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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028291/00170
 Material Information
Title: The Florida alligator
Alternate title: Summer school news
University of Florida summer gator
Summer gator
Alternate Title: Daily bulletin
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Orange and blue bulletin
Page of record
Physical Description: v. : ; 32-59 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: the students of the University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Creation Date: May 15, 1964
Publication Date: 1912-1973
Frequency: daily except saturday and sunday (sept.-may); semiweekly (june-aug.)[<1964>-1973]
weekly[ former 1912-]
weekly (semiweekly june-aug.)[ former <1915-1917>]
biweekly (weekly june-aug.)[ former <1918>]
weekly[ former <1919-1924>]
weekly (daily except sunday and monday june-aug.)[ former <1928>]
semiweekly[ former <1962>]
weekly[ former <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates: 29.665245 x -82.336097 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note: Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note: Has occasional supplements.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000972808
oclc - 01410246
notis - AEU8328
lccn - sn 96027439
System ID: UF00028291:00170
 Related Items
Preceded by: Orange and blue
Succeeded by: Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
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1 111111111 ALLIFG-ATOR f;





INSIDE THE ALLIGATORAA Vol.56No.139 University of Florida, Gainesville FridayMay i 15,1964 V 'I'Il L Lfir


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funds held up again P. 2 ; ;"t;;; t ;


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The introspective Alligator P. 4 .



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UF in 1970 P. 7 \ : '
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The 86-hour rule P. 11 .,-. ."

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HC appointments/ madeFlorida AJ\ f.

LEFT TO RIGHT, DICK ADAMS, BILL RYALS, PAUL HUCK I



Blue Key Homecoming Appointed were: Adams, vice-president of the stu- view. He worked on the Homecoming ran Chairman. Stratton, a 2UC
'64 chairman Norwood Gay appointed -- C. Howard McNulty, Gator dent body, is a 3LW from Ocala.He Parade last year. from Callahan, Is a member of
several students to high Growl Chairman. McNulty, a4LW is a member of Phi Delta -- Bill Ryals, Promotion Director Hume Hall Council.
positions on the Homecoming committee from Melbourne, Is married and Phi and Sigma Chi social fra- Ryals, a ILW from Tampa, -- Al Leonard, Chairman of
this week. has four children. He Is presi- ternity and worked on the Gator Is married. lie Is a member of Parade Division. Leonard, a 3JM

At the same time he urged stu- dent of Phi Delta Phi legal fra- Growl staff last year. Phi Kappa Tau social fraternity, from Milton, Is a member of PI
ternity, past president of SigmaNu worked in orientation for student Kappa Alpha social fraternity. He
dents who have not already applied -- Paul C. Huck, Finance chair-
social fraternity, and was pub- government last year. was special acts chairman of the
to do "Each
for jobs so.
Homecoming utilizes the ser licity coordinator for Homecominglast man. Huck Is a 3LW from Miami, -- Richard E. Thompson,Slogan Homecoming Parade last year I
year Is married. He Is a member of
stu- year. Chairman. Thompson, a 2UC from -- Tom TygartSweetheart
vices of from 2,000 to 3,00
Phi Delta Phi and Phi Delta
In -- Dick Adams, Assistant Gen- The- Port St. Jo, Is a member of Leg- test Chairman. Tygart, a 4LW
dents. Many positions every
ta social
and memberof
fraternity, a
islative Council. from Jacksonville, was assistant
capacity are still openhe sdld. eral Chairman of Homecoming. the board of Florida Law Re- -- Mike Stratton, Assistant Slo- sweetheart chairman last year. ;





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PLAYERS REHEARSE 'SUMMER AND SMOKE1: L TO R, WAYNE COBB, LINDA LASHBROOK, MIMI CARR





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Page 2 The Florida Alligator FridayMay 15, 1964 __

"

Council refuses ; Rt ,> #1/1/r .;'.. ,,',







Athletic; request





The Athletic Association lost the ball during Tuesday night's
Legislative Council meeting when It failed to receive final
approval for its allocation of student activity fees for the
summer trimester.The .


Athletic Association's allocation of three dollars per
student, amounting to over 15,000 dollars from the regular
$14.50 student activities fee, was postponed two weeks. The .
remaining 13 student organizations received final approval x a ,
of $57,615 In fees for their summer budgets. m


Opposition to approval of the Association's funds was led Bob Lorin Smith, right, a College of Engineering graduate,
by Floyd Price, 3LW, president protem of Leg. Council. was awarded the first engineering graduate fellowship in
Price was backed up In his actions by Andy Percival and
Skip Havlser. the College. The check, for $3,200, is being presented

A motion by Price to postpone approval the Association's by Dean Thomas Martin of the College.
allocation until the next meeting passed without a dissentingvote.
.


"Normally an organization which receives student activity Religious Meeting
fees submits a budget or special request to the Legislative HIGH I
Council for approval," Price said. "The Athletic Association THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE OR-
merely says 'give us this much' and expects no questionsto GANIZATION meets every Sunday
be asked." evening at 6:45 p.m. in Room 212
of the Florida Union. Students FOR GOVERNORand
invited to attend.
A similar move by the council last summer to deny funds to faculty are
the Athletic Association received state-wide attention In several
dally newspapers. At that time, representatives of student
College Radio Meeting of All Precinct Workers
government met with the Athletic Association but failed to iron
out the problems concerning accounting of the funds. The out- 817 W. Univ.Ave.i
come found University President J. Wayne Reitz withholding
activity fee budgets from campus organizations until Leg. TV SATURDAY; MAY 16
Council approved the AA request."In 2:00: PM
HI-FI
the fall trimester, the Athletic Association received 45 GAINESVILLE HIGH SCHOOL
per cent of all student activity fees. The appropriation pre- Radios TEACHERS' AUDITORIUM
sented at the council meeting represented 20 per cent of the
total summer fees," Price said. "The students actually have HOME & AUTO
no knowledge as to how this money Is used." PHONOGRAPHSREPAIRED Block Assignments Will Be Made
"We can only protest," Price said. "If any corrective
action is to be taken It will have to be initiated by the faculty
heads of the other organizations. These
fee-supported groupsare ----------
.
plagued every trimester by a lack of funds; yet they never W
speak out against the group that takes up to 45 per cent of the
available funds." See Surf Star only at these
Authorized Artcarved Jewelers

Price said he hoped this action will cause either the Athletic
,, .
Association to make some move toward cooperation with the '
students and their Legislative Council,or else cause the faculty
heads of other fee-supported organizations,who have cooperatedwith
the council,to speak out against this one "nonconforming"group.
Bartow City Jewelry Store

"We were elected to represent the students and express
their viewpoints," Price said. "We spend their money and, Coral Gables Carroll's JewelersFt.
consequently, we owe them the duty to protest when a situationof
this nature arises." Lauderdale Carroll's JewelersFt.

Lauderdale Donald Shaffner
Percival, 3LW, stated, "When students I represent ask why V.
the Athletic Association gets such a large chunk of their
Gainesville Rutherford's
Inc.
activities fee, the only answer I can give Is that they are the ">'' -

Athletic Association and we dare not ask." .... ...:;:;;;::!t :;:::;,:
Jacksonville
Well's Jewelers
"We are only asking for some accounting and a little coopera-
tion," Haviser, 3JM, said. "We prefer to be worked with rather
than worked over." a. -"f/ f; Key West Beachcomber's Jewelers

... .... .. ., Miami Co.
Little
,' River Jewelry
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In other business the council approved the Faculty-Student .",*,*, m: :: ; > .:,..:
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Insurance Board's recommendation of the Guarantee Reserve :: ::
Life Insurance Company to handle student insurance for the (' Panama City Armstrong Jewelry Co.

next school year. Guarantee's rate of $17.25 per year, for *>* > '? .
single student coverage, was the low bid received by the Perry Wells Jewelry Co.
N IN-.JUljjtq
board. This year's premium was $21.00 for a single student. .
Notice was taken from the floor of the council that SG Pres. '..'.::<_....*.**&<&.::*' <'X':., ..,.::.: "!,:,,,,",, Pensacola Elebash Jewelry Co.
Ken Kennedy has not presented to the council a replacementfor .'
the cabinet post of Secretary of Academic Affairs. The .. "':+.< b :2A.: ..:. rtcarve d& "n .. St. Augustine Phinney Jewelry

present council meeting.Unitarian secretary's. approval was turned down In a previous .> ;::.:: ,:.::,..'w.*:;:-.:: .... '..,.',......'.,..,. .,.... .. ., ::....,::,.....,. Tallahassee Vason Jewelers

Vero Beach Du Bose Jewelry Co. Inc.
-

Breathtaking, beautiful'and yoursAll Wauchula R. H. Herr Jewelers

Universalist Fellowship the surging beauty the exciting mystery of the West Palm Beach Krauss Jewelry
sea itself seems in
captured this newest engagement .
1204 NW 10th Ave. ring from Artcarved. See the distinctly new, Winter Haven Freeman's Jewelry

11 'to 12 Sunday Services 11 to 12 Sunday. School yet timeless, design of Surf Star at your Artcarved

Jeweler.. Priced from $180. For more information,

plus helpful suggestions on wedding etiquette

Speaker: Walter T. Marinetti Asst. Curator of send 25C for Wedding Guide to J. R. Wood i

Exhibits, Florida State Museum Sons, Inc., 216 E. 45th Street, New York 17, New

Topic: Americanism For Export York, Department C. 'TPAClotAAK

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1 Friday,May 15, 1964 The Florida Alligator Page 3

STOCK REMOVAL SALE !T ,I


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EVERYTHING MUST GO

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,I Phi Gamma Delta pledge class is sponsoring Jinnie
Lee, 5EG, above, in the Miss Camp Wauberg
Playday contest. Murphree Area Council is
V ( sponsoring Betty Wendt, below, in the contest,
:: i4 which will be decided Saturday at the camp.
p (Photo by Carolyn Johnston)


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.
Page 4 The Florida Alligator FridayMay 5I964The





Alligator: a tradition faces tomorrow



becoming part of the Journalism School. In the

hand," one student said this week. story, Rae O. Weimer, director of the school, said
The Florida Alligator is an Institution on the UF "The Alligator Isn't as bad as some people think, The Alligator would be better off under the school's
the oldest tradition of all. It writing
campus -- perhaps but it could stand some improvement. The supervision.

was established In 1908, which means there is not accuracy, objectivity -- they could all use some upgrading "But this school would never take The Alligator

an al'irnni living who can look back on his college ," said another.Present unless it had sole control and responsibility for It,"

days without thinking of The Alligator. editor John Askins says he believes the be said.

It bas been through three wars, a depression, the main troubles are inexperience and time. "In the "Student Government thinks they're better off owning
dawn of the atomic Age. Its face bas changed from what they're doing,
first place, only a few really know The Alligator and running it, and from their point of
time to time, but it bas always been at hand for the down here. The rest have
or supposed to be doing, view I can understand It.
,
student who wanted to know what was going on. don't realize how
and they
of view
point The
had a little experience "But from a professional Alligator
One could, with elaborate research, trace the development much more there Is to learn. has many shortcomings. And from the unl.

of the Alligator through good years and "Well, that's a little harsh. I have a lot to learn versity's point of view, it would be better off In our
bad. It might be Interesting, but there would be little staff this was
--
myself. But a lot of The Alligator's hands. The Alligator is such a powerful vehicle that
because we are exploring now the role of the than right now,
point "
,
trimesters
more true for the past few it reflects on the whole university, he said.
today and the startling truth is that what The still need to get In
paper I think __ although they try hard, "You have to decide whether you want a good pro
Alligator is at any given time depends mostly upon twice of asking
everything ,
the habit of checking fessional newspaper with sound Journalistic practicesor
where It's trying to go, not where it's been. moment
things of thinking every to voice
people to repeat the students can use their pros
What of The Alligator of today,then? Is It doing what a paper
while they're on a story. -- a plaything
Is should? Indeed, what should it be doing? And is it more and cons, their preferences
even
"The second trouble, time, is probably "The Alligator is not within the School of Journalism
what it should well? Could it be better? WillIt
doing important. If you have time, you can show a reporter because the students don't want it to be."

be better? what he's doing wrong, you can correct mistakes, If that is the case, then it would seem The Alligator
Let's find out. -- Ed. story instead of Just skim
research a
really
you can will stay a "student" newspaper.

the top. "There would definitely be advantages In movingto
"We have more time this summer, with only two the Journalism School," Askins said "There would

issues a week, and I think the stories reflect it. though they are perhaps not
be disadvantages
Thomas Jefferson, the oft-quoted sage of Democ- out also ,
to decide During the Fall and Winter, however, putting apparent or as easy to spell out. I am not sure
to
racy, once said, ". .and were It left me The 'Gator is like running on a treadmill. You never as "
which I favor.
without newspapers myself course
should have government
whether we reflect plan ahead.
stop long enough to look around, would welcome the
I without a government, I should Lundy is against It. "I knowledge
or newspapers
to expect a news-
unfair in a way,
"It's really ,
doubt the School of Journalism could add
not hesitate for a moment to prefer the latter. which no
the street. Alligator
later bit more pessimistically, he paper as good as those you buy on to the paper, but there's a question in my mind as
20 a
,, years to school and that should really be their
,
staffers
said. "Perhaps an editor might begin a reformation go do nothing to whether policy decisions of the newspaper would
main concern. Commercial newspapermen to the students under School of
such as this. Divide his paper into four remain totally up
in some way out
I' during the working day but put a newspaper,
chapters, heading the 1st, Truths. 2nd, Probabilities. Journalism control.
would Askins said.Walker think the students are mature enough to run the
t, 3rd, Possibilities. 4th, Lies. The first chapter Lundy editor this past trimester and this "I

'I, be very short. coming Fall,echoed Askins words."One basic problemwe newspaper. I think we're proving that. Sure, we
Both are extreme statements, but they embody the is living down TheAlligator's make mistakes, but then so do the professors. We're
face every day on campus
two prevailing public views of newspapers. The Alligator reputation -- inaccuracy and ir- still learning and we know it."

is no exception, though there bas probably past We try to convince people that we Both Askins and Lundy are students In the school.

been more mistrust than confidence over the yearson responsibility.sincerely doing our best to keep those two diseasesout Reducing the number of Issues per week would be
are
the part of Gator readers. reversing a trend that has existed since 1962, when
of the paper, but It's a hard, hard Job. Puttingout
Why? Isn't the paper serving its readers as they a full-time daily newspaper on a part-time basis the paper became a daily. Before that it had come

should be served? out twice a week. This summer, too, marks a step
is task, he said.
no easy
Over the years The Alligator bas built up a repu- upward in weekly issues from one to two.
"People work down here for only one reason --
tation for innaccurarcy, unobjectlvlty and general love the work." Lundy is against the Idea of any reduction. Askinsis
because they
inadequacy, especially among the faculty,who are here Two solutions have been offered for the problems for a Monday, Wednesday and Friday Alligator.

year after year, but also among currect student raised. One is for the School of Journalism and Com- Most students and faculty have never expressed an

bodies."I munications to produce The Alligator. The other is opinion either way, though student reaction would
read The Alligator for its entertainment value; probably be against reduction. The FSU paper, the
for the paper to return to a slower pace -- weekly,
that includes the mistakes, which are sometimesthe week. Florida Flambeau, recently took the big step from
twice or three editions a
most entertaining part of the paper. Sure, I A story in the paper early this year held that semi-weekly to daily The only major Florida college
read the news stories for information, but when it's ON PAGE 5
student fear of censorship kept The Alligator from CONTINUED
something that affects me directly, I find out first- .
.



