originator of the concrete shot
and discus ring, used in the 1936
Olympics and adopted by the
NCAA for championship meets.
Beard has been interested for
several years now in developing
an all-weather running surface, a
surface that no amount of rain
would hamper. In recent years he
has corresponded with large
chemical and asphalt companies,
searching for the one most prac practical
tical practical surface.
Beard sent questionnaires to 10
track coaches throughout the na nation,
tion, nation, asking their opinions on the

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fMMgm 1 turned on my rockets and climbed to 40,000 .. .when
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Listen to the exciting Colgate Sportsreel with Bill Stern, Mutual
network weekday mornings. Check yeur paper ter time and elation.

1 FIND out what Its like to be with IBM I
r JSSh^IIIp ji||
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H campus interviews for 1958 graduates with x
H 8.A., 8.5., M.A., M.S., Ph.D. DEGREES B
if your interest At in: end degree or major is: Bf
MMM M
Engineering Mathematics ;
Sngmeermg Research and Development Physic* Medianicol Etoclricol Engineering lSi'
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Contact your
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11111111
SOME FACTS ABOUT IBM I
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type of track he wanted to build.
The majority felt the asphalt idea
a practical one.
All-Weather Track
Besides the all-weather fea feature
ture feature of the new track, it is expect expected
ed expected to have a good bit of resilience
to it. It will also eliminate main maintenance
tenance maintenance problems found with the
conventional cinder track.
Runners will use the short,
quarter-inch, spike on their shoes,
an i no loss of traction at the
starts is expected.
The first meet to be held on
the track will be the Florida
Relays, March 29, when more
than 1,000 athletes from over the
country will be present.
Fans are going to be pleased
with the new track and field lay layout,
out, layout, too. Steel stands for 4,000
will be placed on the west side,
and parking facilities for 180 cars
will be available. When more
parking is needed, adacent fields
will be used. Rest room facilities,
and eventually dressing rooms
for the athletes, are being built.

t iiitmSm EUB
, fT Hr
A REVOLUTIONARY NEW TRACK is nearing completion on the Florida campus. The new. all allweather
weather allweather surface, designed by Gator track coach Percy Beard, Is now nearing completion. 'Work 'Workmen
men 'Workmen are hurrying to have the oval ready for the Florida Relays, to be held next month.

Bowlers Advance
( I: v
In Blue Loop Play

Chi Phi, Lambda Chi Alpha,
and Pi Kappa Phi scored tenpin
victories last Thursday, to join
Delta Chi, Delta Upsilon and Al Alpha
pha Alpha Epsilon' Phi in the second
round of Blue League bowling
competition.
The Pi Kaps, last years cham champion.
pion. champion. rolled over Phi Sigma Kap Kappa

MAUPINTOURS /1958
ADVENTURE! EDUCATION!
IRn
TRAVEL! SUMMER 1958!
Join a special American-directad, H
student/teacher tour through
the Soviet Union. Choose from
six departure dates ... travel M
to seldom-visited cities such as ft
Kwv of tha Ukraine, Stalingrad,
Odessa, Yalta, Sochi. Tbilisi of e
Soviet Georgia, Kharkov . r
enjoy a Volga River or Black Sea
cruise ... see Leningrad and t
Moscow. Visit Warsaw, Prague H
and the Brussels World Fair ... ft
plus extensions to the European
Capitals.
Inclusive rate from $1389, from
New York. Reservations limited,
apply now for sufficient time v :
to secure Russian visa. Write
today for descriptive folder. |T
See your travel agent or §,
Tom Maupin I
IffH'H- T OUR assocIATES E
1a \ I JJA 1236 Massechusetta
WEiSZSm Lawrence / Kansas

