Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

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Gator Staffer and Carleton Discuss Federal Aid Program
Dr. William G. Carleton, noted UF political science instructor, reads from a state newspaper
about the proposed US Government plan to give financial aid to the nations high schools and colleges.
Alligator staffer Judy Bates, interviewed Dr. Carleton on his views concerning the program. Long
over-due be states in an accompanying story. (Gator Photo).

the largest
all-american
college semi-weekly
in the nation

Volume 50, Number 26

Many Goals Realized,
Says SBP Beardsley

Less Than 50 Per Cent Approved
According to Recent Party Platform

A look this week at the Gator Party election plat platform
form platform presented and promised to the Student Body last
Spring showed that less than 50 per cent of the goals
it set forth have been accomplished.

Os the 15 major and min minor
or minor platform planks com comprising
prising comprising the platform seven,
have been fulfilled, six have
not and two are either par partially
tially partially or entirely in the
planning stage.
In an interview with the Alli Alligator
gator Alligator Friday, President Eddie
Beardsley reviewed the accomp accomplishments
lishments accomplishments of his administration
during the past year in compari comparison
son comparison with the goals promised in his
Partyis platform during the elec election
tion election campaign.
Following are excerps from the
original platform which promised
a unique contribution to the
campus political scene, and a
philosophy of government for the
students.
After each plank are listed
Invitations Available
Today and Tomorrow
. Graduation Invitations for
February graduates may be
picked up at the Information
Booth today through Thursday
from 1 to 5 p.m.
The prices for the invitations
are: paper2o cents, carboard
folder4o cents, leather bound
BO cents.
Dean of Men Lester L. Hale,
Senior Class President Ned Da Davis,
vis, Davis, and a representative of the
University Alumni Association will
meet with all candidates for Feb February
ruary February graduation next Tuesday,
Jan. 21, at 4 p.m. In the University
Auditorium to discuss the gradu graduation
ation graduation ceremonies.
Procurement of caps and gowns,
the Senior Class Endowment Fund,
and the protocol and procedures
of the graduation ceremony will
be discussed.

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"Oooh, this new Florida Union is C 001..."
Two students peer at one of the scale-models for the new Florida Union constructed by the senior
class in Architecture. The class, which has been working on construction plans all semester, has
been gaining practical experience while at the same time giving ideas on construction to the Florida
Union Planning Committee. Students Anne Bradford, freshman from Miami, and Fred Bond, freshman
from Ft. are two of many viewing the public display in the Florida Union Social Room,
ft to and Tto 10 each day for the next three week*. (Gator Photo) I

m FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

By JOE THOMAS
Gator City Editor

Beardsleys comments and opin opinions
ions opinions concerning the original pro promise
mise promise and the actual outcome.
(1) STUDENT GOVERNMENT
CIVIL SERVICE SYSTEM: The
only way to open Student Gov Government
ernment Government to afl students is to be begin
gin begin to abolish the political fa favoritism
voritism favoritism now rife in student gov government
ernment government activities. We advocate
a SG MERIT SYSTEM which
will abolish the SPOILS SYS SYSTEM.
TEM. SYSTEM.
Any person interested in stu student
dent student government may begin in a
responsible position; continued
good work will lead to unbiased
promotion. With this plan, Flor Floridas
idas Floridas Student Government will
lead the way to cleaner, more
open administration.
As such we dropped the Civil
Service Plan, Beardsley said,
but the original idea behind it
was the most important thing
and weve accomplished that.
Couldnt Work
After discussing it with Flet Fletcher
cher Fletcher Fleming (past Student Body
president) last Spring, we de decided
cided decided that a true merit system
couldnt work.
However, the president explain explained
ed explained that he tried to take the ap appointment
pointment appointment to under-secretaries out
of party lines by giving a posi position
tion position to every religious house and
to every fraternity even if they
were not in the party.
(2) MORE TELEPHONES IN
ALL DORMS: There is an acute
shortage of telephones in all of
the dormitory areas. We feel that
SG is In position to alleviate this
situation and provide enough
telephones for convenient service
for all dormitory residents par par(Continued
(Continued par(Continued On Page FIVE)

Skinner Here in
Solo Appearance
A one-woman show by Cornelia Otis Skinner, stage star anc
author, will be presented in the University Gymnasium tonight at

Orientation
Reverts to
'Old System'
Freshmen students entering in
February will return to the old
system of registering for classes,
according to Harry Mahon, stu student
dent student director of orientation.
Mahon, appointed by Director of
Orientation A. W. Boldt, Assistant
Dean of men, will head the staff
guiding an approximate 200-250
new students on their tour of the
campus and its facilities.
Plans are being formulated to
have 15 groups to include all in incoming
coming incoming students start on Wed Wednesday,
nesday, Wednesday, Feb. 5, from the Univer University
sity University Auditorium. All new students
entering with less than one se semester
mester semester at a college will report at
8:30 a.m. while those new stu stu(Continued
(Continued stu(Continued On Page FIVE)

FLORIDA STUDENTS SPEAK

Students 'Unaware' Os
SG Aims this Semester
Bv RUTH DYER
Gator Staff Writer
What has Student Government done for you as an individual
this semester? Now this doesnt seem like such a difficult question,
but it was surprising how few of the 35 students interviewed in this
weeks Alligator poll could answer it.

Generally speaking, when the

Carleton Sees Federal School Aid Advantages

By JUDY BATES
Gator Staff Writer
Federal aid to education is long over-due, and
if properly channeled could be an answer to the
overwhelming problem which confronts the na nation
tion nation today, believes Dr. William G. Carleton, pro professor
fessor professor of political science.
In an interview, exclusive to the Alligator, Dr.
Carleton, prominent lecturer and author, express expressed
ed expressed his views on the controversial subject of fed federal
eral federal aid to education.
College scholarships for able young men and
women, provided in whole or in part by the fed federal
eral federal government, are long overdue, he said.
We have been wasting too many of the most
precious of our human resources. We have not
been fulfilling our deal of progressively eliminat eliminating
ing eliminating the unnatural barriers to equality of oppor opportunity.
tunity. opportunity.
Urgent Reasons
But today, in the face of world crisis and So Soviet
viet Soviet achievements, there are urgent additional
reasons why the federal government should help
our gifted and needy young people get a liberal
and a specialized education.
When asked about controls which might follow
federal aid to education, Carleton replied, Os
course public education must have public con controls.
trols. controls. But there is certainly no reason to be be,
, be, lieve that officials in Washington, drawn from the

University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, Tuesday January 14, 1958

TONIGHT AT

8 oclock.
The program will include Miss
Skinners sketch called, The
Yearly American Invasion, im impressions
pressions impressions of American tourists who
visit Paris.
This act will be one of a series
of solo character sketches written
by Miss Skinner, against a back backdrop
drop backdrop of imaginary characters.
The program is sponsored by
the University Lectures Series and
is open to the public.
A writer of wit, she decided
early in her theatic&l career that
secondary stage roles offered little
artistic expression and mone monetary
tary monetary gain. Miss Skinner establish established
ed established the monodrama in the Am-'
erican theater with her self selfwritten
written selfwritten charcter sketches.
Miss Skinner began her career
of playing with an imaginary
stage full of characters with
her Mansion on the Hudson,
in which she portrayed all six of
its characters.

question was asked the first
reaction was a big Well now,
let me see ... This was fol followed
lowed followed by a pause. The pause
would grow longer. Scratching
his head, the person would fol follow
low follow through with something like
Gosh. I really dont know off
hand. Give me some time to
think of something.
Now dont get me wrong.
Everyone didnt answer this way
only the average student who
has no direct connection with
Student Government. Those who
knew something of the inside
were able to provide some very
adequate answersboth pro and
con.
The point seemed to be this:
Student Government should
keep the students as well in informed
formed informed on its actions rs it
does on its promises.
Some individual answers were:
Debbie Dalton, 2 U C lts
kept me from having a student
book exchange where I could
sell books for more and buy
them for less.
Ed Rich, 3EGlts given
me almost all the money it
owes me.
David Stanley, lUFBy be being
ing being a justice in the Traffic
Court, Ive learned quite a bit
about. student government. It's
helped me a lot. and I think its
(Continued On Page FIVE)

Comes Graduation and 'Job-Hunting' Time
Good Grief, If I dont get a job, what am I good for . Senior Dick Marlowe, about to pick
up a degree in Journalism, thinks as he looks over the Job Placement Opportunities Board across
from the Century Tower and hastily scribbles down a few positions needed. Dick hopeful of a good
paying job, nevertheless is aware that fewer good opportunities are reported in many fields come
graduation. (Gator Photo).

in

"FAIR AND FAVORABLE"

UCHeads Approve Report

By GRACE ZINN
Gator Staff Writer
Fair and favorable was the
general reaction of the heads of
departments C-courses to the re*-
cent investigation report.
In an Alligator interview this
week, the collective opinion of the
professors was that the report was
valuable, and that the suggest suggestions
ions suggestions for improvement were on
minor matters.
Dr. H. L. Knowles, C-2, felt
that the report was quite fa favorable.
vorable. favorable. He thought that some
criticisms were out of proportion,
and that the comment would have
been different if the visiting in investigators
vestigators investigators have taught the course
for a semester. He thinks that, on
the whole, the evaluation was
beneficial
Dr. J. Hooper Wise, C-3, thinks
that the full report had value.
He felt that the Alligator covered
on the critical points and blew
criticism up like a balloon. The
criticisms, Wise said were minor,
and that the C-3 department is
constantly undergoing changes
which would meet the criticisms.
When asked about the sugges suggestions
tions suggestions to change the grading sys system
tem system to allow the instructors to
give part of the final grade. Wise
said that he thought it depend depended
ed depended on the course and the circurn
stances.
Questions Practicality
Dr. W. E. Moore, C-41, felt that
the suggestion to add a separate,
course to cover the field of hu human
man human relationships is a good idea
in theory, but questioned the prac-i
Alligator Party Set
For Friday Night
The time of the Alligator staff
party to be held at the Pizza
Patio Friday night has been
changed to 8:30
Members wishing to attend
should sign up at the Alliga Alligator
tor Alligator office today to allow time
for reservations to be made.
This is the last Alligator of
the semester. All staff mem members
bers members should return Sunday, Feb.
10 in time for the Feb. 12 edi edition.
tion. edition.

colleges and universities of the whole country,
will be any less intelligent or any less better
trained for their jobs than officials in Talla Tallahassee
hassee Tallahassee or the county court houses. If anything,
officials in Washington are likely to be more
aware of current realities.
Carleton was asked if it would not be just as
well if it were left up to the states to aid educa education.
tion. education.
The job is not likely to get done if we leave
it to toe states, he said, because the states do
not have the revenue.
Easily Intimidated
State leaders too often have less sense of ur urgency
gency urgency about the world crisis, and also, they
are more easily intimidated by selfish pressure
groups opposed to spending more money on any
education, let alone on scholarships to those gift gifted
ed gifted intellectually.
Carleton said if the objections to federal schol scholarships
arships scholarships flow from fear that gifted Negro students
will be awarded a few of them, then these objec objections,
tions, objections, which violate the spirit of Americas funda fundamental
mental fundamental laws and institutions, should be smoth smothered
ered smothered in the withering scorn they deserve.
He stressed the importance of giving federal
scholarships, not wily to those gifted in the phy physical
sical physical sciences and technology, but also to those
gifted in the humanities and the social sciences.
To limit scholarships to the technical fields

ticality of it. He stated that the
C-41 department was considering
adding case studies in Human
Relations to the textbook in the
next periodical revision.
Dr. S. W. Kokomoor, C-42,

Magazine with 'A-Peel'
Here During Exam Week
By SONNY WARTH
A 36-page Orange Peel, a take-off of Time Magazine will be dis distributed
tributed distributed to students a week from Wednesday, at the Information
Booth, according to Editor Bob Chalom.