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B EDITOR II WALKER LUNDY. .. DEAN LESTER HALE- SG PRES. KEN KENNEDY x t f


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II' RAE O.-WEIMER PAUL HENDRICK EDITOR JOHN ASKINS

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iill.imun.l" Saj 'W iailiajaeiBIII FridayMay 15,1964 The Florida Alligator Page 5 I

ALLIGATORCONTINUED ,

Kennedy called for objectivity"as much as possible.We Then there is the matter of bias. Elections are
certainly all have our biases that will show up to probably the worst examples of biased reporting,
a certain extent," he said. and student elections in the past have made The
FROM PAGE 4 He said he hadn't been misquoted too much "as Alligator into not much more than a propaganda sheet.

paper that doesn't publish daily now is the Miami such." It Is hard for student editors not to become Involvedin
Hurricane, a literate, well-made-up weekly which the races, but the paper suffers when they do.
seems to offer lots of advantages and few problems "It's more mis-slanting, taking a very minor side- A front-page story during one recent election_spread
to either the stuJ r.J hodv, the newspaper staff or comment and making it the feature of the story.An a divorced candidate's marital record across the
the tdmlnlstratlon. example might be a story. last trimester: Ken- campus. Though Kennedy praised The Alligator for
But Hurricane editor Linda Reifman last month nedy Alms At Alligator' its handling of this year's elections, politics on this,
wrote an editorial directed at the student body in which "I don't want and don't view the Alligator as an the most politically-oriented campus in the state,
she criticized their lack of interest in the paper. "Are instrument of Student Government. I've never been in remains a constant danger to the paper.
you dead or are we dead?" she asked. "The Hurricane favor of a state-controlled press," Kennedy said.
probably has the most passive readership of any "I don't think we work together as much as we
university newspaper in the country." She mentioned should, however," he said. "The Alligator has so many needs," Askins says.
thought-provoking articles the paper had run, with "You could never discuss them all in one article.
little success In We need new equipment, more salaries, better com-
awaking response, in her view, and Hendrick thought the paper should have objectivityand
ended with a munication with Tigert and Student Government, more
dignified plea for letters.
accurate reporting, and said its role had shifted
The Alligator, on the other hand, never wants for over the years from gadfly to SG policy-maker to trust from the faculty, twice as many reporters,
letters during dally publication days. Is frequencyof Intellectual stimulant during various eras. experienced editors, time to check our facts, under-
publication the standing by professors when we're late for class--
controlling factor?
Lundy said he thought both the administration and
Thus far we have talked only about accuracy _.. the list is endless and probably boring to anyone whodoesn't
Student Government viewed The Alligator as a nec-
an important area, but not as important, probably, essary evil. "I think the administration recognizesthe work down here.
as the question of function what is the function of
need for a newspaper, but on specific occasionsI
a college newspaper? Whome does It serve, and think probably they wish they'd never heard of
how?
The Alligator. These Instances are the exception
"The Alligator should inform the students as to rather than 'ie rule, hopefully. I think the same Is
what's going on. Because we're a daily paper, I think basically true for Student Government. A correctionThe
it's our obligation to Inform them on what's going on
outside the campus as well as inside. And to relate
the two worlds Joseph Pulitzer, founder of the St. Louis Post- student
Lundy said. first story in this activity! fee. The
Dean of Student Affairs Lester Hale also saw The Dispatch and a great editor of the New York World, series, "Publications and student activity fee IS only
Alligator as first a medium for informing the students, wrote a statement upon his retirement which has the Board," contained a mis- $14.50. Publicationstake. i
as did Student Body President Ken Kennedy and former since become the Post-Dispatch's editorial credo, Publications do not receives about $2 each trl-
Student Body President Paul Hendrick. But each had printed on its editorial page each day: receive a $14.50 bite of the mester from each student
his own ideas as to function after basic Informationhad -- Always fight for progress and reform;
been taken care of. -- Never tolerate Injustice or corruption;
"It must be a good education experience for the -- Always fight demagogues of all parties;
students who participate in any of the departmentsof -- Never belong to any party;
production. If people who work on the paper can't -- Always oppose privileged classes and public "But we're a tremendous university, from the stand-
gain better knowledge of good Journalism, then it isn't plunderers; point of size and population, and we're going to get
serving its real potential," Hale said. -- Never lack sympathy for the poor; much bigger In the near future. The Alligator has
"And I think it has a function to properly represent -- Always remain devoted to the public welfare; to keep pace with the rest of the campus.
campus attitudes and atmosphere in such a way as -- Never be satisfied with merely printing news; "And, of course, the world Is growing smaller and
to have a health-engendering effect upon the campus, -- Always be drastically independent; at the same time more complex every day; peopleare
though this is not its sole purpose."It -- Never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by becoming more tense and more anxious to know I
can create a friendly camp or an irate camp predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty.The about everything that might affect their futures even

by the way in which it handles news, slants things, remotely, or their happiness; specialization in every
editorializes, and so forth," he said. Alligator probably will never fulfill all these field requires more lucid, thoughtful, analytical re-
"I don't feel the newspaper necessarily has to protectthe "Ten Commandments" -- certainly never all at proting than ever before.
image of the university, but on the other hand, once. Neither do most commercial newspapers. It "There are a few really good college newspapers
It shouldn't act so as to destroy it. can fulfill those functions emphasized by the various around the country; we get them in the mall every day.
"People and the things that happen create the imageof campus leaders quoted before, though In the opinionof None of them are great, because they haven't thought
the university. The paper should be as accurate most, including editors Askins and Lundy, it does enough recently about what their readers need. Per-
and fair as it can in presenting as accurate an imageas not always do so now. There Is the Orange and haps we have the same problem; certainly we're not
can be reflected. Blue bulletin, which carries material that is almost great either. But we're on our way, I think, as soon
"I think on the other hand that the paper in reporting completely suitable and proper for The Alligator. as we realize the need."
problems on campus is of value to the university There is the Compass, published by the Division of The Alligator needs Improving, yes. It seems to be
in uncovering things that do need attention. Informational Service mostly to carry news and other standing at a crossroad, with all roads pointing toward
I am against problems being uncovered secretly and material of Interest primarily to the faculty. There "progress." Where It will go from here, whetherit
then made a big thing of before somebody a chanceto are numerous departmental and college-wide infor- will ultimately be a model for Jefferson's first
do something about it. The paper has a responsibility mation sheets published because the information they statement rather than his second, is a matter for
to provide the other side with a chance to Indi- contain must be spread, and The Alligator does not conjecture only. But its problems, at least, are
cate what's being done," he said. offer the required certainty of coverage. evident, and its goals are visible.

a


LONG'S CAFETERIA Patronize Gator Advertisers Court team wins I



SPECIALS in Beach finals J


The Living Sound of

UF'.twoMooICourll..mllaced
each other this past weekend in the
RIB EYE STEAK, tossed salad, choice of vegetable, GREAT FOLK MUSIC finals of the state contest, and the

roll & butter, tea or coffee ONLY 97< top team only won by 85/100018

ON 20TB CENTUR7-FO RECORDS point.UP.

SHRIMP SALAD PLATE ONLY 85$ eliminated Miami and Stetson
.
teams In earlier rounds.


BOILED SHRIMP PLATE ONLY 75$ The winning team was Bryan

4 Ellis and Bob Feagan. Runners-
,y up were Decree Moss and Carry
Rlchman. Rlchman.was voted outstanding -
participant by the State

REMEMBER we have the complete dinner special time.me Court, which heard the r

night for Only 97$ THE MAGIC Of MAYO LOGAN ENGLISH INTRODUCING J
every MUIN A rsfreshing new SINGS THE WOOOV WELL-MOUNDED DICK
voice in folk musiCi GUTHRIE SONG BAG GLASS The record debut This Is the fourth year In a row
Mayo Mulr sings a Logan English' plays of one of the moitvarsatllt
wide span of folk, tongs and sings a host of e i new folk, UF teams have taken first place in
In har first I e n t I Ir. bait songs mad fa- artists on the current the state finals Last year's team I
album.TFM moos by Woody ear*.
3122 (TFI 4122) Guthria. TIM 3U (TF84t3') also tied for first in Southeastern
BUY YOUR STUDENT MEAL TICKET and get one TIM 3121 (W 4121) regional competition in Atlanta.

DINNER FREE! For the Authentic Sound in Folk Guitars- The finals were held in the
Americana Hotel In Miami Beach

GEETSCH at the Florida Bar convention. .

LONG CAFETERIA The finest name in folk guitars Gretsch now offers you a chance Books needed !
to become a recording star Win a 20th Century-Fox Records con-
tract in the Gretsch Folk Guitar Contest; Mall your best folk
313 West University Avenue Downtown, between recording or tape of minimum minutes length to Gretsch Con. MS 206 TEXTBOOKS are in '1
test, P. 0. Box 1234, New York 17, N. Y. Contest void in areas short supply this trimester. Any .J
the two theatres where prohibited. one who has one should resell it :
to one of the bookstores.'tI .


P



..



Page 4 FridayMay 15, 1964 .




: a tradition faces tomorrow I



.. u _
becoming part of the Journalism School in the
The Florida Alligator is an institution on the UF hand," one student said this week. story, Rae O. Weimer, director of the school, said
campus -- perhaps the oldest tradition of all. It "The Alligator Isn't as bad as some people think, The Alligator would be better off under the school's
was established in 1908, which means there is not but It could stand some Improvement. The writing, supervision."But .
an alumni living who can look back on his college accuracy, objectivity -- they could all use some upgrading this school would never take The Alligator
days without thinking of The Alligator. ," said another.
unless it had sole control and responsibility for it "
It has been through three wars, a depression, the Present editor John Askins says he believes the he said. ,
dawn of the atomic Age. Its face has changed from main troubles are Inexperience and time. "In the "Student Government thinks they're better off
time to time, but It has always been at hand for the first place, only a few really know what they're doing, The Alligator and running it, and from their owning
student who wanted to know what was going on. or supposed to be doing, down here. The rest have understand it. point of
view I
One could had a little experience and they don't realize how can
with elaborate research, trace the development -
"But from a professional point of view, The Alli-
of the Alligator through good years and much more there is to learn.
has shortcomings. And from
bad. It might be Interesting, but there would be little "Well, that's a little harsh. I have a lot to learn gator many the university's -
point of view, it would be better off
in
point, because we are exploring now the role of the myself. But a lot of The Alligator's staff -- this was our
hands. The Alligator is such a powerful vehicle
paper today -- and the startling truth is that what The more true for the past few trimesters than right now, thatIt
Alligator is at any given time depends mostly upon I think -- although they try hard, still need to get in reflects on the whole university, he said.
to decide whether
have
"You want
where it's trying to go, not where it's been. the habit of checking everything twice, of asking you a good pro-
fessional with sound journalistic
What of The Alligator of today,then? Is It doing whatIs people to repeat things, of thinking every moment newspaper practicesor
the students can use to voice
a paper their
should? Indeed, what should It be doing? And is It while they're on a story. pros
doing what it should well? Could it be better? WillIt "The second trouble, time, is probably even more and cons, their preferences -- a plaything.
"The Alligator Is not within the School of
be better? Important. If you have time, you can show a reporterwhat Journalism
because the students don't want it to be."
Let's find out. -- Ed. he's doing wrong, you can correct mistakes,
you can really research a story instead of just skim If that is the case, then it would seem The Alligatorwill

. the top. stay a "student" newspaper.
"We have more time this summer, with only two "There would definitely be advantages in movingto