pa Kappa 1277-1051. Bob Best and Bob
Patemo paced the attack with
283 and 262 series respectively, j
Blyth was high man for the Phi
Sigs.
Paced by Gerry Smiths 3621
series, Chi Phi, runnerup in last
years tenpin tourney, topped Tauj
Kappa Epsilon in another first
round match. Smith combined
strikes and spares for 184 in the
first game, and followed with a
178 for the days individual high.
Steve Hinton aided the Chi Phi
cause with a 174-161 pair of
games for a 335 total.
Lambda Chi Alpha defeated Al Alpha
pha Alpha Gamma Rho in the after afternoons
noons afternoons third match, as Fred Wil Williams
liams Williams and Dick Cuba provided
the difference. Williams started
slowly with a 130 game, but came
back in the second for a 192 and a
322 set. Cubas 293 was second
high, while Sam Snedeker led the
AGR team.
Delta Chi, DU, and AEPi ad advanced
vanced advanced to the quarter final
round on byes.
The other quarter-finalists were
determined yesterday, when Del Delta
ta Delta Sigma Phi met Phi Gamma
Delta and league leading Phi
Kappa Tau took on second place
Theta Chi.

Ryanmen Beat
Tech Tankers
In Dual Meet
The University of Florida swim swim!
! swim! min to team, bouncing back from
j a poor showing on its recent
j road trip, splashed to victory in
j eight of ten events to outdistance
j the Georgia Tech mermen, 57-
29, last Friday afternoon in the
Florida pool.
With Coach Jack Ryan insert inserting
ing inserting a host of sophomores into
the lineup, eight different men
gained first places for the Flor Florida
ida Florida team. Limited practice ses sessions
sions sessions had kept the Gators from
getting into top condition for the
acccording to Ryafi.
Co-captain Phil Drake, All-
American butterfly specialist, set
a new meet record as he covered
the 200 butterfly course in 2:20;-
05. Drake did not compete in any
other events during the meet.
Sophomores provided most of
the other points for the Gators.
Bobby Dugonne won the 50-yard
freestyle, Peter Henne took the
diving win, Jim McDonnell cap captured
tured captured the 200-yard breaststroke,
and Terry Bom splashed to vic victory
tory victory in the 100-yard freestyle.
SEC backstroke champion Bill
Ruggie added more points to the
Florida total, as he finished first
in his specialty, the 200-yard
backstroke.
Distance swimmer Bill Wenz
took the 440-yard freestyle for
the Gators, and the relay quar quartet
tet quartet of Mike Burdgess, Card Wied Wiedamann,
amann, Wiedamann, Roy Tateishi and Dave
Scales took the final Florida vic victory.
tory. victory.

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SCENE: It is almost zero hour
at Los Bismuth. On stage are
Capt. Carruthers, the man in
charge of the launching of the
satellite, and Manfred Faustus
Sport, the man who will ride
the satellite.
Carr: Well, Sport, this is it.
Sport: Real gas, Cap. Im
almost flying already. How
do I look?
Carr: You could wear cat-gut
and lemon-peels, and who
would be the wiser?
Sport: Wake up, Cap. What
about that crowd at Mt. Palo Palomar
mar Palomar with that big, spooky
telescope? Gdt to look spiffy
for-them.
Carr: That ahirts a beaut.
But, wheres the rest of your
* luggage?
Sport: Who needs more? This
shirt is a Van Heusen Vantage

Gator Cagers Bow, 90-78
To Howell-Led Maroons

By KJSNN FIN KEL
Assistant Sports Editor
Despite leaving the game because of a sprained ankle with seme twelve minutes remaining, Mis Mississippi
sissippi Mississippi States All-America candidate, Bailey Howell, scored 35 points in leading the Maroons to a 90*7*
victory over Florida's slumping basketballers Saturday night at Starkeville, Miss.