6 The printer has not definitely
stated the publication will ar arrive
rive arrive on that date, but distribut distributi
i distributi ion of the 6,000 copies will be fir firi
i firi st-come, first-serve, according
to Chalom.
The magazine with A-Peel is
Chaloms description of the ma magazine
gazine magazine pertinent to college life
and the Florida campus. Among
the articles are those on the pro proposed
posed proposed new Florida Union, the Flo Florida
rida Florida football team and the politi political
cal political situation on the campus.
The layout of the magazine fol follows
lows follows Time magazine, with pic pictures
tures pictures and cartoons similar to the
national new's magazine.
Chalom feels that if this issue
J is a success more editions will
follow. The students opinion of
! the edition will be invaluable, the
editor feels. It is planned that a
pool of student opinion will be
; taken immediately following pub pub-1
-1 pub-1 lication for future reference.
A poll would be useful in future
efforts to continue publication of
! the magazine.
| Orange Peel Business Mana Manager
ger Manager Norwood Gay stated yester yester;
; yester; day that the Executive Council
! will be. requested to appropriate
$2,000 for a second edition of the
; magazine next semester. Nearly
the entire appropriation of $2,000
was used chi this edition, said Gay,
j and an equal amount will be need- i
ed for another issue. (The Peel!
receives only $2,000 a year from
the student fee.)
Banned Once
The breakdown for this edition
is $1,850 for six thousand copies,
j (Continued On Page TWO)

would be a serious mistake. As it id already, our
whole American culture tends to distort our so society
ciety society and its values too much on the side of ma machines
chines machines and gadgets.
A Balanced Education
We must keep alive the highest creativity in
the humanities and the social sciences. It will do
no goodindeed, it will do much harmto turn
out leaders who are giants in technology and
dwarfs in politics and human relations.
In the long rim, Carleton contends, the world
contest is not going to be won or lost by techno technology,
logy, technology, important though technology is.
As a matter of fact, both the Soviet Union
and the United States, he said, are going
to be so well prepared in technology that the
technological factors wil? cancel each other out,
neutralize each other.
Therefore, the decisive battle will be waged
for the minds and hearts of the people of the
world, and this battle can not be won unless the
American people and their leaders possess so social
cial social insights, human and humane awareness, and
political understanding.
Dr. Carleton pointed out that this is no time for
favoring one kind of education and stinting an another.
other. another.
This is a time for extending and deepening
ail kinds of education, he said, scientific,
(Continued Ou Page FIVE)

felt that the criticism of the Fund Fund;
; Fund; emental Mathematics course was
i true, and that the course had
veered away from the original
philosophies. He said that the de de(Continued
(Continued de(Continued On Page TWO)

a Jt
§ Mm
The Editor Sports his Magazine with 'A-Peel'
Editor Bob Chalom holds up the drawing of the new maga magazine
zine magazine with A-Peel, otherwise known as the controversial humor
magazine the Peel. Chalom expects the 36-page book to be ready
for distribution a week from Wednesday in the Intormation Booth
across from the Hub. (Gator Photo by Warriner.)

serving
11,000 students
at university
of florida

Six Pages This Edition

Dr. Hatcher
To Address
Graduates

By FAT MUBFHY
Gator Feature Editor
Harlan H. Hatcher, pres president
ident president of the University of
Michigan, will speak before
a graduating class of 634 at
commencement exe r c i s e s
Saturday, Feb. 1, in the
Florida Gymnasium.
The exercises will begin
at 7:40 p.m. with the acade academic
mic academic procession of Pomp
and Circumstances. Fol Following
lowing Following an introduction by
University President j.
Wayne Reitz, Hatcher will
deliver an address to the
graduating class.
Hatcher became president of
the University of Michigan in ldsi.
Before his appointment, he Was
vice president of Ohio State Uni University.
versity. University.
Hatcher reeved the Doctor of

Philosophy de degree
gree degree at Ohio
State Universl*
ty in 1927. He
also served as
Dean of the
College of Arts
and Sciences
at that univer university.
sity. university.
The author of
several novels
and volumes of

r. hi

Great Lakes
history, Hatcher is a member of
the Modem Language Association,
American Association of Univers University
ity University Professors, National Council
of English, Great Lakes Historical
Society and Phi Beta Kappa.
Following Hatchers address.
President Reitz will confer de degrees
grees degrees to graduation students.
Bachelor of Arts degrees will be
awarded to 504 students. Masters
degrees will be conferred on 103
students. Twenty-seven students
Will receive Doctorate degrees.
Following Hatchers address,
benediction, the exercise will close
(Continued On Page FIVE)



New P. K. Y. School Completed

By SALLY STEWART
Oft tor Asst. Newt Editor
An\ opportunity to push the
frontiers of education forward'
will be afforded by the new P. K.
Yon go Laboratory School, Dr. J.
B. White, dean of the College of
Education, said yesterday.
The new $1,600,000 experimental
school has been completed but
final details and a delay in the
arrival of furniture will postpone
the opening of the new school,
White said. The tentative move
from the present building is sched scheduled
uled scheduled for April 15.
The old P. K. Yonge build building
ing building has been re-named Norman
Hall after Dean J. W. Norman,
who was dean of the college
from 1920 to 1945.
The enlarged school will mean

- 1 W- . ' 'v, >
| 4 '' '
aas t
v v
wRp
if | fcl vIMPiPf"
PART OF NEW $1,600,000 SCHOOL ...
.. will push back the frontier* ot education**

Orange Peel
Due This Month
(Continued From Page ONE)
and about $250 income from ad advertising.
vertising. advertising.
The Board of Student Publica Publications,
tions, Publications, upon hearing the Peels
financial plight earlier this se semester,
mester, semester, approved a petition re requesting
questing requesting the Council to appro appropriate
priate appropriate funds for the magazines
second edition.
If nothing can be worked out
with the Council, Gay express expressed
ed expressed belief that it would be best to
do away with the magazine. It
is not worth all of the obvious
trouble and effort of the many in involved
volved involved nor the 20c from the stu students
dents students to put out an annual
Orange Peel, stated Gay.
The Peel published twice last
year. The first edition was ban banned
ned banned by the Board before publi publication
cation publication for Containing lewd
material. The second edition was
distributed to students after first
being examined by a student Gov Government
ernment Government censor committee.

-The Florido Alligator, Tue*., Jan. 14, 1958

Page 2

'.ff' ;
1 \ 1
v* % i
j if ....,,.. T ,"" jh j
Ever meet a dreamer?
Frill* instead of fundamentals are what interest him.
In his future job he dreams of a carpeted office, a re resounding
sounding resounding title, an acre of polished mahogany to sit
behind. Wide-awake men, on the other hand, look first
of all for fundamentals sound training, advancement
opportunity, challenging work, professional associates,
good pay. The frills will follow.
The Bell Telephone Companies offer such career
fundamentals to wide-awake, ambitious young men major majoring
ing majoring in the arts, the sciences, business or engineering.
Why not make arrangements to talk with the Bell System
interviewer when he visits your campus? And for more
information about the careers these companies offer,
read the Bell Telephone booklet on file in your Place Placement
ment Placement Office, or write for "Challenge and Opportunity to:
College Employment Supervisor
American Telephone and Telegraph Company
195 Broadway, New York 7, N. Y.
BELL TELEPHONE COMPANIES

TO BE OPENED APRIL 15

more facilities for educational
research and experimentation,
White said. We hope to ma*e
the school a center of education educational
al educational research in the South.
Located approximaaely 1-5 of
a mile from the present school
and about two blocks southeast
of Sorority Row, the new labor laboratory
atory laboratory school spreads north and
south over an 35-acre plot. The
school extends 1,000 feet from
the elementary classrooms at
the north end of the building
to ths gymnaaiun at the south
end.
Will Give Price
While the distance to the new
building will give observors In
the College of Education a Lit Little
tle Little longer walk, the isolation
of the school will instill in the
laboratory students more pride

UC Deportment Heads
Give Views on Survey

(Continued From Page ONE)
partment le trying to get back to
these philosophies. Dr. Koko Kokomoore
moore Kokomoore agreed that the course
would be improved if it had a
lab. However this would present
many difficulties in scheduling,
space, and instructors
Dr. R. F. Davidson, C 5,
thought that the report was good,
and something that needed to be
done. He felt however, that there
was not quite enough criticism
of the C-5 department. This, Dr.
Davidson commented, could be
due to the fact that the C-5 de department
partment department now moves along with
the suggested improvements.
Criticism Not Justified
Dr. C F. Byers, C-6, did not
think that the criticism erf too
many facts in C-6 was justified.
He said that the emphasis on
facts is often on the part of the

in their school, White felt.
At the present time the Col College
lege College of Education and ths labor laboratory
atory laboratory school are housed in the
same building.
The spacious 15-unit building
will accommodate 960 students,
an increase of 460, This will
mean an additional section of
30 pupils from kindergarten
through the 12th grade. The in increase
crease increase will make it possible to
offer a broader curriculum and
will give the students more op opportunities
portunities opportunities to choose the sub subjects
jects subjects they want, White said.
The central staff of the new
school will Include Director Ro Robert
bert Robert A Meyers, Principal Tho Thomas
mas Thomas J. Hill, School Psycholo Psychologist
gist Psychologist Dr. Daniel Soper, and two
curriculum consultants, Dr.

student, who fails to look beyond
the fact to the principle. Dr.
Byers felt that, The exams tend
to over-emph&sixe the facts more
than the course. This he attri attributed
buted attributed to the nature of the objec objective
tive objective exam, which makes testing
on ideas difficult.
As to the suggestion for im improvement
provement improvement in grading, Dr. Byers
said that the department is per perfectly
fectly perfectly willing for the instructors
to have a certain portion of a fin final
al final grade. However, the percent percentage
age percentage which the instructors would
determine is debatable
Dr. Byers commented that the
suggestion for a lab is good in
theory, but it presents difficulties
in scheduling, space, and instruc.
tor. He stated that the report
was fundamentallyhighly satis satisfactory.
factory. satisfactory.
Dr. Maurice Boyd, C-l, could
not be reached for comment.

Pauline Hilliard and Dr. John
Lounsbury.
We are also in the process
of organizing a research com committee
mittee committee to be composed ot re representatives
presentatives representatives *rom the College
of Education, the Psychology
Department, the Sociology De Department,
partment, Department, and the College of
Medicine to assist in planning
research to be carried on in the
laboratory school, White said.
Outdoor Classrooms
Features of the new labora laboratory
tory laboratory school include indoor-out indoor-outdoor
door indoor-outdoor classrooms for the ele elementary
mentary elementary grades. All noisy
work can be carried out In the
outdoor play area, White said.
The outdoor area will also
provide an excellent oppor opportunity
tunity opportunity for science education pro projects,
jects, projects, he added.
An unusual feature of the
school is a natural creek which
runs east and west across the
building grounds and separates
the elementary from the Sec Secondary
ondary Secondary classrooms. The creek
is also used as a drainage de device.
vice. device.
A modern department adjoin adjoining
ing adjoining the schools administration
building will house facilities for
reading, health, and psychologi psychological
cal psychological clinics.
Other buildings include the ma materials
terials materials center (library and aud audiovisuals)
iovisuals) audiovisuals) the air-conditioned
music room and auditorium,
home economics department, art
and industrial arts room, and
science laboratory.
White said housewarming tour
through the building will be
held in the future.

Final Concert
Set in Fla Gym
This Saturday

The National Chorus of Am America,
erica, America, a group of 55 professional
singers, will appear in a pre-final pre-finalexam
exam pre-finalexam concert Saturday in the
Florida Gymnasium.
The program, which begins at 8
p.m., is open to the publio free of
charge.
The National Chorus was re recently
cently recently organized by the Nation National
al National Institute for Music, Inc., and
is the nations first full-time, pro professional
fessional professional repertory chorus dedic dedicated
ated dedicated to bringing great choral mu music
sic music to audiences throughout the
United States.
Selections by the group In past
performances have included such
works as Bachs Saint Matthew
Passion, and Handels Mes Messiah.
siah. Messiah.
Hugh Ross, musical director of
the Chorus, was conductor and
musical director of the Bchola
Cantorum, a New York choral
organisation, for 80 years.
Ross recently directed a ohoral
presentation on Omnibus tele television
vision television program.
The choral presentation featur featured
ed featured by the Chorus will be accom accompanied
panied accompanied by short narration, ox oxplaining
plaining oxplaining the mood and theme of
each movement.
The Chorus is sponsored by the
Lyceum Council.
Business Frat
Installed Here
Pi Sigma Epsilon, National pro professional
fessional professional fraternity in marketing,
sales management and selling, in installed
stalled installed a new chapter at the Uni University
versity University Friday.
Lloyd L. An tie, national presi president
dent president of the fraternity from At Atlanta,
lanta, Atlanta, helped initiate the new
members.