Thomas Jefferson, the oft-quoted sage of Democ- Issues a week, and I think the stories reflect it. the Journalism School," Askins said. "There would
'said the Fall and Winter however putting out also be disadvantages, though they are perhaps not
racy, once .and were it left to me to decide During ,
whether we should have government without news- The 'Gator is like running on a treadmill. You never as apparent, or as easy to spell out. I am not sure

papers, or newspapers without a government, should stop long enough to look around, reflect, plan ahead. myself which course I favor."
not hesitate for a moment to prefer the latter." "It's really unfair, in a way, to expect a news- Lundy is against it. "I would welcome the knowledgewhich

20 years later, a bit more pessimistically, he paper as good as those you buy on the street. Alligator no doubt the School of Journalism could add
said. "Perhaps an editor might begin a reformationIn staffers go to school, and that should really be their to the paper, but there's a question in my mind as
some such way as this. Divide his paper into four main concern. Commercial newspapermen do nothing to whether policy decisions of the newspaper would
chapters, heading the 1st, Truths. 2nd, Probabilities. during the working day but put out a newspaper," remain totally up to the students under School of

3rd, Possibilities 4th, Lies. The first chapter wouldbe Askins said.Walker Journalism control."I .
very short." Lundy editor this past trimester and this think the students are mature enough to run the

Both are extreme statements, but they embody the coming Fall,echoed Askins words."One basic problem newspaper. I think we're proving that. Sure, we
two prevailing public views of newspapers. The Alligator we face every day on campus Is living down The make mistakes, but then so do the professors. We're
is no exception, though there has probably Alligator's past reputation -- Inaccuracy and Ir- still learning and we know it."
been more mistrust than confidence over the yearson responsibility. We try to convince people that we Both Askins and Lundy are students in the school.
the part of Gator readers. are sincerely doing our best to keep those two diseasesout Reducing the number of Issues per week would be

Why? Isn't the paper serving its readers as they of the paper, but it's a hard, hard job. Puttingout reversing a trend that has existed since 1962, when
should be served? a full-time dally newspaper on a part-time basisIs the paper became a dally. Before that it had come

Over the years The Alligator has built up a repu- no easy task," he said. out twice a week. This summer, too, marks a step
tation for Innaccurarcy, unobjectlvlty and general "People work down here for only one reason -- upward In weekly issues from one to two.
Inadequacy, especially among the faculty,who are here because they love the work." Lundy is against the Idea of any reduction. Askinsis
year after year, but also among currect student Two solutions have been offered for the problems for a Monday, Wednesday and Friday Alligator.
bodies."I raised. One Is for the Schoolof Journalism and Com- Most students and faculty have never expressed an

read The Alligator for its entertainment value; munications to produce The Alligator. The other Is opinion either way, though student reaction would

that includes the mistakes, which are sometimesthe for the paper to return to a slower pace -- weekly, probably be against reduction. The FSU paper, the
most entertaining part of the paper. Sure, I twice or three editions a week.A Florida Flambeau, recently took the big step from
read the news stories for Information, but when it's story in the paper early this year held that semi-weekly to dally. The only major Florida college

something that affects me directly, I find out first- student fear of censorship kept The Alligator from CONTINUED ON PAGE 5Angel's

-. r E .:-
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Midnight Star Evening Star Vogue





EDITOR WALKER NDY'DEAN LESTER HALE SG PRES. KEN KENNEDY
I

.no. easy task. .educational .objectivity
--
e .J'4.V T -


f-

Wing Tangiers Astral

A1r E .


Which

f =

is your

.


-,."" L. favorite ?

RAE O. WEIMER PAUL HENDRlCK EDITOR JOHN ASKINS

J ; .shortcomings .role shifted .not enough time


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i






FridayMay 15,1964 The Florida Alligator Page 5


[ALLIGATOR \. r

Kennedy called for objectivity"as much as possible.We Then there is the matter of bias. Elections are .
.
certainly all have our biases that will show up to probably the worst examples of biased reporting, *
a certain extent,'' he said. and student elections In the past have made The >
CONTINUED
FROM PAGE 4 He said he hadn't been misquoted too much '-as Alligator into not much more than a propaganda sheet.It .

paper that doesn't publish daily now Is the Miami such." Is hard for student editors not to become Involved fIn

Hurricane, a literate, well-made-up weekly which the races, but the paper suffers when they do.
seems to offer lots of advantages and few problems "It's more mis-slanting, taking a very minor side- A front-page story during one recent election spread :
to either the stuJer.. Mdy, the newspaper staff or comment and making it the feature of the story. a divorced candidate's marital record across the !
the administration.But An example might be a story. last trimester: Ken- campus. Though Kennedy praised The Alligator for
Hurricane editor Linda Reitman last month nedy Alms At Alligator.' its handling of this year's elections, politics on this,
wrote an editorial directed at the student body in which "I don't want and don't view the Alligator as an the most politically-oriented campus In the state,
she criticized their lack of interest in the paper. "Are instrument of Student Government. I've never been In remains a constant danger to the paper.

you dead or are we dead?" she asked. "The Hurricane favor of a state-controlled press," Kennedy said.
probably has the most passive readership of any "I don't think we work together as much as we
university newspaper In the country." She mentioned should, however," he said. "The Alligator has so many needs," Askins says.

thought-provoking articles the paper had run, with "You could never discuss them all in one article.
little We need new equipment, more salaries, better com-
success In awaking response, in her view, and Hendrick thought the paper should have objectivityand
ended with munication with Tigert and Student Government more
a dignified plea for letters. ,
accurate reporting, and said its role had shifted
The Alligator, on the other hand, never wants for over the years from gadfly to SG policy-maker to trust from the faculty, twice as many reporters,
letters during daily publication days. Is frequencyof Intellectual stimulant during various eras. experienced editors, time to check our facts, under-
publication the standing by professors when we're late for class--
controlling factor?
Lundy said he thought both the administration and
Thus far we have talked only about accuracy _.. the list is endless and probably boring to anyone whodoesn't
Student Government viewed The Alligator as a nec-
an important area, but not as Important, probably, essary evil. "I' think the administration recognizesthe work down here.
as the question of function. What Is the function ofa
need for a newspaper, but on specific occasionsI
college newspaper? Whome does It serve, and think probably they wish they'd never heard of
how?
The Alligator. These instances are the exception
"The Alligator should Inform the students as to rather than 'ie rule, hopefully. I think the same Is
what's going on. Because we're a dally paper, I think basically true for Student Government. A correctionThe
it's our obligation to inform them on what's going on
outside the campus as well as inside. And to relate
the two worlds Joseph Pulitzer, founder of the St. Louis Post- student
Lundy said. first story in this activity! fee. The
Dean of Student Affairs Lester Hale also saw The Dispatch and a great editor of the New York World, series, "Publications and student activity fee IS only
wrote a statement his retirement which has
Alligator as first a medium for informing the students, upon the Board," contained a mis- $14.50. Publicationstake.
since become the
as did Student Body President Ken Kennedy and former Post-Dispatch's editorial credo, Publications do not receives about $2 each trl-
Student Body President Paul printed on Its editorial page each day: mester from each student
Hendrick. But each had receive a $14.50 bite of the
-- Always fight for and reform
his Ideas progress ;
own as to function after basic Informationhad
been taken care of. -- Never tolerate Injustice or corruption; -
-- Always fight demagogues of all
"It must be a good education experience for the parties;
-- Never belong to
students who participate in any of the departmentsof any party;
production. If people who work on the paper can't -- Always oppose privileged classes and public "But we're a tremendous university,from the stand-

gain better knowledge of good Journalism, then It isn't plunderers; point of size and population, and we're going to get
serving its real potential," Hale said. -- Never lack sympathy for the poor; much bigger in the near future. The Alligator has
"And I think it has a function to properly represent -- Always remain devoted to the public welfare; to keep pace with the rest of the campus.

campus attitudes and atmosphere In such a way as -- Never be satisfied with merely printing news; "And, of course, the world is growing smaller and \
to have a health-engendering effect upon the campus, -- Always be drastically Independent; at the same time more complex every day; people I'
-- Never be afraid to attack
though this Is not its sole purpose."It wrong, whether by aro becoming more tense and more anxious to know t
can create a friendly camp or an Irate camp predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty.The about everything that might affect their futures even

by the way In which It handles news, slants things, remotely, or their happiness; specialization In every
editorializes, and so forth," he said. Alligator probably will never fulfill all these field requires more lucid, thoughtful, analytical re-
"I don't feel the newspaper necessarily has to protectthe "Ten Commandments" -- certainly never all at protlng than ever before. I

Image of the university, but on the other hand, once. Neither do most commercial newspapers. It "There are a few really good college newspapers I
It shouldn't act so as to destroy It. can fulfill those functions emphasized by the various around the country; we get them In the mall every day. .
"People and the things that happen create the Imageof campus leaders quoted before, though In the opinionof None of them are great, because they haven't thought
the university. The paper should be as accurateand most, including editors Askins and Lundy, It does enough recently about what their readers need. Per-
fair as it can In presenting as accurate an Image not always do so now. There is the Orange and haps we have the came problem; certainly we're not
as can be reflected. Blue bulletin, which carries material that Is almost great either. But we're on our way, I think, as soon
r "I think on the other-hand that the paper In reporting completely suitable and proper for The Alligator. as we realize the need."
problems on campus Is of value to the uni- There is the Compass, published by the Division of The Alligator needs Improving, yes. It seems to be
versity in uncovering things that do need attention.I Informational Service mostly to carry news and other standing at a crossroad, with all roads pointing toward
am against problems being uncovered secretly and material of Interest primarily to the faculty. There "progress." Where It will go from here, whetherIt
then made a big thing of before somebody has a chanceto are numerous departmental and college-wide infor- will ultimately be a model for Jefferson's first
do something about It. The paper has a responsibility mation sheets published because the information they state *nt rather than his second, la a matter for
to provide the other side with a chance to medicate contain must be spread, ad The Alligator does not conjecture only. But Its problems, at least, are
what's being done," he said. offer the required certainty of coverage. evident, and its goals are visible.




LONG'S CAFETERIA Patronize Gafor Advertisers ] Court team wins t




SPECIALSRIB in Beach finalsUF's I


The Living Sound of

two Moot Court teams faced
each other this past weekend In the

EYE STEAK, tossed salad, choice of vegetable, GREAT FOLK MUSICON finals of the state contest, and the

roll & butter tea coffee ONLY 97 top team only won by 85/100 of a
or $
20TB CBNTURT- FOI RECORDS point. j

SHRIMP SALAD PLATE ONLY 85$ UP eliminated Miami and Stetson.
teams In earlier rounds.
too*

BOILED SHRIMP PLATE ONLY 75 ? ENOUSH The winning team was Bryan .

WOODY Ellis and Bob Feagan. Runners- I
ounrrJE up were George Moss and Gerry

RIchman. Richman was voted outstanding t
participant by the State
Supreme Court, which heard the 1
REMEMBER we have the complete dinner special finals. "

night for Only\ 97$ THE MAGIC OF MAYO LOGAN INGUSH INTRODUCING THI
every MUIR A refreshing new SINGS THE WOODY WILL-ROUNO0 DICK I
vole in fork music. OUTMRIf SONG SAG GLASS The record d. This is the fourth year in a row
Mayo Muir sings a English' plays but of on* of th. most
wide spanof folk' songs and sings a host of tb e versatile now folk UF teams have taken first place
In her first entire best tongs mad fa- artists on the current the state finals. Last year's team
album. moos by Woody se. i
TIM 9132 (TFS 4122)) Guthri I ..nejUI (TFS 4UI) also tied for first in Southeastern
BUY YOUR STUDENT MEAL TICKET and get one TFM 3131 (TF* 412) regional competition in Atlanta.


DINNER FREEI I For the Authentic Sound in Folk Guitars The finals were held In the

Americana Hotel in Miami Beach
GRETSCH at the Florida Bar convention. i

LONG'S CAFETERIA The finest name in folk guitars Gretsch now offers you a chanceto Books neededMS f
become a recording star, Win a 20th Century-Fox Records con-
tract in the Gretsch Folk Guitar Contest Mall your best folk
313 West University Avenue Downtown, betweenthe recording or tape of minimum minutes length Gretsch Contest 206 TEXTBOOKS are In
P. 0. Box 1234, New York 17, N. Y. Contest void in areas short supply this trimester. Any J I
two theatres where prohibited. one who bas one should resell it .:,
to one of the bookstores. "


i

1


vl A w 1.. .k F Y 1
4



6 The Florida Alligator FridayMay 15, 1964Competition



opens for graduate grant

-

Competition for 1965-66 U. S. graduates for study in such coun- In teaching English as a foreign the 1965-66 scholarships. All All requests for application
government graduate giants for tries as Bolivia, Dominican Republic language; also, teaching fellow- others may secure informationand forms from at-large candidate
academic study or research Ecuador, Guatemala and ships in Italy for the teaching of application forms from the must be postmarked by Octobe
abroad, and for professional train- Venezuela. Recommended fields American language and literature, counseling division of the Insti- 15. Applicants not enrolled at a
ing In creative and performing of study are social sciences, political history, philosophy or law. tute of International Education, university in the fall of 1964 mus
arts, opened officially May 1. science, history, law and hu- Students now enrolled In a college 809 United Nations Plaza, New submit their completed applications -
The Institute of International manities. or university may consult York 17, N. Y.; or from any of to the New York office of
Education conducts competitionsfor There will be opportunities for their campus Fulbright Program IIE's regional offices In Chicago, the HE by November 1. Enrolled!
U. S. government scholarships teaching assistantships in India Adviser (G. A. Farris, Inter- Denver, Houston, San Francisco, students must submit applications!
provided by the Fulbright-Hays Act and Italy for students interested national Center) about applying for and Washington, D. C. to Mr. Farris by October 15, 1964.
as part of the educational and cul-
tural exchange program of the Department -

