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UFPKY NEH LSTA SLAF



The Florida alligator
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028291/00077
 Material Information
Title: The Florida alligator
Alternate title: Summer school news
University of Florida summer gator
Summer gator
Alternate Title: Daily bulletin
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Orange and blue bulletin
Page of record
Physical Description: v. : ; 32-59 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: the students of the University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Creation Date: March 5, 1948
Publication Date: 1912-1973
Frequency: daily except saturday and sunday (sept.-may); semiweekly (june-aug.)[<1964>-1973]
weekly[ former 1912-]
weekly (semiweekly june-aug.)[ former <1915-1917>]
biweekly (weekly june-aug.)[ former <1918>]
weekly[ former <1919-1924>]
weekly (daily except sunday and monday june-aug.)[ former <1928>]
semiweekly[ former <1962>]
weekly[ former <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates: 29.665245 x -82.336097 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note: Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note: Has occasional supplements.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000972808
oclc - 01410246
notis - AEU8328
lccn - sn 96027439
System ID: UF00028291:00077
 Related Items
Preceded by: Orange and blue
Succeeded by: Independent Florida alligator

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
        page 6
    Main: Extra
        page 7
    Main continued
        page 8
        page 9
        page 10
        page 11
        page 12
Full Text



Student Owned

Student Controlled

Dedicated To Student

Interest


C -fA



to


Vol. 39, No. 22
n- 9-o--- University Of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 5rch ", 1948




Dr. Miller Becomes President Here Toay



National Educators Meet ---- ;- ... .. President Of U.of Illinois



Endorses Regional Plans To Deliver Main Address


The University of Florida was the site for one of the
most important conferences in the history of the South
Wednesday and Thursday, as educators from all over
Dixie met to form the framework for a regional college
program.
Other national educators were
present to endorse the regional
better college plan as "the only
answer to needs for better train-
ing in highly specialized fields
throughout the nation."
Owen D. Young, New York in-
dustrialist and educator and one n ,u d r
of the top 25 men of the nation, Vou In I I
said that the South will be able
to put its plan into effect "quick- Pr
er and easier than we in the
North, but we know it is inevit- essi l
able there too."
Dr. Oliver C. Carmichael, presi-
dent of the Carnegie Foundation Students To Take Part
for the Advancement of Learning, .
whose speech is one reported in For FirSt Time In
this same issue, believed that this College History
Southern plan provides the only
present hope for adequate train-
ing in certain fields. Today, for the first time in the
In the past, this type of region- history of any institution, students
al education as was outlined here, will take uart in an inauguration.
and which will be placed in the
Alligator as soon as it is released, Leading the procession at the in-
has been often discussed in pro- auguration of President Miller to-
fessional meetings, but until Gov. day will be representatives of stu-
Millard Caldwell of Florida set- dent government and organiza-
tied on this idea for a regional tions.
conference, nothing specific was Next in the procession will come
done. official representatives of nation-
What the educators agreed on al social fraternities and sorori-
Wednesday and Thursday will be ties, representatives of the Alum-
relayed to the Southern gover- ni Association, faculty of the Uni-
nors, most of whom are expected versity of Florida, delegates of
to meet in Washington next week. learned societies, foundations, and
Ed Ray, managing editor of the educational organizations, educa-
T empa Daily Times, gathered tional representatives of the gov-
statements from several educa- ernors of the Southern states, dele-
tors, and they are printed here in gates of universities and colleges,
part: the Academic Council, official
Dr. Caldwell and Mr. Meadows guests, Board of Control, and Gov-
ao Alabama: A well-rounded pro- ernor Caldwell and the Cabinet.
gram of tax-supported higher edu- The procession will end with the
action for Alabama requires at- he procession will end with the
cation for Alabama requires at- entrance of the President of the
tention to at least the following Univerit il ie, f
areas in addition to what is now University, J. Hillis Miller, fol-
available: 1-Facilities for the lowed by the Chairman of the
doctorate which is now being of- Board of Control.
feared only in medicine. 2-Facili- Members of the Board of Con-
ties for strengthening the first trol include: J. Thomas Gurney,
year of graduate work in all fields. Chairman, Orlando; Thomas W.
3-Expansion of facilities for tech- Bryant, Lakeland; N. B. Jordan,
nical and professional education Quincy; J. lIenson Markham,
in at least the following: Law, en- Jacksonville; Hollis Rinehart, West
gineering, architecture, medicine, Palm Beach.
dentistry, nursing (collegiate lev- Present with the Governor of
eli and pharmacy, social work Florida, Millard F. Caldwell, will
and forestry. be members of his cabinet: Robert
:Jr. Staples and Dr. Jones of A. Gray, secretary of state; Clar-
Ar.iansas: There are so many enie M. Gay, state comptroller; J.
fields that we can't enumerate Edwin Larson, state treasurer; J.
t. em' fully. Btft we. know that Tom Watson, attorney general;
we must act regarding veterinary Nathan Mayo, commissioner of
heedicine, dentistry, social work, agriculture; Colin English, state
architecture, petroleum, engineer- superintendent of public instruc-
ing and, of course, the medi- superintendent of public instru
cal and other such professional Lon
schools.
Dr. Byrd of Maryland: There cation l
are many fields in which we could Educ tonal Plan
establish regional schools for stu-
dents of both races. Engineering Given Educators
and professional schools are among i
our greatest needs. By GS
Dr. Mlller and Dr. Williams of By Governors
sional schools, we have a great In an attempt to keep the reg-
need for forestry graduate work, ional educational plan from get-
Dr. Erwin of North Carolina: ting mixed up with party politics
We have no dental or veterinary and racial issues, the southern
facilities. We also need schools governors here turned over their
in some of the sciences, in nurs- plan to the educators. l
ing and mining. We are ahead Governor Millard Caldwell, of t
of most Southern states in grad- Florida, is the only governor pres- a
uate work, but there is much we ent in the discussion of a plan
need to do on the regional level, for cooperative financing of high-
Dr. Miller of Virginia: We could ly specialized and professional
use 600 trained librarians in Vir- training schools, for which the
ginia right now, but they are not region's leading college presidents
available, nor is the facility for and deans are gathered here.
training them. We need graduate Caldwell said yesterday's meet-.
schools in veterinary medicine, ing was a working conference
forestry and a, great amount of devoted to the establishment of
training in the professional fields a practical program ,of procedure
for both races, of regional education.
e


DISTURBANCES SNOWBALL INTO DISASTER


Resources Development

Topic Of Dean MacQuigg

President Of ASEE Says That Modern Life
Complicated By Dependence On Mechanization
Dean Charles E. MacQuigg, sufficient to service a community
president of the Americas Society of 3,123,000 people or of the order
for Engineering Education, in an of magnitude of Chicago.
address Wednesday night before Stream pollution was briefly
a large gathering of Southern ed- discussed by reference to a re-
ucators and engineers, said, cent publication of the Georgia
Modern life, dependent as it is on Institute of Technology. The bio-
mechanization, has complicated logical relation to the oxygen
Our way of living to such an ex- content of the streams is discus-
tent that ordinary disturbances sed with a fascinating brevity and
may snowball into a major disas- clearness, showing how the inves-
ter. tigators of Georgia streams had
Speaking on the development of revealed conditions requiring rem-
natural resources by engineering edial treatments.
colleges, he gave an illustration Dean MacQuigg then passed
of the ei.ect our modern urban to equally grave problems In-
versus rural life by speaking of volving our fuel supply. Over in
the occurrence of a blizzard in a Alabama the power company,
rural community as against the the university, and the U. S.
effects of the same storm in a Bureau of Mines are working
highly mechanized metropolitan on the underground gassifica-
area. tion of coal. It seems fairly ob-
"In the congested areas of a vious that before long, synthet-
great city a breakdown of the ic petroleum products will have
'ilk supply would quickly be to be made in the main from
followed by disaster if unreliev- coal.
ed; the same holds for fuel, Referring to recent develop-
ransportatuon, water supply, mnents in Florida, mention was
garbage disposal and all of the made of the tung oil industry,
numerous facilities which we and especially the modern sewage
take for granted," he stated, disposal laboratory plant being
The quoted installed on the campus of the
figures showing University of Florida at Gaines-
the demand for w ville. the speaker closed with the
Water alone n in i statement that the place of engi-
iet modern so- neering colleges and their import-
ity; good pot- ance for training the needed scien-
lai water, he tific talent was only too obvious.
Oro0 b abIyV be IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT
ought cheaper The Florida ALLIGATOR will
l transported have two editions today-the one
1 lower cost you are now reading and anoth-
all air, Namely, for a few cents er one which will be out for dis-
er toll in most communities, tribution shortly a f ter one
.1he told of one steel plant in o'clock today. It will be distrib-
hio W'hich had an estimated con- uted outside the inauguration
aPti"on of water in a quantity ceremonies.


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Pictured is Florida Field, where inauguration ceremonies are scheduled to take place. In the event of inclement weather, the ceremonies
will be held In the University Auditorium with the persons holding reserved seat tickets being seated before others.


ASEE Meeting


Opens With Talk


By Dr. Miller'

Inaugural week conferences of-
ficially got underway Wednesday
afternoon when Dr. J. Hillis Mill-
er, president of the University of
Florida,, opened the first confer-
ence of the American Society of
Engineering Education in P. K.
Yonge Auditorium.
In greeting the members of
the Council of ASEE, Dr. Miller
said, "I am, perhaps, handi-
capped by intellectual innocence
of technical aspects of puire en-
gineering, but 1 have had: very
close association, through ad-
ministration, with engineering
education.
"I hold the opinion that a pro-
fessional school within an institu-
tion of higher learning needs in-
telligent administrative support.
Such support will aid the College
of Engineering at the University
of Florida, for example, in find-
ing its rightful place in the
school's total curriculum."
Dr. Miller's opening words were
preceded by an introductory talk
by Dr. R. C. Ernest of Ohio, en-
gineering instructor of the Uni-
versity of Louisville (Ky.).
According to Dean Joseph Weil
of the University of Florida Col-
ege of Engineering, "experimen-
tal research" are the key words
it this week's conferences of the
ASEE.
An address by Dean Weil,
during the opening conference
attempted to answer the ques-
tions of development of engi-
neers in the South and how
these engineers can guide our
republic In sound democratic
ways.
Dean Weil said, "Engineering
experimental research will at-
empt to promote intelligent con-
ervation and use of the vast re-
ources of the Southeastern Unit-
d States for practical purposes
n the relatively near future."
Prior to the opening confer-
ence Wednesday, a committee of
he Engineering Council for Pro-
essional Development arrived on
he University of Florida campus
o inspect facilities of the College
f Engineering. This inspection is
art of a nationally recognized
program of collegiate accrediting
n engineering education.


Sweigerf Discusses

Practical Curricula

or Engineering


There's No Let-Up


INAUGURAL CONVOCATION
FLORIDA FIELD STADIUM, 10:00 A.M.
J. Thomas Gurney, A.B., LL.B., Chairman of the Board of Control,
Presiding.
Concert University of Florida Band, R. DeWitt Brown, directing.
Processional-Coronation March Meyerbeer.
Invocation The Right Reverend John Durham Wing, D.D., Bish-
op of the yEpiscopal Diocese of South Florida,
Address-The Role of Education in International Affairs, George D.
Stoddard, Ph.D., Litt.D., LL.D., L.H.D., President of the Univer-
sity of Illinois.
Address-The University's Responsibilty, Colgate W. Darden, M.A.,
LL.B., President of the University of Virginia.
Vocal Solo-The Lord's Prayer Malotte, Gladys Swarthout, Mez-
zo Soprano, Gibner King, Accompanist.
Induction of the President-The Chairman of the Board of Control.
Inaugural Address-Higher Education: The Balance Wheel for Prog-
ress in the State of Florida, Joseph Hillis Miller, M.A., PhD.,
Litt.D.
Conferring of Honorary Degrees-The President of the University.
Ralph H. Allee, Director of the Inter-' merican Instiute of Ag-
ricultural Sciences, ;Cos)s-9 P 7s.. .Presented .hy Provost H. Har-
old Hilme. ,
0. C. Carmichael, President of the Carnegie Foundation for the Ad-
vancement of Teaching. Presented by President Emeritus John
J. Tigert.
Colgate W. Darden, President of the University of Virginia. Present-
ed by Governor Millard F. Caldwell.
George D. Stoddard, President of the University of Illinois. Pre-
sented by Vice-President John S. Allen.
Owen D. Young, Foi-mer President and Chairman of the Board of
Control of the General Electric Corporation. Presented by Pro-
fessor A. P. Black.
Citation of the Governors The President of the University.
Alma Mater Milton Yeats.
Benediction The Reverend Thomas V. McCaul, D.D., Pastor of
the First Baptist Church, Gainesville.
Recessional-Pomp and Circumstance Elgar.
FRIDAY AFTERNOON
1:30-3:00 p.m.-Buffet Luncheon for Inaugural Delegates, Special
Guests, and Their Wives. Banquet Hall, Florida Union.
2:30 p.m.-Conference on Regional Planning for Library Resources
in the South-First Session-Robert Bingham Downs, Director
of the Library, University of Illinois, Discussion Leader., Room
205, Peabody Hall.
3:00 p.m.-Conference on In-Service Training for Teachers, B. C.
Riley, Dean, General Extension Division, University of Florida,
Presiding. P. K. Yonge Auditorium.
4:30 p.m.-Meeting of the Committee on Cooperation in Higher Edu-
cation of the Southern University Conference, Harley W. Chand-
ler, Chairman of the Committee, Presiding. Room 202, Build--
ing D.
6:30 p.m.-Dinner for Visiting Librarians and Guests, C. A.. Robert-
son, Chairman of the Division of Language and Literature, Pre-
siding. Wesley Foundation.
Address-Cooperation in Higher Education Among Southern Univer-
sities, Harley W. Chandler, Dean of the University of Florida.
8:15 p.m.-Recital-Joseph Shuster, Cellist, University Auditorium.
Delegates, Conference Participants, and their Wives Will Be Guests,
of the University.
SATURDAY, MARCH 6
9:00 a.m.-Conference on In-Service Training for Teachers, G. Bal-
lard Simmons, Acting Dean, College of Education, Presiding.
P. K. Yonge Auditorium.
10:00 a.m.-Conference on Regional Planning for Library Resources
In the South-Second Session-Robert Bingham Downs, Discus-
sion Leader. Room 20 kPeabody Hall.


LEGAL REVIEW PUBLISHED

First Review Presented

To Governor Caldwell
Governor Millard F. Caldwell received the first copy -of
the University of Florida Law Review at a breakfast yes-
terday given at the Hotel Thomas by members of the Law
Review staff.
In accepting his copy the Governor congratulated the


The selection of correct engi- student editors on the success of
neering curricula to tie in with their project. He expressed the view, presented the first copy to
the actual practing of the pro- belief that the publication would the Governor, whose enthusiastic
session was the theme of an ad- take its place among the scholar- support did much to make the pub-
dress by R. L. Sweigert Wednes- ly legal periodicals of the nation, location a reality. Warren M.
day in P. K. Yonge Auditorium. and that it would become of in- Goodrich, present editor-in-chief,
Sweigert's talk was in connec- creasing value to the bench and introduced the guests, and thank-
tion with the presentation of re- bar of the state, particularly if it ed Professors James M. Day,
search papers and discussion of followed a course of diligent re- Frank E. Maloney, and George
academic engineering problems. search and constructive criticism. John Miller, faculty advisors, for
"It has been an all-too-common, Harold B. Crosby, editor-in-chief their energetic roles in getting the
practice," he said, "to study en- of the first issue of the Law Re- review underway.
gineering iurricula and determine
what constituted an average cur- S O I PI
riculum As a result it ap- scene f Regional manning
pears that engineering education
may not be keeping up with the .
practice of engineering.
"Engineering practice, as I
know it, and as verified by many 'nd s"
articles by practicing engineers in
various engineering publications A
as well as by discussion with .s r
practicing engineers, is based up- -o. .,
on function and upon areas of fun- -4 i 0 ,
damental knowledge." ..
Sweigert presented, as part of
his address, an outline listing the
functions and preparatory divi-
sions that engineers 1nay engage -. .
in prior to practiiing engineering. ----,
He proceeded further into the Educators and scholars of the future will look back upon P. K.
graduate levels of education and Yonge as the place where regional planning was given impetus.
discussed fundamental areas of It was here that many conferences were held in conjunction with Pres-
knowledge basic to engineering. ident Miller's inauguration.


tj


By Robin Brown
The University of Florida will witness one of the biggest
events in its history this morning when Dr. J. Hillis Miller
is inaugurated as its fourth president.
The inauguration ceremonies are tentatively set to
take place in the University Sta-
dium. In case of inclement wea-
ther, however, the event will be
moved to University Auditorium.
of the auditorium, guests of the
STUniversity having reserved sec-
tion tickets will be seated before
Presidents To Be other persons are admitted.
The inauguration ceremonies
will have a nation wide hookup
over New York Mutual from 12:30
&Given Awards to 12:45 this afternoon. Title of
the program will be ::Salute To
Florida" and will include a portion
Young, Darden To Get of Dr. Miller's inaugural speech.
Degrees Presented By The main address will be giv-
Pre n Meill en by Dr. George D. Stoddard,
President Miller president of the University of Il-
linois. Also, an address will be
Two university presidents, one made by Dr. Colgate Darden,
lawyer-economist, the director of president of the University of
Virginia and former governor of
the Inter-American Institute of Virginia.
Agricultural Sciences, and the Students of the University will,
president of the Carnegie Foun- for the first time in the history of
dation for the Advancement of inauguration ceremonies play an
Teaching, will have honorary, de- important part in the procession.
grees conferred upon them by Dr. It is also noted that the general
public has been extended a "cor-
J. Hills Miller at the Inaugural dial invitation" to participate in
Convocation today. the program.
The two university presidents


are Virginia's Dr. Colgate W.
Darden and Illinois' Dr. George
D. Stoddard. Dr. Darden, for-
mer governor of Virginia, was
chancellor of William and Mary
before coming to his present
post. Dr. Stoddard was a mem-
ber of the United States dele-
'gation to the UNESCO meet-
ings and was also chairman of
the United States educational
mission to Japan. Both men
will receive the degree of doc-
tor of laws.
'Owen D. Young, for 26 years
chairman of the board of General
Electric, holds honorary degrees
from 24 colleges and universities,
and is a commander of the Legion
of Hbnor of France, a commander
of the Order of Leopold of Bel-
gium, and has served as a mem-
ber of the Board of Regents of
New York. He will also be award-
ed tihe degree of doctor'of laws.
The remaining tao to be award-
ed degrees are Ralph H. Allee, di-
rector of the Inter-American In-
stitute of Agricultural Sciences,
and Oliver C. Carmichael, presi-
dent of the Carnegie Foundation
for the Advancement of Teach-
ing.
Allee has on number of oc-
casions represented the State
Department and the Depart-
ment of Agriculture in interna-
tional affairs. He also organized
collaboration in agricultural re-
search and education with other
American republics. Allee will
receive the degree of doctor of
science.
Carmichael, former chancellor
of Oxford, is now a senator of
Phi Beta Kappa. He was also
chancellor of Vanderbilt Univer-

sity and is noted for his work on
the Belgian Relief Commission
under President Hoover. Car-
michael will receive the degree of
doctor of laws.