Silwtmn* /f)/j
Marked woy down for immediate I
clearance. a m am
:A | F
IVY AND RKJULAR STYLE g \ I*. Lc
big EN S SUI^ Q Sport Shirts SWEATERS
AND 59.95 O/ Notlonolly odvertlsed brands in flan- RfG. TO 5.95 REG. TO 10.95
ftA r\QQ nels, cottons and synthetic fabrics.
REG 45 00 K Hundreds to select from in Ivy and S A69 $/69
TO 49.95 \JyJ regular models. *^
MEN'S reg. to $059 i /^i/rT/%
SPORT COATS i JACKETS
*18" *3
$0099 i FOR 7.00 reduced lA and
REG. TO 34.95 ZZ ;
MEN'S SLACKS uress OnlriS I REDUCED for clearance
*7,m . *2 69 C:/
REG TO 1295...., / 15.00 2 FOR 5.00 | WUiMJn WtMgf lf/4|
3 79
NO CHARGE FOR ALTERATIONS ______ 2 FOR 7.00 202-204 W. Unlvrity Av#. Phon FR S-JJO2
' - - -

AEC Cancells
Science Program
The ORSORT program, under
which the University of Florida
and five other universities train trained
ed trained selected young scientists for
the Atomic Energy Commission, i
has been cancelled.
University of Florida officials
said that the action was anticipat anticipatedthat
edthat anticipatedthat the program was init initally
ally initally set up as a stop-gap mea measure
sure measure to insure the training of a
sufficient number of reactor
technicians.
The ADC, in announcing can cancellation
cellation cancellation of the program, indicat indicated
ed indicated that it was no longer needed.
Universities now have suffici sufficient
ent sufficient equipment to train people in
nuclear science in their own.
Under the program, selected
young scientists and engineers
were sent to the contributing uni universities
versities universities for six months inten intensive
sive intensive study in physics, chemis chemistry,
try, chemistry, mathematics and engineering.
The last six months of the one oneyear
year oneyear course are spent at the Oak
Ridge Bchool of Reactor Techno Technology
logy- Technology

I MORE MONEY
MORE CASH |
FOR YOUR
USED BOOKS
STARTING FRIDAY
JANUARY 17th
at the
CAMPUS SHOP
I and 4
BOOK STORI
I \
M # The Highest Cash Prfct For Your Used
IMC DAY*
I 50% of New Book Price For Used Books
That Ar Authorized To Be Used Agoin
We Also Purchase Discontinued Books
Located on the Campus Adjoining The HUB

SG Poll Shows Students
Want WRUF on Air Later

6tudents would like to see
WRUFs broadcasting time ex extended,
tended, extended, according to results of
an Executive Council survey
committee.
The survey was taken to de determine
termine determine student reaction to a pro proposed
posed proposed two hour extension of
WRUFs broadcasting time.
Out of the 900 students inter interviewed,
viewed, interviewed, 887 said they would like
for WRUF to remain on the air
until 2 a.m. and 45 said they would
not.
When asked how many nights
during the week they were up at
that time, 21 said one night, 39
said two nights. 65 said three
nights. 77 said four nights, and
553 said five nights.
Only 54 said they would not lis listen
ten listen to the station if the time were
extended.
Kenneth Small, director of
WRUF, told the Alligator he is
considering the results as a pos possible
sible possible means to acquire sponsor sponsorship
ship sponsorship for the extra time.
However, we dont intend to
make anything on it, said Small,
we might have to hire more en engineers

gineers engineers if records are used, and
there is the cost of network
committments to be consid considered.
ered. considered. The first step would be to
extend the playing time from 12
a.m. to l a.m."
ROTC Rifle Team
To Enter Contest
The Florida Rifles, University
of Florida Army ROTC Rifle
Team, has begun preparations for
entering the Third U.B. Army
Matches.
The winners of the matches,
the top one-third, will be selected
to compete in the National match matches
es matches to determine the National
ROTC winner, selected from all
Army*- Air Force and Navy ROTC
;teams entering.
Members of the University of
Florida Team include Cap Captain
tain Captain Cooper, Peppers, Kidd, Hen Henderson,
derson, Henderson, Wilson, Walker, Hurwits,
Giles, Swoope, Davis, Jenkins,
McKinney, Vary, Stokesberry and
Brugh.

Public Affairs
Grants Offered
Btudents interested in public tf tffalrt
falrt tffalrt and public eervice careers
who will receive their B.A. in June
have been offered an opportunity
to apply for fellowahipi to etudy
at three different universities. The
fellowships grant SI,BOO a year
; plus college fees. Each fellow fellowship
ship fellowship approximates, $1,950 in total
| value.
Beginning this June fellows will
serve with a public agency such
as TVA or a department in a city
| or state government. In the 19$$-
59 school session they will take
graduate courses at the Univer Universities
sities Universities of Alabama, Tennesaes,
and Kentucky.
For eligibility requirements and
other information students should
write the Educational Director,
Southern Regional Training Pro Pro;
; Pro; gram in Public Administration,
| University of Alabama, Univer Univeriaity,
iaity, Univeriaity, Alabama. The deldline for
submitting application* is March
110.



'A TEMPORARY SITUATION*

Job Outlook Poor This Year

By 808 BTNOIT
Gator Staff Writer
Job opportunities for February
nginoering graduates are not as
promising as last year, according
to Pref. Edward Copp, assistant
dean at the College of Engineer Engineerlog.
log. Engineerlog.
This is a temporary situation,
said Copp, and is due in part to
the technilogical readjustment of
the aircraft industry to the pro production
duction production of guided missiles for de defense.**
fense.** defense.**
Many of the aircraft compan companies
ies companies sub-suppliers have temporar temporarily
ily temporarily reduced personnel during the
re-adjustment to missle produe produetion.
tion. produetion. At present, companies de- 1
siring engineers can afford to be
more selective and choose from
the highest ranking graduates.
TTiree Offers Each
In past years there were
many more job offers per stu- |
dent, however, now the average is j
about three offers per gradu- j
ate.
Students w r ho graduate in the
lower half of their class can j
not be as selection as graduates
have been in the past, however,
less than a dozen graduates have
not yet accepted job offers, |
Copp said.
Graduates in non-technical fields
will also not have as large a;
HMflMffl WALLET SIZE
PVVMM DELUXE PRINTS
I wWl IjUjUfe I One Pose Only
WMm SAMI I SEND ANY SIZE
HHBil PHOTO OK NEGATIVE
Original Picture Ketwned
Jim Dandy, Dept. A, Newberry, S.C.

KIT KAT
dining and dancing nightly
4560 NW 13th Street
Phone FR 2-9154

FLORIDA BOOK STORE
HH|H GUARANTEES To Pay You
m HIGHEST CASH PRICE
rnmoN. F, For Your USED TEXT BOOKS
IMB WHT UNIVERSITY AVtNUE
EXAMINATION PERIOD
A Big New List of STUDY AIDS Is Now Available
DMggvit mm of STUDY AIDS ton robe your grade one latter. If you are looking for additional AIDS
or roforonto materials, lot us know. Ws ire always glad to help you.
4
...< >.v
litlYiinf--r - /"jo* imiriMr
' New Impale Sport Coupe. Chevys the oniy car in its he'd
with body by Fisher and Safety Plate Glass all around.
Chevrolet says new in the nicest ways!
It's not the names of these fine Chevrolet features that were talking about. That which we call Turbo-Thrust
would by any other name be just as sweet. It's what the names stand for. Its the way Chevrolet looks new, rides
new and performs new. Thats whats important and thats what you should see and feel. How about now!
' ... < [j
TURBO-THRUST VBl * j
powerghde :
fd the 7*t*\ Radically new with the AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION 2 '****'
combustion chamber* located in the block Optional at extra coot. 2 APPRAISALS
instead of on top. Defayen 250 h.p.l
r~pr.TJ~Vir,T : ;
: TURBOGLIDE ! DELIVERIES t
A U X\l3W Vjr-LiJ.A-r.il. a springs at ail four wheels 2
a Tba only trlpM-turbme automatic far Steel muscle* to lake vou frvsckiwd CkemoUt dealers dwpia, this famous trademark
drive in the low-price field and | J 1 ** muscies w lake you '
Chevrolet has tti None smoother j smoothly over rough spots!
. than this extra-cost option. Jg VHVtiII I VIM 2
mmmm^ j
BLUE-FLAME jg @ gnpll JWB find kuvs j
6 As economy-minded j W are good as gold at
as ever, but now even j your Chevrolet dealers! I
peppier with a higher | fcgrf M
145 horsepower! j .he ss corvette-even sportier.' 2
SEE ALL TH*S AMD MORE. TOO. AT YOUR LOCAL AUTHORIZED CHEVROLET DEALERS

selection of job offers as in the
past.
Maurice E. Mayberry, head of
i the University Placement Bureau
: stated that cutbacks in defense
: spending have brought about a
j slight recession but he feels this
| situation to be temporary.
A survey being conducted by
j,. ;
New Prof Named
To Ag Staff
Dr. James Montelaro, former
member of the research division
of Minute Maid Inc., of Orlando
has been appointed io the teach teaching
ing teaching staff of the Vegetable Crops
Department in the School of Agri Agriculture.
culture. Agriculture.
Dr. Franks S. Jamison, head of
the department, said Montelaro
will join the staff tomorrow'.
Montelaro received his B.S. at
Louisiana State University and
his Ph.D. at the University of
Florida.
Plans Nearly Complete
On Union New York Trip
Final plans for the Florida Un Union
ion Union Board New York trip are
nearing completion, and those
students wishing to register should
do so as soon as possible.
The $75 expense for the trip!
includes hotel bill for seven nights,
round trip transportation, and all
baggage gratuities. An initial fee
of S2O is payable at time of re registration,
gistration, registration, the balance due on Jan.
7.

Florida

: I the National College Placement
i Service will give a more complete
; picture of national bus ine s s
trends. The results should be
available by the campus place placei
i placei ment service soon.
Consider All Jobs
Students should consider all
I! sources of job opportunities, but
' registering with the University
Placement Bureau will assure
companies conducting interviews.
Phis is the most effective way of
securing a job.
Many individual colleges also
have placement services. Infor Information
mation Information regarding interview's are
disseminated by various colleges.
Mayberry j*aid that between 60
and 70 percent of graduates are
placed by the University Place Placej
j Placej ment Bureau.
STORY ERRORS
In a recent story, the Alliga Alligator
tor Alligator erroneously reported that Dr.
C. B. Pollard, professor of chem chemistry,
istry, chemistry, would deliver a talk on
Race Relations in the South
second semester.
Actually, Dr. Pollard's talk will
deal with crime prevention, not ;
race relations.
We are also sorry if any stu-
dents were led to believe in a J
story on recent SRA lectures that
Mr. Carl Neidhardt suggested any
concept of freedom that would
stimulate anarchy or suggest that
such a freedom would become ac-
ceptable to the church and reli religious
gious religious community.
| Neidhardt's main point was that |
| art, with its tolerance of change
and its thirst for spiritual content j
and fundamental order, can be
! a great resource to mankind. j

WjSSjfi.- ; .-.-. A- J? SmT y
jiii Jr Jf
Senior Smiles at Finals
Sam Barnett, a graduating senior, smile* thoughtfully over his :
studies as if contemplating the future that looms bright after his
last finals this month. He is one of 634 students slated to receive
degrees at commencement exercises Feb. 1. (Gator Photo).

University Lost And Found Booth
Holds Over 1000 Unclaimed Articles

The lost and found booth lo located
cated located in the Hub, contains 1151
unclaimed articles lost since the
beginning of the semester, ac according
cording according to Jay Thai, secretary of
Alpha Phi Omega, national ser ser

ser vice fraternity sponsoring the pro project.
ject. project.
Everything from buttons to bi bicycles
cycles bicycles is turned in and the ma majority
jority majority never claimed.
| Thai said articles are kept for
30 days, then evaulated and sold.
Books can be bought at the lost
and found for less than second secondhand
hand secondhand bookstore prices.
People coming to the lost and
found are usually vague about
identifying their possessions. Such j
comments as; it had doodling,
on the cover or it was left in
the rain are com mo n Thai
said, when an Identifying charac characteristic
teristic characteristic is asked for.
Persons who do have the-ir
names on lost objects are noti notified
fied notified that the lost and found has
found them. Boxes are placed
in the cafeteria, Peabody Hall
and other buildings for the mis misplaced
placed misplaced items.

Campus Auto Regulations
In Effect During Finals
All traffic rules and regu regulations
lations regulations will be enforced during
exam time and semester break,
according to Campus Police
Chief Audie I. Shuler.
Students who are bringing cars
to the University are required
to register them with the cam campus
pus campus police to receive the proper
decal.