of State. Under this & students. here is the
program, more than 900 American professors prudent ..
graduate students will have
the opportunity to study in any
one of 51 countries. The purposeof DAY
the awards is to Increase mu- ; # BEST NEWS OF THE

tual understanding between the
people of the U. S. and other countries -
FOOD FOR LESS"Follow
through the exchange of per- .. BETTER
sons, knowledge and skills.
Students who wish to apply for

an award must be U. S. citizens \ Lr\ TheGOOD
and have a bachelor's degree or
its equivalent by the beginning date b EATING
of the grant, and be proficient in y.
the language of the host country. J
Selections will be made on the 'q 4CV 'w-v Crowd To The

basis of academic and/or profes-
sional record, the feasibility of theapplicant's Park Lane I
proposed study plan and Jf
personal qualifications Prefer- \ ; ;
ence Is given to candidates who \ i\ Cafeteria
have not previously lived or studied
abroad and who are under the age
of 35. k JUST PRESENT
Creative and performing artists
will not require a bachelor's degree YOUR ID. CARD

but must have four yearsof
TO CASHIER and RECEIVE
professional study equivalent
experience. Social workers must
have at least two years of pro- SPECIAL BONUS DISCOUNT
fessional experience after the t
Master of Social Work degree. OFF OUR LOW, LOW
Applicants in the field of medi- I
cine must have an M. D. at the fREE r
time of application.
/
Three types of grants will be :L. 000\'JersOr'brth r
or _
available under the Fulbrlght-Hays oy o F 6 or
.
t\es
Act: U. S. government full grants, to \cep
joint U. S. other goernment coke not
'6 hour 365 DAYS A YEAR
grants, and U. S. government tra- more \; iRIE!
vel-only grants.A e Y.,,S.c.ndCep
full grant will provide a stu- .F C.N..
.,
Iced Ti
dent with total tuition, maintenance 1t o f
round-trip transportation to isFREEIAlw.yt
Complete
one of 38 participating countriesIn d
the program, health and acci- \ Luncheon .
dent insurance and an Incidental % FRA EaR ES S Specials

allowance. GANtZpttOo\ \ Every Day (Monday thru Sat.)
lag3's1
Joint U. S. other government
grants will provide tuition and full ec\o\ fOO or 'pOrt\es FULL COURSE LUNCHEON t
or partial maintenance from a foreign s r \ooC\ue's AAa\ INCLUDING BEVERAGE
government, plus travel costs Eo r fR 6- ,
from the U. S. government. These co\ t1\ot\OO

grants. will be available in 18 countries fr'nf 67$" COMPLETE .>

Travel-only grants will supple-

ment maintenance and tuition scho- tt\a\. LESS DISCOUNT!
larships granted to American stu- \> { y.>t
dents by universities, private donors -
and foreign governments. tr-\\' NO CHARGE FOR TAKE-OUT j I

Countries participating In the \\\JU CONTAINERS
full grant program will be Argen- .t : 1S LUNCH
tina, Australia, Austria, Belgium- Vo }l S1

Luxembourg, Brazil, Ceylon, 0s1( 11:30 A.M.-2:05 P.M.
Chile, China (Republic of), Col- N\'J V
ombia, Denmark, Finland,France, \EV.SO EDINNER .
Germany (Federal Republic of),
A74
Greece, Iceland, India, Iran, Ire- :; 4:30 P.M.8:05 P.M. t

land, Italy, Japan, Korea, Malaysia 12 Hot Entrees To Select
Mexico, Nepal, the Nether-
lands, New Zealand,Norway,Paki- .t&; From Daily.
stan, Peru, the Philippines,Portu- :
gal, Spain, Sweden, Turkey,United; 1 a
Arab Republic, the United King- jrxR
dom, and Uruguay.
Joint U. S. other government .".... ,
ti .H+
grants will be available for graduate -
'
,
,
study In Bolivia, Brazil,Chile, fi AMPLE,
Colombia, Costa Rica* Dominica \ I4 4 f fREE PARKINGCAFETERIA I
Republic, Ecuador Guatemala
Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, Nica-
ragua, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, !
Rumania and Venezuela. : I 4t ;,

Travel-only grants will be avail- =
able to Austria, Brazil, Denmark, .
France, Germany, Iceland, Israel, -
Italy, the Netherlands and Sweden.In .
1965-66 additional grants for
Latin American study will be avail- 1212 North Main, in the Gainesville Shopping CenterPage
able. It Is expected that as manyas 4 minutes
50 grants will be offered to from campus
g. iduatlng seniors and recent




.



J r






FridayMay 15,1964 The Florida Alligator Page 7 1



Fraternity averages riseScholarship Corrick looks into' !:


averages of mem- the all-men's average In 59.3 per the Summa Cum Laude rating for f
bers of college fraternities cent of all colleges reporting. superior scholarship, where every the future
throughout the nation continue to ;
These percentages are based on fraternity chapter on their respec-
climb above the respective all- reports from chapters from whom tive campuses exceeded the all-
men's averages for the past aca- comparable data is available, com- men's average. Of this numbersix By LIZ BREWER l
demic year, according to an analysis prising over three-quarters of all achieved the honor for three Staff WriterBy
Just released by the National fraternity chapters In the United successive years, while seven

Interfraternity Conference.The States and Canada. There was a achieved It for two successive 1974, UF enrollment will hit 20,000, the student
final figures for the aca- total of 283 Institutions reportingwith years. body will be composed of more entering juniors than
demic year 1962-63 reveal that the 3,038 fraternity chapters in- r freshmen, and the Plaza of the Americas will become
all-fraternity. aye rage exceeded volved. additional parking space.
Out of 60 national
fraternity George Corrick, assistant to the UF president,made
The improvement in fraternity organizations, 28 reported that at these In
predictions an interview last week. And
when are scholarship has been particularly least a majority of their chap- he didn't stop there.
pronounced during the past decade, ters or more were above the all- Other
65% and 35% it was pointed out. Only 40.3 per men's averages on their respec- -- Approximately prophesies: ten new buildings will be con-
cent of the colleges reporting 10 tive .
campuses.The structed, Including a new classroom building north of
good marks? years ago ((1953-54) show the all-
building E, an addition to the main library.
fraternity above the all-
men's average data was developed from -- A dental school will be added to the J. mills
\. average. official sources supplied directlyby Miller Medical Center, making; It the first dental

-c This Improvement in scholar- the Institutions involved and school In the state.
-- However, most of the changes at UF In the next
v I= ship has shown a steady, consis- was processed by the scholarship
tent Increase. For the previous reporting service of the National ten years will occur in the form of expansion and
/l 1I// academic year, the figure was Interfraternity Conference on a growth of present programs. New building, money or

I, 68.1 per cent and two years pre- con/arable basis throughout. In equipment will be used to serve existing programs,
vious the figure was 56.7 per cent.A releasing the latest figures, Dr. Corrick said.
Zeke L. Loflln, Chairman of the -- The most rapid rate of growth will occur at the
similar Improvement has been NIC Scholarship Committee and junior level due to the state's expanding junior colege

i; recorded in the nationwide per- Chairman of the Mathematics Department program. Increased emphasis will be placed on. pro-
i 1 Ir11 centage of individual fraternity of the University of fession programs and graduate schools.
j ; chapters above the all-men's av- Southwestern Louisiana, declared: "The UF Is not aspiring to many new schoolsor
'lI ; ;frr erages. During 1962-63, a total colleges. We already run the gamut from journa-
f f rl of 49.8 per cent of all fraternity lism to nursing. Any growth will be growth within
chapters reporting were above "There is a growing pride In the school, such as added programs or degrees.
their respective all-men's aver- scholarship excellence among fra "We intend to put an Increased emphasis on plan-
ages, whereas only 41.4 per cent ternities. Scholarship and scho- ning for any changes that the new programs call for
1 could show a superior rank 10 years lastic honors are being empha- in terms of physical plants, resources, and monetory
earlier. sized as never before In frater- needs," Corrick said.Interviews.
nity publications, In leadership

During the past academic year schools, and at national fraternity '" -
; : 1."i: ; ;,
;
/ also, 31 Institutions qualified for conventions." "
i 1 ti, P -
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STUDY THIS SUMMERIn 1

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--.- ,. -
.. --
--







e 8 The Florida Alligator FridayMay 15,1964

L LETTERS

Pi.i'o

Get out and vote
";>' ,: ;fr
':: (: ?>>". }'' f/'';'

A true representative? EDITOR:

As one of the "Inspectors" at the campus precinct for the

May 5th voting, I should like to urge all eligible studentsand
EDITOR: to each other so that when you takea Would Mr. Haness chastise Senator campus residents to vote on Tuesday, May 26th.

1 would like to disagree with careful analysis, a long range Fulbright for his stand on civil Many voters asked us last Tuesday the number registered

Mr. Haness' letter of April 28. look, your decision takes on a new rights In light of his achievementsin voters in Precinct #31. The Supervisor of Voter Registration,

Mr. rianess state that a senatorIs position that is not sacrificed to the field of foreign relationsand Mrs. Bethea, has since furnished the following figures: 799

"the representative ofthat either the black or the white. The education, and call him nota Democrats, 145 Republicans, and Independents. Last Tuesdaya

constituency which elects him to congressmen does the same thing true representative? total of 432 votes were cast in the Social Room of the Florida

represent their interests and welfare and acts on his judgment, which Union. In addition there were some absentee ballots, but I do
In the national government. moderates the black and the white. Robert M. Keyserllng not have this number.

He bears the burden of faithfully I Before the second party primary on May 26th, It might be

representing his people,and acting Essay deserves RebuttalEDITOR advisable to clear up certain areas of doubt expressed last
with the knowledge, experience, Tuesday:
and that is derived
common sense : 1. Both primary elections(May 5 and 26) are party elections.
from close association and contact
Mr. Price's lengthy essay on the Civil Rights Bill There are no write-ins allowed In the primary unless there Is
with the grave issues of our time.
Mr. Haness' statement seems to deserved publication, because Its main argument is the a possible special ruling.
connote that a representative Of principal one offered by the bill's opponents. It also 2. As a party election, the elector (voter) can vote only
deserves a rebuttal, because that argument is falla within the party In which he is registered: registered Demo-
the people should be the Washington -
cious. crats can vote only for Democratic candidates. Registered
representative of his constit-
Mr. Price makes the bill sound rather drastic. He Republicans can vote only for Republicans. (The machine
uents. In the reading text for PCL
201, we find the following analy- Is, I gather, against only Title II of the bill. But operator is required by law to set the machine so that the
Title II doesn't say that "any Individual owning or voter can move only the levers of candidates in his own
sis of the representative and his
constituents and their reconcillla- running an establishment mast Integrate it." Insteadit party.)
says that certain specified businesses serving the 3. Those registered as Independents CANNOT vote In
tion. Edmund Burke states "Your
,
representative owes you not his general public must not turn away customers for either of the primaries (since there Is no Independent Party

reason of race, religion, or national origin. proposing a slate of Independent candidates). :
Industry only, but his judgment;
The objection that Mr. Price raises is that the 4. Absentee ballots: One can apply NOW for a May 26th
and he betrays, Instead of servingyou
bill thereby Infringes the right of property ownersto ballot; and for the General Election in November one will
If he sacrifices it to your
opinion." The late Estes Ke- their use of their property, and that this infringe- be able to apply in the period 45 to 5 days before the election.
ment Is Intolerable, because It lessens the individual 5. In answer to many questions, the Republican slate will
faufer wrote an artlcal In 1947on
rights of all. be larger on May 26th. It will include delegates for Presl-
the dual function of a repre-
The trouble with this argument Is that nobody in dental electors, also district and state committee-men/women.
sentative as a Washington repre-
the South ever raised It against the Jim Crow 6. If you have not voted In one election within the last two
sentative and as a Member of
To laws that established segregation in the first place. years, your name has been automatically purged from the roll.
Congress. explain why a con-
The Southerner talks as though the system of segre- The books will be open June 1st If you want to apply for re-
gressman votes the way he does,
gation that limits the effective choices of the Southern instatement. t
I quote from a New York Times
Negro are simply the result of custom. The truthIs 7. A voter cannot change his party affiliation to another
essay by Cabell Phillips, a noted
that the restored white Southern legislatures party until five days after the General Election.
"There five
political analylst. are
sources a congressmen uses: (1) rammed through literally hundreds of Clvll-Rights- 8. The campus police have again granted a parking variance.On .

opinion back home, (2)partypoUcy, Bills-In-Reverse In the 1880's that established the May 26th anyone may park In the voting area for voting
system we have now. All that the present bill before purposes.
(3)) reports of congressional com-
mittees, (4) newspapers and radio, Congress would do would be to restore a few of the 9. The polls are open from 7 A. M. until 7 P.M. We were

(5)) floor debate." I believe that rights forcibly taken from the Negro 75 years ago. busy from 5 P. M. on. Vote early and avoid the rush.

this explains the true position ofa If Mr. Price and others can argue that the Federal The clerk and inspectors will be glad for you to examinethe

representative to his constituents government has no right to require1 the owners of posted sample ballots. There will be a small machine

public accommodations to open them to all who can demonstrator -- and they will gladly instruct new voters In

I find further that Mr. Haness pay, then how can they defend the system of laws procedure before they enter the voting booth. BE SURE TO ::
that prohibit those same owners from accepting NegroeS VOTE.
makes the mistake of the Black
? I submit that If anyone's sense of justice
and White fallacy by linking the
civil rights advocates with "the and liberty is defective, it is Mr. Price's. Sincerely,

forces of moral justice and the Joy Upham

against American the might tradition of bigotry of equality,preJu- Warren Dean ," : ._" >' .:, ",;; : ,.v:,, :';. .