Federal Education

Office Functions

(ited For Engineers
Armsby Says Group
Harmonizes U. S. Needs
Henry H. Armsby, specialist for
education in engineering, speaking
before' a luncheon group of the
American Society for Engineering
Education, brought, forrth 10 sig-
nificant facts pertaining to the ac-
tivities of the United States Office
of Education in Washington. He
stated in part:
"The U. S. Office of Education
keeps the ASEE posted on what's
going on in the nation's capital,
relative to educational engineering
. .,. recently released a work with
title 'Zeal to Democracy' for pub-
licttion in the ASEE Journal .
attempts to secure accurate fig-
ures of available engineers and
jobs that are available for them
all over the country.
"The office is preparing to mail,
extensively, a questionnaire which
will sample opinions about how to
improve general and specialized
education. Naval men are being
encouraged to take graduated
courses at the Universities of
Maryland, Virginia, and Califor-
nia perhaps the University of
Florida will offer this service to
personnel of the United States
Navy.
"Non-veteran educational aid has
the recommendation of President
Truman's 'Committee of Higher
Education.' This latest proposal
is two-fold. First, plentiful schol-
arships of $744 each, and second,
$1500 fellowships for 10,000 stu-
dents now and up to 30,000 in
three years."


CAN BE DONE


Need For Pooling Resources

Apparent, Says Carmichael

No Longer Justification For Waste,
Noted Educator Tells Audience


Prof. Blessey


Talks Of Federal


Aid To Education

Speaking before the conference
of the American Society for Engi
neering Education, Southeastern
Section, Wednesday, Prof. Walte:
E. Blessey, associate professor
Tulane University, stated:
"Our whole system of high:
education in the United States i:
reaching far too few persons witl
a program that is too 0oi in qual'
ity Instead of having four pei
cent of our population collegI
graduates, we should raise th<
percentage to at least 10 pe]
cent .
"The federal government has
continually encouraged and as-
sisted institutions of higher learn-
ing There is no consistent
pattern running through federal
legislative acts, but it is evident
that the federal government has
made and is making use of high-
er educational institutions .
"The federal government has
always been interested in aiding
higher education -out never before
with the keen interest that is now
evidenced by our legislators and
statesmen in the advancement in
science and technology. Therefore,
if a federal program of scholar-
ships and fellowships materializes
as surely it must, then, if it is to
achieve its purpose, we as engi-
neers and educators must be pre-
pared to lend assistance to our
government in the selection of the
most qualified potential engineers
in that vast reservoir of American
high school students."


State Troopers

Will Escort

Campus Visitors
A group of 18 State Highway
Patrolmen will convoy visiting ce-
lebrities for the inauguration cere-
monies and the Regional Education
planning conferences.
These troopers, commanded by
Captain Clifton and Lt. T. J. Reil-
ly, will escort the visiting dignita-
ries as they travel back and forth
about the campus and the city of
Gainesville. T he complement,
which arrived Wednesday from
Lake City, will also stand by while
inauguration is going on in the
football stadium.


Regional librarians

Hold Two-Day

Conference Here

"Regional Planning for Library
Resources in the South" is the
topic for three sessions of librari-
ans from colleges and universities
in the South to be held here this
afternoon and Saturday morning.
Dean Harley W. Chandler's ad-
dress on "Cooperation in Higher
Education Among Southern Uni-
versities" will highlight the con-
ference. Dean Chandler will speak
at a dinner tonight at 6:30 for vis-
iting librarians and guests to be
held at Wesley Foundation.
Opening session is scheduled for
this afternoon at 2:30 in room 205,
Peabody Hall with Robert Ding-
ham Downs, director of the library
of the University of Illinois, act-
ing as discussion leader.
Ten o'clock tomorrow morning
will see the close of the conference
with a discussion under the direc-
tion of Downs in room 205, Pea-
body Hall.


*the delegates that the dawn of a
new day for higher education hi
the south was approaching .
Much has happened since 1933
in the field of social planning
which encourages the belief that
the time is ripe for novel under-
takings, for some bold pioneer-
ing. The recent discussions In
the Conference of Southern Gov-
ernors as reported in the papers
confirm the Impression that ef-
fective planning is possible and
that now is the time to under-
take it .
The most expensive phase of ed-
ucation is that required for med-
icine. The cost of 'laboratory and
hospital facilities added to that of
instruction in our best medical
schools exceeds $3,000 per capital
annually. The solution to the prob-
lem of cost is clearly cooperation
between states to the end that the
best applicants will be cared for
and that training of high quality
will be assured .
No one state alone could bear
the cost, nor would it have enough
, students wishing to avail them-
selves of this highly specialized
training to fill the laboratories and
classes. But a half-dozen states
acting together should be able to
realize the ful potentialities of the
birthplace of the atomic bomb and
thereby provide for the South and
the nation the outstanding scien-
tists of the future .
It is worthy of note that no oth-
er region has ever undertaken so
bold an enterprise nor one that
has so much promise for the fu-
ture. The fact that regional plan-
ning is already farther advanced
in the south than in any other sec-
tion of the country gives substance
to the belief that broader and more
inclusive plans can be realized.
Exceptional resources already
exist in the South for the develop-
ment of an outstanding center for
research and training in the phy-
sical sciences in the Oak Ridge
plant near Knoxvilla.


Dr. 0. C. Carmichael, president
of the Carnegie Foundation for the
Advancement of Teaching, speak-
ing before the General Session of
the Conference on Regional Plan-
ning in Higher Education Thurs-
day morning, stated in part:
It is becoming increasingly clear
that educational and cultural en-
terprises must be so planned as to
get maximum results for expend-
itures made. There is no longer
justification for waste of resources
through dupl*Yation of efforts
which could be avoided through
planning and cooperation. With
Fifteen years ago I spent two
days in this University with a
group of southern educators dis-
cussing the various aspects and
possibilities of planning for high-
er education in this region. It
was recognized then that if the
maximum educational resources
were to be made available to
youth some division of labor
would have to be agreed upon
and programs based on that
agreement established in south-
ern institutions .
The possibilities of specialization
in English, History, Economics,
Psychology or some other single
subject-matter field on the part of
institutions came
up for consil-ra-
tion. It was re:-
ognized that irrt
class gradu at :
and research pro- f "
grams in all thes,_s-
fields could not F
be provided by
any one institll- i
tion. It would bL
possible, however,
by concentration on some one field
for each of the stronger universi-
ties to develop library resources
and provide staffs for graduate and
research work of highest quality.
The memory of that meeting
held 15 years ago is still vivid in
my mind. The high hopes expressed
at the time left the impression on


0


The Largest Circulation

Of Any Non-Daily Paper

In The State 0oiFloriSia






































































































The Best Food


The Florida Alligator, Friday, March 5, 1948


Clubs And Organ


Twenty Students
To Receive Bids
From Gargoyle
, Twenty students of the School
/of Architecture and Allied Arts
will receive bids for membership
in Gargoyle, honorary architect-
ural fraternity.
Architectural students to re-
ceive bids include Robert L. Allen,
St. Petersburg; Ernest Bowen,
Gainesville; Robert B. Browne,
Jacksonville; Harry E. Burns,
Neptune Beach; George Fisher,
Jacksonville; Theodore Gottfried,
Miami eBach; Herbert S. John-
son, Palm Beach; Winton J. Roe-
chach, Fort Pierce; Clarence
Sproule, Gainesville; Woodrow W.
Wilkins, Pensacola; Jack S. Wil-
son, Edgar A. Wilson, Fort My-
ers; W. S. Bierbower, St. Peters-
burg, and Edward G. Grafton,
Coral Gables.
Students of Building Construc-
tion receiving bids are: William
C. Clark, Jr., Daytona Beach; Ed-
ward A. Ehinger, Palm Beach;
John B. Nora, West Palm Beach,
and Henri Scroville.
Swan A. Brown, Gainesville
student of Landscape Architec-
ture, and Robert A. Stratton, Or-
lanldo, student of Painting, w ill
also receive bids to Gargoyle fra-
ternity.
Pledge projects will be assign-
ed during the coming week by an
initiation committee composed of
Gerald Gunderson, Gainesville,
chairman, Dick Wyke, Miami,
Jerry Garrison, Sarasota; and,
William Latsko, Gainesville. Inia-
tion ceremony will be held March
23, and will be followed by a
banquet, to which wives and
dates will be invited.
At the last meeting plans were
discussed for the writing of "The
Gargoyle Spout," anunal publi-
cation of activities 9f the School
of Architecture ana Allied Arts.
Other activities planned by Gar-
goyle for the semester -include a
spring picnic, May 2, and spon-
soring of speakers on architectur-
al subjects.

Sally: "Why does Bill look so
$ad lately?"
Sammy: "Oh, these long skirts
are getting him down-he has no
imagination."




CALECHESTERFIELD,
LUCKY STRIKE, PHILIP
MOMRIS, OLD GOLD, PALL S
MALL. KOOL RALEIGH,
HERBERIT TAREYTON |
SAVE MONEY--and trips to
th elore-by bthi Biole-coil-
Venet wayv of buyIngVla&-s
rette. OLER BYMAIL
with condenae direct ifrom thisl
ad-at our BARGAIN PRICE
o SI1.50 per c Onof 200. We
pay postae, Insure, always B
reh C-tats ImmediatelY'.
ORDERALL 'YOU WANTI
TONSI Send Check or Mon Order, or aeaowe
C.O.D. Act nowl Order TODAYi
JOHN ROBERT SALES cO.
Dept. W-4 Box Clayton 5, Mo.


Above is. Dr. George F. Weber,
president of the Florida Academy
of Sciences, .who .has .called a
meeting of the. group's, council
for tomorrow morning at 10
o'clock in Science Hall to decide
where the annual meeting of the
academy will be held.
The academy, affiliated wi t h
American Association for the Ad-
vancement of Science, Is a state
group concerned with results of
scientific research in the physical,
social, and biological sciences.

DTD Will Hold
Annual Banquet
Brothers and pledges of Delta
Tau Delta will travel en masse
to Jacksonville Saturday to cele-
brate the founding of the nation-
al fraternity and Delta Zeta chap-
ter of the University of Florida.
The banquet, being held this
year at the invitation of the Jack-
sonville alumni chapter, is being
held at the Roosevelt Hotel and
marks the 23rd annual affair of
the Floridla'Delts.
H. J. Doherty, local chapter
president, will be master of cere-
mqnies. and Guy Botts, prominent
Jacksonville lawyer, will be prin-
cipal speaker. Over 150 alumni
and undergraduate members are
expected to be present.


Young Demos Ask

Class Suspension
Young Democrats unanimous-
ly, at their meeting last week,
passed a resolution which asks
that President Miller suspend all
classes May 4, Election Day, so
that the student vote may be
facilitated. The resolution, wNch
the young Democrats say is a
step forward in the working
of Democracy on the campus, is
soon to be presented to Miller
for his consideration.


I


The Best Band


KAs, Sigma Chi's Hold Annual Weekends


1


I


izations

Senator Shands
Discusses Plans
In Campus Forum
Senator W. A. Shands, guberna
trial aspirant, discussed his plat
form In an open forum Tuesda3
evening in Florida Union.
Shands spoke on his contribu
tions toward finances, education
taxes, and citrus and also denied
that he had any activities in the
repudiation of the establishment o
a campus laundry.
The speaker was under "cross
fire" when two University profes
sors of political science threw
barage of questions at him.
S. T. Dell, local attorney, intro-
duced Shands.

Phi Alpha Theta
Plans Made By
Pol. Sci. Dept.
Plans are being formulated for
the establishment on the campus
of a chapter of Phi Alpha Theta
national honorary history frater-
nity.
Dr. Donald Worcester. Depart-
ment of History and Political Sci
ence, has called an organizational
meeting for Tuesday afternoon at
2:40 in Room 10, Peabody Hall. All
'history faculty, graduate and un-
dergraduate students who 'are ma-
jors in history are invited to at-
tend. Professor Worcester, Pro-
fessor Rembert W. Patrick, Pro-
fessor Paul L. Hanna and Profes-
sor Sam Proctor are in charge of
arrangements.
Phi Alpha Theta was founded in
1921 and has fifty-two chapters in
universities, and colleges through-
out the United States. Chapters
are already functioning at Florida
State University and Stetson Uni-
versity.
Phi Alpha Theta publishes the
historical journal "The Historian."


Campus Club Drops

Price On Burgers
The Campus Club has recently
dropped prices on several food
items.
The price drops that have been
put into effect include hamburg-
ers, all the way, from 20 cents to
15 cents; hot dogs, with slaw and
relish, from 20 cents to 15 cents:
Steak plates from 85 cents to 75
cents. This includes french fries,
lettuce and tomato salad, rolls and
butter.
The Campus Club has also added
hot roast beef and roast pork sand-
wiches at 35 cents. Milkshakes are
15 cents, and malteds are 20 cents.
You can tell the man "lots of
malt." and g t practically all you
want.


With The Engineers
Today's inauguration program
winds up the fourteenth annual
meeting of the Southeastern Sec-
tion of the American Society for
Engineering Eduiation, Several pa-
pers of importance to engineering
students were presented, including
such topics as "Conrolled Enroll-
nent in Engineering Schools,"
'Designing the Undergraduate
Curriculum," and the highly con-
troversial topic of "Four-Year
Versus Five Year Engineering.
Curricula." In addition, many of
the engineering educators attend-
ed the Governor's conference on
regional planning for higher edu-
cation.
All freshmen who plan to go into
ny branch of engineering are in-
vited to join the professional so-
ciety of your branch. Besides mak-
ng friends and getting some point-
ers from the Inside, you will save
some money on your professional
dues upon graduation. We have
separate societies for the Aeron-
auticals, Chemicals, Civils, Elec-
tricals, Industrials and the Me-
hanicals.
In addition, the Benton Engi-
ieering Society (named in honor
of the late Dean Benton) is com-
posed of all branches. From time
to time this column will give
you the scoop on these different
societies and their activities.


Now In Progress


9 Great Day


Of


Savings!


Every Department Participates !