GOING WEST? There's one thing you cant ft *l*l*4 A
go without. Wash-and-wear chaps? Shoc- f JL iL vA I UAS ///$ LUCK*** 1
resistant Stetson? Foam-rubber saddle? V A j
Nope, nope and nope. What you need is V/ jKlfck £ get *********
plenty of Luckies! (Figured wed say that,
didnt you?) Luckies, you see. mark you what astaevng how? |
as a man who really knows his brands. \ cr^
Haveem handy, and youll be considered C\ V
bebut youve still got the cigarette > / xjjjjAy
thats hght as they come! Luckies are Jpf
made of naturally light, wonderfully good- Nil *' 'iMYi(f
tasting tobacco, toasted to taste even ihwm, Gaunt Haunt
f n
WHAT IS A 6-TOOT KAMIT? WHAT IS A SEASICK MONAECH?
/ss, STUDENTS) MAKE >25 a,
ZyrJ/tf Do you like to shirk work? Heres some easy a
moneystart Stickling! Well pay $25 for A-J0 ly
every Stickler we printand for hundreds ysjJ* |j x3£ .OJk%k i *y P /
| more that never get used. Sticklers are l I SaJM
simple riddles with two-word rhyming ~\w t //Wf & j 's!S /r */I
| answers. Both words must have the same XuNlulUlr'jTji (fl j 1
isRU j number of syllables. (Dont do 'nF/w(/l fmtm m
(iif'ifliin lirjiimiiiiirirM.m drawings.) Send your Sticklers
£ with your name, address, college
f anH class to Happy-Joe-Lucky, jack thoeni. Rare Hart icon thikoll. Green Queen
u; Box 67A, Mt. Vernon, N.Y. 'ow* state teachers cou. u or asizoha
fA' |k I I WHAT IS/ A CANDY TESTE*? I ( WHAT A HAPPY HYEOTHISISf "1 [ WHAT A SBNWV-MNCHOTS EYE iHAOt?!
j lUg
CIGARETTES j _ ...
joscth colucci. Fudge Judge OOnaid coiehan. Cheery Theory sichasd van wasensh. Miter Visor
"ommmmmmmmmmmmmmmm bichisah state w.e.t.A. nonlensehs
< 1 n>< ll' 111 n.i MBMMMMHHHNNHHHHIMMi **
LIGHT UP A light SMOKE -UGHT UP A LUCKY)
.** frodiidtf

Lyceum Council
Slates Symphony
Next Month

The Detroit Symphony Or Orchestra,
chestra, Orchestra, under the direction of!
Paul Paray, will appear at the j
University. Tuesday, Feb. 11. at
8 p.m.
Compositions of five well-known i
musicians will be played by the
Symphony in the Florida Gym Gymnasium,
nasium, Gymnasium, under the sponsorship
of the Lyceum Council.
The Symphony has toured the
country from Miami to New York
and from Philadelphia to Atlan Atlanta
ta Atlanta in the last year.
The conductor-pianist, Paray, j
has been with the Detroit Sym- j
phony since its reorganization in
1951.*
The program includes Wagners
Prelude and Love Death from j
Tristan and Isolde, which nar narrates
rates narrates by music the story of two
young people caught in the spell
of a love potion.
Debussys Prelude to "The Af Afternoon
ternoon Afternoon of a Faun is an im impression
pression impression of the slumbering Greek
idyll, as written in the poem by
Mallarme.
The program also features Bi Bizets
zets Bizets Dramatic Overture, Patrie
and Mendelssohns Symphony No.
5 in D (Reformation).
University students are admit admitted
ted admitted free of charge to the concert
with the presentation of Their I.
D. cards. Tickets, which may be
purchased at the box office, are
$2 for adults; $1 for children and
non-university students.

Today & Tomorrow
John Wayne
Sophia Loren vjjg
Rossanorazzi
fMM*|Va rennl p uts j' s
BiSSSe *?$!
Bli[|oQsWfl*nSTS Oh
nCHNKAM** h TKMHKOm*
STARTS THURSDAY
iftytoiu
Ha J
Mot. 80c Eve. 90c
No Children's Tickets

The Florida Alligator, Tues., Jan. 14. 1958

2,000 Questionaires Are Mailed
To Determine Honor Court Status

In an effort to determine the
"effectiveness of the Honor
Court. 2,000 qucs:iOj;a;res were
mailed out yesterday to a cross
segment of the student body by
a specially appointed survey com committee.
mittee. committee.
Tom McDonald, comm ill e e
chairman, said last Friday that,
"The purpose of the question questionaire
aire questionaire is to help the Honor Court!
determine the effectiveness of the
present system and to point out
any changes that might be ne necessary.
cessary. necessary.

Serving Delicious Hamburgers
Plain 15call the way 20c :
LOUIS' LUNCH {UuS
Phon. hi (n> Or4r n MIN **

Prepare Now for
Final Examinations With £
STUDY AIDS |
Here is e short check list es STUDY AIDS eveiiahle for some coersos. ~
Ask to see e copy of oar completo cotolofao BsHng eWs In evor
200 courses.
C-ll STUDY GUIDE AND OUTLINE ft. 75 ~
C-21 STUDY GUIDE b OUTLINE 1.65
CHEMISTRY MADE SIMPLE 1.00
C-31 WORD LIST 1.25
ENGLISH GRAMMAR
C-41 STUDY GUIDE r OUTLINE 1.35
C-42 STUDY GUIDE b OUTLINE 1.85
MATHEMATICS MADE SIMPLE 1.00
C-S1 STUDY GUIDE b OUTLINE I 1.85
C-61 STUDY GUIDE b OUTLINE 1.65
C-62 STUDY GUIDE b OUTLINE 1.65
ATG 211 ELEMENTARY ACCOUNTING 1.25
BLY 161 GENERAL BIOLOGY 1.25
CY 121 FIRST YEAR COLLEGE CHEMISTRY 1.75
GENERAL CHEMISTRY 1.10
CHEM PROBS b HOW SOLVE THEM 1.25
CY 123 HOW TO SOLVE PROBLEMS IN QUAL ANALYSIS 1.25
CY 217 SCHAUM'S COLLEGE CHEMISTRY
THEORY 6r PROBLEMS I.SS
FIRST YEAR COLLEGE CHEMISTRY .1.75
ES 201 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS 1.50
IS 203 STATISTICAL METHOD 1.75
EM 313 SCHAUM'S HYDRAULICS 6r FLUID MECHANICS 3.00
EM 365 SCHAUM'S ENGINEERING MECH 2.85
EM 367 SCHAUM'S STRENGTH OF MATERIALS 3.25
EH 201 GREEK ROMAN EH 202 ENGLISH LIT TO DRYDEN 1.75
HY 201 ANCIENT HISTORY 1.00
HY 245 AMERICAN HISTORY BEFORE 1877 1.50
HY 246 AMERICAN HISTORY AFTER 1865 1.50
LAW Ask for special list of STUDY AIDS
MS 105 SCHAUM'S COLLEGE ALGERBRA
THEORY b PROBLEMS 2.10
SCHAUM'S ANALYTIC GEOMETRY
THEORY b PROBLEMS 1.60
SCHAUM'S PLANE b SPHERICAL TRIGONOMETRY .. 1.85
ML 385-390 THERMODYNAMIC FUNDAMENTALS 1.50
PROBLEMS IN STEAM POWER ENGINEERING 1.95
PPY 201-220-231 PHILOSOPHY:
AN OUTLINE HISTORY 1.75
PS 201-202-205-206 FIRST YEAR COLLEGE PHYSICS,... 1.25
PCL 201-202 AMERICAN GOVERNMENT 1.50
FLORIDA BOOK STORE

The questionaire contains 17
questions ranging from, How did
, j you rate your orientation of tne
Universitys Honor System?,[ to
j Do you think the Honor System
is doing its job?
McDonald added that the ques questionaire
tionaire questionaire also would serve as a
guide to find out the weakpoints
that may exist in the Honor Court
Public Relations Committee.
.! Other survey committee mem members
bers members include: Tommy Hedges,
. Wayne Jones. Bill Hollingworth,
Debbie Dalton, Joan Porter, and
up*-
Joe Wahl berg.

Page 3



m FIOIIDA ALLIGATOR

Our 50th Year of Publication

Page 4

Time is Running Out
At the end of the first semester, it is customary for the Florida Alligator to re review
view review Student Government for the first semester, to interpret for the students its
accomplishments, its failures, and what lies in store by Student Government in the
last three months of its term.

Reluctantly, the Alligator comes to the
conclusion that Eddie Beardsley and his
administration has done little for the stu student
dent student this semester. The real issues and
the real problems have been either
shunted aside or passively discussed, and
the Beardsley Administration has failed
to get its program across to the student
body.
A Student Government can be partial partially
ly partially judged by how well it has carried out
its party platform. The Alligator shall
present this side of the picture later on
in this editorial, but more important to
determine the effectiveness of an admin administration,
istration, administration, is how did it meet the problems
that came up during the semester, and
is its overall program a constructive one ?
* * *
Executive Council, main legislative
body of the SG, has had its meetings
conducted with little parliamentary pro procedure.
cedure. procedure. Two or three persons have held
the floor at the same time, two motions
have been introduced at the same time,
as during the book exchange debate last
Tuesday night. Without effective leader leadership
ship leadership from the chair, the Council wanders
aimlessly in debate.
Has the Council and Beardsley really
delved into problems that are confront confronting
ing confronting the students now ? When the Ath Athletic
letic Athletic Department announced that a de deposit
posit deposit would be charged on all tickets for
the Jacksonville game, did Student Gov Government
ernment Government let the students know where it
stood on the matter?
In the realm of student employment,
deterioration of student participation in
campus affairs, school spirit, even traf traffic
fic traffic and parking, has Student Govern Government
ment Government this year discussed any 'one of
these issues, arrived at any conclusions ?
(Albert the Alligator was a Blue Key
sponsored project, thus Student Govern Government
ment Government can accept no responsibility or
blame there).
The Alligator, in an attempt to steer
Student Government in the direction of
being alert to student interests, has cited
editorially a host of suggestions during
the semester. We can only suggest, not
direct.
The Book Exchange failure last week
is an example. Beardsley, with some
forceful leadership, could have gotten
that program through. He said he was in
favor of the program to the Executive
, Counci, but he failed to convince strong strongly

It's a Matter of 'When'
We see where attorneys for Daytona Beach Negro Virgil Hawkins are making
another bid to enter him in the UF Law School.

After being bucked by the U.S. Su Supreme
preme Supreme Court which ordered the lower
courts to implement integration, Haw Hawkins*
kins* Hawkins* lawyers are applying to Federal
District Court in Tallahassee to order
his admittance as soon as possible.
We dont doubt, as most other Flo-
The Florida Alligator
All-American Rating, 1953-57
Member Associated College Press
The FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student news newspaper
paper newspaper of the University of Florida and is published every
Tuesday and Friday mornings except during holidays,
vacations and examination p erlods. The FLORIDA ALLI ALLIGATOR
GATOR ALLIGATOR is entered as second class matter at the United
States Post Office at Gainesville. Florida. Offices are located
in basement of Florida Union. Telephone FR 6-3261. exten extension
sion extension 655. and request either editorial or business office.
Business office hours 2 to 5 Tues.. Wed., Fri. Subscrip Subscriptions
tions Subscriptions 63.00 per year.
Editor-in-Chief DAVID LEVY
Managing Editor LEE FENNELL
Business Mgr. .... CHUCK RUFFNER
DAN HACKED. EXECUTIVE EDITOR; JOE
THOMAS, CITY EDITOR; ROGER LEWIS,
STATE EDITOR: PAT MURPHY, FEATURE
Grace Hinson, society editor; Sally Stewart,
assistant news editor; News Staff Writers: Judy
Bates, Don Adams, Pauline Bauman, Arlene Fn Fnnnger.
nnger. Fnnnger. Dot Gannon, Gloria Brown, Steve Rich Richardson,
ardson, Richardson, Esther Firestone, Bob Jerome, Bob Be Benoit,
noit, Benoit, Sally Galloway, Jerry Palmer, Jean Car Carver,
ver, Carver, Marge Reitz.
KEN SHER, SPORTS EDITOR; BUDDY HAY HAYDEN,
DEN, HAYDEN, INTRAMURAL EDITOR.
Sports Staff Writers: Richard Jacobs, Charlie
Pike, Ray LaFontaine, Frank Kear, David Jones,
Hugh Waters, Bill Buchalter, Janet Moskowita,
Billy Shaw, Kenn Finkel, Henry Goldman, Stu
Blum berg, Barbara Newman, Mureii Rubin
FRANK GRAY, ASST. BUS. MGR. FOR PRO PRODUCTION;
DUCTION; PRODUCTION; KEN CLIFFORD, ASST. BUS. MGR.
FOR SALES; RONALD SHASHY, SUBSCRIP SUBSCRIPTION
TION SUBSCRIPTION MGR; MARTIN STEINER, OFFICE MGR;
SUSAN STATLER, NATIONAL AD MGR.
Business Staff: Marty Reeber, John StoJer, Boh
Golden, Stan Newmark, Virginia Lee Philpott,
Sandy Ura, Mike Wallace, Joel Karesh, Buzay
Loden, Brace Bateman, George Brown, Frank
Stephens, Harry Squires.