dice, and blind ignorance," whichhe -a **

links most anti-civil rights W Here she comes'Apologizes
wonder i ifheld
I
advocates with. c Lionel I Ball I -.
Mr. Haness seems to be guilty lie
o four!
of this Black and White fallacy as
-
many people are. An opinion on -a

any subject or an idea can be

likened to a newspaper photo. The

photo is made up of tiny black

and white dots which, when seen I

from a distance take on the different -

shadings of gray. Black

and white are in decisions also, 6 Don Addis
and they too are positioned next



I -for deprivationEDITOR The o FloridaALLIGATOR*


(To Mr. Gerald Feaster): his ultimate education. The university, semi, tri, or
I think that your article demonstrates a certain quarter-mester systems, is not the ground upon which

amount of personal reconciliation. It appears, how- one learns to "think," but rather to gain the tools for

ever, to echo the cries of many similar advocates later application in the Intellectual world. Editor . . . . . . John Askins

who are guilty of the same rationalization that you If you should consider this as just an opportunityto

present as a basis for hypothesis.First "memorize and lose sleep," then would prescribea Executive Editors

let us take time for a sincere critical evalua- re-evaluation of your own study habits rather than Jim Hammock Benny Cason

tion of the "threat to higher education" that you so the system. Granted work comes somewhat faster Associate Editors

vehemently describe. Like yourself am a graduating under this system but hardly to the degree that one Bob Thomas Joel Gaston

senior at this Institution and have been exposed to should worry about 'cracking up" In the process. To Jim Castello Ernie Litz

the semester and trimester system for equal periodsof place the burden of your entire intellectual pursuitson Pat Hogan Eunice Tall

time. It seems reasonable to question whether one the university is a grave Injustice. The validity Beth Kraselsky Nancy Brachey

is being deprived of the opportunity to "broaden his of your' degree as an intellectual achievement is

outlook and objectivity" under the current system. small. It is only useful to you as a measure of Sports Editor. . . . . . Martin Edwards
Perhaps there are some individuals who regard vocation preparation and then too much faith is placedin

their learning experience and ultimate education as that. Your education is still a lifetime from com- Staff \vriters

that which they receive In the four year tenure as a pletion and the degree you receive will not alter the John Hancock, Jackie Cornelius, Millie Gorman, Barbara ,

student on the university level. Under this philosophyIt degree to which you desire to achieve it. Keller, Ed Barber, Don Federman, Jojce E. Kilmer, Patti

Is conceivable that an extra three weeks of classes If ALL you receive at the end of four years Is a Pitz, Liz Brewer, Hall Cal!'. Charlie Bush, Joe Kollln, Bob

would be necessary for the nttalnance of a slightly degree under the trimester system then ALL you would Wise, Jim Carleto, Phil Geyer, and Stan Kulp.

greater amount of assimilation subject matter. Indeed receive is a degree under the semester system.

the difference of three weeks between the two systemsthat Furthermore, if, after considerable examination of Receptionist ....... . . . Marsha G. Brown

you describe might just afford that dubious op- your efforts through these past four years, you still

portunity. maintain your present attitude, you still have a con- PRODUCTION CREW
I prefer to choose a different philosophy. For me, siderable lifetime to make up what you feel you have Don Addis, Nelson Meyer, Sam Shaya, Ernie Lltz, Dave
the ultimate education that one might achieve Is that lost in the twelve week difference that the semester Plche, Jim Neff, and Darlene Pierce.

total realm of knowledge that can be obtained through system would have given you. Not bad is it? A
diligent study and experience from birth until death. lifetime to do twelve weeks of thinking in. Then you The Florida Alligator is the official student newspaper of the

This Implies, of course, that the education which will have achieved the ultimate of what you value your University of Florida and is published five times weekly

one receives on the university level is but minutely education to be. On behalf of the University of Floridaand except during the months of May. June and July, when it is

significant in the totality of ones learning experience. the board of directors, I apologize that you have published semi-weekly. The Florida Alligator Is entered as
This philosophy also makes implication to the fact been deprived of learning how to think. second-class matter at the United States Post Office ,at

that one need not even attend a university to achieve Gary Winston, 4ED Gainesville Florida.Pa -



l





I

FridayMay 15,1964 The Florida Alligator Page 9 '- i

--'------
< : r j

.
i LL t ii m Uj c I !3 cI Jt1lte

I ) by REID POOLE head of UP music department


Clyde __ .
- -
The great Philadelphia Orchestra, unquestionablyone the annual engagement of the brightest names in the
of the finest symphony orchestras in the world, musical world. In Scheel's day alone the roster

""" under its eminent conductor, Eugene Ormandy, will Included such soloists as FrimI, Saint Saens, Ysaye,
present a concert in Florida Gymnasium on the Uni- Thibaud, Kreisler, Sembrlch, Schumann-Heink, Gad-

By DON GROOMS \) versity of Florida campus on Wednesday, May 20, ski, Hofmann, Louise Homer, Lhevlnne, Rubinstein,
1964. The concert Is a special presentation of the d'Albert and Moritz Rosenthal. In 1904 Richard

I .ll.Jfli .,. .,,, Lyceum Council. All seats will be $2.00 in reserved Strauss and Felix Weingartner appeared as guest
T VT''''''''' ''''" '' ;'''': "" '''' ,
'" sections. Tickets are on sale at the "Hub" Information conductors. For Strauss, It was the beginning ofa

I'm starting an organization called "Clyde." It Booth, daily 1:00 430.: long, close association with the orchestra, frequently -

Is in direct opposition to the Lake Wales organization "ONE OF THE GREATEST"This as guest conductor Introducing his own com-
positions In premiere performances.After .
called 'George.
writer was privileged to hear the Philadelphia
the death of Scheel In 1907 Carl took
Pohllg
Now George was formed by bunch of right-wingers
Orchestra just last month in its home auditorium,
to tell first graders and such which of our American Philadelphia's Academy of Music. I can assure you over the podium. He had served at Covent Garden,
B'ayreuth and with Mahler at
Hamburg. During
politicians are the good guys and which are the bad its reputation is well-deserved.
PohU 's tenure the number of subscription concertsrose
guys. Clyde, on the other hand, doesn't believe there Hearing the orchestra in its sixty-fourth season, ,
to twenty-five pairs and the orchestra en-
are any bad guys OR good guys-just sink guys. one can hardly imagine that it had the usual small-
There will be no chain of command in Clyde, exceptfor scale beginning, stemming from a number of amateurand Joyed continued growth In stature. In November
1909 Rachmaninoff for the first timeas
Sergei appeared
I'll be
myself. President and Treasurer. We'll semi-professional associations. From early
pianist, composer and conductor and another long, .
have no meetings and print no literature. Our pro- colonial days there had been musical activity and .
grams will be paid for by voluntary donations from Interest in Philadelphia but until the turn of the present fruitful composer-orchestra relationship sprang to
life. Before his death In 1943 Rachmaninoff had
,
idealistic and gullible University of Florida students century, no attempt to form a full-time resident
who want to help make the world safe for Clyde. rchestra had been successful.The made more than 38 appearances with the orchestra,
proof that he "would rather perform with the Phila-
The group then wanted to know if I were for or orchestra presenters first concert In November "
delphia Orchestra than any other in the world.
against Governor Wallace of Alabama, Ross Barnettof 1900, at Philadelphia's Academy of Music under conductorIn
When Leopold Stokowskl was engaged as
Mississippi, General Edwin Walker of Texas, and the direction of Fritz Scheel. It was Scheel who
1913, he inherited an organization technically expert -
Robert Welch of Massachusetts. Well, the only ones provided the impetus leading to the founding of the and enjoying a solid reputation at home and
in the bunch that I've met were Walker and Welch. orchestra. The German maestro came to the United
abroad. To the orchestra he brought a highly Individual -
Welch threw me out of a Birch Society meeting becauseI States for a series of programs at the Chicago World's
style, vitality and daring. lie was a notable
was taking TV pictures when he didn't want any taken. Fair in 1892. musician and leader with an unfailing sense of show-
During an interview with Walker, he objected to my He stayed on to conduct an orchestra in San Fran- manship. For twenty-eight seasons, Stokowskl made
questions and accused me of persecuting him. cisco which was a predecesscr of the San Francisco
memorable music -- tmd! memorable talk. lie also
I explained to the group that the only people I Symphony. Summer, 1899, saw him leading what was made the orchestra not only one of the top ensemblesIn

didn't like were the ones who had offended me personally then "The New York Orchestra" In a Philadelphia the country, but a dynamic model for others to
Neither Wallace nor Barnett have had the amusement park. Three amateur musical societies follow.As .
persuaded him to remain In Philadelphia with each
pleasure of meeting me.
a champion of new music, Stokowski achievedan
The group finally took away my mouse ears and group paying him $1,000. impressive list of American and world premieres.
drummed me out of the club because I wasn't pro or His one stipulation was the he be allowed to conduct Among these "firsts" were Scrlabln's "The Divine

con anything. That's when I got the idea for an organization two concerts with a professional orchestra. These Poem," Mahler's Eighth; Symphony, Strauss' Alpine
called "Clyde." concerts, presented in the spring of 1899, caused an
Symphony and Fourth Piano Concerto, Sibelius' Fifth;
To qualify for membership in this club, you have enthusiastic public response which led to the actual Sixth and Seventh Symphonies, Stravinsky's "LeSacredu
to frown on freedom riders, white citizen council founding six months later of the Philadelphia Or- Prlntemps," Shostakovlch's First Symphony,

members, black muslims, white muslims, finks, do- chestra. Berg's "Wozzeck," Schonberg's "Gurrelleder" and
gooders, juvenile delinquents, policemen, peddlers, Even from the beginning the orchestra numbered "Die Gluckllche Hand."
store clerks who snarl, handshakers, the industrial from eighty to eighty-five players. Concerts Increased -

revolution, Lifeline, and Los Angeles, California.In from six the first season to fourteen pairs ORMANDY ARRIVES ON SCENEAn
other words, If you dislike most everything without and eventually to twenty-two pairs, thus establishing

feeling called upon to mount a soap box and haranguethe a precedent of continual progress which the orchestra unexpected guest conductor In 1931 was Eugene
masses--then you're invited to join and become still follows. The current season consists
up Ormandy who stepped In at the last moment for ailing
of some 80 regular concerts. In addition the orchestra -
part of a non-moving organization -- Clyde. guest artist Arturo Toscanlni. Ormandy was engaged
presents Pop concerts, Pension Foundation
as guest conductor frequently thereafter.
concerts, youth programs, and several "specials." ..
He was named conductor of the Philadelphia Or-
Another precedent set from the beginning was
very chestra In 1936. He has been the orchestra's perma-

nent conductor and music director ever since, and
JAZZ CORNER
with the 1963-64 season celebrated his 28th anni-

versary of making musical history and leading the

Jean Baptiste 'Django'ReinhardtBy Illustrious Philadelphia life.Orchestra to the greatest year of Its


CHARLIE BUSH ard, Rex Stewart,Coleman Hawkins, and Benny Carter.It .
was not easy to keep Django pinned down at the
Perhaps the most colorful legend In all of jazzis Hot Club. Often he would disappear for days.

the story of the gypsy guitarist Django Reinhardt.Jean Yielding to his gypsy heart he would wander throughthe

Baptiste (Django) Reinhardt was born In a gypsy forests and along the seashore.

caravan near Liverchles, Belgium, on Jan. 23, 1910. When the German army poured into Paris in 1940 See What's New in
In his childhood he roamed about the Europena country- the quintet had already broken up; Grappelly had _

side with the caravan, living the life of a free spirit, moved to England, and Django had left Paris for _

marveling at the beauties of nature, and soaking up parts unknown. After the liberation of Paris the
the rhythms and the passionate-melancholy strainsof wandering gypsy popped up again and quickly formeda The Browse Shop

gypsy music.As new quintet usually including clarinetist Hubert

a child he was musically gifted. He first mastered Rostaing.

the violin, then the guitar. In his teens Djangowas Fortunately for us, Capitol records has recently Qualify Paperbacks
astonishing his fellow gypsies with his skill on acquired some of the rare recordings made by the

the guitar. Then tragedy struck. quintet In the post-Grappelly period of the early
A fire brok out in Django's trailer and severely 1940's, and just released an album of them: "Django I INSTANT CANDIDATE '64 .Ameson & Sparling

burned his entire left side. The fire permanently Reinhardt and the Quintet of the Hot Club of France" NATURE OF NATURAL HISTORY .Marston Bates
paralyzed two fingers on his left hand. Surely, 18- (T-2045.) The album is a very good one. All 11
year old Django could never play a guitar again. tracks are "winners," and that is unusual for any PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST AS A YOUNG MAN

For more than six months Django was physically record album. Many of the selections are Django's .James Joyce

unable to hold a guitar. Then, despite the pain, he compositions. It Is remarkable but true that Django FAITH OF A HERETIC .Walter Kaufman
took up his guitar and tried to play. Now two fingers never teamed *o read or transcribe music. All of
would have to do the work of four. The gypsy foughtto his beautiful compositions (and there were many) CONCISE HISTORY OF PAINTING .Levey

regain his former skill as though his very existence had to be dictated to a copyist.In THE ABSOLUTE TRUTH ABOUT MARRIAGE

depended upon it, and 1 1'ideed' it did for music had
already become his whole life. 1946, Django came to the US for a brief tour .Lois Wyse

How Ironic that a tragedy should turn into a blessing.His with Duke Ellington, then returned to France. In CONTRACT BRIDGE FOR BEGINNERS I .Goren

affliction led him to use unusual patterns of 1953 he passed away In his home in Samols-sur-

harmony and melodic phrasing. Possibly with what Seine, the victim of a storke.
the psychologists call "overcompensation" Django American Jazzmen owe a great debt to Jean Bap TECHNICAL & REFERENCE

taught himself to play his lr-n? melodious runs with tlste Reinhardt. His gypsy rhythms and his unique

incredible speeds (Even todj. there is no guitarist way of playing variations upon the melody Influenced DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
faster than all who Jammed vlth. him In France In the '30's PARTIAL
Django).
Three years later he was ready. He joined Andre and 40's, while back In the US future greats like .Garabedian

Ekyan's band and literally shocked the French public Barney Kessel studied his records. CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS .Klotz
with his colorful and original style of playing. Thenin Django Is still the only European jazz musician to
1934 Django formed the famous Quintet of the Hot be given equal status with American jazzmen by critics,

Club of France. The quintet included the outstandingJazz tans, and musicians alike. The BROWSE SHOP

violinist Stephane Grappelly, Louis Vola on bass, "The Best of Django Reinhardt"Capito1TB010226)is
and Roger Chaput and Joseph Reinhardt (Django's an excellent collection of Django's work from 1937to -

brother) on rhythm guitars. 1945. The album contains two records and Is the Campus Shop & BookstoreINCONOCLAST

From 1934 to 1939 every American Jazz musicianto best musical biography of Django to date.
Tomorrow when climb out of bed Django will
visit Paris sought out the amazing gypsy for a you ,
Jam session. Django played and recorded with such have been dead U years to the day. But his legend
Wells Barney Btg- goes on and on.
,
greats as Louis Armstrong, Dicky


{ ..
f'



Page 10 The Florida Alligator FridayMay 15,1964GATOR



CLASSIFIEDSFor




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EXCLUSIVE FIRST AREA SHOWING'you've
blocks from campus. For appoint- tioned, Danish modern furniture,
ment to see call 372-0481. (B- 1 bedroom, kitchen equipped. Call

heard of the victors.. 139-2t-c). 372-6309. (B-135-tf-c).