The Gators were never in the
contest, trailing 49-35 at intermis intermission.
sion. intermission. The absence of junior center
Howell and the fouling out of start starters
ers starters Dale Fisher with 18 minutes
remaining and Charles Hull with
three to go permitted the locals to
outscore State in the final half
43-41, but as has been the case
in several Florida games this
season, a first half lead was too
great an obstacle to overcome.
Guard Joe Hobbs led Gator
marksmen with 19 counters, with
his running-mate at guard,
Charlie Pike, notching 16. For Forwards
wards Forwards Jerry Henderson and
Dick Hoban had 15 and 10
points, respectively, while cen center
ter center Bob Sherwood accounted for
9. In addition to Howells 35,
Hull dumped in 18, Jerry Kee Keeton
ton Keeton had 15, and Usher chalked
up 10 for the Maroons.
Hobbs Ups Average
Hobbs, who wals leading the
Southeastern Conference at the
free throw line with an .869 per percentage.
centage. percentage. sent 7 out of 8 through
the cords to raise his percent percentage
age percentage by one point. The Gator cap captain
tain captain now has hit on 80 out of
92 attempts! or an .870 mark.
Hobbs also has hit 394 points
for a 23.2 average, putting him
61 points away from the Flor Florida
ida Florida record of 453 which he set
last year. However, the Gators
competed in 24 contests last
year as opposed to only 21 this
s e ason.
The loss was Floridas fifth in
a row. Following last nights en encounter
counter encounter with the Mississippi Re Rebels
bels Rebels at Oxford, the Mauermen re return

UF Diamondmen Announce
1958 Season's Schedule

Coach Dave Fullers Florida
baseball team has taken to the
diamond in preparation for a 22-
game schedule beginning March
7, with a shakeup in Southeastern
Conference scheduling policy eli eliminating
minating eliminating doubleheaders from the
upcoming campaign.
On March 7 and 8, the Gators
will bone up for the 2(f game
collegiate schedule with a pair
of exhibition games at home with
the Parris Island Marines. On the
following Friday, they play host
to their first regularly scheduled
foe, Rollins College, traveling to
Winter Park the next day for a
rematch.
On following weekends, the Ga Gators
tors Gators will meet Auburn in two home
contests, Miami in a pair on the
Hurricanes diamond, and Geor Georgia
gia Georgia Tech at Atlanta.
The Tennessee Volunteers play
host to the Florida nine April 7
and 8, before returning to Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville to play two-game series with
Florida State and Georgia.
The Gators visit the Bulldogs in

shirt. Its one of those all
cotton, drip-dry numbers that
never needs ironing.
Carr: What a discovery! But
how will you wash it up there?
Sport: In the rain, man, in the
rain.
Carr: And how will you dry it?
Sport: In the sun, man, in
the sun.
Carr: Well, its zero minus
one. Sport, youll be gone for forever.
ever. forever. (SOUND OF WHOOSH WHOOSHING).
ING). WHOOSHING). Hes gone.
EPILOGUE: The scene is the
observatory at Mt. Palomar.
Scientist: Man, hes real gone.
Just look at that Van Heusen
Vantage shirt.
Yes, in outer space, or right
here on terra firms, no drip-dry
discovery ranks with Van
Heusen Vantage shirts. The
tariff? Only $5.

STATE ACE SCORES 35

turn return home for their final three
games of the season. These in include
clude include a February 22 skirmish with
powerful Vaftderbilt, a Feb. 24
game with Georgia Tech, and the
finale with Georgia on March 1.
Frosh Bow
Coach Jim McCachrens Baby
Gators dropped their third contest
of the season in Marianna Fri Friday
day Friday night, losing 88-69 to Chipola
Junior College.
T ailing 59-58 in the second
half, the frosh had fouls call called
ed called on two players on the same
shot, and Chipola picked up five
quick points. McCachren then
decided to save his tiring start starters
ers starters for the next night's game
with the Florida State frosh,
and he inserted his second
string.
Forward Bob Shiver led Ga Gator
tor Gator scorers with 19 markers.
Frank Etheridge had 16, Lou
Merchant, 14, and Jeff Osborn,
13.
Top FSU Frosh
Saturday nights game with the
FSU frosh proved another toughie
as the Baby Gators wrapped up
a 67-62 win, their second in as
many games with the Seminole
Papooses this season.
Wiping out a 37-33 halftime lead,
the frosh outacored FSU 34-25
after the break to capture the win.
The scoring was well balanced
with Osborn hitting for 15, guard
Paul Mosny for 14, Merchant and
Etheridge for 13 apiece, and Shi Shiver
ver Shiver accounting for 10 more.
The Baby Gators now return