March 3 through March 13


SEARS


130 W. Main St.
Gainesville, Fla.
Phone 2580


THE HOTEL CLUB


Announces

A NEW PRICE POLICY

For The Stag Room
25c Per Person

For Your Listening And Dancing
90s Per Couple


Larry Gibson and His Orchestra

Friday And Saturdays


THE HOTEL CLUB


Secession, Juleps chapter Sweethearl

Order Of The Day Selection Highlichh


Activities At Rebel Plantation Sigma (hi Function
Kappa Alpha, fraternity will be- A nation-wide tradition will b
y LEIGH CHEMICAL SOCIETY gin its Plantation Ball tonight at observed tomorrow night when th,
Tuesday at 7a30 p.m. in Chem- six o'clock when .a declaration will t"Sweetheart of Sigma Chi" is chos.
IA/ 11t ibe issued by Jack Griffin from s .... er for th c yer 08.at eo
- ietry Auditorium, Dr. A. P. Black his headquarters at Fort Kappa Theta Chapter.
, will give a talk on the "Natural Alpha stating that the Yankees Rodney King, chapter dent
d Waters of Florida." Everyone is have fired on Fort Sumpter and will present the new Sweethea
e invited. that a proclamation has been or- with p Gnld lovith e nu a rt
f dared to secede from the Union. dance to be held in her honor at
Barbell Club To Plan A Confederate flag will be raised the Twentieth Century Womens
Wei ht-Lightin Exhibit immediately with the playing of Club. Maids of honor will also be
- Weight-Lighting Exhibit "Dixie." presented. Music will be furnished
Plans will be discussed for an broadThe secession st ov erem ony i to be from 9 until 1 am. by Ed Lag and
exhibition to further weight-lift- is invited to te ceremony, which his orchestra.
ing and training on the campus at will be held on the front lawn of Preceeding the Sweet heart
a meeting of the University of the Kappa Alpha Plantation. Dance will be a. formal banquet
Florida Barbell Club Monday in Mint Jueps will be served on beginning at 7:30 in Hotel Thorn.
the Committee Room of Florida the veranda in celebration of the d as. Guests of honor will be wel.
Union. secession. There will be a barbe- f b.comed by the chapter president,
cue at 7:30. After the barbecue The above picture was taken at a P.A.D. banquet which was held The weekend officially opens
comes the Sharecropper's Stomp. last week at Hotel Thomas. Dr. George J. Miller was principal speak- with a buffet supper at the house
Weekly Dance Slated President Truman and Congress er. Standing from left to right are Sam Allgood, Dr. John J. Tigert,tonight.here will wing the supper
Tonight By Fla. Union have been notified by telegram Mr. Joe Jenkins, Dr. Miller, Clifford Sheppard, Lance Lazonby, Prof. with skits furnishing further e
l hl is r that the K. A. Chapter will secede F. E. Malloney, and Ellis G. Piper.wte it A gues swillter
Florida Union will hold its reg- from the Union for the period of entertainment. All guests will enter
ular weekly dance tonight from 48 hours. Secretary of State Mar- GIRLS GET THE RUSH sigma Chi house through a large
8:30 to 11:30 at the Recreation shall, a K. A. alumnus was wired mask that will cover the doorway.
Hall. an invitation to be Chief of Staff A prize will be given to the couple
There is no admission charge, of Confederate forces. John Edgar oes P wearing the best costumes.
and all students are urged to at- Hoover, an alumnus was asked to o rte in Pledges Couples will unmask at mid-
tend. head Confederate Secret Service. p* lm a Pi night and there will be a break.
Phil Harris and Senator Claghorn To ICmax usnh W eek fast.
were invited to attend. Saturday morning and afternoon
Red Cross Goal There wil be a picnic lunch By Jane Poorbaugh and Martha Nell Tison, Gaines- Si and their dates ill attend a
Saturday afternoon at the Mill- all-day picnic at Goldhcad State
hopper. Although advent ot coeds on the i villePark
For Campus Set The big event of the weekend Florida campus is one semester Sigma Kappa
is the first Plantation Ball Sat. old, the first organized sorority Mary Jane Miles, 1ampa; Mar-
At Five Thousand urday night. The K. A.' o have been rush period was terminated Tues- cell Smith, Jacksonville, and
growing side-burns m or the occa- day when rushees received their Nora Jean de Clereq, Inglewood, RIDING ON YOUR RIMS?
The campus Red Cross Drive got sion and will be costumed as Con- final bids to become pledges. Calif.
under way Monday under point federate soldiers and officers. The The rush period began three Zeta Tan Alpha
sponsorship of Floriday Union and belles will be called for n car- weeks ago with nine sororities Mary (Mickie) Bell, Bradenton; Re-Tire S pig
Alpha Phi Omega, service frater- riages on which will be stationed participating, but since Chi Ome- Jacqueline Beal, Gainesville; Mary AT
I tty. a colored doorman and a footman. ga refrained from rushing, only Lou Leggett, Gainesville: Janet
ilt The belles, of course, will all wear eight sororities pledged girls this Steele, Gainesville, and Joyce
Bill Rion, general chairman for hoop-skirts. semester. Ward, Gainesville.aunders Gawe
the faculty division of the Red Coronation of the Kappa Alpha Sororities which are officially Service Station
Cross Drive, has announced that Rose will take place at 11:30 p.m. recognized as being "on campus,"
as of Wednesday night $70 has Each gentleman will have two of which Chi fmega is a mem- "I understand he takes her to Youir Neighborhood
been turned in from the faculty votes, one for his date and one for ber, pledged the following: mystery plays instead of dances."
drive. Figures are not available -the girl of his choice. Alpha .Delta Pi "Yes, they love each shudder." Firestone Associate
for the student drive which is be- Virginia Lee Crews, Lake Pla- Englishman "W h a t's that
ing handled by Alpha Phi Omega. cid; Betty Vasta Hall, Arcadia, bloomin' noise I 'ear this time ofO*
Solicitations will be carried on and Kathryn Hoge, Arlington, night?
until March 15, and Chairman Rion a ona orestry va.
has announced that the University t Delta Delta Delta
goal has been set at $5,000. He raterni T Be Carolyn Cowsert, St. Peters-
requests that faculty members and burg; Evelyn McKinley, Braden-
employees contact the building n stable Here ton, and Marjorie Varn, St. Aug- "Portra
n stastine Here "Portraits
chiarmen, which have been select- ustine. K a
ed for each building. exercises for installation of a Elizabeth West, Charlotte, NC.;
Jordan Ansbacher, president of chapter of Xi Sigma Pi, national Margaret Jennings, Jacksonvile by
Alpha Phi Omega, is chairman of forestry fraternity, will be held in Be e al
the student drive. This fraternity Austin Carey Memorial Forest.Betty Blakemore, Lakeland, and b y
will sponsor the Ugly Man conte March 12, according to Professo Anne Olah, St. Petersburg.
on March 15 with all proceeds to Charles Gelt of the University of The following were pledged by er
go to the Red Cross. Florida School of Forestry. he five sororiting wes which are peti-dged
The University of MForida chap- th e five sororities which are pe n
ter will be the fifteenth in Xi Sig- tioning to be recognized:
i m Pi. Professor Geltz,-Alpha ChiiOmega
CBcamea .memberW aeat ue Wilma Faircloth, Jackson, Tenn.:
while student LaRetta M. Garland, Gainesville,
C w Colegdenat the University of California, and Jessie Mae Smith, Gaines-T o
By Eugene Dos and who is a former head of tWh r ville.
By Th e past two weeks have seenorganization, explained that the Alpha Omicron P
omThe pasto thewo year's best proek have seen purposes of the fraternity art to Bernardine Bailey, Gainesville;
presented by the cowar's best programs maintain high standards in forest Carolyn Baer, Branford: Joann 38 W. Univ. Ave
ganizations.ed .. March co15 is noe education, work for upbuilding Deen, Gainesville: Irma Jean
asiniziont dateMrch15isnow the forestry profession, and pro- Koon St. Petersburg; Barbara Te o 98
a significant date for something mote fraternal relatiqns among Davis, GainesvilleT Eleanor Cope-
other than income tax payers forestry workers. avis, Gainesvlle Eleanor Cope-
It is the date set aside for the Ag DirectworkHarods. eland, Gainesville; Iris "Bishop,
Coliseg t a g Diretor Harold S Newins, Dr. Gainesville; Carolyn Jones, Gaines-
College fish fry .Sponsored by Edwin Zi.,gler, and Kenneth R. villa, and Mary Cnningham,
the Ag Club, all interested in ag- Swinford of the forestry school Gainesville.May Cn nnhm
riculture are invited to attend ... are also members. Prof.. a a m e e Phi Mu Do You Want To Make That
Block and Bridle is still working W Miller. Jr., and Wa i e rPhi mt JWko le
hard to make the Baby C h i c k will be initiated along with 21Fraser Betty Jean Hatch, Jacksonville,
will be initiated along with 21
and Egg Show a success and forestry students.
sweatiing out the Rodeo ... Al- Students to be initiated on
pha Zeta is cooking with gas on March 12 are Fred Brett. Jr.,
the Ag College Fair.. Crestview; Joseph Bulbin, Miami; HE
A prof broke down ad gave an Edwin Collins,. Oneco; Boyd Close, SEND HER FLOWERS
open book exam, but Earl Far- Moore Haven: James Dickinson;
nell turned up without a book Madison: Robert Dodison, East-
Ray Toller hopes to pick up t h e port, Md.; Alvan Gilmore, Pensa- SO W"
teaching job with veterans at port, Md.;R Alva n Gilmore, Pensa- a e
Alachuacola; Raymond Goddard, La k e- '. Oseasf
Alachua. land; Thomas Herndon, Orange Ge,,,,
Introducing the Block and Bri- Park; Frank Hill, Tampa; Wilbur "
dle Club Founded as the To Park; Frank Hill, Tampa; Wilbur n-o
eador Club in 1931. became th eHitchcock, St. Petersburg; BWes n Mo -.
Block and Bridle in 1938 when na- Ji McClurewi, Ft. Lauderdale, Wis.; MorHen-
tional charter was secured ry Peples, Tavares; Lauderdale; Hen-l,
It aims to create interest in andry Peeples, Tavares; Levi Powell
give training in the livestock and Pinetta; Charles Rou, Reddick;
dairying industry To become Kenneth Scuddlter, San Ant. Petersburg;onio
a member, you must serye one e- s r e B -
mal in the LittleI nternational- thony Slankaukas, Tampa; and New Is she th girl who always says "Maybe"? A dainty
maLivestock show, ae Little Internationalrds Fred Stanberry, St. Petersburg. corsage of roses may help her to be more definiet-
of the meetings as a pledge, and 1948 and more sentimental.
be voted in by two-thirds of the g
members .... Two dollars fee... Colin Eng ish Spring & Summer ROSE OR CARNATION CORSAGE-$3.00
Activities are the Little Interna-
tional Livestock Show, Rodeo, Club Organized Samples Three Torches Corsage Bar
State Baby Chick and Egg Show
Give a social gathering, such At an organizational meeting Now On Display Across From FSU Music Annex
as a barbecue once a semester of Colin English for Governor At
Mets when. the horns are hung Club on the campus recently, stu-oA
out, usually second and fourth dent supporters of Colin English, Beer's Tailors PARK COPELAND
Thursday H. H. Hopper in- candidate for governor, elected PARK & COPELAND
cumbent president Animal the following or ae d Alterations o
Husbandry department are very Joe Bradham, St. Petersburg; 424 W. University Ave. Tallahassee, Florida
cooperative as faculty advisors vice-chaiman, Charles Earnest, Phone 837-Wire or Write
from time to time. Miami; secretary, Ken Jones


S


Lauret rHill; and treasurer, J im
Robinson, Orlando.
Appointed as committee chair-
men were Bob Bishop, Aucilla,
registration; Doyle Con no r,
Starke, membership; and K y t 1 e
Williams, Miami, publicity.
Joe Hall, University of Florida
alumnus and manager of cam-
paign headquarters for Colin
English, spoke to the club on the
personal history and service of
Colin English In Florida.

Former Girls' Club
Members Asked To
See Adelaide Selle
All former members of the Cam-
pus Girl's Club and all unmarried
women, employees of the Univer-
sity are asked to contact Adelaide
Selle in the Cashier's office for
the purpose of planning a dinner-
dance for April 5.


MOVING

Local & Long Distance
From Or To Anywhere .
In U. S.

STORAGE
CRATING
SHIPPING

HEMBY
Storage &r Transfer Co.
130 East Masonic St.
PHONE 2094
M. C. Allyne, Mgr.
Class '35


r;


J


09 d 0 .


_ _








State Funds


For New Dorm


Bring Results
Total Of $1,000,000
Approved For Building
The $40,000, which is part of
the State Funds for the new
dormitory building project, is
bringing in good results as the
plans for these dormitories are be-
ing hastened forward.
A total of $1,000,000 has been
approved for this construction and
other monies will be forthcoming
as the sale of revenue certificate
issues to the public begins.
"This is only the first step in
the getting of more dormitories,"
states George F. Baughman, Uni-
versity Business Manager. 'Other
supplemental plans are going to be
provided until housing needs are
taken care of for all students."
Baughman also stated that plans
for the new Student Exchange
Building are being developed as
the University has received an
amount of $108,000, which is to be
expended for this program.


New Magazine


Invades Campus
SURF, the new Southern inter-
collegiate maabzine, which goes
to more than 18 Southern cam-
puses and is circulated in all
Southern states, will invade t he
campus this month for the first
time, and will have an agency
here, it was announced today by
Phil Harsham, editor-in-chief.
With the announcement that the
March issue will be circulated on
the campus this week, SURF re-
leased the story that Pen Gaines
has ben selected as editor at the
Florida campus, and that Elmer
Atkins, Orlando, will be in charge
of circulation. These men can be
contacted in the basement of
Florida Union.
Articles, stories, pictures, etc.,
should be submitted to Pen
Gaines.
The March issue contains a
story and pictures on the motor-
cycle races at Daytona B ea.c h
held annually in early March.

KAM Will Hold
Annual Contest
Kappa Alpha Mu, national col-
legiate honorary fraternity in
photo journalism, announces its
third annual 50-print Collegiate
Photography Exhibition. Science
Illustrated, co-operating with
Kappa Alpha Mu, will award the
grand prize which includes a trip
to New York with traveling ex-
penses paid, seven working weeks
with the magazine at a salary of
$t0 a week, and promise of a job
if the win ning photographer
proves acceptable.
Entries wil be accepted by News,
Pictorial-Feature, Fashion, Sports
and Industrial classes from now
until April 30. The grand prize
will be awarded to the best of
five winners. A complete list of
awards will be announced at a
later date.
Students regularly enrolled in
any college or university are eligi-
ble to enter up to 10 prints with
no more than five entries in any
one division. Prints may be 5x7
or larger but must be mounted on
standard 16x20 board. There is no
entry fee, but pictures must be
sent prepaid and will be returned
express collect.
Entry blanks and contest rules
may be obtained by writing to
W. J. Bell, siaretary, 18 Walter
Williams Hall, University of
'Missouri, Columbia, Missouri.


Legal Fraternity
Names Pledges
Delta Theta Phi, legal fraterni-
ty, pledged 17 law students Fri-
'day afternoon in a ceremony at
Florida Union.
Those pledged include: Bryan
He nry, Gainesville; Roy T.
Rhodes, Tallahassee; John K .Fol-
som, Tallahassee; Addison H,
Thomsan, Miami; George L.
Pink, Fernandina; Wilson L. Bai-
ley, Blountstown; Joseph D. Krol,
corona; A. Z. Adkins, Jr., Starke;
Sherwood L. Stokes, Haines City;
Howard L. Garrett, Tampa; Gor-
don H. Lee, Jacksonville; Lynn N.
Silvertooth, Gainesville; George
C. Smith, Miami; O len W.
Cheshire, Lakeland; F. Gaines Se-
bree, Fr., Leesburg; Lee E. Mc-
Ilvaine, Gainesville; and William
M. Barnett, Brooksville.
Lucien C. Proby, dean of the
Fred M. Vinson Senate of l5D'elta
Theta Phi, conducted the cere-
mony.


Conferences Dominate

Remainder Of Activities


Three conferences, a committee
meeting, and a recital compose the
major activities this afternoon,
tonight, and tomorrow morning
for participants in, and delegates
to, the inauguration.
Today at 3p.m. Dean B. C. Riley,
of the General Extension Division,
is to lead the discussion on "In-
service Training for Teachers."
The meeting will take place in
the P. K. Yonge Auditorium.
At 4:30 p. m. the Committee
on Cooperation in Higher Educa-
tion of the Southern University
Conferenie will meet in room 202
of Temporary Building D. Har-
ley W. Chandler is chairman of
the committee.
Delegates, conference partici-
pants, and their wives are to be
guests of the University for a
break in the "business of the day"
at 8:15 p.m. tonight when they
attend a recital given by Joseph
Schuster, cellist, in the University
Auditorium.
A second conference on "In-
service Training for teachers" is
to be held at 9 tomorrow morn-
ing in .P. K. Yonge Auditorium
with G. Ballard Simmons, acting
dean of the College of Education
presiding at the meeting.


Glee Club Women
Choose Officers
For Spring Term
The Women's Glee Club of the
University began this semester's
activities with election of officers
at their meeting Tuesday.
Those students who were. elect-
ed were: President, Mrs. Majel
Barret; vice president, Mrs.
Elayne Williams; secretary-treas-
urer, Adelaide Selle, and librarian,
Grace Elder.
The new offciers will form an
executive council which will meet
with Director Tom Fay to handle
the club's business.
All interested persons are in-
vited' to attend the next regular
meeting which will take place in
Wesley PFoundation Chapel Tues-
day night, 7 to 9 p. m. There will
be part rehearsals in the audi-
torium, Room 3, Monday and


At Florida

ELGIN WHITE

Smokes

Chesterfields

Egm Says:
It's a eigoret'e *tat reofly tastes
good.
Voted TOPSI--Chesterfield is the
largest selling cigarette in Amer-
ica's colleges (-by nation-wide sur-
vey).


Mr. ABC Gives
Chesterfields
Free Next Week
Starting next week, a represent-
ative of the Chesterfield Cigarette
Company will visit the campus
every week to give out free pack-
ages of cigarettes, Chesterfield
agents Holly Brumby and Jim
Bowe announced this week.
Bowe stated that if the repre-
sentative, who will be called "Mr.
ABC," stops a student and finds a
package of Chesterfields in his
possession, he will give the student
an extra package.
"If the student is actually smok-
ing a Chesterfield when stopped,
he will receive two packs absolute-
ly free," he said.


Reese Smith Elecled

P. C. Club President
Holding their first meeting of
the second semester Tuesday
night, members of the Plant City
Club elected Reese Smith to head
the organization. Selected to serve
with President Smith are Theo Sa-
liba, vice-president, and Ned Ha-
ven, secretary-treasurer.
Officers of the club have re-
quested that all students living in
and around Plant City avail them-
selves of this opportunity to meet
others from their area. A meet-
ing has been called for Tuesday
night at 8 o'clock in Room 210,
Language Hall,

Wednesday at 7 p. m. It is im-
portant that members attend these
rehearsals, since a new repertoire
is being made.


'Fact Sheets'


Are Now Ready


For Speakers

May Be Had At Gator;
More Speakers Needed

Public Relations Board announc-
ed today that fact sheets and out-
lines for the student speakers who
desire to speak before a high
school audience have arrived and
are ready for circulation.
Approximately eight of 10
speeches have already been made
by student speakers, and the PRB
now urges all students who do wish
to speak before a high school au-
dience to come to the ALLIGATOR
office as soon as possible and pick
up the outlines and fact sheets
from which to organize their
speech.
It is hoped by the PRB that the
majority of speeches can be made
this semester, and reports from
some of the students show that
dates for speeches have already
been scheduled.
All interested students are again
urged to contact a PRB repre-
sentative in the ALLIGATOR of-
fice as soon as possible.

There will be another general
meting Wednesday afternoon at
4:30 in Florida Union.

Progress Tests
Information
C-11 Thursday, March 11, 8:30
p.m. University Auditorium.
C-12 Thursday, March -11, 6:45
p.m. Students whose last names
begin with A-H will report to the
University Auditorium; I-J to
room 176 of Building E; K to room
175 of Building E; L to room 174
of Building E; M to the Chemistry
Auditorium; N to room 177 of
Building E; 0 to room 178 of
Building E; P to room 179 of
Building E; Q-R to Science 101; S
to Agriculture 108; T-V to Agri-
culture 104; W-Z to Science 212.
Ms 105 Wednesday, March 10,
7:00 p.m. University Auditorium.
All students' registered for these
courses are expected to take these
tests, and each student must bring
his own pencil containing electro-
graphic lead. Students will be re-
quired to use their University stu-
dent numbers.

Poet Robert Frost

Speaks Here Monday
Robert Frost, widely known
poet and lecturer, and called by
some "the greatest living poet of
today," is scheduled to speak in
University Auditorium at 8 p.m.
Monday night. His topic is to be
"Mark IV 12."
This is not the first time t he
famous writer h a s visited the
University ot Florida. He spoke
here with tremendous success in
1940.


Business Manager

Surveys Campus

Beautification
With the planting of innumer-
able varieties of tree, sowing and
resoding of grass, placement of
shrubbery, laying of sidewalks,
redecorating of classrooms and
offices, and filling in of several of
the treacherous Gator Gulches,
the rehabilitation program of the
campus is rapidly nearing com-
pletion.
According to University offi-
cials, the recently organized beau-
tification project will have been
finished with respect to the major
scars and eyesores within the
next few weeks. However, addi-
tional maintenance and further
improvement is to be continued,
until every square foot of the
campus is in tip-top condition.
George F. Baughman, Univer-
sity business manager, said this
week that he and his office are
very grateful for the help stu-
dents have given his department
in this program. He asked that
continue with their cooperation
with all the work that has yet to
be done.


Progress Tests
In Aud. Tuesday
C-31 Literary Comprehension
Test will be given Tuesday night
at 8:30 in University Auditorium.
All C-31 students are expected to
take this test, and each must bring
his own pencil containing electro-
graphic lead. Students will be re-
quired to use their University stu-
dent numbers.
Ms 106 progress test will be giv-
en Tuesday night, at 7:00 in Uni-
versity Auditorium. All Ms 106
students are expected to take this
test, and each should bring his
electrographic lead pencil and Uni-
versity student number.


BUILDING NEARS COMPLETION


The Florida Alligator, Friday, March 5, 1948


Union To Be Center


For Student Activities
The Business Manager's office
announced today that outside con- scholastic activities. New lounges
struction on Florida Union Annex and recreational rooms will be
will be completed within a few provided, relieving the congestion
dkys. of the constant flow of traffic in
The project, started several the building.
years ago, had been delayed by
the shortages of materials, but
within the last several months,
these shortages have been allevi-
ated and work has progressed. t O WgEEKI
Work will next be started in the W E
interior of the building and con-
tracts will be let to various con-
struction companies for remodel-
ing materials for rooms, walls,
and hallways of the building pro-
per. Interior architectural plans
are finished and only completion
of the outside holds up the refin-
ishing of the inside.
Florida Union, once the propos-
ed Student Exchange Building is
finished, will be strictly a Flor-
ida Union no bookstore and no
soda fountain which will house
the offices of the various student
organizations. It will be the cen-
ter of student social life and non- .,CA


Ag. Club's Fish Fry
Tickets Are On Sale
Until Monday Noon
Professor H. S. Newins, School
of Forestry, will speak to the Ag.
Club Monday night.
At the last meeting Dr. Veldhuis
gave a talk on citrus by-products
and their future. outlook.
Tickets are now on sale for the
fish fry to be held in College Park
Monday night, March 15. Tickets
will not be sold after Monday
noon; they must be obtained in ad-
vance. Tickets are 50c each.


DANCE
AND A MOVIE

Saturday, March 6
Airbase Gym
7:30 p.m.
Admission 50c a couple
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Delicious Sandwiches

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Fine Writing Papers

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-- -----L






4 The Florida Alligator, Friday, March 5, 1948



On The Clemson


0Spot'

by m Il oyd


.FLORIDA'S NEW GYM IS TO BE COMPLETED by
February, 1949, says Dean Dutch Stanley of the School of
Physical Education, Health and Athletics. No definite
schedule has been set by the contractors, but steel con-
struction will start soon it was learned by this writer. The
$1,600,000 gym is to be the most outstanding sports arena
of the South. It will have the most complete facilities and
will house more departments than any other gym in the
South. The south end will be a separate gym, without
bleachers, for the Physical Education Department.
The'west side will house the office of the dean and
his staff. The playing floor of 27.960 square feet will
have a seating capacity of around 10,000. According
to Stanley it will be the show place of Florida. The
old brick gym will be turned over to coeds for their
use.
There is some doubt as to the destiny of the new gym or
wooden barn. Our suggestion would be to give it to the
Intramural Department for their exclusive use. Our In-
tramural Department, the. best in the South, is really a
credit to the University and needs this extra space.