Available now Efficiency apart-
ment and comfortable corner room I Real Estate ]
now see the losers// across from the University. Would
like quiet male student to sharea '
suite of rooms June 1st at 321S. 3BR House, 2 baths, dishwasher,
the bunch W. 13th St. (B-139-lt-c). disposal, large living room, walkin -
shown first craziest/ closets, small down payment.
AIR CONDITIONED attractive, 376-1583. (I-139-2t-c).
& last
/ that
of misfits t > MMBa HHMH MM HMM i M MM MMHMM
clean, quiet room in new home.
...: Law Professor selling spacious
Kitchen privileges. Ideal for study.
eVer Went Test 3 bedroom home, Study,1-1/2 bath,
/ 372-8944 or 372-3102. (B-139-
/ ________ "'- U-c). attic fan, built In drawers, vanity
fora scalp and much storage $80 per month
__ Two rooms furnished motel type, many extras,negotiate equity. FR-
treatment/f' ground floor, refrigerators. Two 6-2775. 1062 N. E. 4th Ave. (I-
'I. blocks from air-conditioned library 134-tf-c).
)
\ near most colleges and
all practical requirements. Sum- 3 BR, 2 bath, concrete block home,
..: mer rates. 6-6494. (B-136-8t-c). central heating, hardwood floors,
Fla. Rm. Located near Little-
( New Ranch Home, unfurnished.Two wood & Westwood schools. Termsto
\ C bedrooms, living room,dining suit buyer. Call 372-3793 after
7)x.'i:- area, and 1-1/2 baths. Two rooms 6 p.m. for appt. Owners movingout
/
air-conditioned. $100 per month. of state. 621 N. W. 35th St,
J. W. Robinson Ranch located 11 I-136-5t-p).
miles southwest of Gainesville on
Route 346A. For information write
Box 185, Flagler Beach, Floridaor
M call 439-2123. (B-136-5t-c). I Car Rental I

HEELS put on in S minutes
14 1? "i SOLES put oq in 15 minutes
---------- ECONO-CAR.* A car of 5 can drive
x MODERN SHOE to Daytona or Jacksonville and
cheaper than the combination bus
% 4'J4. across from REPAIR 1st notional SHOP bank fare. For reservations call 6-
3644. (N-139-lt-c).

.... -- .
teatures: 1:00 J ,

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FridayMay 15, 1 1964 The Florida Alligator Page H
'Y
.. ,_.i><" ._, ;
.
CLASSIFIEDS .t "I"'l 1! '" .: "" ,.;'" -' ':' :;.1 _, ,

'.. I
{: I!86-hour rule/ catches
LOST Girl's I D bracelet. Call '-,

2-4010 and ask for Cheryl. (L-
Autos 139-lt-p). fewer students nowFewer

.

359 Ford V-8, automatic, radio I ServicesNESTOR'S I students are being caught by the 86-hour

heater, 3 new recaps. $500 4 t rule since the trimester system began. Dr. William

aving for Peace Corps. Phone ; E. Moore, director of University College counseling,
-32Jl, Ext. 5676 and ak for Gary: TV SERVICE was; 3 ? thinks its because students are improving In quality.

ewman after 4 p.m. or phone forced to move. Now located at ,t' Whatever the reason, though, most students have

2-6189. (G-139-H-C). 232 S. E. 1st St., west of Old Post never heard of the 86-hour rule, though they know a

Office. Free estimates. Tubes: little more about its companion, the 48-hour rule.

:LEAN CARS, $95 to $595. 90 Checked Free. Phone 372-7326 DR. RAY FAHIENNew The 86-hour rule prohibits students for registering

lay 50/50 guarantee. No down We invite all our old friends to< if they have not been accepted by an upper division

ayment. Small weeklyor monthly come and see us. (M-139-tf-c). college after completing 86 hours
ayment. H & H Motors, 1636( I This rule Is backstopped by the 48 hour rule,

3. E. 3rd Ave. 372-3749. (G- TYPING on electric typewriter, head said Dr. Moore, which prohibits students from regis-

139-4t-c). 35? per page, 10? per carbon tering if they have not maintained a "C" average

copy. Also stencil and mimeo- <. after 48 hours.
|56 FORD, Blue and white, 6 cyl., graph work. Extra charge for a 'The 48-hour rule makes the student come to

auto, trans., good tires, new tag. theses and dissertations. Call of Chern. Engr. j grips with himself. If he progresses okay it won't

Call 372-9426 after 7:30. Richard 6-7611. (M-139-lt-c). stop him," Dr. Moore added.
Clarke. (G-139-2t-p). When a student Is caught by the 48-hour rule he
Dr. Ray W. Fahlen, a nuclear )
RUBY has moved to GaInes- makes a contract with his upper division college. ..
and chemical engineering specialist -
ville. ALTERATIONS of all klnds- If he takes required courses and earns adequate
today was announced as the
WantedWANTED across street from administration grades, he can proceed.Dr. .
new head of the Department of
building at 1238 S. W. 3rd Ave., Moore noted that If a student falls to take the
Chemical Engineering.
Phone 6-8506. (M-135-F-C). required courses for his college he can be caught by
Fahlen, 40, Is a specialist in
( One beauty operator the 86-hour rule.
I five days per week. Call Blanch's Shirts carefully laundered to order the extraction of atomic materials "The major reason for the rule," said Dr. Moore,

I at FR 2-1581. (C-135-4t-c). and ironed by hand. See from ores to create nuclear re- "Is to keep students from wasting money in a hope-

Mildred at Gator Groomer, 1618N. actions. less quest. It is better for them to graduate from
W. 1st Ave. next to University The appointment is effective July "
WANTED Luggage rack for 63 another university than just collect hours here.
Branch 1, and Includes the title of Pro- I
Post Office. (M-135-tf-c).
[ Porsche. J. F. Munroe 2-5152. The 86-hour rule does not suspend a student from
fessor of Chemical Engineering
(C-137-3t-c).. the university prevents him from reregistering.It .
for the
Fahien is senior engineer
GARNER DRAFTING SERVICE forces him to get a decision from his prospectiveupper

WantedPhysician's I -- LeRoy lettering,charts,graphical Atomic Energy Commission'sAmes division college. If he's not accepted, he is
I Laboratory at Iowa State
Help
delineation, and preparationof He also currently forced to change majors, stay out of college for a
University.
data for Ozalld reproduction for while, or attend another university.
holds in chemi-
a professorship
aide; type; meet pub- theses and dissertations. 372- "The effect of the rule Is to decrease the numberof
lic; keep records. Salary accord- 8008. (M-138-4t-c). cal engineering at Iowa State. students who put In more than four years and still
diversi-
He has been conducting
ing to ability andexpe r Ie nce. fied research In fundamental fail to graduate," said Dr. Moore.
Phone 376-2608 for application. There are very few students in school under the
chemical engineering
processeswith
-139-2t-c). 86-hour rule, according to Associate Registrar Rich-
atomic applications.Ills .
energy
are II. Whitehead. "Usually the 48-hour rule discourages -
special Interests include, energy -
those not making satisfactory progress before -
I Lost & Pound ] of conversion mathematics, and, the kinetics applications and- they reach 86 hours."

"Very few students get caught by the 86-hour rule
thermodynamics.Fahien .
FOUND Book Personal Adjustment took his baccalaureate now," said Dr. Moore. "The only ones are those
by Sidney Jourad. This who change majors late or have been ill."
degree in chemical engineeringat
book was dropped by a scooter Washington University In 1947; According to Whitehead, there were probably less
than 100 out of 6,000 students effected by the 86-
rider at 13th St, and 16th Ave. his master's at Missouri Schoolof
hour rule last trimester, and probably about five
You retrieve it by calling
may
Mines in 1950, and his Ph. D.
2-2795 after 6 (L-139-lt- Involved this summer.
p.m. in the same field at Purdue Uni-
c). versity In 1953. "The University Is not interested in 'bustingout
students," Whitehead said. "It is Interested in
He has continued post doctoral "
teaching those who are here.
LOST Relfler Drawing Instru- education through programs at
ments between Library and Buck- Brookhaven National Laboratory; "The two rules are working well,"added Dr.Moore. '
"The student is protected--he can always appeal to
13th 4.
man Hall Wednesday, May the University of Colorado; and "
between 11:00 and 11:10 A.M. Reward the University of Wisconsin under the Student Petitions Committee.
Call FR 6-4871. (L1392tp a National Science Founda- The 86-hour rule has been In effect over ten years.

). tion Science Faculty Fellowship. PPuPmrmLPalm : _a isr L,zk :{ p .ll.IW


CENSOR .
.

One.of two magistratesof !! ; '
Beach : ,
ancient Rome who .
knows no limit- j .o
age ,
imposed taxes and regulated .

the morals and is equally partial a : ,. t' r

manners of the commun- to father and son- ; "

ity; an official I examinerof handsome examples:

manuscripts, plays,etc. sports jacketsin 4 1

having power to prevent new plaids of pi '

publication or performance; .
**
Dacron polyester and cotton.
a critic; an official in

some colleges Webster '


MEANINGthe Galey'

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one seem to be. .
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Page 12 The Florida All motor_ Friday,May 15, 1964



Insurance fo THE NAVAL RESERVE TRAIN- APPLICATIONS are now 1 being AKD, honorary sociological fraternity DR. ROY E. LEILJCH has been

ING CENTER at 1300 N. E. 8th taken in Room 315 of the Florida I| will hold a special meet- awarded the highest honor of the

Ave. will have open house from Union for committee member- ing in Johnson Lounge, Monday Florida Recreation Association,

more 9 to 4 p.m. Saturday, In honor ships. The Union committees, evening, May 18, at 8:30 p.m. witha making him the first educator to be

pay of Armed Forces Day. such as the films, special pro- I lecture by Mexican sociologist so honored. The association pre-

A model of the battleship"Florida" jects, international, dance, recreation I Prof. Carlos A. Echanove, on sented him with its Merit Awardat
and complete training publicity, hostess, forums :J< "Contemporary Sociology in Lat- its annual conference and work-
and cost lessStudent facilities will be ')n display for and fine arts committees, '"* America." Dr. Echanove has shop at Ft. Pierce last week.,

the public. are all in need of people to work i taught and lectured in Algiers, Lelllch, chairman of the Collegeos

Insuran during the Spring trimester. I'I Brussels, Beirut, Madrid, Paris, Physical Education and Health's
will cost less
THE ORANGE COUNTY Councilfor recreation curriculum, was honored -
and pay more this Fall, according Social Studies and the university '. ... .... ......,,_.. ....v..y. for outstanding service to the
to Martin Schwartz, 4BA, secre- ...;. :"" <.,. ." <. /i''"" .'
are sponsoring a one-day recreation profession in Florida.