Athens April 26 and 28, and then
return home for a return match
with Georgia Tech. The final
games on slate will be with
Auburn on the Alabama plain
May 9-10.
Florida Gridders
Slate Banquet
Varsity and freshman mem members
bers members of the Florida football team
will be feted at their annual ban banquet
quet banquet on Tuesday, Feb. 27, ac according
cording according to Coach Bob Woodruff.
Highlight of the affair will be
an address of the Very Rever Reverend
end Reverend Roger W. Blanchard, Dean
of St. Johns Cathedral in Jack Jacksonville.
sonville. Jacksonville. A former tackle at
Boston University, Dean Blanch Blanchard
ard Blanchard was one of the members of
the Sports Illustrated Silver An Anniversary
niversary Anniversary All-American team last
year.
The banquet takes on a parti particular
cular particular significance each year, for
it is at this time that next sea season's
son's season's team captain is announced,
along with presentation of the
man voted Most Valuable Sen Senior
ior Senior and the winner of the Wal Walter
ter Walter J. Matherly Trophy.
The captain is named as the
result of ballots cast by return returning
ing returning lettermen. This same system
is used for selecting the most
valuable senior, who will be in invited
vited invited to return to the campus the
following Homecoming to receive
the Forest K. Ferguson Memor Memorial
ial Memorial Trophy In recognition of this
honor.
The Matherly award, made In
honor of the former Dean of the
College of Business Administra Administration
tion Administration and long-time faculty chair chairman
man chairman of athletics, is given to the
letterman football player who re received
ceived received the highest grades during
the fall semester.

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home for their final three games
of the year which will be prelimi preliminaries
naries preliminaries to the final three varsity
games.
Kappa Sig Cops
Orange Pin Win
Kappa Sigma advanced to the
second round in Orange League
bowling play, downing Sigma Phi
Epsilon 1365-1344 Thursday after afternoon
noon afternoon at the Gainesville Bowling
Center.
The victory matched the Kap Kappa
pa Kappa Sigs against a strong Tau Ep Epsilon
silon Epsilon Phi squad Tuesday to
complete second round pairings.
Other activity included the Pi
Kappa Alpha-Sigma Alpha Epsi Epsilon
lon Epsilon clash and the Beta Theta Pi-
Alpha Tau Omega match Mon Monday,
day, Monday, while Sigma Chi matches
strikes and spares with Pi Lamb Lambda
da Lambda Phi this afternoon.
Ray Marks and Dick Skrzyp Skrzypkowski
kowski Skrzypkowski paced the Kappa Sig at attack
tack attack against SPE. Marks pooled
games of 138 and 162 for an even
300 count and Skrzypkowski
rolled a 286 aeries. Bill Nall
was high for SPE with a 808.

c li
FREE!
1958 TAG
with oN
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CARS
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brakes and air condi conditioning.
tioning. conditioning.
$3,495.00
55 Olds
"98" Starfire Convertible,
hydramatic, radio, heater,
power steering, power
brakes, low mileoge.
$1,995.00
54 Olds
"98", 4 door, hydramatic,
radio, heater, power steer steering,
ing, steering, power brakes, and air
conditioning.
$1,495.00
53 Cadillac
"62" 4 door, hydramatic,
radio, heater, power steer steering.
ing. steering.
$1,495.00
57 Chevrolet
9 passenger station wogon,
powerglide, radio, heater.
$2,295.00
GOOD
TRANSPORTATION
53 Plymouth
4 door, heater.
$395.00
48 Chrysler \
4 door, radio, heater.
$195.00
49 Plymouth
Club Coupe, radio, heatec
$195,00
CHECK
C WAYS
D for
SAFETY!
B&G
MOTOR CO., INC.
your authorized
CADILLAC-OLDSMO6I LI
dealer
305 S.E. Ist AVE.
Phone FR 2-1471
See or call one of our
courteous salesmen
Bennie Brasington
Thurston McLeod
John Owens
Bronce Roberts
THI SAFI FLACi TO tWY*