Editorials

ly strongly enough in order to offset the recom recommendations
mendations recommendations for a veto by the Student
Government Finance Committee.
Student Government does not go out
of office until early May. Three months
still remain in its term. Efforts can still
be made to boost student salaries, effect
better policy in the student fee portion
which goes to athletics, and a number of
other real items.
Student Government may well be
judged this year by how good a job the
Constitutional Revision Committee does,
of which Beardsley is chairman.
Since not one member of a student studentfee
fee studentfee organization, nor one officer of a stu student
dent student publication is on that committee,
we can only hope that somehow fair re results
sults results will be evident.
* * *
Regarding the party platform of last
spring, this is not a strong indication of
a party, for each group makes promises
it knows cannot be fulfilled.
For instance, Beardsleys group prom promised
ised promised a Civil Service System as No. 1 on
its platform. It is true that undersecre undersecretaries
taries undersecretaries in the cabinet have been appoint appointed
ed appointed from outside the party. But the
platform promise that continued good
work will lead to unbiased promotion
was a farce from the start.
Plank No. 2, more telephones; some
results here, mainly by the Housing Of Office:
fice: Office: No. 3, no increase in student fees;
not yet, anyway: 4, campus parking and
traffic problems, little result, certainly
no cars for sophomores as Beardsley
promised : 5, more student employment;
not yet: 6, improved football seating
plan; nothing dramatic accomplished
here: 7, promote school spirit; some ad advances.
vances. advances.
The platform promised other things,
such as baby sitting for the Flavets,
which was continued from last campaign
during football games, and lights for
tennis courts, on which no results has
been forthcoming.
If more time is needed to bring about
a worthwhile year for Student v Govern Government,
ment, Government, Beardsley has the time. We hope
a success can be made of the Constitu Constitutional
tional Constitutional Revision attempt, for it will prob probably
ably probably be this effort which in large part
determines the accomplishments of Stu Student
dent Student Government at least during the
second semester of 1957-58.

ridians are prone to admit, that it is
merely a question of time before Haw Hawkins
kins Hawkins arrives in Gainesville.
The question of public mischief,
which the State Supreme Court invoked
in denying Hawkins admittance last
year-, we doubt. The fact that an over overwhelming
whelming overwhelming majority of UF students said
they were not opposed to integration in
the recent Board of Control survey indi indicates
cates indicates that sane minds will prevail w hen
and if the day of integration arrives.
Actually, it is not a question of in integration,
tegration, integration, for that word has been gross grossly
ly grossly distorted. It is just a question of giv giving
ing giving equal education to all people, regard regardless
less regardless of race, creed or color.
...Back Again
The Orange Peel, back again, is due
for distribution next week. After view viewing
ing viewing advance copies of the 32-page humor
magazine, we dont doubt that all 6,000
copies will go faster than Aunt Jemimas
pancakes.
Its humorous, spicy, serious, and in interesting.
teresting. interesting. Editor Bob Chalom and his
staff have done a good job.

V (\ (Ag/77
/EVERT STUPENTI SWUU> STOW EVERY J A HABiTf- Cm AT THE SAME TIMESEVEN M'S V / STAND 1
(fljONtp HAVEJS I H6t£ BAY IH£ ,sMl W \ ANP CWE-.-STUpV- A WetK-K WEEKS £at VEAt- I I MMIOToNY.'/
Vsrupy HARTS.' / AT THE SAME Time-IN ) AlUtyS WITHOUT" L ON ANPON-AND ON-AHPOHf / I WIH'_/
y S may i.iW ilwy

Tuesday, Jan. 14, 1958

LITTLE LOUIE AND AL

2£/ Jfr* sssssfil...'
.. \\ -".'W* vrmirsw '' ';
fIS \ y s T\u
% u
-

"I can't understand it! The girl has a speech impediment,
and still she gets the top grade?"

MURF'S COLUMN

It Can't be Done Without Some Help

By PAT MURPHY
Gator Feature Editor
Next month, the Board of Stu Student
dent Student Publications will meet to
select the top brass for next
year's Seminole. In March, the
Board will face the equally dif difficult
ficult difficult problem of finding stu students
dents students to run next years Alliga Alligator.
tor. Alligator.
More than ever, today stu stuents
ents stuents at the University of Flori Florida,
da, Florida, like collegiates at other uni universities
versities universities throughout the nation,
are expecting professional'
jobs done on their caimpus news newspapers
papers newspapers and yearbooks.

Yet a problem
that is not un uncommon
common uncommon is re recurring
curring recurring again
this year as in interviews
terviews interviews by the
Board draw
near namely,
the problem of
find i n g the
qualified s t u udent
dent udent body.
When the
Board meets in

- JH
JH
9P:3t% Vi
MURPHY

February they wi*l frankly have
a tough time of deciding on the
people to run the Seminole. With
the exception of one or two good
workers, the Seminole, like most
other campus publications, is
suffering from the disease com commonly
monly commonly known as student iner inertia.
tia. inertia.
The laziness and disinterest
displayed by the majority of
people who say they work" on
publications force those on top to
convert the setup into a one or
two-man show.
Students expect, and rightly
so, the best from their year yearbook,
book, yearbook, and are quite free with
criticism if the publication does
not live up to their expec expectations.
tations. expectations. What they fail to see
in most cases, however, is that
a professional job requires the
time and devotion and just plan
sweat.,, that few students have
to offer. And, regardless of an
editors devotion to his office,
GUEST COLUMN

Mahon, Graham, Likely Candidates for Student Body President

By 808 CHALOM
Former Summer Gator Editor
This Fall has produced many
things that could lead into an.
interesting Spring Election.
A certain amount of intrigue
should arise out of the fact that
there has been more than the
usual in juggling of political line lineups,
ups, lineups, the formation of new par parties,
ties, parties, etc.
Unfortunately, whatever inter interest
est interest might be caused by the vast
amount of political maneuvering
that has occured in overshadow overshadowed
ed overshadowed by a very serious lack of can candidates.
didates. candidates.
Politicians say that there is an

increasing lack
of interest in
campus politics.
There is aiways
the political
reserve of
Greek key keyseekers.
seekers. keyseekers. but
many of these
have turned out
to be poliduds.
Two categories
of men that

.v..
CHALOM

make for Stu Student
dent Student Government administra administrations
tions administrations appear to have become ex extinct.
tinct. extinct. These are (1) those prov proven
en proven leaders who are always ready
to assume the responsibility of
high Student Government of office;
fice; office; and (2) a younger group
who are primarily students, not
glory-seekers, whose dedication
to the ideals of student self selfgovernment
government selfgovernment has utilmately plac-

he still has to do and study studying
ing studying to stay in school.
*
At this point, the assistance
of a dependable, qualified staff
is a necessity.
Yet often, and especially this
year, the Seminole has been
forced to become a two-man
show in order to survive.
For example, when the Semi Seminole
nole Seminole comes out in May, look
carefully at the pictures of those
who are top officers in that
publication. Chances are that
less than half of them deserve
to have their faces in the book
at all.
This figureheading" of offic officers
ers officers has become so acute thia
year, that in February the Board
will have trouble making ap appointments
pointments appointments with full confidence
that these people will do the best
job.
By these statements I am not
criticizing those who have work worked
ed worked hard for the Seminole, and I
do not mean that the appli applicants
cants applicants are not qualified in rela relaion
ion relaion to the time they have been
on the Seminole staff, but in
most cases it takes more
than one semesters work with
the application of a yearbook
to get the over-all scope of the
project and do a professional
job.
And from where do the as aspiring
piring aspiring leaders come? From the
ranks of the lowly staff mem member
ber member who volunteers his or her
services each year.
A close look at the average
person who signs up for publica publications
tions publications like the Alligator or Sem Seminole
inole Seminole shows that person to be a
fraternity or sorority pledge.
Most greek organizations require
their members to enter into two
activities on campus, and the
eager-to-please sticks his name
in the files of two organizations
that.
*
Almost anyone Mho is active
in extra-curriculars will tell you
that the most common question
the average pledge asks is,
What organization can I join
that requires the least work??

ed them high in the Hall of
Fame.
At the present, there appear
to be three partiesonly one of
which is seemingly well-organiz well-organized.
ed. well-organized. First, there is the Victory
Party, which is composed of
remnants of both the old Uni University
versity University Party and the newer
Suwanee Party formed gener generally
ally generally around the nucleus of
the University Party, this in includes
cludes includes Kappa Sigma, Pi
Lambda Phi, Sigma Nu, Phi
Delta Theta, Pi Kappa Alpha,
Delta Tau Delta, Sigma Phi
Epsilon, Phi Gamma Delta and
Lambda Chi Alpha. Among the
leaders are Stan Rosencrans, Pi
Lam; Sigma Nu Larry Stagg;
Jack Bierley, Kappa Sig, for former
mer former Chairman of the Universi University
ty University Party; and Pike Jim Martin.
At this point, it appears that
the standard bearer of the Vic Victory
tory Victory Party for President is Sig Sigma
ma Sigma Nu Bob Graham. Graham,
present Chancellor of the Ho Honor
nor Honor Court, has served in Stu Student
dent Student Government in various
capacities as well, and is an
outstanding student. Though he
plans to transfer to Harvard
Law School in 1959, he appar apparently
ently apparently would welcome the op opportunity
portunity opportunity to serve in the no. 1
post next year.
The Suwannee Party appears
now to be composed of Sigma
Alpha Epsilon, Tau Epsilon Phi,
Beta Theta Pi, Alpha Tau
Omega, and with some un uncertainty,
certainty, uncertainty, Sigma Chi, Kappa Al Alpha,
pha, Alpha, and Alpha Gamma Rho.

n n LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
....... .By Bryan

Officers of publications and
other organizations, supplied
with staff members of this at attitude,
titude, attitude, may as well recruit
workers from the nearest zoo.
The fraternities and sororities
are not wholly to blame for
this situation; they just want
their members to do more on
campus than sport a jewelled
pin. Just as truly, not every stu student
dent student or every pledge is parti particularly
cularly particularly interested in time-con time-consuming
suming time-consuming extra curriculars. But
the required activity card
hurts the organization officer
in the outcome, when he finds
a file full of names and an of office
fice office full of empty desks.
Perhaps the loudest protest
that is seen on the Alligators
editoral page is the independent
gripe of non-representation.
Those who feel the fraterni fraternities
ties fraternities and sororities are pushing
them out of the picture have
the answer laid out for them,
if they will just take advant advantage
age advantage of the situation prevalant
in so many organizations on
campus, including the Alligator
and Seminole.
Until those who have the po potential
tential potential to put out a good news newspaper
paper newspaper or yearbook apply them themselves
selves themselves to the job, their criti criticism
cism criticism as about as valuable as
the voter who compalins, Why
dont those guys in Washington
do something about the weath weather?
er? weather?
* *
Until qualified students are
willing to spend their free hours
with such organizations, the edi editors
tors editors will have a tough time put putting
ting putting out the yearbook or news newspaper,
paper, newspaper, and the Board will have
an even tougher time of choos choosing
ing choosing their successors.
And a common occurrance on
campus will still be the bright brighteyes
eyes brighteyes freshman who giggled,
Boy, working on Lyceum Coun Council
cil Council is the easiest activity I join joined.
ed. joined. I havent been over there
once this year. And the Ly Lyceum
ceum Lyceum Council officer who she
unknowingly spoke to muttered
under his breath, Don.t w r orry,
we havent missed you.

Leaders in this contingent are
Bud Shorstein, Tau Epsilon
Phi; and Bruce Garwood, one onetime
time onetime president of Alpha Tau
Omega. The presidential can candidates
didates candidates from the Suwanee
Party appears to be Harry
Mahon, president of S.A.E., who
was recently appointed Director
of Orientation for 1958.
* *
At the moment, the remaind remainder
er remainder of the Greeks seem to be
content to watch from the side sidelines,
lines, sidelines, though many of the smal smaller
ler smaller houses have long-standing
political alliances with larger
houses that are now commited.
Th|re is almost a complete
absence of any strong Indepen Independent
dent Independent strength has declined great greatly
ly greatly in the past few years, to the
point where this year there is
practically no group representa representation.
tion. representation.
A number of other candidates
have been mentioned for the no.
1 slot, though there is one name
that looms high above all others
as a possible candidate. This
is Tom Biggs. Biggs has all the
qualifications necessary. He is
a past Chancellor and Clerk
of the Honor Court, a member of
Florida Blue Key, Had of Fame,
and this years Gator Growl
Chainman. A veteran, with no
political allegiances. Biggs
would be an odds on favorite
if he were to run. There is, how however,
ever, however, one obstacle. Biggs has
stated that he does not want to
run. Still, political observors
are aware that there could al-

Rid Football of All
Limits, Says Reader

Editor:
Mr. Sher, in his column Fri Friday,
day, Friday, pleads for calling spades
spades in regard to the NCAA
code. All would argue that a de decrease
crease decrease in hypocrisy in this area
would be a refreshing change.
Let us indeed rid ourselves of
this wishy-wishy, half and half
business. but let us not stop
with this negative note. It seems
to me (although this is not
original with me) that the solu solution
tion solution is to professionalize foot football
ball football completely.
If the alumni, parents and
other citizens of the state believe
that winning teams are essential
to the public relations" of the
University, why not let them or organize
ganize organize a corporation, lease the
stadium and hire players to
play for Florida? If this
were done, all pressures on the
team members to maintain scho scholastic
lastic scholastic averages would be elimi eliminated.
nated. eliminated. They could devote ten
teams a day or more to prac-
BILL GRAYSON

'Mike and Liz Clod' Arrive

By BILL GRAYSON
Gator Columnist
This reporter was greatly
elated last week when he was
told that the world-famous cou couple
ple couple Mike Clod and his lovely
wife. Liz, were vacationing in
Gainesville, He was even more
elated when he was told by the
editor of the Alligator to inter interview
view interview this famous couple.
When I first saw Mike and Liz
they were out in their back yard
collecting empty Coke bottles.
Liz looked beautiful in black
sequin walking shorts with a
sable crew-neck sweater. She
completed her outfit with a dia diamond
mond diamond tiarra and sun-g.asses.
Mike looked like his usual self.