tary"This of the is interior.due to benefits we conference on contemporary In Win-economic ; ; FOUR UF PROFESSORS will be

received from purely competitive ter Park.problems Host for Saturday the economic I CAMPtlS COMrASS I Iand ; in Miami May 7-9 for the Florida
Historical Society's annual meet-
bidding, Schwartz said, "plus the conference will be Rollins College.
extended territory of companiesthat Speakers for the event will be: Ing. They are Dr. Herbert J.
... Doherty, chairman of the social
we covered. Dr. Clement Donovan, Head of the "_gV ___'...,.
Copies of the desired Insurance UF economics department "Fed- DAMES Santiago de Cuba, in addi- sciences department and outgoing
EDUCATION are plan-
plan were sent to about 100 Insur- eral Debt--Monster Mouse" tion to holding positions in sev- editor of the society's quarterly;
or ; ning a family outing for their regu-
ance companies all over the nation. eral Mexican universities. He is Dr. Samuel Proctor,Incoming editor -
Richard Sterba assistant
JLJF
lar
The will
pro- May meeting picnic
From this amount 16 bids books including ; Dr. E.A.Hammond,professorof
were the author of several -
fessor of )mics "Russia'sEconomic
eccr; be Saturday at the lake home of
returned, with the winning bid submitted "Sociology In Hispanoa- social sciences; and Dr. Rem-
Growth -- Present and Dean and Mrs. Joseph White.Cars .
t by Guarantee Life of Ham- is bert W.Patrick, graduate research
Potential;;" Dr. Norman G. Keig, will meet in the parking lot behind merlca. The public cordially
mond, Ind. Last year, this.company Invited. professor of history.
UF assistant of
professor econ- Norman Hall at 1 p.m. and then .
in wrote student in excess of $1.5 million omics, "Persistent Unemployment drive to the lake. Each family ',.II III_!!ilv!,= .*' Q t?>' l.
premiums, accord- In an Affluent Economy;" Is asked to bring their own lunch. :
_
to x
Ing Schwartz. and Dr. Joseph W. Romita, UF .
STUDENTS FOR GOLDWATER
Seis
Starter & Complete
associate professor of economics,
elected a new slate of officers for
Work on the new program was "Economic Problems cf Peace." Clubs by McGregor for Men, Women & Children
the
Trimester
Spring at
done by the Faculty and Student a meeting Ii
Insurance Board, composed of four Monday evening at the Florida ; Bags

faculty and four student members Union. GOLF
THE GATOR AMATEUR Radio Carts
of which Schwartz as secretary of Club will meet Monday at 8 p.m. Elected were Lionel Leon, ,i '
Interior is chairman. The board in Room 521 of the Engineering president; John Roscow, vice- .{ Putters & Wedges

was created last year to evaluateand Building. Everyone interested in president; Carol Mayo, recording Head Covers

revise the current Insurance amateur radio Is Invited to attend. secretary; and Jim Simcoke, cor- :' Balls .
,
plan. responding secretary. :'
"I would strongly advise any Plans for future activities were ;t Gloves
student not covered by any other CLUB RENDEZVOUS is spon- discussed. The next meeting will Shoes & SocksJimmie
soring a Rodeo Dance Friday from held next Monday at
program to take advantage of this starting :
8 to 12 p.m. Emcee will be Stu 7 In Room 121 of the Florida Union.
The benefits :;
coverage. are good Goods
Bauers. Faculty, Staff and stu- I'I'be Hughes Sporting
and the cost Is much less than any All students Interested in the Gold- .
dent Identification cards will be
water for President movement
other plan available," Schwartzsaid. are :;
required at the door. encouraged to come. 1113 W. University Avenue FRanklin 2-8212

... ... ._,._. .. _.
'MUm h ""1 "1 "" It"'" l IH "Ie" lJ.j A'1'<
C iV v 'fV"iJi'R' r''t1 k'i;\ }'l 1 j r:'<:'1rtFk. X ; !.. R
"Part of our goal In presentingthe
Insurance is to Increase stu-

( dent participation as much as possible

\ And we will do this by
directly contacting each student
I through the mall," he said. "
Student Government will mail 1124 West University Avenue
McCOLLUM DRUGS
every student, enrolled for the Fall

trimester, letters from UF President .

.' ,. J. Wayne Reitz and Student FAMOUS BRAND
, Body President Ken Kennedy, a
McCOLLUM DRUGS EAST
brochure explaining the plan, and & 1324 East University Avenue .
an IBM card.

"By informing the student body
I and sending the IBM card, all

: the applicant has to do is fill out

the card, enclose a check and he
I WATC SALE
I will be covered even on his way

I back to campus," he said.

Beginning August 30, the new
I' group Insurance for students will

be reduced almost $4 for single
students and hospital benefits will

be Increased from $10 to $14 per
day. y pi :s


An optional benefit will also be lOW

. offered In a clause which will refund *

university fees for any tri- LOWPRICES

mester the student must drop out
because of sickness or Injury

As an added feature to the basic 3

plan, students will have a guaranteed -

conversion, which allows

the insured to convert the Insur- Over 40 Different Styles To Choose From! -
ance to an individual policy upon

leaving the university no matter Men's and Women's +
t what his physical condition. a A

p Not only will a student be able Perfect For Gifts! Perfect For Yourself!

to Insure himself, but he will also

be able to choose from among other t

plans to enable the spouses or .88

' ) children to be covered.
Some of the benefits'are various

amounts paid for doctor visits,
Plus Fed. Tax
nurses, outpatient services, am-

bulance expenses, and maternity Now. t .
t needs.


J LOOK AT THESE FAMOUS NAME FEATURES!)
' 17-2125 Jewel Movement. ee Sweep Second I...... The Greatest Watch ,
__ 14 Carat Cold C.... ee Expansion Band
1" Automatic e Diamond Trim. Buy In
Use GatorClassifieds Incabloe Movement. e Leather Band*
M.t.rprood e Bracelet Band McCOLLUM DRUGS
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HIstory Come
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I. '\\' _. ', lJI"" .""'.... >>jttir."If,:' ____ ._ 13
1/1: ,'<< FridayMay 15, 1964 The Florida Alligator Page ,. I

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Mrs. H.D.;, Pope, picture at left, ,was' the featured speaker
atlast night's Greek Supper, sponsored by the International
Committee of the Florida Union. A long-time resident of
Greece, Mrs. Pope here exhibits her collection of dolls from ,.
the country. At right, a vase owned by Mrs. Pope Is a copy
of vases made during the 5th Centruy B. C. In Greece.
(Photo by Carolyn Johnston)



4 1 e 3 studentspicked

an--'""' .;I
for conventionThree


students from the Collegeof John D.Henry associate
professorof
Journalism school places 2ndThe Health Related Services have pathology and director of clini-
been selected to present research cal laboratories at the College of
papers June 15: and 17 to the national Medicine.The .

School of Journalism and Communications has editorial writing, feature writing or Interpretive re- convention of the American Jamieson paper reports an
been awarded second place In national competition porting Society of Medical TechnologistsIn unusual blood antibody found In a
by its students, Rae O. Weimer, director, announced Kansas City. patient at the Health Center. The
today. Scholarships already have been awarded to Florida'swinning The students are Ann L. Jamie- antibody was identified In routine
students, and matching funds sent to the School. son, who prepared apaperon"An- clinical analysis. Identification
The award to the school includes a merit grant of tl-Kldd," an unusual blood com- of the specific blood component'wasvery
$500, a silver medallion and a scroll. ponent; and Susan Ballard and Important to the treatment of
Those students in the UF journalism school who Mary Anne Griffith, who will deliver the patient, Dr. Henry said.
This is the third year UF's journalism students earned points In the overall competition are Rebecca a joint presentation on a rare
have competed In the William Randolph Hearst FounD.. Quinn, Frederick Lane, Linda Ann Barson, Virginia kind of bacteria known as Mora- The Ballard Griffith paper,
dation Journalism Awards Program, winning fifth, Gardner, Judy Barnes and Robert E. Thomas. xella Mlmeae. written in conjunction with Guido
fourth and this year second. "In view of the fact that only Controni, chief bacteriologist In
four student papers In the nation the Health Center's clinical labor

Hugh W. Cunningham, associate professor In the Thomas Is a present Gator Associate Editor. Lane, were selected presentation,two atories, deals with new methods:
school, directed participation in the contest. Mrs. Barnes and Miss Quinn have worked on the paperin from the same Institution repre- for the identification of bacteria
past trimesters. sents a unique honor,"' said Dr. In the Morazella Mimeae group
Competition runs throughout the academic year.
Winners are selected each month in news writing,
Best selling booksFiction -

Nonfiction
FOUR DAYS -- American Heritage and U. P. I.
tu THE SPY WHO CAME IN FROM THE COLD -- John
) Sa.j8; : A DAY IN THE LIFE OF PRESIDENT KENNEDY --
Le Carre.CONVENTION. Jim Bishop
-- Fletcher Knebel and Charles W.
PROFILES IN COURAGE -- John F. Kennedy.
Bailey II.
THE NAKED SOCIETY -- Vance Packard.
__
THE GROUP Mary McCarthy.
AMONG WARRIORS -- Robert Murphy.
__ Remarqup.DIPLOMAT
THE NIGHT IN LISBON Erich Maria
__ THE GREEN FELT JUNGLE -- Ed Reid and Ovid
THE MARTYRED Richard E. Kim.
Demarls
VON RYAN'S EXPRESS -- David Westheimer.
MY YEARS WITH GENERAL MOTORS -- Alfred
__
THE WAPSHOT SCANDAL John Cheever.
Sloan Jr.
,
THE VENETIAN AFFAIR -- Helen Maclnnes.
__ WHEN THE CHEERING STOPPED: THE LAST YEARS
THE NIGHT OF THE GENERALS Hans Hellmut
OF WOODROW WILSON -- Gene Smith.
Klrst.
I I r

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rich harvest of summerwear, each bearing a brand dining experience

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14 The Florida Alligator FridayMay 15,1964
.WM '.

BOOK REVIEWS H .:

Faculty news notesSEVEN


Huie explodes' Eatherly myth MEMBERS of the facultyof Mrs. Edith McBride Cameron
the UF College of Medicine have retired last month as assistant
been Invited to speak before the dean with the Florida Institute for
I South Carolina Medical Asso- Continuing University Studies after -
United Press InternationalTHE :\jr? Cherrhez l'homme, of course; but were several ciation May 7.Representing. 37 years of service.
hommes involved. the college will be Mrs. Cameron began work in
HIROSHIMA PILOT, by William Bradford Huie Stout Is an unusually skilled performer in the detective Dr. George T. Harrell, Dean; Dr. 1927 with the old General Exten-
(Putnam $ .95)): A meticulously factual biographyof category. He can still carry off the traditionaltype 0. Frank Agee, instructor in radiology sion Division, forerunner to FI-
former Air Force Maj. Claude R. Eatherly, hero of detective story, in which all the suspectsare ; Dr. Lester R. Dragstedt, CUS, as a children's storytellerand
of one of modern America's weirdest myths. gathered together at the last and anatomized research professor of surgery;Dr. a travel commentator on sta-
The accepted version of the myth has it that until the guilty one screams and tries to flee; and Melvin Greer, assistant professorof tion WRUF. I
Eatherly was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross he can make it mostly believable. pediatrics and medicine; Dr.
and hailed as a hero for his part In the Abombingof "Trio for Blunt Instruments" is good stout fare. Hugh M. Hill, associate professorof Are You Interested :
Japan; that his conscience so troubled him that he obstetrics and gynecology; Dr.
In Investment
refused a disability pension as "blood money," at- THE BELLS OF BICETRE, by Georges Simenon Jared C. Kniften, instructor in It t
tempted suicide and turned at last to petty crime In (Harcourt, Brace & World $4.95)): This psychologicalnovel medicine; Dr. Andrew E. Lorincz, Returns-Local I
search of the punishment he felt he deserved.In suffers by comparison with a contemporarywork associate professor of pediatrics. r
one form or another, this story has appearedas of non-fiction on the same subject. Simenon'sRene Real EstateOpportunities
fact In such publications as the Congressional Maugras, wealthy. high-pressure Paris news- I ?
Record and Newsweek as well as in the antiAmericanpress paper publisher, who re-lives his past as he lies ina Rules changeTraffic
around the world, although it is almost totally hospital bed after a crippling stroke, seems a little call I
1 ') false unreal, compared with Eric Hodgkins' moving accountof and parking regu- WAYNE D. MASON.
Huie Is able to demonstrate that: his stroke in "Episode." Maugras Indulges in erotic lations pertaining to restricted -
-- Eatherly's part In the atomic attacks on Japanwas fantasy about his night nurse, falls Into the typical areas are now in ASSOCIATEERNEST
strictly minor. He was not decorated for it (except depression that ma::ks victims of strokes,but eventually effect from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. TEW REALTY
for a routine award of the Air Medal). Far from being recovers his speech and emerges with only a limp on a trial basis, to allow
lionized, he was ignored -- and rather resentedthe from the searing experience. Hodgkins' book comes non-academic personnel to PHONE 376.6461
fact off far better, we suspect, because it is a superb be dropped off closer to their 2O1O N. W. 13TH STREET j
-- He attempted suicide (if he did, a point which Is job of reporting what went on In the mind and life places of work. GAINESVILLE FLORIOA
by no means sure) some seven years before he or of a victim of the frequently Incapacitating ailment. I t
anyone else had suggested he had a "guilt complex" Both we and he are fortunate that he recovered sufficiently (
about Hiroshima. to again make a living by writing. HodgkinsIs
-- He accepted his 100 per cent (mental) disability best remembered for his novel, "Mr. Blandings J
pension without question for years and probably is Builds His Dream House."
still collecting it.
-- He tried to escape rather than court punish- NEXT DOOR, by Johanna Moosdorf (Knopf $3.95)):
ment for most of his minor crimes, which included Michael Glenny's translation from the original German
check-passing, robbery and post-office burglary. comes across as adisjointed stream-of-consciousness
Eatherly read Huie's book in manuscript. He was novel about a former Nazi concentration camp doctor.
scornful."A One former prisoner who seeks Dr. Brockendorf
hundred years from now I'llbe the only American describes such men In these words: "Today he is t
anybody thinks of in connection with Hiroshima," he bound to be a model citizen with his own house anda ,
said. "Maybe they'll remember Truman,too. Eatherlyand car. The Germans have become rich and very J
Truman, The Hero and the Villian." respectful. How vulgar, how tasteless and unjustto
Huie isn't sure the ex-major Is wrong. remind them of the past, Isn't it?" Brockendorf
had evaded capture at war's end, and Is living in a
German city as head of a successful pharmaceuticalfirm. 1
TRIO FOR BLUNT INSTRUMENTS, by Rex Stout Ills war crimes Included killing children by
(Viking $3.50)): Rex Stout, who is probably the best Injecting phenol into their veins, and railroading his 1.1 I just made\rry smart buy. 2. It's an item that will stand me
working practitioner of the traditional puzzle form of wife -- when she objected to his Inhuman career -- Would 1 vou like to hear aloud it? in jjood stead throughout my life.
whodunit, also is an outstanding performer in the field Into an Insane asylum where she also was to be killed.
of the novelette. This is his latest triple-decker But she escaped, and lived as a sort of housekeeperand You can t't' I'm all .us. You don't say.
account of the exploits of Nero Wolfe nursemaid with distant relatives. The book has
M "Kill Now -- Pay Later," the first case in the the makings of a meaningful and exciting suspense
collection, involves two killings by the bluntest story, but its form -- in chapters told in the first
instrument of all -- the earth, which is pretty deadly person by various characters -- succeeds only in 'a)
when encountered by any creature in free fall. Were confusing the theme.
they accident, suicide or murder, and if the latter,
who pushed? EXTREME MAGIC, by Hortense Calisher (Little, iT l
"Murder Is Corny" is a rather more limited Brown $5): Eight short stories and a short novel in
problem, involving the unquestionably deliberate i which Miss Calisher again demonstrates her own extreme -
bludgeoning of a man delivering unshucked corn to magic in capturing and holding the reader's 1
connoisseurs. Nero Wolfe usually couldn't have cared attention. From the funny opening tale of the American
less, but the corn he got was substandard, and his girl who found that French as It Is spoken in France is
confidential assistant was a prime suspect. different from the classical French she learned from
Superficially at least, "Blood Will Tell" was a her tutor, to the tragic novella which closes the book,
simpler case. A sexy divorcee had been beatento there are entertaining and moving situations brilliantlytold.
death with a vodka bottle, so what are you waiting .
'1. It niMranttrs !\t.t'uritfor the 4. It can provide money for my 'I .
family I expect] to have shortK. ihildrt-n's education"