GATOR SWIMMERS TAKE ON CLEMSON here
tomorrow afternoon and comparing past records the
boys from this school should grab a one-sided vic-
tory. Last year the Gator tankmen took a 51-23 meet
from the Tigers and Florida has far better swimmers
this year than last. With Bill Pepper, Lou Brown,
and others grabbing all these first place points they
are tough for anybody. With only one senior on the
squad the Gators should be a big threat for the SEC
in 1949.

LAST NIGHT AFTER THIS COLUMN was written the
University of Florida basketball team trotted onto the
game floor with one of the top cage teams of history. By c
now most of you readers.know what the score was, and we
hope it was favorable. Naturally, it would be one of the 1
major upsets in the history of the hardwood game if the
Gators won. Our vote goes to Kentucky by 20 points over
a courageous Gator quintet.

HANK GARDNER, F CLUB PREXY, is no doubt one of
Florida's leading boosters. It seems that Gardner had a
rather queer dream the other night. During his night of
peaceful sleep he heard station WRUF blast out that the d
Gator basketball team had made history by upsetting Ken- F
tucky by 20 points. No man can be expected to pull any i
harder than Hank. 8

WHEN COLUMINISTS ON THE SAME PAPER have T
to criticize each other to fill up space then their nose
for news has turned from reader interest to personal X
interest. Attention Marty Lubov and Elgin White. 7


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Open 'Til 7:30 P.M.
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Fried Large Shrimps

Dozen 85c

Fried Sea Scallops

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Sorry, We Can Take No Phone Orders 'Til Further Notice
LOUIS COULLIAS, Former Owner Royal Cafe


Baseball Squad


Cut As Opening


Game Date Nea

With the official lid lifting
the Gators' 1948 baseball car
paign less than three weeks awa
Coach Dave Fuller has begun
tighten the screws on his bumped
crop of diamond hopefuls.
Many an excess found will tak
the form of sweat during the nu
merous practice games which wi
be held from here on out in an e
fort to round the team into to
shape for the opener with Ala
bama on March 22nd.
After giving every m a n
chance to show his stuff under
game conditions in an all after
noon practice last Saturday, Fu
ler began to wield the axe.
Squad Cut
To date 30 men have been trim
med from the once bulky s q u a
of 69. The remain 39 include 1
infielders, eight catchers, eigl
outfielders and 13 pitchers.
The infielders are Bishop
Brown, FTelding, Forbes, Hudson
Milligran, P i g g o t, Reynolds
White and Whittington.
The catching corps consists o
H. Bishop, Bains, Garcia, Irlel
Ramseyer, Scarborough, Walke
and B. Davis.
The outfielders are Berquist
Bracken, C. D a vi s, Ledeaux
Poole, Powell, Schact and Strat
ton.
The hurling staff is composed
of Adanis; Dickens, Edwards
Fussell, Gaines, ,Hurst, Montsdi
oca, Owens, Stiegal, Pope, Marri
belle, Stradley and Rutowski.

Intramural
Results
Independent Softball
All Stars 22, Bobcats 2; Avon-
dales 17, Baptist 2; Gator Club 12
Presbyterian 8; Killers 9, CLO 2;
Wesley 23, Conchs 2; Seagle 5
Killers 2; Presbyteria 12, Crane
8; Hell Cats 3, Pensacola 0.
Frat Volleyball
SN over ATO, 15-9, 12-15, 15-7;
'EP over XP, 15-3, 15-2; BTF
aver AGR, 15-4, 15-4; LXA over
DS, 15-8, 13-15, 15-16; PKA over
KA, 15-8, 15-10; KA over KS 15-
11-15, 15-1; SN over SX, 15-1,
5-0; PGD over TX, 15-2, 5-15,
5-4; PKP over PKT, 14-16, 15-10,
5-10; DX over BTP, 15-1, 6-15,
5-8.
Dorm Handball
Singles: Murphree L-M over
.uckman B-C, 21-4, 21-16: Mur-
hree A-B over Sledd C-G, 13-21,
1-14, 21-19; Buckman B-C over
homas C-D, 21-5, 21-10; Murph-
ee L-M over Murphree C-D, 21-
21-3; Murphree A-B over Temp.
-., 21-3, 21-4.
Doubles: Temp. 0 over Murph-
ee L-M, 21-4, 21-8; Murphree A-
over Temp. H, 21-3, 21-6; Temp.
over Sledd C-G, 21-16, 21-13;
emp. H over Temp. K, 21-7, 21-
Murphree A-B over Fletcher


Swimmers


r

of
,-
y,
to
1er
kce
U-
ill
f-
3p
a-
ai
er
r-
1-


_ Intra-Squad Tennis Meet

o Moves Into Second Week
By Sandy Schnier
p, Gator tennis fans can treat themselves to the low-down
n on their 1948 varsity squad next Monday, Tuesday, and
s Wednesday afternoons when the second week of an "up-
A the-ladder" tournament gets underway on the clay courts
y, just west of the drill field.
r Little Joe Dunayer, former Miami Beach High School
star, will battle Byron Wise, Gainesville city champion, on
:, one court Monday while Don Kaplan and Phil Wanger
, meet on the other. Both matches
- will begin at 2 p. m.
At 3:15 Frank Skillman and T
d Bill Cohen pair off, and Bill MUphree Teams,
9, Oughterson and Jack Borling
- start on the other court. Frank T pI A Estl
- Wood and Co-Captain Bobby Rig-
gins play at 4:30.
Five matches are on tap Tues- f l rm M b I
day with Co-Captain Harry Ter- I OfDorm Handball
rell and Reece Cooper, and Bor-
ling and Oughterson starting off Murphree L-M and Murphree
at 2 p. m. Skillman takes on Wan- A-B singles teams moved into the
ger, and Dunayer and Kaplan finals of the Dorm League Intra-
open up at 3:15 p. m. Wise and mural handball tourney by push-
Cohen end the day with a 4:30 ing past semi-final opponents
match. Wednesday, while Murphree A-B
Wednesday's schedule has Wan- also reached the final round in
; ger vs. Wood at 2 p. m.; Terrell doubles competition, being paired
vs. Dunayer and Borling vs. Cohen in the title round with Temporary
e at 3:15, and Riggins vs. Oughter- O. Both final round contests Were
son and Wise vs. Cooper at 4:30. scheduled for yesterday after-
Coach Herman Schnell reported noon.
; that these matches would deter- Murphree A-B's Bowers reach-
mine playing rank this season, but ed the payoff round by edging out
that the ladder is to be set up Delgado of Sledd C-G in a close
r subject to change at any time. semi-final match, two games to
First match for the Gators is one. Delgado took the first game,
against Florida Southern in Lake- 21-13, but lost his place in the
land March 26. tourney by dropping the next two
This week's results: to Bowers. 21-14 and 21-19.
Kaplan downed Wanger, 7-5, Set to oppose the A-B singles
6-2; Cooper outlasted Oughterson, ace in yesterday's championship
6-4, 4-6, 6-2 in a hot battle; Ter- tussle was Leader of Murphree
rell took Borling, 6-4, 6-3; Ought- L-M, who won over Graves of
person defeated Terrell in a close Buckman B-C, 21-4, 21-16, in the
one, 4-6, 6-3, 6-4: Cooper beat other round-of-four singles tilt.
Borling 7-5, 6-4; Wood won over Murphree A-B's doubles combi-
Cohen, 6-4, 6-2; Kaplan downed nation of Perritt-Lott copped a
Skillman, 6-4, 3-6, 6-4; Dunayer semi-final contest from Holtsberg
came back to whip Wood, 2-6, 7-5, and Bittick of Temp. H, 21-3, 21-6,
6-1, and Oughterson took Wanger, to enter the doubles finals against
6-4, 6-3. the Horowitz Sherman duo of
Temp. 0, 21-4. 21-8 winners over
ST lar i Jewett and Kittinger of Murphree
H 4ans ? er W inS L-M Wednesday. -
Next sport on the Dorm slate is
alr a softball, which gets under way'
Ga .or k rlnq a ce Monday with four opening round :
games. Defending champion in the
Wih diamond sport is the Alachua Air
Hans Taenzler, flashy G a t o r
cage center, copped the Universi- Three Gator Seniors
ty of Florida high scoring bas- The 28 lettermen engaged in
ketball race this season with a The 28 lettermen engaged in
regular season total of 322 with University of Florida spring foot-
Harry Hamilton, forward, in sec- ball drills consist of 11 sophomores.
ond with a 283 total. 14 juniors, and three seniors. The
Taenzler grabbed the lead t h e seniors who make '48 their last
first two games and was near the season are quarterback Doug
top all season. Hamilton made a Belden, halfback Bobby Forbes,
strong bid mid-season, but the big and guard Fletcher Groves.
Jacksonville center put on the -
steam to run up his big total. Gator Lettermen
Taenzler's total score is believed
to be the highest number of points Fourteen lettermen, paced by
ever scored by a Gator cager. captain hurler Bobby Ennis, of
Other scoreres and totals ar e: Tampa, are trying for their old
Julian Miller 188, Bill Atkinson positions on the University of
120, Bill Welch 101, Harold Has- Florida track team which opens its
kins 90, Lamar Bridges 77, Hen- season with the Florida Relays on
ry Cornell 63. March 27th.


Here


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Wesley Sets Pace


In Softball Tourney
By Julian Clarkson
Wesley Foundation pounded out a 23-2 victory over an
outclassed Conch Club nine Tuesday afternoon to cinch
first place in the fourth bracket of the Independent Lea-
gue intramural softball tourney, but other bracket winners
had not been determined through games of Wednesday.
The first bracket faced possibility of a three-way tie
pending the result of yesterday's clash between a vastly
improved Hell Cat team and the Bobcats. The second
bracket outcome rode on the
Avondale-Crane Hall tilt yester-
day with the Avondales seeking
their fourth straight win, while ilgma NUS Loom
yesterday's tussle between the
Tarponr and Seagle, both unbeat- A
en, decided the winner of the As Inreaf In M ral
third bracket. ..t.. B fl
Finals Next Week VOlleyball BaIlII
The deadlock in the first group
will either be settled Monday, or
will require two days in the event The Sigma Nus loomed as a
of a Hell Cat win yesterday. Any threat to the Intramural volley-
other bracket ties will also be ball crown in the Fraternity
played off early next week with Orange league this week by de-
the finals on tap for the latter eating Alpha. Tau Omega, Tues-
part of the week. day.
Wesley's smashing win over the In the first bracket of the cornm-
Conchs found the fourth bracket petition in the Orange League the
champs on the rebound after SPE's and Delts were both un-
barely nosing out the Saints, 1-0, defeated at press time. In games
on Monday in the face of a no-hit- this week SPE beat Kappa Sigma
ter that Neet, Saint moundsman, and PKA, winning both in two
served up to them. The Wesley games. PKA was defeated 11-15,
nine snapped out of its lethargy 7-15 and KS lost 8-15, 9-15. KA
in a big way against the Conchs, played two matches beating KS
unleashing a powerful 19-hit bar- 15-7, 11-15, 15-1 and lost to the
rage, including a triple and a Pikes 8-15, 10-15.
homer by winning pitcher Zim- In the second bracket, ATO aft-
merman, mainstay of the team. er making a strong bid for the
Meanwhile the Saints wound up title by defeating Phi Delta Theta
with a 4-1 record to finish a and Sigma Alpha Epsilon lost a
strong second. hard fought match to Sigma Nu.
Bracket Tie The Sigma Nus have yet to play
The first bracket was -compli the Phi Delta, and in case of
cated further Wednesday by the a Phi Delt victory the bracket
All-Stars' 22-2 massacre of the could end in a three way tie be-
Bobcats, which gave the Stars a tween ATO, PDT, and SN. In
3-1 mark, the same record held by games this week SN beat ATO 15-
Mortar and Pestle. The Hell Cats 9, 12-15, 15-7; ATO beat SAE
also had a chance to finish at 3-1 15-12, 15-8; SAE whipped SX 15-
by whipping the Bobcats yester- 9, 13-15, 15-6; and SX lost to
day SN 1-15, 0-15.
Next week's schedule will be as
follows: Monday-KS vs. PKA, SX
vs. ATO. Tuesday-DTD vs. KA,
Pi Kaps Take Two PDT vs. SN.
The finals will be held on Thure-

Matches T Reman Drawings for golf, will be held
Sine e Intramural office on Wed-
On Top In League ne Swimming Meet
Swimming Meet
Pi Kappa Phi emerged as a Members of the varsity and ]
dark horse in the Blue League freshmen swimming team will hold a
volleyball tournament this week an intra-squad meet at the pool
by defeating the crack Phi Kappa starting at 3 p. m. Saturday it was
Tau team in a close contest Wed- announced this week. The meet t
esday.Pi Kaps remain the on will be under regular dual intercol-
undefeated team in the first bra- leate rules and reulatoe
ket by virture of their win. In
games this week Phi Kappa Tau Busy Day i
won two and lost one beating DS April 17th will be a busy day for t
15-2, 15-2 and PGD 15-10, 15-12 University of Florida athletes.
and lost to PKP 16-14, 10-15, 10- The Gators play Rollins in base- t
15. The leading Pi Kaps also ball, Mississippi in track, Stetson y
beat TX 15-2, 5-15, 15-4. LXA in tennis, and Rollins in golf. All I
beat DS 15-8, 13-15, 15-6. but the tennis matches will be in f
In the second bracket the Pi Gainesville. c
.a.ms continued their champion- B
ship march by taking all comers 15-10, 15-7. In other games DX D
to remain the only undefeated beat AGR 15-2, 15-13; BTP defeat- a
team in the bracket. In the clos- ed CP 11-15, 15-7, 15-9; BTP N
est game of the week PLP de- whipped AGR 15-4, 15-4; TEP p
heated TEP 15-12, 4-15, 15-13 to walloped CP 15-3, 15-2; and DX r
gain the lead. They also beat DX beat BTP 15-1. 6-15, 15-8. B


West University & 8th.-Phoane VZ57I


Pictured above are the Hellcats and Killers, finalists in the Intra-
mural Department Independent League bowling. The Hellcats won
the title. Front row Killers: T. L. Bailey, C. Chafin, N. Hope, D. Har-
rison, and J. SonAmers; back row, Hellcats: J. Adaltington, C. Perry-
man, N. Alien, AI Lowman.


roday'


Gator Tankmen


Favored To Cop


Fourth Victory
By John Willford
Florida's swimming team, rapid-
ly gaining back their old pre-war
reputation as being the big boys'
of the Southeastern Conference,
will square off against Clemson's
splashers here this afternoon at 4
o'clock in their first home meet. s
The Gator tankmen have split
six meets this season, winning
'from Georgia, Emory and Duke,
and dropping close clashes to
Georgia Tech, North Carolina and
N. C. State. When Coach Frank
Genovar's mermen shoved the
Emory team all over their own
pool last week to break the At-
lantans' 14 straight winning
streak, the conference pencil-
pushers built it up as a "slip on
Emory's part." But when the
Orange and Blue swimmers came,
within three points of upsetting
the top-rated Ga. Tech squad-
breaking the Tech pool record in
one event while doing so-the
scribes couldn't help ranking the
Floridians as one of the confer-
ence's top pool contenders.
The local Saurians are expect-
ed to boost up their side of the
ledger another notch when they,
play host to the Clemson aggre-
gation, as the Tigers have lost to
both Georgia and Emory. How-
ever, the unpredictable South Car-
olina outfit, recent winners of the
three-way South Carolina collegi-
ate state meet against the U. of
S. C. and Furman, lists a few
individual standouts that have
posted quite impressive records
this season.
One of these is Henry Walker,
Tiger sprint specialist, who could-
n't have picked a worse opponent
to try to stand out against. The
Clemson star will be up against
Lou Brown, one of the South's
youngest and flashiest collegiate
swimmers, who has yet to be de-
feated in competition this year in
the 100-yard free style event.
Brown's 52.3 second clockwork
against Tech was 1.1 seconds
faster than the existing South-
eastern Conference record.
Another hot race is expected
when Florida's Bill P e p p er
matches strokes against Clem-
son's Parker, winner of both the
220 and 440 yard swims in the
South Carolina state meet. Pep-
per holds six straight triumphs
against no losses in the 440.
Rod Brisendine, Clemson diving
ace, will be up against Florida's:
two Bills-Bill Bracken and Bill
Sa r 1 a n on the springboard.
3racken, rated one of the confer-
ence's best flipsters, walked away
with three straight first places
in the Gators' recent Georgia
our.
Florida's tentative list of on-
rants in each event: 50 and 100
'ard free style, Lou Brown and:
lenry Martin; 220 and 440 yard
ree style, Bill Pepper and John
Cornell; diving, Bill Bracken and
Bill Harlan; breastroke, Bud Mc-
)ougal; backstroke, Tom Brown
nd Fred Teed; 400 yard relay,
Martin, Teed, Brown, T., and Pep-
per or Cornell; 300 yard medley
delay, Brown, T., McD'.-1.al and
Irown, L.








Wowed 'Em


,,agir NXorima Raymond shows
uu the dress that ran Juan
Fi -on off :he front page when
v. urc it in Buenos Aires.
T:e C cvclahrder went for a stroll
v .:in e act off the liner Ar-
_..._; and had to clash through
:u .?t away from a thou-
S : n: ho followed her.
S.. ic wa 'aken into pro-
cu su'ody by police.



I "s In Housing

o ?e Discussed

fI, Meeting
.,cent associate members of
the American Institute of Archi-
,teLs \o'ill have an opportunity to
atlend the Florida North Chapter
m:_ting Monday night in Peabody
H I.
H. preview of the Museum of
Ao,.criT Arts housing exhibition,
on display in the School of
Arhitecture and Allied Arts, will
start at 7 o'clock.
The program of the chapter
m-eting will be on trends in
liousing. Jefferson M. Hamil-
t associate professor of ar-
chitecture since 1947 at the
University of Florida, will talk
on the subject of "Trends in
iioasing Legislation."
Hamilton was assistant to the
director of the Housing Division,
PWA, in Washington in 1933 and
1934. For the next nine years he
was the regional administrative
officer and technical consultant,
HOLC, in Baltimore. Hamilton
was a member of the firm, Adams
and Hamilton, Tampa, from 1925
to 1930, and later was a designer
for the firm of Voorhees, Gmelin
and Walker of New York City.
therer speakers and subjects
will include 'Housing Technique
and Education," by Sidney Car-
ter, who has received a master
pf regional planning degree
frontn Harvard, and "Problems
in Housing Project Manage-
ment," by Ray O. Edwards.
Ivan H. Smith, Jacksonville ar-
cbitect and graduate the 1929
Ia.. University of lrida, will
sica.l en the subject of "The
Architect's Participation in Hous-
ing." Smith was graduated from
tl' University of Florida in 1929
w;th a BS degree in architecture,
a-', is now a member of the firm
Re:-rold's. Smith and Hills, archi-
tects and engineers. Jacksonville.
Hc is associated with Guy Fulton
on the two new building additions
a'. ]!orida and one at Florida State
University.