Mike told me
of an embar embarrassing
rassing embarrassing inci incident
dent incident that hap happened
pened happened at one of
their recent
parties. It
seems that he
had hired the
U.N. building
for a recent
shindig (Yan (Yankee
kee (Yankee Stadium
wasn't avail avails-'W'

s-'W' avails-'W'
lir laP JN
GRAYSON

able that afternoon). Suddenly
to his horror he realized that
there were not any napkins
available for his guests. Mike,
with his usual air of calmness,
stood up on a table and announc announced
ed announced to the guests, Ladies and
gentlemen, we have found out
that there are no napkins. There Therefore,
fore, Therefore, at intervals a large wooly
dog will pass among you.
The butler came in at this
point and told Mike that his
long distance call was ready on
the phone. Mike excused him himself,
self, himself, leaving me with the lovely
Liz.
Liz informed me that she was
soon returning to Hollywood to

ways be a last minute change
of mind, and the presence of
Biggs in the field would then
alter many well-executed plans.
If Biggs were to run, it is
doubtful that Graham would,
However, most quarters feel that
Mahon would, emerge a candi candidate
date candidate regardless of the opponent.
Mahon is more than eager for
the position, while Graham, by
comparison appears to mainly
interested in the welfare of Stu Student
dent Student Government; whether this
is to include him or not being
perhaps second-rate.
Other possible candidates are
Ron McCall, Steve Sessums,
and Tom McAlliley. Sessums is
unlikely for an important rea reason:
son: reason: lack of time; the others,
for lack of support.
* *
Though the election is still
months away, the issues are
not difficult to guess. Victory
politicians will capitalize on the
do nothing antics of the pre present
sent present Administration. They will
say that the present officials
have done little except (1) kill
the student book exchange; (2)
authorize the printing of addi additional
tional additional Seminoles over the dis disapproval
approval disapproval of the Board of Stu Student
dent Student Publications, and pose for
pictures at the Blood Bank. Their
opponents in the Suwannee agre agregation
gation agregation will point to Student Gov Government
ernment Government participation in student
affairs in a somewhat unique an
unprecedented mannerthough
this might become a Victory
target also; and will no doubt
lay some of the blame for things
that have or have not happen happened
ed happened on Victory converts.
Both parties will try to drum
more interest ir. Student Gov Government
ernment Government than has been appar apparent
ent apparent in the past semester; and

Golfland
Driving Range
Doily 4-11 p.m.
Sot fir Sun. 2-11 p.m.
441, North
Clubs for Everyone
Just Past Intersection
N.W. 13th fr N.W. 6th Sts.

tice. There would be no geo geographical
graphical geographical limits on their tra travel.
vel. travel. (Think of the gate 1 they
could share in by a gaijne in
New York or Los Angeles.)
On the other hand, all pres pressure
sure pressure on the faculty to observe
different grading standares for
football players would cease.
The University would get Out of
the entertainment bus ine ss.
(Which, naive though it may
sound, is not what it was found founded
ed founded to do.)
1 The only drawback I can think
of is that if the team became
exceptionally good, some school
in Los Angeles or San Francisco
might take it away from us
because our stadium is too small.
Yours for bigger and better
football,
Ralph B. Thompson
Assoc. Professor of Marketing
P. S. If any members of the
professional team wanted to
take a course or two, I expect
ft could be arranged.

make her next film. Based on a
famous novel, the picture, Lit Little
tle Little Women, tells the true story
of what goes on in a girli
reformatory. Liz will co-ltar
with Jolting Jayne Mansfield
as the Fideles sisters, Semper
and Adestes.
I asked Liz about her famous
art collection. She remarked
they were sincere art lovers and
pointed with pride to such fa famous
mous famous originals as Norman Rock Rockwell's
well's Rockwell's Sunflowers, Picassos
Mona Lisa, and View of
Toledo by an unknown Ohio re resident.
sident. resident. Liz paints a little herself
and she takes great pride in
her still life paintings, as she
has visited some of the finest
stills in the country.
Liz confided that her birthday
was cominglsoon. I asked if she
had any idea what Mike
would give her. She replied
she didnt know, however She
was holding out for Mexico.
Suddenly there was a great
deal of noise coming from the
terrace. Liz got excited and cal called
led called out to Mike. Darling, come
quickly. Your children and my
children are beating up our
children.
Mike re-entered and got the
children quiet. Liz asked who
he had been speaking to on the
phone. He remarked that he had
just bought Antarctica so that
they would have enough ice cu cubes
bes cubes for their coming party.
Mike snuggled up close to Liz
and whispered, Darling, your
birthday is coming soon. What
would you like?
Liz turned and said, I don't
know Mike. What's left?
Suddenly the Century Tower
began to toll the 5:30 Way
Down Upon the Suwannee Ri River
ver River and I knew it was time
to take my leave. I excused
myself and walked back to my
hotel in the rain.

well they should. If the apathjy
toward campus, politics cop'
tinues, and with it the increas increasing
ing increasing decline in candidates fd>r
election, there is the alarming
possibility of Student Goverh Goverhment
ment Goverhment becoming so ineffective as
to hardly justify its continu continuance.
ance. continuance.

.' i
TODAY & TOMORROW
'Happy Hilarious Spoof!'
'A Novel
Affair'
DON'T miss it;
STARTS THURS.
TIE 111 mSK-JOCKET KITH
*fj Jimmy BOWPn!
Cfgpwtee
Warner BROS
AND FEATURES
CTHE STORY OF A TEEW AGE AGEFIRE
FIRE AGEFIRE BOMB! +Ug
green-eyed
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presented sy Warner Bros.
LATE SHOW AT 11:30
FRIDAY
Deborah Robert
KERR-MITCHUM
jfcj



SBP Claims Goals; But Majority of Program Incomplete

(Continued from Page ONE)
Ocularly la the women* dorm*
where they are most needed.
Beardsley stated that his ori original
ginal original idea was to accommodate
each ffcri6 room with a private
phone as is done at L.S.U. but
that the Gainesville telephone
company had informed him that
such a service could not be pro provided
vided provided due to technical difficulties.
The phone company is also
reluctant to place additional pay payphones

Th# Florida Alligator, Tuai., Jan, 14, 1958-I

ALL YOU CAN EAT
LUNCH 11:30-1:30 65c
(60c with o meal card)
MEAT. TWO VEGETABLES, BREAD, DESSERT
ALL THE TEA YOU CAN DRINK
UNLIMITED SECONDS
SUPPER 5:30-7:30 75c
Fried Chicken, Steak or One Os Mony Other Delicious Main Dishes
Served each night. 2 Vegetables, Desert and Bread.
ROOMS AVAILABLE
UNIVERSITY LODGE
1 £ N W 17 th St
MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY
GET A SAFETY-TESTED USED CAR NOW,
.. WATERPROOFED AND READY-TO-ROLl!
I FREE "1958"
LICENSE PLATE
FOR EVERY
B&G MOTOR CO.
3{JSr- USED CAR
SOLD THIS WEEK!
** ENGINE J> BRAKES ** STEERING
'FORSAmVf ** MCTWCAL SYSTBM
B&G MOTOR CO., INC.
"HOME OF CADILLAC & OLDSMOBILE"
115 SE 2nd St. Gainesville, Fla. Phone FR 6-7515
JOHN T. BRASINGTON, PRESIDENT

A DU PONT JOB-FINDER CHART FOR RS-MS ENGINEERS AND SCIENTISTS
, : . o r
' : ] ''
Here b a sampling of the kinds of engineers end scien- column. The code letters refer to the type of work
tists which DuPont will employ this year with BS-MS (Research, Development, etc.). The departments of the
trainingand their fields of work. The chart is an easy Company are listed across the top. The column across A Research C Design E Plant Engineering
way to match your own interests against job openings the bottom indicates some of the locations where these *_ n
t Da Pont departments have openings. DuPont aho hu oppor- i B Development || Production f Sola*
For example: If you are a mechanical engineer, (unities for other engineering and scientific specialties,
nut your finger across the Mechanical Engineers' but space does not permit a complete listing.
.... , .
EXPLOSIVES, i' nmm
CUSTOMER ELECTRO- AND 6RASSELLI ORGANIC PHOTO
ENGINEERING CHEMICALS CHEMICALS EXPLOSIVES DIVISION FINISHES VILM CHEMICALS CHEMICALS PRODUCTS PIGMENTS POLYCHEMICALS TEXTILE FIBERS
Designs snd constructs Nsoprsns Metallic Sodium Sporting Powders Nuclear Reactor Coatsd Fsbrics Cellophane Adds snd Heavy Dyes Photographic Titanium Pigmfnt Ammonis Nylon
major plant facilities. Bllhh r Hydrogen Peroxide Blasting Supplies Meteriele Peints, Varnishes, Sponge Ysm Chemicals Petroleum and X-Ray Film Pigment Colors Antifreezes Dacron
Conducts research snd Vinyl Products Dynamite Heavy Water Lacquers Myler Biological end Chemicals Photographic Titanium Metal Uree Product* Polyester Fiber
development, and provides u s Sodium Cyanide Polymer Synthetic Resin Polyester Film Agricultural Tetraethyl Lead Papers Hyperpure Silicon Plastics Orion
PRODUCTS engineering consul- Organic Chlorinated Solvents Intermediate Finishes Cel-o-seei Bends Chemicals Fluorinated Processing Nylon Acrylic Fiber
tation in chemical and Isocyanates Nylon Intermediate Hydrocarbons Chemicals Intermediates Rayon
mechanical enginering,
Instrumentation,
end materials technology.
CHEMICAL
ENGINEERS AAC B AAAF B, D A. B A A F A. B. D, F A. A D AB.F AB, AF A, B, F AAAF AyB.D
MftlHA MlftAl
ENGINEERS A B, C B g A B A B, D, I A B, F AB.E.F AB A B, D, F A8.0,1
ELECTRICAL
ENGINEERS AAC E AD, E.F AAAF AAE
METALLURGICAL
ENGINEERS AS A B A B
OH EMISTS F A A f A A F AF F A AD, F A AD
PHYStettTS AB A AB AB
Wilmington, DeL, Beaumont Tex. Memphis, Tenn. ffibbstown, NJ. Aiken. S.C.* Newburgh, N.Y. Buffalo, N.Y. Cleveland, A Deepwater, NJ. Partin, NJ. Edge Meor, Del. Charleston, W. Va. Camden, S.C.
POSSIBLE or Louisville, Ky. Niagara Falls, N.Y. Partin, NJ. Circlevilie, A East Chicago, Wilmington, Rochester, N.Y. Newport, Del. Orange, Tex. Chattanooga, Tenn.
INITIAL Plant Locations Montague, Mich. Wilmington, Del.** Philadelphia, Ps. Cknton, le. Ind. Del.** New Johnsonville. Parkersburg, !? n ? on J ? l x
ASSIGNMENTS Wilmington. Dei.** Old Hickory, Tenn. Houston. Tax. Ttnn. W.Va. Martinsville. Va.
Richmond, Va. Linden, NJ. Wilmington, DM.** Victoria, Tex. Old Hickory, Tenn.
Wilmington, Del.** Wilmington, I Wilmington, Del.** Richmond. Va.
Dal.** Seaford, Dal.
Wayneeboro, Va.
Wilmington, Del.**
Oovnwwt awnad, Ou Pwit openttod and/or RMoardt A Development only