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FridayMay 15,1964 The Florida Alligator Page 15 ,>,.
'


nine finishes 2nd ", I ,>. ".p
;'. :J"t ,

,
,.\-J'ti'fI./.M, ;', \,;. ,'\!
.." ,, "
..\" "
By MARTIN EDWARDS contest In which the Gator offensive delivered 16 base ,;\" .<.,, :
Sports Editor
hits.Eggart ;
helped his cause by turning slugger In the (" .
The Gator baseballers downed the Georgia Bulldogs : urth Inning and blasting a home run over the leftfield \,"',. WIit.fn":> '"
twice last weekend by icoics of 1-0 and 10-4 to earn fence with two men on base. : \A 11'1\ \
second place In the Eastern: Division of the Southeastern The hard-hitting Gators rallied In almost every S

Conference. Inning, helping Eggart pick up his sixth win of the
Auburn defeated Georgia Tech twice during the week- season against four defeats. "
end to capture the Division title. Thus the Gators were able to complete their masteryover
Pitcher Charlie Anderson continued his hot pitching the Bulldogs this year. Earlier in the season
streak by blanking the Bulldogs on Just three hits the Gators defeated the Georgians twice at home by
during the Saturday afternoon encounter. He walked scores of 4-0 and 27-3. rr
three and struck out six In posting his fourth win The latter contest was a near-record offensive
of the season against a lone defeat. This was his performance for the SEC.
ninth victory in ten decisions during the past two Big hitters during the recent series Include Tom

seasons. Shannon, who hit safely three times, Including a :.w",'\,",/<. ")
homerun In the second game. Shannon upped his r'i' $

Anderson, during the course of this year's campaign, batting average to .306, but rookie third baseman Don :,,: .-' .5 Sx .. ,
has given up four earned runs during the 55 Inningsin Pendley, .313, took over the lead in the team batting 7.
which he has pitched. He has an earnedrunaverageof department by acquiring enough official appearancesat
0.65one of the best pitching marks in the country.The the plate during the series.
Gators tallied the lone run In the second inningof Other top hitters were Earl Montgomery, who made
the Saturday game when Bill Blomgren laced a two doubles among his four hits, and sophomore Bill
line-shot double to right field, went to third on a Blomgren, who sm :shed a home run and chipped In
wild pitch and rode home on Dave Porter's sacri- with a double and a single.

fice fly.Only. The ,Vuburn Tigers ended up the year with an overall
one Bulldog made It as far as third base duringthe mark of 13-5. The Gators were Just one-half behind,
afternoon. In the contest, Anderson retired 11 posing a 12-5 record. Auburn won the championshipby
consecutive batters in a row from the second to the downing Georgia Tech 10-2 Saturday.
sixth Inning. The effort was his third straight com- The difference between the two teams was a ralned-
plete game victory against SEC competition. out game with Georgia Tech in the Gators' home
Hurler Danny Eggart was the winner of the Friday series in April.



UF nine plays RollinsThe


Gator baseball team for a double-hear .* with SPORTS
reSaturday
High enough for a new state high school pole vault record
turns to action at home the Tars.
Friday sails John Worthy of Miami In last weekend's state championships -
with a single game against Rol- The Gators are currently 16-8 I__ here. Worthy vaulted 13 feet 8 Inches.
fins, then travels to Winter Park
__ __ for the season, 12-5 in SEC, and
have 10 games remaining on their
schedule. Games are evenly divided -

Icy? between home and road. Intra murals offers clubsBy

In addition to Rollins, the Gators
meet Jacksonville U. May 20 and
FSU May 29-30 at home and face
these same clubs on the road. ERNIE LITZ Contrary to popular belief these activities: do not
With the big hitting splurge of Associate Editor require previous experience to Join the club, and
the recent Georgia series,In which Instruction will be provided for all club members.The .
The UF Intramural Includes this
not only
r the Gators pounded out 23 hits, program
several Gators moved closer to summers all-campus playoff tournament, but a whole Fencing (Club is also Involved In some major ,.
host of Individual clubs to all students for
the .300 mark. open a competition but Its main purpose too, Is recreation,
wide of recreational Interests.
variety ,and any and all are Invited to participate.
Third baseman Don Pendley, The Gymnastics Club and the Judo Club are two
Most prominent recently was the Weight-Lifting
.313, leads the team In batting, other activities that have continually gained popu-
Club which recently participated In the Florida AAU
with first sacker Tom Shannon larity.
Weightlifting championships and had 3 members place,
.306, trailing right behind. Both
in a field of 50 contestants.
men will be back In action next The club meets daily In the Northendof the Springs Several Gymnastics contests last trimester drew

year.A Sports Stadium between 3 and 6 p.m.A rather large crowds In Florida Gym. Coach Joseph

Are You similar activity is the Barbell Club,whose purposeis Regna, head of the Gymnastics club la Interested In
trio of seniors are battlingto not so much competitive as conditioning among all those who want to take the time to join and learn
attain the .300 status and may the members.The something about the skills and the sport.
ASlowReader achieve their goal against Rollins. This same story is true for Coach Dick Relslnger,
They are second baseman Earl Barbell Club meets 2-6 p.m. daily In the West who Is giving his time to continue to work with the
Montgomery, .288, catcher Dave corner of the Florida Gym, in the weight room. Judo club while he is currently working for the Peace
? Porter, .286 and captain Jim Dun- Very popular during the summer months are the Corps.
A can, who Is batting at a .276 clip.A highly active Sailing Club and Water-Ski Clubs.
noted in Chicago
publisher All these clubs are expressly set up by and for
reports there is a simple tech-
nique of rapid reading which fourth slugger, sophomore The Sailing Club takes advantage of the resources of students and student participation. Anyone InterestedIn
should enable you to double right fielder Bill Blomgren, .267, Florida to allow students to get out on the water and Joining any of them, or interested In starting a
your reading speed and yet retain Is among the leaders in the SEC have a good time. The Water Ski Club also allows club In another sport, Is requested to merely drop by
much more. Most peopledo with runs-batted-in. He has a students use of facilities they might not otherwise the Intramural Department, Room 228 Florida Gym,
not realize how much they total of 22 for the season. make use of. where all possible help will be furnished.
could increase their pleasure,
success and income by reading .
faster and more accurately.
According to this publisher,
anyone, regardless of his pres- .
ent reading skill, can use this Summer vacation? PATRONIZE GATOR ADVERTISERS
simple technique to improvehis
reading ability to a remark- the world
able degree. Whether reading We'll help you see ,

stones,books,technical matter,
it becomes possible to read sen- have a great time, ""
tences at a glance and entire
Pages in seconds with this and save money, too. TennisTennis
method.To .
acquaint the readers of
Balls
this newspaper with the easy- (Pennsylvania-Dunlop-Bancroft)
tc>follow rules for developing Sheraton's Campus Representative will give you a free Student ID or Tennis Rackets (Bancroft & Dunlop)
rapid reading skill, the company Faculty Guest Card. With it you can get ION discount rates at all 90 .
has printed full detailsof Sheraton Hotels and Motor Inns 'round the world even in single Presses I 24.HOUR RESTRINGING SERVICE ')..
I
its interesting self-training rooms! With 2 or 3 in a room you save even more. And you get fabulous Covers
method in a new book, "Ad- food. Beautiful rooms. Free parking. Let Sheraton teach you a thing or Shorts for Men by Fred
ventures in Reading Improve- two about relaxing and living it up this summer at Sheratons from Perry
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who requests it No obligation. free ID or Guest Card, and more information, contact this Sheraton
Simply send request to:
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Alan Kay
Campus Representative: ,

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Dept. 3705Chicago 90 Sheraton Hotels & Motor Inns 1113 W. University Avenue FRanklin 28212Gator

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.>-



Page 16 The Florida Alligator FridayMav 15.1064



:
will be Cat"
Her name "Copy
N henceforth and forever more. Lee
__ 4
: Webb, 171 Fletcher L, submitted ij,
: the winning name, and to him goesa
free subscription to the Alli-

N gator, which means he can get It
sent to anyone In the United States
r
free of charge. Wow! Meanwhile,
Copy (or Miss Copy, or Is it Miss
4n. Cat? Or is It Mrs.?) Is sulkingand
muttering -- SHE liked 'Ma
.
_WBr_ dame x.' (Photo by Carolyn Johnston -
)


CAROLYN SMITH -t ',M' ,




Begin plans '


for 'welcome'Fall ;n V7t



,. Welcome Week activities, :'
which annually greets more than -1TIF r'w 1M
1,200 freshman and transfer women :

are underway with Carolyn F

Smith, 2UC, chairman.
Some 200 UF students have vol-
unteered to aid her as "Dig Sis-
ters" In the dormitories. In this :

capacity they will "adopt" an Incoming -
girl and help her adjust to
the new college environment. -u.

"Working together, we're tryingto .
Improve Welcome Week and

make It a meaningful, fun-filled
seven days for everyone," Miss T
Smith said. "This place can seem
like a big world If you don't know
anyone."
Beginning Aug. 29, the "Big
Sisters" will return to campusfor

seminars, workshops, and hall Faculty

decorating Miss Phyllis parties.Mable, head president I: Got a lot to carry? Get a bjib ':

(I counselor, Is advisor. notice .' + t '' i\

xikf f R'v: r';
Demonstrationsexpected : ::(
Faculty not teaching dur-
ing Trimester IDE and ';';:,

againGainesville therefore not having payroll '
deductions during that time .
can anticipate more
should make arrangementsto
civil rights demonstrations this
maintain their hospitalization ,
summer, according to James A. ':.x',"
and major medical Insurance '.
"
Gloster, former president of the
coverage during this
.. Gainesville NAACP Youth Council
period. Otherwise, the Insurance -
Gloster, a Negro student at UF, carrier will cancel
handed over the reins of the Youth ,
their membership.To .
Council, which Includes all NAACP
continue the protection .. '
members aged 12 to 25, to Frank- ;
during Term III, they must
lin Simmons, a senior at GainesvlUe's -
provide a personal check
Lincoln High School, April
made out to the Universityof ,.. ",.'.:,.. ,,'Now, qdd d few Sa' Say 8. Make oe it oislo *o you ton walk to he bat k, '' .:' ,
30."This Florida to cover the nec- "': '
summer," said Gloster, .
amount.
essary "
"the council plans to work toward > :
The arrangements must ; ,
gaining equal job opportunities for
,
be made before June 1. Before 8 i'i
Negroes in Gainesville. It also /I i
*
submitting checks, call
plans to register Negroes :
some 9,000 -
ext. 2101 for Individual
pre- ,:'i
who are qualified to vote, mium rates. :; i
but who are not registered." ." ..
:
In the past, the council has > "I"
*negotiated with local restaurant
owners In a bid to integrate eating ; \ i
CHoMPCHcMP cilohP%
facilities, also supplied pickets .

during,demonstrations at the C.I., crioMf cHoMP ':: ; .'' ", '.,' .'',,,,',,w,:.,,.},\
"
Park '' "
: ,
Plggie Humpty Dumpty, : ,; ':' "
Mac's and the Florida Theater. CHOMP CHOMP" ,. ::: ::)}.:' W" : :,:";" "
"Here on campus, I hardly rea-
lize that a race problem exists, I Cut a hole to the roof to let the sun,, in. Window At least 21. Doors 5 should do.

but in Gainesville, discriminationIs I

quite obvious," Gloster said. ),..,,t..i.,.:,',:,
Currently, 13 Negroes are enrolled -
at the UF. Seven, threeof
them girls, live In university
housing. The others live offcampus. -


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