Florabel Wolff Sunshine State Led Abe
Will DI T;i TTo Publisher For Book
Will Dlau lTila


University Cafeteria


Serves Students' Needs

New $800,000 Addition To Cafeteria Will
Increase Seating Accommodations
By Hayes Kennedy stock is approximately $25,000.
The first cafeteria in operation The head chef at the University
The first cafeteria in operation Cafeteria has been employed at
on the University of Florida camp- that position tor the last 17 years.
us wah located at the end of W. P. Long, the cafeteria manager
Thomas Hall. In 1912 the first has held his post for the past two
permanent cafeteria building was years and has executed all his
erected and is still in use today, duties with great efficiency.
During the years 1912-1929 the On the whole a wide variety of
meals were served family-style, high-grade food is served at the
and from this time on have been cafeteria at low prices, providing
served cafeteria style. Ian economic advantage for the
Short-order breakfasts are majority of students who eat their
served from 7 a. m. until 8:38( meals at the cafeteria.
a. m. in the main cafeteria, and
following this, regular break-
fasts are served from 8 'til 10 in J ourney
the banquet hall. Lunch is served
from 11 a. m. til 1:45 p. m. in
oth dining room. Spper is Faces Debators
served from 5:45 until 7 p. m.
The Campus Club, which is run
in conjunction with the cafeteria,
serves meals continually from 8 a. Wednesday, the Florida, Debate
m. until 10 p. m., presenting a wide Society sent a. group of six men
variety of short orders. Five thous- to attend the annual South Atlan-
and meals per day are served in tic Debate Tournament in Hick-
the cafeteria and the Campus Club ory, North Carolina, which began
combined. There are 230 students March 4 and will continue
employed by the cafeteria, through the 6th.
Upon completion of the $800,000 Along with varsity debaters
addition to the cafeteria, the seat- Jerry Gordon, Alan Westin, Leon
ing accommodations will be in- McKim, and Bill Castagna who
creased to' 1,144 at one sitting, will enter important debate corn-
serving from five separate lines, petition at the tourney, were Earl
Only the latest electrical equip- Faircloth and Elliot Shienfield
ment will be used in this modernis- who will participate in the ora-
tic building. To be found in this torical and radio contests respec-
equipment are such things as elec- tively.
trick steam-tables, electric ovens This is a crucial tournament for
and. stoves, and electric dish-wash- the Gators because tl.h showing
ers. In all the equipment is valued they make at this tourney will
at $135.000, not including $25,000 partially determine whether t n e
worth of new chairs and tables. University of Florida will be one
Being completely air-conditioned, of the representatives from the
this edifice will be practically southeast at the West Point Na-
sound-proof. Completion of the tional Debate Tournament to be
new cafeteria is expected by the held at a later date.
summer school session, at which There will be some 30 teams
time the main cafeteria and the present from the South Atlantic
banquet hall will be reconditioned area at the tournament in Hick-
to match the new addition. pry. Last year Florida received an
Approximately. five tons of over-all rating of second place in
footstuffs are consumed each this event.
day, and only fresh-frozen foods
or fresh vegetables are served
during the time they are in sea- PATRON IZE
son. There is a wide variety of
food served every day from-
which the student may make his College Inn
selection, including a choice of
five or six vegetables, eight Barber Shop
salads, and two or three meats.
The current inventory of foods in













-, ..




\


TrIIll r IT 1111a


Role In 'Joan'
David Hooks and and Florabel
Wolff will play the lead roles of
the Director and (the Inquisitor)
and Mary Gray (Joan) in the
Florida Players' production of
"Joan of Lorraine," a play in two
acts by Maxwell Anderson, to be
presented March 16, 17, 18, 19 at
8:15 p.m. in P. K. Yonge Auditor-
ium.
Others in the cast include: Leon-
ard Mosby as Al, the S(tage Man-
ager; Greta Andren, Tessie, the
Ass't. Stage Manager (Aurore);
Iris Bishop, Marie. the Costumer;
Stephen Sands, Gardner, (Ber-
trand de Poulongy) (Election);
Robert Murdock. Abbey (Jacques
d'Arc) (Cauchon, Bishop of Beau-
vais); James Dee, Charles Elling
(Durant Lax art); Sanford
Schnier, Dellner (Pierre d'Arc).
John Throne will play the part
of Jo Cordwell (Jean d'Arc);
Murray H. Dubbin, Quirke (St.
Michael) (D'Estivet); Rosemary
Flanagan, Miss Reeves (St. Cath-
erine):; Patricia Collier, Miss Sad-
ler (St. Margaret); Her m a n
Sihonbrun, Farwell (J ean de
Metz); JExecutioner); James E.
Mooney, Noble (La Hire).
Gordon M. Day, Sheppard (Al-
ain Chartier); Ralph E. Wilson,
Les Ward (The Dauphin); Law-
rence F. Mansfield, Jeff's a on
(Georges de Tremoille); Francis
B. MacDonald Kipner (Regnault
de Chbartres, Archbishop of
Rheims); G. Larry Rodman, Long
(Dunnois, the Bastard of Or-
leans: William B. Ferguson,
Champlain (Father Massieu).

Cafeteria Addition

Ready For Students

In June Or July'


Abraham Lincoln was never in
Florida, but a book about the
sunshine state led him t oa pub-
lisher for the only book Lincoln
ever wrote.
Until the Robert Todd Lincoln
collection was opened last July, it
was something of a mystery how
Lincoln chose a publisher for his
book containing his speeches in
the debates with Stephen A,
Douglas.
How Lincoln solved his dilem-
ma over choosing publisher was
solved by Dr. William E. Barrin-
ger, University of Florida asso-
ciate professor and author of
several books on Lincoln who dis-
covered a letter on the subject in
the microfilm copy .of the Robert
Todd Lincoln collection in t h e
University Library.
A copy of a letter dated June
26, 1858, shows that Follett, Fos-
ter and Company asked Lincoln
for a testimonial on "The Exiles
of Florida, or the Crimes Com-
mitted by Our Governm nt
Against the Maroons, who Fled
from South Carolina and Other


:ave States, Eeeking Protection
Under Spanish Laws," a book
they had published for Joshua R.
Giddings, an Ohio Abolitionist
congressman.
Since Abe Lincoln did not wish
to be identified with the Aboli-
tionist faction of the Republican
party, the company got no testi-
monial, but when Lincoln wanted
a publisher for his book it was
this company that he chose.

If a fellow trys to kiss a woman
and gets away with it, he's a man:
if he tries and doesn't get away
with it, he's a brute; if he doesn't
try but would get away with it if
he tried, he's a coward; But if he
doesn't try and wouldn't have got-
ten away with it if he had, he is
wise. -Pelican
*, *
The dimmer the porch light, the
greater the scandal power.
How fat she is
She used to wasn't
The reason is, she
Daily doesn't.


ESPECIAU-Y THE WOMEN-- THEY
WORE SHAWLS ON THEIR HEADS,
SHORT COATS, LONG, SLOPPY
SKIRTS AND PUR LINED
SOOTS--


C)AOR'AT IT, JASEZ, T. -\
WANT TrHAST WINDOW IN
THE HENHOU5s FIXED! I
IOLP YOU TO aT
YES'FIPw


P06~6C"THUN<.,y rOSH,
THERFE'.5A M1575 TlLLiSRM"
IN T11E-TRU3LI y:THO3dHT
MOT0~!1: HASPIT


YESSIR! I'VE SURE EEN
-OMESICK THIS WINTER



:4 |~ .


WHEW.'I'M ALL IN, \/60ODNE55, PAW,
MODERN FARMING C OUR. GRAN'PA
AIN'T WHAT IT' TOOK CARE OF
CRACKED UP TH155 FARM ALL
. TO BE BY HIMSELF!


Popular? He oug&t
to be!-,,He buys

'em 6/F1%om-


Lewis Jewelry Co.


Bring Us Your Repairing


All Work Guaranteed


Watchmakers, Engravers

And Jewelry Work




LEWIS

Jewelry Co.

"Gainesville's Leading

Jewelers"


Be proud ofw/Aat fou write ...


,


R


"After capping his millionth bottle, he began screaming
'Can You Top This? Can You Top This? "







6 The Florida Alligator, Friday, March 5, 1948




Official Newspaper of the Universit7 of Florida, In Gainesville, Florida
Published Wednesday and Friday morning. Application for reentry
as second clasx matter at the post office at Gainesville, Florida, pending.

Editor-in-Chief .......................... Pen Gaines
Managing Editor ...................... Ted Shurtleff
Business Manager ..................... Ken Richards
BUSINESS STAFF
Hugh Stump, Jr., Assistant Business Manager; Advertising Manager,
Ted Wittner; John Cornell. Circulation Manager; Mel Frumkos, Account-
ant; Brose Olliff, Collection Manager; Ed Prange, Exchange Editor; Mer-
chandising Manager, Everett Haygood.
Steve Sirkin, Assistant Accountant; Harry Yarbrough, Assistant Circu-
lation Manager.
Advertising assistants: Bob Birt, Murry Roth, Herbert King, Hugh Ans-
ley, Phil Harrell, Gene Scarbrough.
Merchandising assistants: Chuck Gilmore, Charlie Abbott, Van Allen,
Ernest Kopp, Bill Perkins.


On Our Own Planning

It is curious to know what people think about planning.
Take budgets, for instance. There are as many for them
as against them. You can say the word "planning" to,
many people and they will immediately think of regimen-
tation.
Courses are selected here today because they are crips,
or come at a convenient time of day, but we doubt if that is
true education.
Then, too, people even run into businesses and marriage
without planning. Cities are built without planning and
traffic is congested; it becomes ugly and people move
away.
The world is going ahead now without definite plans for
its occupants. Every nation seems to want to plan its own
affairs, and world depression follows.
But, we are plenty glad that God does not act without.
a plan-the seasons come and go, the days come and go.
We could find no meaning for life anywhere.
Since we feel their that "planning" is a discipline, and
that planning does not restrict freedom, only gives it a
framework in which to function, we would like to urge
the mapping -out of your own activities, your own ideas,
along with this planning of our education.
"There is.no longer justification for waste of resources
through duplication of efforts which could be avoided
through planning and .cooperation."-These were the
words of 0. C. Carmichael, president of the Carnegie
Foundation for the Advancement of Learning, who spoke
yesterday at a regional planning in education.
We can gather one thing if nothing else from this "plan-
ning" conference, and that is this: We had better not drift
into the future. We had better get a compass and a rud-
der and do some planning of our own way of life.


Education Is A Debt

The University of Florida is now of age. It is no longer
riding among the "un-heard-of" educational institutions.I
During the past two days, and at today's huge inaugural
ceremonies, the University of Florida has entertained some
of the most famous of contemporary educators.
We are definitely taking the leadership in higher edu-
cation, and we students are definitely a -part of this grow-
ing institution-so much a part that we can see to it that
we continue up the rungs on the ladder to become the top
institution in the South, and one of the best in the nation.
As we have said before, education is a debt due from
present to future generations. What took place here this
week, and what you students will do while you are here
will insure our carrying out our duty for the coming gen-
erations.
Dr. Miller today will be officially installed as president
of'this institution and as his inaugural address will state,
the University is stepping into a permanent piece of higher
education, and each of you must shoulder your own re-
sponsibility.
And yet we want to remind you students something
about the need for educating your own lives first. We
think of itas a sandpapering job, which smooths out wood
to a finished article.
You undoubtedly shy away from the hard work that lies

between you and a complete education The lessons are
hard, and you look around to see how happy the birds are
and how beautiful the world is, and you wonder why all
the struggle. You must sandpaper all the rough places of
study.
There is a longing in most of us to become better and
truer men and women. It will cost us, and it will require
a lot of sandpapering.
We long to make this University better. It will cost us,
and it will also require a lot of sandpapering on the part of
each individual-whether in campus politics, in the teach-
ing position, or as a student in our hallway.
The. classroom and the campus are charged with pre-
serving the lessons of history. This is your task as well as
the students next to you.
Thus, education.makes us know what we must do for the
University and for world peace, and our faith in God
brings us face to face with our responsibility in terms of
the brotherhood of man. r


Shoes For The Coeds

Vogue Boot Shop
212 E. University Ave.





ALLEN



PRINTING



COMPANY


JOB PRINTING




430 E. Main

West Of Post Office

Phone 620

I Gainesville, Fla.


Ordinary

Times

By
Buddy
Davis


American: "Why, that's an
owl.'
Englishman: "Of course it is,
but 'oo's 'owling?"


TODAY & SATURDAY
JIMMY WAKELY
in
"RIDING DOWN THE TRAIL'"
JOHNNY SANDS
in
"BORN TO SPEED"
SUNDAY & MONDAY
PAT O'BRIEN
in
"RIFF RAFF" and
SHELIA RYAN
in
"THE BIG FIX"

TUESDAY ONLY
JOAN CAULIFIELD
in
"THE UNSUSPECTED"
WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY
JUNE ALLYSON
PETER LAWFORD
in
"GOOD NEWS"
In Technicolor


AN EDUCATOR'S PRAYER
Let me see, as I don the robes
of my rank and office, that my
world is a small one. Let me rec-
ognize that education extends fur-
ther than my domain of vine cov-
ered buildings. Grant me the
power to comprehend that the
world is a college, that events are
teachers, happiness is the gradua-
tion, character is the diploma.
Let me cast aside the illusion
that college is preparation for
life, for college is actually a part
of the student's life. Let me see
the college years, not as a time
of -seclusion, but as a time of
growth and development.
Let me realize that ideas are
as potent as bullets-that words
are merely the shells for the
thought behind them. Show me
that one misguided student can
wreck the world-that one wrong
word can send a brilliant scholar
down the dark trail of medio-
crity.
Let me respect faith, but also
let me remember that doubt is the
driving power of education. Give
me patience with the skeptical
student, for skepticism is merely
the first wail marking the birth
of a philosophy of life.
Let me avoid preaching any
political doctrine to defend de-
mocracy, for democracy needs no
defending in the objective world.
Rather, give me the foresight to
train my students in critical
thought and values of life, and
the form of government shall be
democracy.
Give me the power to resist
governmental interference in edu-
cation, for with go ve rnment
comes a single way of thought-
a conservative and status quo re-
action. Teach me to see that a
violent burning of the books is not
necessary for censorship, show
me that a copy reader can accom-
plish the same end with his pen-
cil.
Teach me to use my theoretical
knowledge in a practical manner,
so that those who sit before me
can grasp and comprehend the
things about them. Let me show
that history, in its passing, has
left its mark of progress, and that
the world is a single colorful unit
instead of one great mass of
cross-purposes.
Show me that the student's
mind is like his stomach the
amount it consumes is nothing,
for digestion is the vital function.
Let me prepare my material so
that it may present a challenge
to probe deeper into the things
we do not understand.
Help me to think straight and
present the subject clearly, for a
few subjects thoroughly taught
are infinitely better than a large
number flabbily taught. And
when I am questioned and have
not the answer, give me the cour-
age to admit my weakness and
the humbleness to seek the an-
swer.
Grant me the serenity to accept
those things I cannot change, the
courage to change those which can
be changed, and the wisdom to
know the difference. Most of all,
give me the courage, for without
the courage to act, all my knowl-
edge is nothing.
And finally, when my last stu-
dent leaves the graduation stage
and turns to the arena of the out-
side world-finally, when my work
is done, take me by your side. Let
me find the answer to the burn-
ing question of all ages. Let me
seek a solution from the greatest
and meekest Educator of all
times. Let me finally end the
search for which I have devoted
my life. For the crucifier Pontius
Pilate did not wait for an answer
when he asked Jesus:
'"Vhat iS truth?"
A proud parent called up the
newspaper and reported the birth
of twins. The girl at the desk
didn't quite catch the message
over the phone. "Will you repeat
that please?" she asked.
"Not of I can help it," was the
reply.


As I

See 'Em

By
Elgin White


Boy, what a raking over the
coals the writer received over last
week's colyum! I guess from all
the reaction that has taken place,
the boys whom I aimed at think
I am a doity rat. 0. K., so
I'm a doity rat, fellas. But s a v e
me some of the cheese, will ya?
There's enough for all of us.
Now hear this. One of the big-
gest attractions that has ever
happened at the University of
Florida will take place today. The
inauguration of Dr. Miller is some-
thing everyone should see and
hear. I think that every student
on this campus will achieve some
realization of just what a higher
education means. The witnessing
of su6h an event as this will
erase the utilitarian ideas of edu-
cation that some students have.
There's no question about it. This
thing is BIG!
So big that the Mutual Net-
work has seen hit to air this cere-
mony over the entire nation. And
this is a big country.
We have heard from various
sources that many students are
going to take advantage of the
cut in classes to take a little
vacation home. This cut in classes
is not for the convenience of
hitchikers and bus riders to get
to the old home town two hours
before supper instead of one
hour.
This cut in classes is for the
express purpose of giving the stu-
dent at this University the op-
portunity to witness something
that they will, in all probability,
never see again in many, many
years. Had the classes not been
cut, these angels that are looking
homeward wouldn't have left be-
fore Saturday, anyhow. One day
won't make a heck of a lot of
difference in the lives of you guys
and gals insofar as getting home
is concerned.
But one day like this one is
liable to influence your life in
a manner that you can't even
begin to imagine. If we were play-
ing a championship football game
tomorrow, it would be an impos-
sibility to feret a single student
outside the three-mile limit of
Gainesville. A championship foot-
ball game will never have the
significance that this inaugura-
tion will have. Not even if Florida
were one of the teams play-
ing.
In Dr. J. Hillis Miller, we have
one of the finest presidents in the
country today. How else could
each individual student at this uni-
versity show his appreciation for
such a leader than to attend his
inauguration this very day?
No student is compelled to go
to this inauguration. No student is
compelled to eat either, but the
food of grandeur, impressiveness,
solemnity, and wisdom that can
be devoured at this auspicious oc-
casion can't be measured in calo-
ries but in centuries of scholastic
achievement.
This thing is BIG! Don't miss
it!
Ten will get you twenty that
the walking man is Doak Walker,
All American football player.


File Thirteen


Sue: "Pull your dress down, the
men can see your knees."
S a l (obediently): "H o w's
that?"
Sue: "Holy smoke, pull it up
again. Now you can see your
brassiere."
Hubby wandered in at 3 a.m.
after a glorious evening.
In a few minutes a series of un-
earthly squawks howled out of
the radio. Wifie looked in to the
room and discovered him twisting
the dial back and forth frantical-
ly.
"For heaven's sake, what in the
world are you doing?" she ex-
claimed.
'G'way, g'way. Don't bother me.
Someebody's locked in the safe
and I've forgotten the combina-
tion."
A pessimist is one who thinks
all women are immoral. An opti-
mist is one who merely hopes so.