PERSONAMZID INFORMATION The kind of work openings Bated may hare been filled or new jobs may
you will do and the location of your first aeaignment have been added to the list For up-to-the-minute infor infordepend
depend infordepend on your qualifications and the openings avail- m&tion about possible jobs for you, see the Du Pont
able. Since the above chart was prepared, some of the representative when he visits your campus.
WAT OH THI OU PONT "SHOW OP THB MONTH" ON TBL.BVISION

phones payphones In the firle dorms, the
president added, because since
most of the traffic is incoming
calls the company stands to take
a loss if they install new phones.
Beardsley has scheduled a
meeting next week with Harold
Riker, director of housing, to dis discuss
cuss discuss the matter further.
(*) SO INCREASE IN STU STUDENT
DENT STUDENT FEE: We realize that
there are certain area* of stu student
dent student activities which are in need

of additional funds such as pub publications,
lications, publications, and the Florida Union.
] However, we feel that this can
|be accomplished by reallocation
lof student fees and increased
j subsides from the legislature. Un Under
der Under no circumstances will we ad advocate
vocate advocate an Increase In student
fees.
Dick Kerri ns, past secretary secretarytreasurer
treasurer secretarytreasurer and current member of
the Executive Council Finance
Committee, recently visited Flor Florida
ida Florida AAM and F.S.U. and found
that their Student Governments
get Si 5 more out of the 575 stu student
dent student fee for student activities
than the Florida SG.
This matter has not been taken
up with the Administration yet
but Beardsley expressed the pos possibility
sibility possibility of action being started at
this months meeting of the Board
of Control.
(4) POSITIVE ACTION ON
CAMPUS PARKING AND TRAF TRAFFIC
FIC TRAFFIC PROBLEMS: We will strive
for the following: (1) No move movement
ment movement of automobiles during class
breaks. (2) Eliminate ALL park parking
ing parking meters. (I) A speed-up of
parking area construction. (4)
Bring the handling of all stu student
dent student violations back to Student
Traffic Court. (5) To allow so sophomores
phomores sophomores to register their auto automobiles
mobiles automobiles In September.
I feel that we got the best
deal we could, Beardsley com commented.
mented. commented. We tried in vain to get

Page 5

STUDENTS!
SOLES
PUT ON
15 MINUTES
HEELS
PUT ON
5 Minutes
"SHOES REBUILT
THE FACTORY WAY
Modern Shoe
Repair Shop
Phene FR 6-5211
34 NORTH MAIN STRUT
Next te
The Fint Notional Bonk
Vic Balsamo Owner

Gainesville Auto Top Shop
Complete Upholstery
Tailored Tops Soat Covers
1620 Hawthorn* Rd., Ph. FR 2-1041

cars for sophomorex but did get
special priviledges for those with
a 3.0 average or better.
The Traffic and Parking com committee
mittee committee has been inactive lately be because
cause because of the recent illness of its
chairman, Dean A. W. Boldt, but
Beardsley said they would start
meeting next week.
Change Things
Ons of the urst things the pre president
sident president felt the committee would
try and do was to attempt to
change the registration proceuure
to prevent the false registration
of cars and thus allow sopho sophomores
mores sophomores and freshmen to borrow
cars.
Parking meters have been re removed
moved removed except for those in front
of the Hub, and-the president felt
that those served a good purpose
by providing parking space for
people running short errands to
the Service Center.
But Beardsley noted that park parking
ing parking meter offences do not multi multiply.
ply. multiply. A stable fine of Si has
been set. Also, all traffic viola*
tions have been brought baee to
the student Traffic Court.
(5) MORE STUDENT EMPLOY EMPLOYMENT,
MENT, EMPLOYMENT, There is a need for
greater student job opportunities.
This problem could be alleviated
by the removal of non-students
from University employment. Al Also
so Also responsible jobs should, when
possible be held by students. SG
will take action to make these
jobs available.
The Student-Faculty Food Ser Service
vice Service Committee, the president
feels, has made it possible for
students to communicat* with
Food Service officials and for all
views to be aired.
Also, arrangements are being
made to bring job openings in both
in Food Service and off-campus
employment to the attention
of the students through a stu student
dent student job placement service.
(6) IMPROVED FOOTBALL
SEATING PLAN; We will pro provide
vide provide a system of simpler and
fairer seating. We will have Mock
seating for the Flavets which will
be insured by a member of the
Flavets holding a position on the
football seating committee.
In reference to the trouble hat
occured at the Homecoming game
this year when the BSU block got
pushed out of their seats by a
fraternity group Beardsley men mentioned
tioned mentioned that after that game each
block had a representative who
was personally responsible for hie
i group. Had any group caused trou trouble
ble trouble they would have been denied

block seating priviledges at later
games.
Very Poor
This year also, groups were kept
out of the card section in an at attempt
tempt attempt to give it back to the stu students
dents students , remarked Beardsley, but
the card tricks wsre very poor.
The president intends to recom recommend
mend recommend to the next administration
that groups who could be held
responsible for the quality of
the tricks be seated in the card
section.
(7) -PROMOTE SCHOOL SPIR SPIRIT:
IT: SPIRIT: We shall create a depart department
ment department of Student Government
which shall have as its responsi responsibility
bility responsibility the fostering of school tra traditions
ditions traditions and spirit. This depart department
ment department will assume ail the respon responsibility
sibility responsibility of the troubled Pep Club.
Beardsley felt that the new
School Spirit Committee under
commissioner Harold Lewis did
a good job this year and plans
to recommend that this commit committee
tee committee continue to operate.
In addition to these major in innovations
novations innovations and programs, Student
Government under the Gator Par Party
ty Party administration pledges to es establish
tablish establish the following:
Beardsley said the Alligator
Business Manager could not pro provide
vide provide this service without charg charging
ing charging an additional fee which the
flavets were not willing to pay.
A SAVINGS TO STUDENTS
THROUGH A FEASIBLE GAS
CO-OP:
The Gas Co-Op begun during the
Fleming administration has been
continued under Beardsley.
HOLIDAY AFTER THE GEOR GEORGIA
GIA GEORGIA GAME:
I believe Its a good thing and |
a morale builder, Beardsley said, j
and I plan to talk to President i
Reitz about it before I leave.
BABY SITTING FOR FLA FLAVETS:
VETS: FLAVETS:
This service has been continued
under the present administration.
PUBLIC TYPEWRITER FACT FACTLOTES:
LOTES: FACTLOTES:
Plans are currently under way,
according to the president, to place
i typewriters in a room in the Flor*
1 ida Union and make them avail available
able available to all students.
EXTEND WRUF SERVICES TO
1:10 A.M.:
A survey has just besn com completed
pleted completed by SG and submitted to
the directors of WRUF which
shows that enough of the student
audience desires an. extension in
the stations operating time and
Beardsley believed that the ex extention
tention extention would be initiated shortly.
TV SETS TS MAIN LOUNGES
OF DORMS:
I think this should be handled
by W.S.A. and the new mens
resident organization instead of
being just a direct gift from Stu Student
dent Student Government, Beardsley
said.
LIGHTS FOR TENNIS COURTS
The president has discussed cost
estimates with Dean D. K. Stan Stanley,
ley, Stanley, head of the Physical Edu Education
cation Education department, and decided
that right now the power costa
are too high to make it a prac practical
tical practical projects. /

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ENOUGH STUDENT PUBLI PUBLICATIONS
CATIONS PUBLICATIONS TO GO AROUND:
The recent overruling of the
Board of Student publications re recommendation
commendation recommendation for 6,500 copies of
the Seminole by the Exec Coun Council
cil Council in favor of 8,000 printings of
the annual was used by the pre president
sident president as an example of his ad administrations
ministrations administrations efforts concerning
this plank.
Summing Up
In general, the president felt the
main problem of any student Gov Government
ernment Government administration centered
around the lack of funds allotted
them from the student fee.
"A lot of these things could be
done if we got more money
from the tee, Beardsley com commented.
mented. commented.
The president summed up by
saying that he thought the stu students
dents students can Judge the results for
themselves. Weve made an ef effort
fort effort in every area and are con continuing
tinuing continuing to do so. Somethings,
however, are just in the planning
stage and we hope to accomplish
; more before the Spring election.*
Graduation
(Continued from Page ONE)
with a recessional. Music win be
provided by the University Sym Symphony
phony Symphony Orchestra, under the di direction
rection direction of Edward Preodor.
Rev. Fred T. Laughton Pastor
of the First Baptist Church will
give the invocation.
A reception for graduating stu students,
dents, students, parents and friends will
be given by Dr. Reitz at the Stu Student
dent Student Service Center, Saturday,
Feb. 1, from 4-5 p.m.

Carle ton Sees Federal Aid Advantages

(Continued from Page ONE)
technological, political, social, and humanistic ..
And the emphasis should be on'the deepening.
Control Necessary
Comparing education control in the Soviet Un Union
ion Union to that of the United States, Carleton said,
In both the Soviet Union and the United States
the educational institution Itself must, of course,
be controlled as an institution.
Organised institutions must have controls.

Unique Opportunity for
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Qualifications:
Age 20 to 28
Neat Appearance Have Access to car.
Coll Mr. Corpening, Tom Sawyer
Motor Inn from 10 to 11 a.m. or
1 to 2 p.m., Wednesday Jan. 15
to arrange for an interview.

Many Students
Unaware of
SG Functions

(Continued from Page ONE)
a fine thing for the University.
Marylyn Dolan, 4 EDGet
serious!
Joan Porter, lUCBeing a
secretary on the third floor, It
pays me every two weeks
whether I earn it or not.
Bill Trickel, SBS Many
campaign promises have not
been carried out by the pre present
sent present administration. I hope be before
fore before thia term la over that they
will carry out some of these.
Theres still a lot to be done
to bring student government up
to the level it should be.
Eleanor Werber, 3JM lt
gave me Albert.
Bill Johnson, 2UFNothing!
Reggie Kurfiss, 3ABlt gave
me away to spend my Friday
afternoons in the Honor Court
office.
Melissa Henry, 2UFPer 2UFPerhaps
haps 2UFPerhaps if it had been an organi organization
zation organization of actions instead of pro promises
mises promises it would have done some something.
thing. something.
Zmtskal Named Dean
At Toledo University
A University professor, Dr.
Otto Zmeskal, has been appoint appointed
ed appointed dean of the College of En Engineering
gineering Engineering at the University of
Toledo. He has been a professor
in the deepartment of mechani mechanical
cal mechanical engineering since 1954.

But, he explained, there is a vital difference.
The Soviet Union seek* to control the creative
throughts of the people it trains. In the United
States, we must never allow the organized in institution,
stitution, institution, be it the corporation or the research
foundation or the government, to control the cre creative
ative creative thoughts of those it trains.
In this, continued faith in the freedom of the
mind, is the decisive weapons of victory for
America and Western civilisation.

BBS

Orientation Back
To 'Old System'
Next Semester
(Continued From Page ONE)
dents with one semester or more
will begin at 1 p.m.
The groups win register for
classes in the gym as do all
other students. This is a depar departure
ture departure from the new type registra registration
tion registration that was initiated in last Sep September.
tember. September. Administration officials
stated that although the new pro procedures
cedures procedures had worked very well for
the large group in the fall, the
small number of incoming stu students
dents students would make the plan im impractical
practical impractical to use. The new plan
featured schedules that had al already
ready already been set up to conform to
the students major field of study
and thereby release the students
from standing in line at the gym.
Mahon will be aided in planning
the program by assistant orien orientation
tation orientation directors Don Allen, Bill
Trickel, and Bruce Bee hard. John
Totty has been named as Techni Technical
cal Technical Coordinator and Joe Thomas
will be his assistant.
Group leaders will be selected
from students with past experi experience
ence experience in the orientation program.
-
VA Provides Tax Service
! For Florida Veterans
An income tax service for some
2,500 Florida veterans and others
whose direct home loans are
held by Veterans Administration
will be provided by the VA re regional
gional regional office in St. Petersburg.
V. S. Parker, manager, said
the office will mail each auch bor borrower
rower borrower a statement of his account,
including interest and taxes paid
during calendar year 1957, which
he may use for income tax pur purposes
poses purposes if he wishes to itemise his
deductions.



UF Swimmers Open Season:
Clash With Bulldogs Friday

By BILL B UCHALTER
Gator Sports Writer
Hampered by a week delay, the Florida swimming team opens its defense of the 1957 Southeast Southeastern
ern Southeastern Conference championship, taking on dangerous Georgia in its initial home meet Friday afternoon
in the Florida pool.

Drainage and repair of the pool
limited the Gator* practice sche schedule
dule schedule since returning after the
Christmas holidays, as the team
was unable to use the pool for
almost a week. The practices held
Saturday and Sunday were the
first team exercises since Dec.
18.
Florida swim coach Jack Ryan
expressed doubt as to his teams
readiness, due to the long layoff.
"The meet will be closer than ex expected,
pected, expected, mainly because Georgia
is really a fine team, and we
havent had enough time to prac practice,"
tice," practice," the grey-haired mentor
commented.
The Bulldogs, runner-up to the
Gators in last years SEC meet,
are led by Jim Bankston, the con conferences
ferences conferences only individual triple triplewinner
winner triplewinner in 1957. Bankston swept
the 220, 440 and 1500 yard free freestyle
style freestyle events at Lexington, Ken Kentucky,
tucky, Kentucky, last year, while just a so sophomore.
phomore. sophomore. The Atlanta junior had
served as a diver while a fresh freshman
man freshman at Georgia.