LAST TIMES TONIGHT


"HEAVEN ONLY KNOWS"
TOM CONWAY
in
"FALCON'S ADVENTURES"
SATURDAY through MONDAY
VICTOR MATURE
in
"KISS OF DEATH"
THREE MESQUITEERS
in
"GUNSMOKE RANCH"
TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY
FRANCHOT TONE
in
"LOST HONEYMOON"
BARBARA STANWYCK
in
"CRY WOLF"
COMING MARCH 16, 17, 18
LAURENCE OLIVER
in
"HENRY V"


Proposed Student Body Law
In accordance with Article IV, Section 4, Subsection 2 of the Con-
stitution of the Student Body, the Letter-Awards Committee of the Ex-
ecutive Council proposed the following law which is printed in part and
which is to be acted upon by the Executive Council and, if approved
by that body, will become effective as an addition to the Laws of the
Student Body:
LETTER-AWARDS LAW
The purpose of this law is to establish a uniform procedure in the
awarding of letters, sweaters and insignia by chartered organizations
or other campus groups, to regulate the types and styles of such
awards from year to year, and to clearly distinguish varsity athletic
letter-sweater awards from those made by non-athletic organizations.
1. No organization chartered shall award letters, insignia, or sweat-
ers, or any combination thereof, unless express provision in its charter
grants the authority.
2. Any organization thus permitted to make an award must submit
to the Executive Council for approval a design copy, to scale and in
color, of such proposed award. If approved, this copy will be placed
on file in the student government office, and all orders by any one or-
ganization must conform to the above-mentioned copy submitted by
such organization before requisitions for proposed award may be pass-
ed by the Executive Council.
3. Sweaters may be awarded to members of a non-athletic organiza-
tion or group only when provided for by charter. Such sweaters shall
not be in navy blue, which color is reserved to sweaters awarded to var-
sity athletes, nor in orange, that color being required of band and in-
tra-mural sweaters and otherwise authorized for use only by varsity
cheerleaders. Block "F" or other types of letters awarded in the above
cases will be blue (with orange border optional) and subject to addi-
tional limitations as set forth in section one, except that among non-
atlletic organizations or groups only the University of Florida bank
and varsity cheerleaders are authorized to wear the block "F". Intra-
mural letter awards will likewise be in blue.
4. Under no condition will white sweaters be awarded by any organ-
ization or group to its members, except that participants in varsity
sports may be granted such awards in accordance with provisions stip-
uated by the Athletic Department and the Athletic Council. However,
this prohibition may not be constructed to apply to he wearing of white
waters by varsity cheerleaders in connection with athletic events, pep
rallies, or allied official school activities, nor may former cheerleaders
be denied the privilc.;e of wearing such sweaters, provided letter in-
signia has been removed.
5. Under no condition will stripes or any other symbols indicating
either rank or position of leadership in an organization or group, or
number of years service therein, be worfi on sweaters by members of
any organization, except that these provisions do not apply to sweat-
ers awarded' by the Athletic Council to letter-winners in varsity sports.
6. This law will take effect from the date of passage, but will not be
construed to apply to awards previously made or to those who have
been recipients of such awards prior to enactment of this law.

Campus Opinions

We have just finished reading "Early to Bed" by Marty Lubov, and
the letter to the edior by Morton Lucoff, both of them condeming El-
gin White's column Qf Feb. 27.
Pen, just what are Mr. Lubov and Mr. Lucoff afraid of? Are they
9lso members of a dissenting group on this campus? It seems to us
that these guys have more fear of what might happen to them rather
than any repercussions that might involve the University of Florida.
Word has circulated on this campus this afternoon, that the gov-
,rnors will not appear for Dr. Miller's inauguration. We don't know
Ahy they won't, but just about everyone that hears that they won't be
lere will have pretty good idea that this stupid protest group was the
mause of it all.
This undoubtedly will have a very adverse effect on the state of
Florida and we think it is A terrible thing.
We think that White hit at the core of the thing, and we also think
that many other students feel the same way. These columns by the Lu-
bovs and the letters by the Lucoffs are the essence of a radical bunch
in fear of being exposed.
Congratulations to Elgin White!
Tom O'Flanagan
Bob Sturrup


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Donna Juanna .... a side-saddle The Leader ........ "Jerky Joe
sister Seykora
Don Juanna ..... her flat-footed "Killer" Johns .... a trigger man
father with a Colt in his nose
Big Tex ....... a Serutan addict Joan of Lorraine ...... Florabel
(Rudy Thornberry) Wolff (How did she get into
Tia Juanna ...... only 17 miles this story?)
from San Diego Red Rock Rosie ...... Rosemary
Mary Juanna .... they drugged Flanagan
her in Waitresses in the Filthy Spitoon
Ida Juanna ........ poppa might Saloon .... Zeta Tau Alphas
catch us Tough Hombres ........ Hooks,
Damdifa Juanna .... Jane Snow Dusenbury, Steis and Funk'
(Brr .) and a cast of four zebras,
"Cactus-Face" Ledoux .. a bush three mules, a stray pussy.
league publisher willow, 15 professors, and a
"Wild Bill" Lowry .... copy boy psychopathic yo-yo.
Editor's Note: With a mini- infested street into the garbage.
mum of editing the copy turned infested newspaper office. The
in by "Humorists" Harold Her- copy boy, an inconspicuous-look.
man and Sandy Schnier, we ing chap, took his feet off the
herewith present Chapter IV of linotype machine, flipped the
Donna Juanna. ashes of his hand-rolled Bull Dur-
ham, and looked at the bandits
-- cooly. He couldn't help it. It was
SYNOPSIS 32 below zero.
As you remember, we left Don- But Tex, knowing full well that Lie
na hanging limply by the hem of was outnumbered, did not storm
her gym-shorts from a crotch of the office. Instead, he crawled on
a pussy-willow. She had been his belly around to the back of the
there for weeks on end without newspaper office and went in. To
benefit of food, water, the GI Bill, his surprise, Mary Juanna, attired
and the warm, loving companion- in a peach-and-cream negligee,
ship of Big Tex. Let us face it, was lying oh so peacefully on a
readers, she was in a spot. Would sofa, snoring to beat the world.
her subsistence cncclc ever ar-
rive ? Tex, although he loved and rev.
ered Donna, acted on the same
CHAPTER IV sub-rational impulses he had learn-
Big Tex trotted slowly into the ed in C-52 and went over to Mary
Oklahoma Strip on his faithful on the sofa. She woke with Tex's
filly, "Teaser." The horse galluped hot breath hovering oh so danger.
up to a poll to take a pause that ously over her ripe, luscious, mel.
refreshes. "Teaser" liked Colces. low, sweet, embraceable, enchant.
Twenty minutes later, Tex rode ing, alluring, wonderful, delicious,
into Strangulation Gulch. Little nutritious, lovely, exotic, blissful,
did anyone know (save the au- captivating, ravishing, ecstatic,
thors) that Tex was out to get enraptured( fascinating, tantaliz.
even. He was odd for quite a few ing, delightful, pouted parted lips.
years. Now, with revenge fairly He could not resist.
oozing from his right ventricle, He smothered her lips 'and face
Tex strided into the Filthy Spi- and neck with onions. He was
toon Saloon, looking for that most hungry. (Here the managing edi-
despicable of all varmints, the tor picked up his blue pencil. He
Leader, didn't want the authors to appear
"Has anyone here seen Jerky- personally before President Miller,
Joe?" he barked back "Yeah he's so he censored many provocative
in the back room shooting Pool." phrases which, unfortunately, left
Tex sauntered into the back NOTHING to the imagination).
room. Pool was on the pool table What was happening to Tex?
lying in a pool of Pool's blood, (Only us and the managing editor
dead know). Could this intoxicating
"Call your shot, pardner!" yell- hunk of woman overpower his af-
ed Tex. L fection for Donna'? But yes. He
"Eight ball in the side pocket," thought not of Donna, hanging
answered the Leader. languishly from the crotch of that
Tex squeezed the trigger of his tree, 40 miles to the west, while he
trusty M-1 as one of the cafe's (here again the managing editor
hostesses came in. The Leader became pious.)
shot. He had to have Mary-no one
Gunsmoke filled the tiny cu- could cook onions like her.
bide. Some one coughed. It was Three solar eclipses later, happy
the hostess on the floor. For both and grinning from spur to spur.
Tex and the Leader had fired Tex finally opened the door that
wildly and plugged the hostess in- led to the front of the newspaper
stead. From her forehead came office. The Leader and his men
a surging stream of blood. One of had gone. They couldn't wait.
her eyes was shot out. Bullets So Tex, to cut the yarn short,
had riddled her in two. One arm, rode 40 miles westward. On sight-
severed at the fibula, lay across ing Donna, he waved briskly, and
the room, fingers clasped in ag- with hisDo chins, jutting proudly
onyTex looked down at her and ahead of him, said: "See ya around
asked: "Does it hurt?" the campus, baby." And immedi-
The hostess, with her last re- ately returned to Mary (sigh) and
maining breath, looked up at him some more (sigh) onions.
and replied, "Only when I laugh."
The peace of the mesa had Will Donna always be up a tree?
again been disturbed. Will she ever re-capture Tex's
Outside the chase began. The amours? Will Mary burn the
Leader, picking up his cohorts at onions? And if so, will Tex eat
the bar, ran across the garbage- 'em?


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EXTRA


Stun a g n ofer


EXTRA


Vol. 39, No. 22




Miller


University Of Florida. Gainesville. Florida


Is


Installed


As


Fourth


Frdav March 9-14


President


Institutions Must Advocate


A Way Of Life, Says Darden


Dr. Geo. D. Stoddard Interprets


Aims Of UNESCO In Address


American collegee

Usefulness Told

In Talk Today

By Jack Shoemaker
Stressing the fact th at
"Our institutions must be-
come the advocates of a way
Ol liie," Dr. Colgate W. Dar-
(en, president of the University of
Virginia and former governor of
Virginia, outlined the usefulness
of elic American college in his
inaugural address this afternoon.
"mnis gathering here in Gaines-
ville of men and women, from
llorida and many of the other
states ot the union, who are in-
terested in public education should
be of great value,'" Darden said.
'"he more thoughtful of our peo-
ple are coming more and more to
understand the enormous stake
wnich the nation has in educa-
tion. Aware of the serious prob-
lems that confront us they wish
to prepare themselves to dis-
charge the heavy obligations rest-
ing upon them. They know that
this will not be easy to do and it
is a heartening thing to see the
earnestness and the intensity
which characterize their labors.
"In a nation wherein political
power rests in the hands of the
people." he continued, "it is im-
perative, if our society is to func-
tion, that the individual citizens
achieve a competence that will
enable them to operate the intri-
cate and finely adjusted appara-
tus that is our machinery of gov-
ernment. The task is not an easy
one. It is nothing like so easy as
it was in the days of the found-
ers of this republic. The tempo
of life is faster now. The machin-
ery is more delicately balanced
and because it moves at such high
speed it can be thrown out of gear
by an impediment which would
have caused little trouble not very
many years ago. Let me illustrate
what I mean when I say the tem-
po is faster by telling you what
I have seen happen during my
lifetime in the field of transpor-
tation."
S.j.' .tt-.d. "It is ,upon the
..,. r, universities that
the ourcen rests of inculcating
the fostering the humanistic spir-
it which is the priceless and in-
S.i. i .i.. ingredient of western
civilization. Our people look to
their, as they have the right to
look, for moral as well as intel-
lectual leadership. They are not
simply the custodians of a vast
amount of factual information,"
Darden emphasized. "They are, or
they should be if they are to jus-
tify their existence, lighthouses
whose powerful rays pierce the
darkness of a troubled and con-
rfused society and light the way
to that higher and firm ground
cnat must De gained and made se-
cure if we are to build a broad
highway into the future.
"Our institutions must become
the advocates of a way of life.
They must become the exponents
of a faith. They cannot survive
as the apologists for a social sys-
tem lacking purpose and direc-
tion. Can it be said that after
twenty-five hundred years of west-
ern culture we have arrived at no
basic principles worthy of being
passed on down to our children?
I think not. For if such is the
case then certainly we have no
defense against the malignant
growth that now threatens to ex-
tinguish individual liberty and
gather all mankind together in a
foul thralldom."
"The task of restating and re-
emphasizing the American creed
-respect for the individual, a
genuine belief in the rights of oth-
ers, along with a willingness to
protect them as we would our
own and an unyielding determi-
nation that government shall be
the servant not the master of men
-is the pressing and immediate
responsibility of our colleges and
universities. Let -us enter upon
our duties. We shall be amply re-
paid," he concluded,


CAN BE DONE.

Need For Pooling Resources

Apparent, Says Carmichael

No Longer Justification For Waste,
Noted Educator Tells Audience
Dr. 0. C. Carmichael, president I
of the Carnegie Foundation for the between states to the end that the
Advancement of Teaching, speak- best applicants will be cared for
ing before the General Session of'and that training of high quality
the Conference on Regional Plan- will be assured .
ning in Higher Education Thurs- No one state alone could bear
day morning, stated in part: the cost, nor would it have enough
It is becoming increasingly clear students wishing to avail them-
that educational and cultural en- selves of this highly specialized
terprises must be so planned as to training to fill the laboratories and
get maximum results for expend- classes. But a half-dozen states
itures made. There is no longer acting together should be able to
justification for waste of resources realize the ful potentialities of the
through dupli'ation of efforts birthplace of the atomic bomb and
which could be avoided through thereby provide for the South and
planning and cooperation. With the nation the outstanding scien-
Fifteen years ago I spent two tists of the future .
days in this University with a It is worthy of note tha no oth-
group of soussing the various aspects and er region has ever undertaken so
cussing the various aspects andnning for high- bold an enterprise nor one that
possibilities of planning for hig has so much promise for the fu-
er education In this region tureThe fact that regional plan-
was recognized then that if the ning is already farther advanced
maximum educational resources ningtisoalreadyifartheradnce
in the south than in any other sec-
were to be made available to tion of the country gives substance
youth some division of labor to the belief that broader and more
would have to be agreed upon inclusive plans can be realized.
and programs based on that
agreement established in south- Exceptional resources already
ern institutions exist in the South for the develop-
The possibilities of specialization ment of an outstanding center for
in English, History, Economics, research and training in the phy-
Psychology or some other single sical sciences in the Oak Ridge
subject-matter field on the part of plant near Knoxville.


institutions came
S up for considera-
tion. It was rec
ognized that first
K class gr adu ate
and research pro-
grams in all these
fields could not
be provided by
any one institu-
tion. It would be
possible, however,
by concentration on some one field
for each of the stronger universi-
ties to develop library resources
and provide staffs for graduate and
research work of highest quality.
The memory of that meeting
held 15 years ago is still vi 'id ii)
my mind. The high hopes ex> i-ss-d
at the time left the impression on
the delegates that the dawn of a
new day for higher education in
the south was approaching .
Much has happened since 1933
in the field of social planning
which encourages the belief that
the time is ripe for novel under-
takings, for some bold pioneer-
ing. The recent discussions in
the Conference of Southern Gov-
ernors as reported in the papers
confirm the impression that ef-
fective planning is possible and
that now is the time to under-
take it .
The most expensive phase of ed-
ucation is that required for med-
icine. The cost of laboratory and
hospital facilities added to that of
instruction in our best medical
schools exceeds $3,000 per capital
annually. The solution to the prob-
lem of cost is clearly cooperation


Sweigert Discusses

Practical Curricula

For Engineering
The selection of correct engi-
neering curricula to tie in with
the actual practing of the pro-
fession was the theme of an ad-
dress by R. L. Sweigert Wednes-
day in P. K. Yonge Auditorium.
Sweigert's talk was in connec-
tion with the presentation of re-
search papers and discussion of
academic engineering problems.
'ii. has been an all-too-common
practice," he said, "to study en-
gineering curricula and determine
what constituted an average cur-
riculum As a result it ap-
pears that engineering education
may not be keeping up with the
practice of engineering.
"Engineering practice, as I
know it, and as verified by many
articles by practicing engineers in
various engineering publications
as well as by discussion with
practicing engineers, is based up-
on function and upon areas of fun-
damental knowledge."
Sweigert presented, as part of
his address, an outline listing the
functions and preparatory divi-
sions that engineers mnay engage
in prior to practiiing engineering.
He proceeded further into the
graduate levels of education and
discussed fundamental areas of
knowledge basic to engineering.


LEGAL REVIEW PUBLISHED

First Review Presented

To Governor Caldwell
Governor Millard F. Caldwell received the first copy of
the University of Florida Law Review at a breakfast yes-
terday given at the Hotel Thomas by members of the Law
Review staff.
In accepting his copy the Governor congratulated the.
student editors on the success of
their project. He expressed the view, presented the first copy to
belief that the publication would the Governor, whose enthusiastic
take its place among the scholar- support did much to make the pub-
ly legal periodicals of the nation, location a reality. Warren M.
and that it would become of in- Goodrich, present editor-in-chief,
creasing value to the bench and introduced the guests, and thank-
bar of the state, particularly if it ed Professors James M. Day,
followed a course of diligent re- Frank E. Maloney, and George
search and constructive criticism. John Miller, faculty advisors, for
Harold B. Crosby, editor-in-chief their energetic roles in getting the
of the first issue of the Law Re- review underway.
I~f -m RA f maNM


DR. J. HILLIS MILLER

Gurney Presides Over

Ceremony This Morning
Dr. Joseph Hillis Miller was today officially installed as the fourth
president of the University of Florida by J. Thomas Gurney. chairman
of the State Board of Control.
In the installing address, Gurney said, "Dr. Miller, it was with full
assurance and deep satisfaction that the Board of Control chose you
as President of the University of Florida. I now give public and of-
ficial expression to that act, with confidence that under your wise, tol-
erant, and inspiring guidance the University will advance surely and
steadily to a greater destiny in the world of higher education.
"The citizens of Florida and the faculty, students, alumni, and
friends of the University have faith in your leadership, vision, and in-
tegrity. They join me in wishing you Godspeed in your new en-
deavor.'"
Dr. Miller then presented his inaugural address, entitled, "Higher
Education-The Balance Wheel of Progress in The State of Florida,"
which follows in part:
If you-the members of my distinguished audience-have not been
thoroughly convinced by chambers of commerce that Florida is the
greatest state in the Union, then (1) you have not been here very long,
(2) you have travelled only in the Everglades, thereby avoiding the
large population centers, (3) you are conscientious objectors, or (4)
you are calloused to such approaches as these active citizens are wont
to make .
Higher education, broadly defined, is the balance wheel of, proi. -i s'
.in any 8ae:th e or nation; and particulai.ly in the State of Floridq itr,h
is on the threshold of great developments. The alternative is obvious.
Without adequate higher education in Florida, we shall build a society
that will be both superficial and artificial, and that will lack the solid
core of culture, intellectual attainments and factual information which
will keep us steadily on a course of sound progress.
WHAT MANNER OF STATE IS FLORIDA?
The State of Florida has a population of between two and a half
and three millions, 53 per cent of whom were born in other states, and
this population is increasing at the rate of approximately one hundred
thousand every twelve months.
The State of Florida, is on the way to becoming one of the wealthi-
est states in the Union. This fact implies agricultural, industrial, en-
gineering. professional, educational, recreational, cultural, and re-
search activities quite beyond anything we have experienced in the
past. These activities, in turn, demand statesmanship of the highest
order in governmental and educational services if the State is to
achieve her ultimate destiny.
HIGHER EDUCATION IN FLORIDA
If any state ever needed the steadying and guiding hand of college
and university trained men and women, that state is Florida. In this
address, I have called higher education the balance wheel of progress
in Florida. I could say as much for all levels of education, including
adult education. Moreover, I have pointed out that the State of Flor-
ida is fully capable of providing adequately for all levels of education.
Statesmanship in education and in governmental circles is, then, the
key to Florida's future.
I am convinced that the youth of Florida stand poised to accept
the challenge of the state and the challenge of higher education. For-
tuliately, the number of young people who stand ready is reasonably
predictable. For the nation as a whole, in 1900, fewer than 250,000 stu-
dents were enrolled in institutions of higher education. By 1940, the
enrollment had risen to 1,500,000 students, by 1947, to 2,354,000 and
by 1948, to an estimated figure of 2,600,000. This means that in Flori-
da, where a. population of 3,000,000 is predicted as early as 1950, there
will be, by 1960, at least 100,000 students seeking higher education, of
which roughly 60,000 will be at the junior college level and 40,000 at
the upper levels.
THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA '
Against this background of thinking concerning the characteristics
of the State of Florida and her people, her economic resources and pos-
sibilities and the challenge of 100,000 of her choice young men and
women, we can take the measure of the University of Florida as it
is and as it must necessarily become
Prior to the war, the University's enrollment never reached more
than 3,500 students. It was predicted in 1946 that by the fall of that
year perhaps as many as 5,500 students would be seeking admission to
the University, and that by 1955 the enrollment might reach 7,000.
Actually, we have enrolled 9,400 students for the school year 1947-
1948, which places the University twenty-first in size among all state
universities and fifth in size among those of the South.
Let us take a look at what has been done since 1946. In the first
place, there have been added more than a half-million square feet in
buildings of a temporary character, including 624 family apartments in
Flavet villages.
Within the past week we have broken ground for an $800,000 addi-
tion to the Library. Authority has been given by the Board of Con-
trdl to'erect a, Student Exchange Building which will house the Uni-
ted States Post Office and our own Bookstore and Soda Fountain. Funds
have recently been released for the drawing of plans for six dormi-
tories-two for women and four for men-to be constructed on a par-
tially self-liquidating basis.
However, ladies and gentlemen, all of us know that buildings alone
will not make a great university. Adequate equipment and supplies
are necessary. Many of. these needs will not be met, I fear, unless we
can attract gifts from benevolent citizens, as well as from some of
the great cultural and educational foundations.
Finally, I shall not consider that I have discharged my full and com-
plete responsibility as head of this great institution until I see erected
on this campus a beautiful chapel where our fellowship of learning can
meet in a great communion of love, aspiration, and reverence. Leave
out, if you will, at whatever hazards there may inevitably be, places
where students can live and learn, and places where the faculty
can associate and teach, but let us not leave out of full consideration, I
humbly pray, our complete dependence upon and our need to worship
the God and Father of us all.

Scene Of Regional Planning


OUTSTANDING MEN HONORED-

Five Eminent Visitors

Receive Florida Degrees

Dr. Miller Confers Four Doctors Of Laws
And One Doctor Of Science Degrees Today

By Fran White
Five honorary degrees were awarded by J. Hillis Miller
at his inauguration as president of the University today.
Those receiving degrees were Owen D. Young, Ralph
Herbert Allee, Colgate Whitehead Darden, Jr., George
Dinsmore Stoddard, Oliver Cromwell Carmichael.
In his citation on awarding the
degree of doctor of laws to Owen
Federal Education D. Young, President Miller said,
F ederl Educa "t..oP .a most welcome commuter
between New York and Florida-
0ffuice Functio always welcome when you arrive
Office Func ons in Florida and equally welcome in
e F E e rs New York when you return .
(i For Enginee lawyer,banker, economist, indus-
Cite For E gin er trialist, and, above all, education-
al statesman and friend of the
Henry H. Armsby, specialist for common man. You have helped to
education in engineering, speaking make America great, and as t h e
before a luncheon group of the embodiment of that greatness you
have been consulted and honored
American Society for Engineering by many educational institutions
Education, brought forrth 10 sig- and by the nations of the world. ."
nificant facts pertaining to the ac- Honoring Ralph Herbert Allee
tivities of the United States Office from Costa Rica with the honor-
f Education in Washington. H ary degree of doctor of science,
of Education in Washingon. the president stated: ". Repre-
stated in part: sentative of the Department of
"The U. S. Office of Education State and of the Department of
keeps the ASEE posted on what's Agriculture, world traveler, great
going on in the nation's capital, teacher, and research scholar; by
going on in the nations capital, your ability, your industry, an d
relative to educational engineering your friendliness, ou have become
. recently released a work with a true ambassador of good will
title 'Zeal to Democracy' for pub- -. you have bridged the gap be-
tween countries and brought
location in the ASEE Journal about understanding and solidar-
attempts to secure accurate fig- ity among the Americas."
ures of available engineers and Miller conferred upon Colgate
jobs that are available for them Whitehead Darden, Jr., the degree
all over the country. of doctor of laws, and in his cita-
S, tion spoke as follows: ". for a
"The office is preparing to mail, time governor of the Old Domin-
extensively, a questionnaire which ion, the illustrious mother of
will sample opinions about how to states and mother of Presidents.
improve general and specialized As chief executive of Virginia,
ir you demonstrated an interest in
education Naval men are being education which has been an in-
encouraged to take graduated spiration to governors all over
courses at the Universities' of this land. A.e president of the Uni-
farylano, Virginia. and ;ahifort- veraity of Virginio, you now prac-
Maryland,Virginiaand fortice what you once preached .
nia perhaps the University of you deserve high honor at the
Florida will offer this service to hand of American higher educa-
personnel of the United States tion."
Navy. Honoring George Dinsm ore
"Non-veteran educational aid has Stoddard with the degree of doc-
tor of laws, Miller stated: "
the recommendation of President scholar, author, administrator;
Truman's 'Committee of Higher at home as a child specialist,
Education.' This latest proposal teacher of youth, director of re-
is two-fold. First, plentiful schol- search, or adviser to a president
or an emperor: you are a worthy
arships of $744 each, and second, representative of the American
$1500 fellowships for 10,000 stu- people in educationalI affairs at
dents now and up to 30,000 in home or abroad. You are among
three years.the first citizens of the world to
three years." e eiveducation a true global sig-


Regional Librarians

Hold Two-Day

Conference Here

"Regional Planning for Library
Resources in the South" is the
topic for three sessions of librari-
ans from colleges and universities
in the South to be held. here this
afternoon and Saturday morning.
Dean Harley W. Chandler's ad-
dress on "Cooperation in Higher
Education Among Southern Uni-
versities" will highlight the con-
ference. Dean Chandler will speak
at a dinner tonight at 6:30 for vis-
iting librarians and guests to be
held at Wesley Foundation.
Opening session is scheduled for
this afternoon at 2:30 in room 205,
Peabody Hall with Robert Ding-
ham Downs, director of the library
of the University of Illinois, act-
ing as discussion leader.
Ten o'clock tomorrow morning
will see the close of the conference
With a discussion under the direc-
tion of Downs in room 205, Pea-
body Hall.


nificance."
Concerning Oliver Cromwell
Carmichael, who was awarded the
degree of doctor of laws, Miller
said: "one thing is certain: the
preeminence of your namesake
has not eclipsed your own bril-
liant career. Though Sir Olivers'
Oxford, through you, may have
made Vanderbilt University a
great institution of higher learn-
ing and enriched other institu-
tions which you have touched, it
has really been your native en-
dowment, your own industry, and
your own humanitarian spirit
that have helped to make Amer-
ica a better place in which to
live ."


Classes Suspended

By Pres. Miller
The reminder of Friday's clas-
ses and all Saturday's were sus-
pended this afternoon by Presi-
ident J. Hills Miller toward the
close of his inauguration cere-
mony.
Miller decided on the suspen-
sion "because of the loyalty of
so many students in attending
the inauguration."


Education's Role

In World Affairs

Is Main Topic

By Harold Herman
"The United Nations Edu.
national, Scientific, and Cul-
tural Organization as a force
with roots penetrating the
daily life of people has at least a
chance to succeed and the Uni-
versity, as the crown of every
modern educational system, must
help foster understanding and
good will among nations."
These two important state-
ments were pointed out by Dr.
George C. Stoddard, president
of the University of Illinois, as
he made his inaugural address
this morning.
Speaking on the topic of "The
Role of Education i Internation-
al Affairs," Dr. Stoddard said
that UNESCO has as one of its
goals a "vast attack upon illiter-
acy," a project called Fundament-
al Education.
"Any realistic attempt, there-
fore, to solve this problem gets us
into the greatest single educa-
tional enterprise ever undertaken
in the hiAtory of human culture,"
Dr. Stoddard said. "As the work
moves on, starting with a few pi-
lot projects in China, Africa, and
the West Indies, and supported
by the nations concerned, we
shall seek a world of mutual un-
derstanding, whether the medium
be the printed page, the radio, or
the motion picture.
"UNESCO will be a friendly
ear, but a listening one," Dr.
Stoddard continued. "It will ex-
change persons-students, teach-
ers and scientists on a large
scale. It is already giving strong
financial and moral support to
scientific organizations that op-
erate across national boundaries.
"It must concern itself more
with the fair practices of its 40
luoi bates than with the
detects of Russia. It has a pra'-
tical program for this, 1too. For
example, the members are mu-
tually pledged to assist in the
re-writing of textbooks f o r
children, particularly in 'his-
tory, geography and the other
social studies.
"In the United States especial-
ly," Stoddard said, "UNESCO ac-
tually does penetrate every ham-
let and city, although people are
not as yet aware of this. I doubt
if there is a man, woman, or child
in this notable gathering who is
not, in fact and in law, a part of
UNSECO. -
"The university is the crown of
every modern educational, sys-
tem," Stoddard remarked, "In a
free society it discharges w i t h
equal concern three great func-
tions. First, it guards as a treas-
ure beyond price the tradition of
intellectual liberty, st im ul a tes
freedom of thought, p e rfects
methods of inquiry, promotes the
advancement of knowledge, cul-
tivates science and scholarship,
nurtures love of truth, and serves
as a source of perpetual enlight-
enment to society.
"Second," he continued, "it
'prepares young men and wom-
en of talent, through acquaint-
ance with the best thought and
finest aspirations of all ages
and peoples, for positions of
leadership in the improvement
of family and community life,
in the more efficient and hu-
mane conduct of industry and
government, and in the foster-
ing of understanding and good
will among the nations.
"Third, it trains selected young
men and women for technical pro-
ficiency in both old and new pro-
fessions, being ever sensitive to
the changing and emerging needs
of society.
"Here today," Stoddard con-
cluded, "drawing upon both mind
and heart, let us renew our faith
and our strength for the trou-
blous times that lie ahead."





I' ,


.......
This an air view of a growing University, which has been thie site this week of one of the Inrtml. out-
tanding educational conferences the South has ever seen. This campus is now of age, and Is taking the
lead in improving campuses all over the southeast. (Read editorial on page 6).


Pictured from left to right are- Doctor Oliver C. Carmichael, of the Carnegie Foundation for the Ad,
vancement of Teaching, Governor Millard F. Caldwell of Florida, and Doctor J. Hills Miller of the Un'i
versity of Florida, who spoke for Regional Education at a conference of the South's top college officials


--~-~---I-r ---- -- -----------~------------- '-'~'Jt d'CYObC" ~) LYII


;F







2 The Florida Alligato



Clubs And Organi


Twenty Students

To Receive Bids

From Gargoyle
Twenty students of the School
of Architecture and Allied Arts
will receive bids for membership
in Gargoyle, honorary architect-
ural fraternity.
Architectural students to re-
ceive bids include Robert L. Allen,
St. Petersburg; Ernest Bowen,
Gainesville; Robert B. Browne,
Jacksonville; Harry E. Burns,
Neptune Beach; George Fisher,
Jacksonville; Theodore Gottfried,
Miami eBach; Herbert S. John-
son, Palm Beach; Winton J. Roa-
chach, Fort Pierce; Clarence
Sproule, Gainesville; Woodrow W.
Wilkins, Pensacola; Jack S. Wil-
son, Edgar A. Wilson, Fort My-
ers; W. S. Bierbower, St. Peters-
burg, and Edward G. Grafton,
Coral Gables.
Students of Building Construc-
tion receiving bids are: William
C. Clark, Jr., Daytona Beach; Ed-
ward A. Ehinger, Palm Beach;
John B. Nora, West Palm Beach,
and Henri Scroville.
Swan A. Brown, Gainesville
student of Landscae Architec-
ture, and Robert A. Stratton, Or-
lando, student of Painting, will
also receive bids to Gargoyle fra-
ternity.
Pledge projects will be assign-
ed during the coming week by an
initiation committee composed of
Gerald Gunderson, Gainesville,
chairman, Dick Wyke, Miami,
Jerry Garrison, Sarasota; and
William Latsko, Gainesville. Inia-
tion ceremony will be held March
23, and will be followed by a
banquet, to which wives and
dates will be invited.
At the last meeting plans were
discussed for the writing of "The
Gargoyle Spout," anunal publi-
cation of activities of the School
of Architecture ana Allied Arts.
Other activities planned by Gar-
goyle for the semester include a
spring picnic, May 2, and spon-
soring of speakers on architectur-
al subjects.

Sally: "Why does Bill look so
sad lately?"
Sammy: "Oh, these long skirts
are getting him down-he has no
imagination."


CtEL. OCHfESTERIELD, .a
LUK -Y STRIKE, PHILIP ils- l
MORRIS, OLD GOLD, PAU. 8J'
MALI. KOOL, RALEIGH. 4Mm,



Sd-t seno Br heNor Mo Oder or
cSA 15O aerEYton of t0o. We .

the t Sead Check or Money Order. or Kepsflt
C.O.D. Act now! Order TODAYI
JOHN ROBERT SALES CO.
Dept. W-4 Box Clayton N, Mo.


Above is Dr. George F. Weber,
president of the Florida Academy
of Sciences, .who .has called .a
meeting of the. group's. council
for tomorrow morning at 10
o'clock in -Science Hall to decide
where the annual meeting of the
academy will be held.
The academy, affiliated w 1 th
American Association for the Ad-
vancement of Science, is a state
group concerned with results of
scientific research in the physical,
social, and biological sciences.


DTD Will Hold

Annual Banquet
Brothers and pledges of Delta
Tau Delta will travel en masse
to Jacksonville Saturday to cele-
brate the founding of the nation-
al fraternity and Delta Zeta chap-
ter of the University of Florida.
The banquet, being held this
year at the invitation of the Jack-
sonville alumni chapter, is being
held at the Roosevelt Hotel and
marks the 23rd annual affair of
the Florida Delts.
H. J. Doherty, local chapter
president, will be master of cere-
monies and Guy Botts.. prominent
Jacksonville lawyer, will be prin-
cipal speaker. Over 150 alumni
and undergraduate members are
expected to be present.


Young Demos Ask

Class Suspension

Young Democrats unanimous-
ly, at their meeting last week,
passed a resolution which asks
that President Miller suspend all
classes May 4, Election Day, so
that the student vote may be
facilitated. The resolution, whbcb
the young Democrats say is a
step forward in the working
of Democracy on the campus,'is
soon to be presented to Miller
for his consideration'. I


r, Friday, March 5, 1948



izations KA's, Sigma Chi's Hold Annual Weekends

Senator Shands Secession, Juleps Chapter Sweetheart

Discusses Plans US Order Of The Day Selection Hiahliohs


In Campus Forum
Senator W. A. Shands. guberna-
torial aspirant, discussed his plat-
form in an open forum Tuesday
evening in Florida, Union.
Shands spoke on his contribu-
tions toward finances, education,
taxes, and citrus and also denied
that he had any activities in the
repudiation of the establishment of
a campus laundry.
The speaker was under "cross-
fire" when two University profes-
sors of political science threw a
barage of questions at him.
S. T. Dell, local attorney, intro-
duced Shands


Phi Alpha Theta

Plans Made By

Pol. Sci. Dept.
Plans are being formulated for
the establishment on the campus
of a chapter of Phi Alpha Theta,
national honorary history frater-
nity.
Dr. Donald Worcester, Depart-
ment of History and Political Sci-
ence, has called an organizational
meeting for Tuesday afternoon at
2:40 in Room 10, Peabody Hall. All
history faculty. graduate and un-
dergraduate students who are ma-
jors in history are invited to at-
tend. Professor Worcester, Pro-
fessor Rembert W. Patrick, Pro-
fessor Paul L. Hanna and Profes-
sor Sam Proctor are in charge of
arrangements.
Phi Alpha Theta was founded in
1921 and has fifty-two chapters in
universities and colleges through-
out the United States. Chapters
are already functioning at Florida
State University and Stetson Uni-
versity.
Phi Alpha Theta publishes the
historical journal "The Historian." '


Campus Club Drops

Price On Burgers
The Campus Club has recently
dropped prices on several food
items.
The price drops that have been t
put into effect include hamburg-
ers, all the way, from 20 cents to o
15 cents; hot dogs, with slaw and g
relish, from 20 cents to 15 cents:
Steak plates from 85 cents to 75
cents. This includes french fries,
lettuce and tomato salad, rolls and
butter.
The Campus Club has also added
hot roast beef and roast pork sand-
'viches at 35 cents. Milkshakes are s
15 cents, and malteds are 20 cents. p
You can tell the man "lots of g
malt," and get practically all you a
want. o
II
C
With The Engineers i
B
Today's inauguration program h
winds up the fourteenth annual a
meeting of the Southeastern Sec- p
ion of the American Society for t
Engineering Eduiation. Several pa-
ers of importance to engineering o
students were presented, including I
uch topics as "Conrolled Enroll- R
sent -in Engineering Schools," te
Designing the Undergraduate A
Curriculum," and the highly con-
roversial topic of "Four-Year dl
Versus Five Year Engineering ea
'urricula." In addition, many of B
he engineering educators attend- ti
d the Governor's conference on It
regional planning for higher edu- g
ation. dg
All freshmen who plan to go into a
ny branch of engineering are in- m,
ited to join the professional so- m
iety of your branch. Besides mak- Li
ig friends and getting some point- of
's from the inside, you will save be
ome money on your professional m
ues upon graduation. We have A
operate societies for the Aeron- tic
uticals, Chemicals, Civils, Elec- St
ricals, Industrials and the Me-
hanicals. as
In addition, the Benton Engi- M
eering Society (named in honor o0
f the late Dean Benton) is corn- T1
osed of all bYanches. From time cu
o time this column will give H
ou the scoop on these different cc
societies and their activities, fr


4ctiv/ties

LEIGH CHEMICAL SOCIETY
Tuesday at 7a30 p.m. in Chem-
istry Auditorium, Dr. A. P. Black
will give a talk on the "Natural
Waters of Florida." Everyone is
invited.

Barbell Club To Plan
Weight-Lighting Exhibit
Plans will be discussed for an
exhibition to further weight-lift-
ing and training on the campus at
a meeting of the University of
Florida Barbell Club Monday in
the Committee Room of Florida
Union.

Weekly Dance Slated
Tonight By Fla. Union
Florida Union will hold its reg-
ular weekly dance tonight from
8:30 to 11:30 at the Recreation
Hall.
There is no admission charge,
and all students are urged to at-
tend.