CENTRAL FLORIDA
SERVICE
Learn to Fly Now!
Qualified Stengle
Instructor Field
Those Interested
Are Cordially Invited
To Attend The
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
Campus Organization
Meetings
Sundays At 6:45 P.M.
Florida Union
Auditorium

Page 6

The Florida Alligator, Tues., Jan. 14, 1958

1
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DEFEND SEC TITLE

PHIL DRAKE
. . Swimming Co-captain
champion sprinter several years
Georgias hopes have been bol bolstered
stered bolstered by service returnee Mar Marshall
shall Marshall Floyd. Floyd was an SEC

Florida Upsets Plainsmen:
Evens SEC Cage Record

Evening their Southeastern
Conference mark at 2-2, and rais raising
ing raising their overall, regular-season
mark to 8-2, the Florida basket basketcall
call basketcall team had a surprising easy
time in downing the noticibly
off Auburn Tigers 90-66, in
Florida Gymnasium Satur day
night.
Led by Hobbs 28 markers,
Florida worked the ball well, re rebounded
bounded rebounded with amazing consis consistency,
tency, consistency, and were exceptionally ac accurate
curate accurate from the field.
Leading 48-36 at halftime, the

ago.
Another standout for the Bull Bulldog
dog Bulldog tankers is Bill Blakely, a
top-notch backstroker.
Floridas top threat is All-
American butterfly expert Phil
Drake. Ryan considers tie big
senior a definite threat to cop
national as well as conference
honors, in his specialty.
Backstroke duties for the Ga Gators
tors Gators will be handled by Bill Rug Ruggie,
gie, Ruggie, winner of both the 100
and 200-yard backstroke events in
the 1957 SEC meet, and holder of
the conference record in the 200.
In the sprints, Ryan will rely
on lettermen Doug Hiler, Bobby
Duganne, Doug Creighton, and
sophs Roy Tatehishi and Terry
Bom, while Dave Calkin and A1
Carpenter will represent the Ga Gators
tors Gators in the distance events.
The loss of Chuck Martin, SEC
diving champion has weakened the
Florida squad. Newly-arrived div diving
ing diving coach Buddy Crone will de depend
pend depend on senior Jim Boyett, fifth
!in the conference meet last year.

i Gators extended their lead to 75-
. 45 with some nine minutes left in
! the game and coasted the rest of
the way. The Tigers were never
in the contest, keeping it close
only in the first few minutes.
! Zinn turned in an outstanding
performance, scoring 17 points and
capturing 28 rebounds, just three
shy of his all-time high of 31, set
in December of 1955 against Wof Wofford,
ford, Wofford, and equaled last year against
Mississippi.
Henderson contributed his us
ually outstanding, aggres siv e,
floor game, grabbing his share of
rebounds, and accounting for 13
points. Hoban played well but
fouled out early in the second
half, suffering a nasty encounter
with the gym floor early in the
game.
Especially heartening was the
performance of junior guard Pike
who played an outstanding game,
dunking in 16 scores though
shackled with an upset stomach
throughout the game. The Miam Miamiam
iam Miamiam is already being tabbed as a
man to watch in next seasons
SEC play.
Sophs Bob Sherwood and Walt
Rabhan also turned in favorable
each accounting for several key
rebounds, while Rabhan pumped
8 points through the cords.
The victory was the first for
Florida over Auburn since Febru February
ary February 21, 1953. Coach Mauer does
not expect such an easy time
of it next month, in Auburn.

Striking Change
In Scoring Rule
Passed by NCAA

A revolutionary change in foot football
ball football scoring rules, the first since
1906, has been passed by the
NCAA rules committee, meeting
in Ft. Lauderdale Sunday.
The rule change, unanimously
approved by the 10-member com committee,
mittee, committee, allows a team which has
just scored a touchdown to earn
two points for running or passing
the ball over the goal line in instead
stead instead of the traditional extra
point kick.
The NCAA committee, compris comprised
ed comprised mostly of college football coa coaches,
ches, coaches, felt that the rule would
make the game more interesting,
as well as minimizing the possi possibility
bility possibility of tie scores.
Under the new rule, the team
scoring a touchdown will be given
the ball on the three yard line,
instead of the two. They will then
have the option of attempting the
traditional conversion boot, which
will still be worth one point, or
running or passing the ball over
the goal, now worth two points.
The plan, suggested by Michi Michigan
gan Michigan athletic director Fritz Cris Crisler
ler Crisler was first brought before
the NCAA seven years ago, but,
Sunday was the first time any
action had been taken.
Other Changes
The rules committee also pars parsed
ed parsed on four other changes at the
meeting.
The loosening of the substitu substitution
tion substitution rule, allowing each player to
re-enter the game during each
quarter, was one of these changes.
Under the system instituted five
years ago, only starters could
come back into the game after
being relieved.
Free time outs were reduced
from five to four per team by
the committee.
Another significant change was
the revision of the rule concern concerning
ing concerning ineligible receivers. Guards,
tackles, and centers, formerly not
allowed past the line of scrim scrimmage
mage scrimmage until the ball was touched
by either a defensive man or an
eligible receiver, now can proceed
downfield after the ball has left
the passers hand.
Kickoff procedure was also chan changed,
ged, changed, stipulating a five-yard penal penalty
ty penalty against the kicking team each
time the kick goes out of bounds.
In the past, the receiving team
took possession on the midfield
stripe if the ball failed to stay
in bounds on two successive oc occasions.
casions. occasions.

Coach Awarded
For Prayer
Florida football coach and ath athletic
letic athletic director Bob Woodruff has
been named winner of the Pop
Warner award, presented to a
member of the American College
Football Coaches Association, for
writing the best six-line huddle
prayer for use in the Pop Warner
midget football league.
Youngsters who are members
of the league will use the prayer
in huddles before each game.

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Invite You
For An Evening Os Fun
Come To The New
Melody Club
DancingCouples Only
Stags Welcome At The Bar.
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[IN RETURN MATCH
'
Cagers Meet Miami Thursday
By KENN FINKEL
Ga.tor. Sports Writer
A return match with the University of Miami Hurricanes, Thursday night, January 16, in Florida Gymnas Gymnasium,
ium, Gymnasium, terminates first semester basketball action for the Florida Gators.
On January 31, the powerful Kentucky Wildcats invade Florida Gym, and the Gators will attempt to im improve
prove improve on their 1-14 record against the perennial Southeastern Conference champs.

Following Kentucky will be
Tennessee, on Monday, February
3. The Mauermen then go on a
four-gum e road trip which be begins
gins begins with return matches with
Alabama, February 8, and Au Auburn
burn Auburn on the tenth.
Miami, supposedly vasUy im improved,
proved, improved, under mentor Bruce Hale,
since Florida nipped them 73-64
in Miami last December, will
send forth Ed Morris and Marty
Burdette at forwards, captain
Gene Stage and the improved Joe
Gardner at guards, and Dick
Berghoff, the imposing seven sevenfooter,
footer, sevenfooter, who has yet to live up to
his pre-season releases, at cen center.
ter. center.
For Stage,, steady and quiet
but ever-dangerous, Morris, who
was outstanding two years ago
but has yet to be the player he
promised to be, and Burdette,
flery-tetnpered and always in ev every
ery every scramble, this will be the
sixth and Anal chance to down
the Gators.
All three have been starters since
they were sophomores, and they
have given Florida many anxious
moments, but they have yet to
turn the trick of winning. Nor
has any Hurricane squad perform performed
ed performed this feat since December of
1953. The Gators are determined
to keep this string intact.
Kentucky Invades
The man in brown, Kentucky
coach Adolph Rupp, who has
made the winning of basketball
games a science, has twelve re returning
turning returning lettermen this year, in including
cluding including aggressive guard Vernon
Hatton, forward Johnny Cox, and
6-7 center Ed Beck.
Althouh the Cats have lost
three games this season, Rupp
considers this years edition to be
better than last years, which,
tough one of the weakest I
have coached, managed to cap capture
ture capture their eighteenth SEC crown
in 25 seasons.
Rupp took over the reins at
Kentucky in 1980, succeeding
young Johnny Mauer, who, two
years from the Illinois campus,

Miami Freshmen, Jax NAS
On Tap For Baby Gators

Two games confront the Flor Florida
ida Florida freshman basket/ballers this
week, as they close out their se semesters
mesters semesters campaign, taking a two twoweek
week twoweek break before resuming ac action
tion action Feb. 11.
The Miami frosh provide the op opposition
position opposition Thursday night prior to
the varsity game with the .Canes,
while Jacksonville Naval Air Sta Station
tion Station meets the Baby Gators
in Jacksonville, Friday night.
Earlier in the season, in Mi Miami,
ami, Miami, the Baby Hurricanes notch notched
ed notched a 78-70 win over the Florida
yearlings, and the frosh will be
out for revenge. Superior height
and the magic eye of Miamis
Chuck Godfrey, who dumped in
44 points, accounted for that vic victory.
tory. victory.
The Baby Canes, coached by
former Miami great, Sy Chad Chadroff,
roff, Chadroff, have but six men on their
squad, and the first five usually
go all the way. Coach Jim Mc-
Cachren, on the other hand, has
a fairly deep squad; however,
six or seven men usually see
most of the action.
Sorting for the Baby Gators
will be Lou Merchant and Paul
Frank Etheridge at forwards, and

coached the Wildcats for three
years, compiling a 40-14 record.
Mauer later moved on to Ten Tennessee,
nessee, Tennessee, where he was at the
helm five years, winning the
SEC banner in 1941 and 1943.
Since Mauer took over at Ga Gatorland,
torland, Gatorland, however, he has yet
to beat the Cats, and has beaten
the Vols but twice in six sea seasons.
sons. seasons.
Although the Gators were sound soundly
ly soundly drubbed, 88-61 in Lexington,
last season, many fans will re remember

IHt 9a. I i3H
mtm H HI fit '** v
Charlie Pike, Florida Junior guard standout, tries to outreach
Auburn giant Bill Gregory, who stands 6B as Gator Jim Zinn
and Tiger Jimmy Lee (21) look on. Pikes shot, although it got by
Gregorys hand, was no good, but Charlie was successful in bucket bucketing
ing bucketing 16 points as the Gators trounced the Plainsmen, 90-66.

Jeff Osborn at center.
The Jax Navy team is expected
to provide rather stiff opposition,
having met some rough compe competition
tition competition this year, including the
Mosny at guards, Bob Shiver and
Daddy Gators earlier in the sea season.
son. season.

FREE
CALL FR i3S?
409 West University Avenue

member remember the 1956 Kentucky game
at Florida Gym, when Florida
fought valiantly, leading much
of the w'ay, only to lose 81-70, in
the waning minutes of the con contest,
test, contest, with the height and experi experience
ence experience of the Wildcats proving the
difference. In that contest, sopho sophomore
more sophomore Charlie Pike, formerly of
Lexington, Kentucky, bucketed 29
points, and along with sophomore
Joe Hobbs, drew praise from Ba Baron
ron Baron Rupp.

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Tennessee is blessed with five
returning letterman, including:
5-11 guard Leon Ammerman, the
only senior on the squad. Other
lettermen are guards Kenny Coul Coulter
ter Coulter and Bob Risser, forward Don
Reeverts, and Center Gene Tor Tormohlen.
mohlen. Tormohlen.
Coach Emmett Lowery, whose
nine losses last year were all
in SEC play, putting the Vote
next to last in the conference, 1*
also blessed with 6-6 forward,
Dolen Showalter, one of the
outstanding sophomore prospects
in the SEC.
Alabama, met Florida last night
in Gainesville, althought not liv living
ing living up to its pre-season expecta expectations,
tions, expectations, nevertheless offers a fast,
shifty, and accurate squad, fea featuring
turing featuring Jim Fulmer and All-Con All-Conference
ference All-Conference mighty-mite, Jack Kublis
zyn. among others.
Auburn, one of the biggest dis disappointments
appointments disappointments in the SEC, has
pinch to offer on paper, but
seemingly little on the court, con considering
sidering considering Saturday nights perfor performance
mance performance against the locals.
Coach Joel Eaves will send
forth Bob Tucker and Jimmy Lee
at guards. Rex Frederick and
Manley Johnston at forwards, and
Bill Gregory at the pivot spot.
Barring complications along the
way, Florida will open with Pike
and Hobbs in the baekeourt, Dick
Ho ban and Jerry Henderson in
the corners, and Jim Zinn at
the post.

FRESHMAN !
fife He"JAM"
art f
ntAfficJL,
on an aetmamkaf
Harieyjtavtdson 165
w th fork
Cat through traffic tie-ups
... deep later in the morn morning
ing morning ... get home earlier at
night with a safe, easy-to*
handle 165. Economical, too
... averages up to 80 miles
per gallon. Take a test ride
today. Easy-pay plan.
I
Solve Your
Transportation Problems
You Can Own A
1958
Harley-Davidson
Lightweight
FOR AS LOW AS 10% DOWN
AND $lB A MONTH
Harley-Davidson
Sales
515 N. MAIN STREET
PHONE FR 6-3740
If you can't afford a new one,
come and examine our supply
of used ones.