Red Cross Goal

For Campus Set

At Five Thousand
The campus Red Cross Drive got
under way Monday under joint
sponsorship of Florida Union and
Alpha Phi Omega, service frater-
nity.
Bill Rion, general chairman for
the faculty division of the Red
Cross Drive. has announced that
as of Wednesday night $70 has
been turned in from the faculty
drive. Figures are not available I
for the student drive which is be-
ing handled by Alpha Phi Omega.
Solicitations will be carried on
until March 15, and Chairman Rion
has announced that the University
goal has been set at $5,000. He
requests that faculty members and
employees contact the building
chiarmen, which have been select-
ed for each building.
Jordan Ansbacher. president of c
Alpha Phi Omega, is chairman of f
he student drive. This fraternity -
rill sponsor the Ugly Man contest i
on March 15 with all proceeds to C
go to the Red Cross. F
t

Cow College Bull o

By Eugene Do"o a
The past two weeks have seen
ome of the year's best programs n
resented by the cow college or-
anizations March 15 is now t,
significant date for something 1.
other than income tax payers fo
t is the date set aside for the AgK
collegee fish fry Sponsored by E
he Ag Club, all interested in ag- S
culture are invited to tend .a]
*lock and Bridle is still working
ard to make the Baby Chick k
nd Egg Show a success and fc
weatilig out the Rodeo Al-
ha Zeta is cooking with gas on M
he Ag College Fair. M
A prof broke down and gave an C
pen book exam, but Earl Far- M
ell turned up without a book .
ay Toller hopes to pick up the p
aching job with veterans at p
lachua. c(
Introducing the' Block and Bri- P
Ie Club Founded as the Tor- P
ador Club in 1931, became t he
lock and Bridle in 1938 when na- ri
onal charter was secured .r
aims to create interest in and P
ive training in the livestock and
airying industry To become E
member, you must serve one se- E
.ester as a .pledge, show an ani- tl
al in the Little International Y
ivestock show, attend two-thirds
f the meetings as a pledge, and
e voted in by two-thirds of the
embers .... Two dollars fee ... C
activities are the Little Interna-
onal Livestock Show, Rodeo, (
tate Baby Chick and Egg Show
Give a social gathering, such
s a barbecue once a semester of
ets when the horns are hung Cl
it, usually second and fourth dc
lhursdays H. H. Hopper in-
umbent president Animal tc
usbandry department are very j
cooperative as faculty advisors vi
'orn time to time.


MOVING

Local 6 Long Distance
From Or To Anywhere
In U. S.

STORAGE
CRATING
SHIPPING

HEMBY
Storage* Ir Transfer Co.
130 Eest Masonic St.
PHONE 2094
M. C. Alleyne, Mgr.
Class. '35


B7- J '' 7w6. ,inma (hi Fun'tirin


At Rebel Plantation
Kappa Alpha fraternity will bN
gin its Plantation Ball tonight a
six o'clock when a declaration wi
be issued by Jack Griffin fror
his headquarters at Fort Kapp
Alpha stating that the Yankee
have fired on Fort Sumpter an
that a proclamation has been io
dered to secede from the Unior
A Confederate flag will be raise
immediately with the playing o
"Dixie."
The secession ceremony is to b
broadcast over WRUF; everyone
is invited to the ceremony, whicl
will be held on the front lawn o
the Kappa Alpha Plantation.
Mint Juleps will be served o0
the veranda in celebration of thi
secession. There will be a barber
cue at 7:30. After the barbecue
comes the Sharecropper's Stomp
President Truman and Congresi
have been notified by telegram
that the K. A. Chapter will secede
from the Union for the period o0
48 hours. Secretary of State Mar.
shall, a K. A. alumnus was wirec
an invitation to be Chief of Stafi
of Confederate forces. John Edgas
Hoover, an alumnus was asked t<
head Confederate Secret Service
Phil Harris and Senator Claghorr
were invited to attend.
There will be a picnic lunch
Saturday afternoon at the Mill-
hopper.
The big event of the weekend
is the first Plantation Ball Sat-
urday night. The K. A.'s have been
growing side-burns for the occa-
sion and will be costumed as Con-
federate soldiers and officers. The
belles will be called for in car-
riages on which will be stationed
a colored doorman and a. footman.
The belles, of course, will all wear
hoop-skirts.
Coronation of the Kappa Alpha
Rose will take place at 11:30 p. m.
Each gentleman will have two
votes, one for his date and one for
the girl of his choice.


National Forestry

Fraternity To Be

Installed Here
Exercises for installation of a
chapter of Xi Sigma Pi, national
orestry fraternity, will be held in
Austin Carey Memorial Forest,
March 12, according to Professor
"harles Geltz of the University of
'lorida School of Forestry.
The University of Florida chap-
er will be the fifteenth in Xi Sig-
na Pi. Professor Geltz, who be-
ame a member while a student
t the University of California,
nd who is a former head of t he
organization, explained that the
purposes of the fraternity art to
maintain high standards in forest
education. work for upbuilding
he forestry profession, and pro-
,ote fraternal relations among
forestry workers.
Director Harold S .Newins, Dr.
dwin Zigler, and Kenneth R.
winford of the forestry school
re also members. Profs. J a m e a
V. Miller, Jr.. and Warner Fraser
ill be initiated along with 21
>restry students.
Students to be initiated on
larch 12 are Fred Brett. Jr.,
restview; Joseph Bulbin, Miami;
dwin Collins, Oneco; Boyd Close,
oore Haven: James Dickinson,
adison: Robert Dodson, East-
ort, Md.; Alvan Gilmore, Pensa-
ola; Raymond Goddard, La ke-
nd; Thomas HerAdon, Orange
ark: Frank Hill, Tampa; Wilbur
itchcock, St. Petersburg; B e n
uskiewicz, Kenosha, Wis.; Mor-
s McClure, Ft. Lauderdale; Hen-
y Peeples, Tavares; Levi Powell,
inetta; Charles Rou, Reddick;
enneth Scudder, San Antonio;
rnest Schulter, St. Petersburg;
iles Sheppard, Lake Butler; An-
tony Slankaukas, Tampa; and
red Stanberry, St. Petersburg.


Colin English

Club Organized
At an organizational meeting
SColin English for Governor
'lub on the campus recently, stu-
ent supporters of Colin English,
candidate for governor, elected
he following officers: Chairman,
>e Bradhanm,: St. Petersburg;
ce-chaiman, Charles Earnest,
liami; secretary, Ken Jones
aurel Hill; and treasurer, Jim
obinson, Orlando.
Appointed as committee chair-
en were Bob Bishop, Aucilla,
gistration; Doyle C o n no r,
tarke, membership; and Ky t 1 e
'illiams, Miami, publicity.
Joe Hall, University of Florida
iumnus and manager of cam-
iign headquarters for Colin
english, spoke to the club on the
rsonal history and service of
olin English in Florida.

former Girls' Club
members Asked To
ee Adelaide Selle
All former members of the Cam-
ia Girl's Club and all unmarried
omen, employees of the Univer-
ty are asked to contact Adelaide
lie in the Cashier's office for
e purpose of planning a dinner-
nce for April 5.


GIRLS GET THE RUSH

Sororities Pin Pledges

To Clmnx Rckh W l


V "CrI r v NR.*4jI Wj wIs, f..t.
Saturday morning and afternoon
By Janie Poorbaugh and Martha Nell Tison, Gaines- Sigs and their dates will attend an
Although advent o coeds on the ville, all-day picnic at Goldhead State
Although advent ot coeds on the Kappa Park.
Florida campus is one semester Sigma Kappa Park.
old, the first organized sorority Mary Jane Miles, lampa; Mar-
rush period was terminated Tues- cella Smith, Jacksonville, and
day when rushees received their Nora Jean de Clereq, Inglewood, RIDING ON YOUR RIMS?
final bids to become pledges. Calif.OUR RIMS?
The rush period began three Zeta Tau Alpha R Tir S
weeks ago with nine sororities Mary (Mickie) Bell, Bradenton; Re-Tire By apng
participating, but since Chi Ome- Jacqueline Beal, Gainesville; Mary, AT
ga refrained from rushing, only Lou Leggett, Gainesville; Janet
eight sororities pledged girls this Steele, Gainesville, and Joyce
semester. Ward, Gainesville. Saunder's Gaswell
Sororities which are officially Service Stat
recognized as being "on campus," service tat
of which Chi Omega is a mem- "I understand he takes her to Your Neighborhood
ber, pledged the following: mystery plays instead of dances."
Alpha .Delta Pi "Yes, they love each shudder." Firestone Associate
Virginia Lee Crews, Lake Pla- Englishman "W h a. t's that On N. 9th. St.
cid; Betty Vasta Hall, Arcadia, bloomin' noise I 'ear this time of
and Kathryn Hoge, Arlington, night?"
Va.
Delta Delta Delta
Carolyn Cowsert, St. Peters- ,
burg; Evelyn McKinley, Braden- i
ton, and Marjorie Varn, St. Aug-
ustine. Kappa Delta "Portra its
Elizabeth West, Charlotte, N.C.;
Margaret Jennings, Jacksonville;'
Betty Blakemore. Lakeland, and by
Anne Olah, St. Petersburg.
The following were pledged by. Anderson"
-ht ?fivr ,srities which are Deti- A d r n


i, II. WI... I IUIVII,
A nation-wide tradition will be
observed tomorrow night when the
"Sweetheart of Sigma Chi" is chos.
en for the coming year by Gamma
Theta Chapter.
Rodney King, chapter president
will present the new Sweetheart
with a gold loving cup at a formal
dance to be held in her honor at
the Twentieth Century Women's
Club. Maids of honor will also be
presented. Music will be furnished
from 9 until 1 a.m. by Ed Lang and
his orchestra.
Proceeding the Sw eet heart
Dance will be a formal banquet
beginning at 7:30 in Hotel Thornm
as. Guests of honor will be wel-
comrned by the chapter president
The weekend officially opens
with a buffet supper at the house
tonight. Following the supper,
there will be a Masquerade Ball
with skits furnishing further en-
tertainment. All guests will enter
Sigma Chi house through a large
mask that will cover the doorway
A prize will be given to the couple
wearing the best costumes.
Couples will unmask at mid-
night and there will be a break,
fast.


Te ve solowing pwerepledgedby
tioning to be recognized:
Alpha Chi 'Omega I
Wilma Faircloth, Jackson, Tenn.;
LaRetta M. Garland, Gainesville,
and Jessie Mae Smith, Gaines-
ville.
Alpha Omicron Pi
Bernardine Bailey, Gainesville;
Carolyn Baer, Branford; Joann
Deen, Gainesville; Irma Jean
Koon, St. Petersburg; Barbara
Davis, Gainesville: Eleanor Cope-1
land, Gainesville; Tris Bishop,
Gainesville: Carolyn Jones. Gaines-
ville, and Mary Cunningham,
Gainesville.
Phi Mu
Betty Jean Hatch. Jacksonville,

A SLAutd&


mule'11ft


New

1948

Spring r Summer

Samples
Now On Display
At
Beer's Tailors
Alterations
424 W. University Ave.


\Nz:


The Anderson Studio

338 W. Univ. Ave.

Telephone 981


Do You Want To Make That


TALLY LASSIE HAPPY

SEND HER FLOWERS











Is she th girl who always says "Maybe"? A dainty
corsage of roses may help her to be more definiet-
and more sentimental.

ROSE OR CARNATION CORSAGE-$3.00

Three Torches Corsage Bar
Across From FSU Music Annex


PARK & COPELAND

Tallahassee, Florida
Phone 837-Wire or Write


Now In Progress




9 Great Day



Of Savings!


Every Department Participates !

March 3 through March 13


AOowgoi #w/


EARS


130 W. Main St.
Gainesville, Fla.
Phone 2580


THE HOTEL CLUB


Announces

A NEW PRICE POLICY m
ti
For The Stag Room

25c Per Person s
n
For Your Listening And Dancing c
tr
90c Per Couple -V
C
th
e
Larry Gibson and His Orchestra r

Friday And Saturdays a

ci
THE HOTEL CLUB ie
so
The Best Food The Best Band d
au


a


The above picture was taken at a P.A.D. banquet which was held
last week at Hotel Thomas. Dr. George J. Miller was principal speak-
er. Standing from left to right are Sam Allgood, Dr. John J. Tigert,
Mr. Joe Jenkins, Dr. Miller, Clifford Sheppard, Lance Lazonby, Prof.
F. E. Malloney, and Ellis G. Piper.


I







State Funds


For New Dorm


Bring Results
Total Of $1,000,000
Approved For Building
Trie $40.000, which is part of
the State Funds for the new
dormitory building project, is
bring in good results as the
Plans for these dormitories are be-
ing hastened forward.
A total of $1,000,000 has been
approved for this construction and
other monies will be forthcoming
as the sale of revenue certificate
issues to the public begins.
"This is only the first step in
the getting of more dormitories,"
states George F. Baughman, Uni-
versity Business Manager. 'Other
supplemental plans are going to be
provided until housing needs are
taken care of for all students."
Baughman also stated that plans
for the new Student Exchange
Building are being developed as
the University has received an
amount of $108,000, which is to be
expended for this program.



New Magazine


Invades Campus
SURF, the new Southern inter-
collegiate maabzinie, which goes
to more than 18 Southern cam-
puses and is circulated in all
Southern states, will invade the
campus this month for the first
time, and will have an agency
here, it was announced today by
Phil Harsham, editor-in-chief.
With the announcement that the
March issue will be circulated on
the campus this week, SURF re-
leased the story that Pen Gaines
has ben selected as editor at t he
Florida campus, and that Elmer
Atkins, Orlando, will be in charge
of circulation. These men can be
contacted in the basement of
Florida Union.
Articles, stories, pictures, etc.,
should be submitted to Pen
Gaines.
The March issue contains a
'story and pictures on the motor-
cycle races at Daytona Beach
held annually in early March.

KAM Will Hold
Annual Contest
Kappa Alpha, Mu, national col-
legiate honorary fraternity in
photo journalism, announces its
third annual 50-print Collegiate
Photography Exhibition. Science
Illustrated, co-operating with
Kappa Alpha Mu, will award the
grand prize which includes a trip
to New York with traveling ex-
penses paid, seven working weeks
with the magazine at a salary of
$50 a week, and promise of a job
if thfe w i n n i n g photographer
proves acceptable.
Entries wil be accepted by News,
Pictorial-Feature, Fashion, Sports
and Industrial classes from now
until April 30. The grand prize
will be awarded to the best of
five winners. A complete list of
awards will be announced at a
later date.
Students regularly enrolled in
any college or university are eligi-
ble to enter up to 10 prints with
no" more than five entries in -any
one division. Prints may be 5x7
or larger but must be mounted on
standard 16x20 board. There is no
entry fee, but pictures must be
sent prepaid and will .be returned
express collect.
Entry blanks and contest rules
may be obtained by writing to
W. J. Bell, secretary, 18 Walter
Williams Hall, University of
Missouri, Columbia, Missouri.


Legal Fraternity
Names Pledges
Delta Theta Phi, legal fraterrni-
ty, pledged 1.7 law students Fri-
day afternoon in a ceremony at
Florida Union.
Those pledged include: Bryan
Henry, Gainesville; Roy T.
Rhodes, Tallahassee; John K .Fol-
som, Tallahassee; Addison H.
Thomsan, Miami; George L.
Pink, Fernandina; Wilson L. Bai-
ley, Blountstown; Joseph D. Krol,
Korona; A. Z. Adkins, Jr., Starke;
Sherwood L. Stokes, Haines City;
Howard L. Garrett, Tampa; Gor-
don H. Lee, Jacksonville; Lynn N.
Silvertooth, Gainesville; George
C. Smith, Miami; 01 en W.
Cheshire, Lakeland; F. Gaines Se-
bree, Fr., Leesburg; Lee E. Me-
Ilvaine, Gainesville; and William
M. Barnett, Brooksville.
Lucien C. Proby, dean of the
Fred M. Vinson Senate of Delta
Theta Phi, conducted the cere-
mony.


VWE 00'r 9eW*
m:*tt S


.

T'.






Pictured speaking before a capacity cro' d at Florida Union is Bill
Castagna, veteran Gator debater, taking issues against the debate
team from Wheaton College. The debate ended in a non-decision.


Conferences Dominate

Remainder Of Activities


Three conferences, a committee
meeting, and a recital compose the,
major activities this afternoon,
tonight, and tomorrow morning
for participants in, and delegates
to, the inauguration.
Today at 3p.m. Dean B. C. Riley,
of the General Extension Division,
is to lead the discussion on "In-
service Training for Teachers."
The meeting will take place in
the P. K. Yonge Auditorium.
At 4:30 p. m. the Committee
on Cooperation in Higher Educa-
tion of the Southern University
Conference will meet in room 202
of Temporary Building D. Har-
ley W. Chandler is chairman of
the committee.
Delegates, conference partici-
pants, and their wives are to be
guests of the University for a
break in the "business of the day"
at 8:15 p.m. tonight when they
attend a recital given by Joseph
Schuster, cellist, in the University
Auditorium.
A second conference on "In-
service Training for teachers" is
to be held at 9 tomorrow morn-
ing in P. K. Yonge Auditorium
with G. Ballard Simmons, acting
dean of the College of Education
presiding at the meeting.


Glee Club Women
Choose Officers
For Spring Term
The Women's Glee Club of the
University began this semester's
activities with election .of officers
at their meeting Tuesday.
Those students who were elect-
ed were: President, Mrs. Majel
Barre t; vice president, Mrs.
Elayne Williams; secretary-treas-
urer, Adelaide Selle, and librarian,
Grace Elder.
The new offciers will form an
executive council which will meet
with Director Tom Fay to handle
the club's business.
All interested persons are in-
vited to attend the next regular
meeting which will take place in
Wesley Foundation Chapel Tues-
day night, 7 to 9 p. m. There will
be part 'rehearsals in the audi-
torium, Room S, Monday and


At Florida

ELGIN WHITE

Smokes

Chesterfields

WIgin Says:
It's a eigoaette that reo"y tastes
good.
Voted TOPSI-Chesterfield is the
largest selling cigarette in Amer-
ica's colleges (by nation-wide sur-
vey) .


ask about

our< co.


Mr. ABC Gives
Chesterfields
Free Next Week
Starting next week, a represent-
ative of the Chesterfield Cigarette
Company will visit the campus
every week to give out free pack-
ages of cigarettes, Chesterfield
agents Holly Brumby and Jim
Bowe announced this week.
Bowe stated that if the repre-
sentative, who will be called "Mr.
ABC," stops a student and finds a
package of Chesterfields in his
possession, he will give the student
an extra package.
"If the student is actually smok-
ing a Chesterfield when stopped,
he will receive two packs absolute-
ly free," he said.


Reese Smith Elected

P. C. Club President
Holding their first meeting of
the second semester, Tuesday
night, members of the Plant City
Club elected Reese Smith to head
the organization. Selected to serve
with President Smith are Theo Sa-
liba, vice-president, and Ned Ha-
ven, secretary-treasurer.
Officers of the club have re-
quested that all students living in
and around Plant City avail them-
selves of this opportunity to meet
others from their area. A meet-
ing has been called for Tuesday
night at 8 o'clock in Room 210,
Language Hall.

Wednesday at 7 p. m. It is im-
portant that members attend these
rehearsals, since a new repertoire
is being made.


'Fact Sheets'


Are Now Ready


For Speakers

May Be Had At Gator;
More Speakers Needed

Public Relations Board announc-
ed today that fact sheets and out-
lines for the student speakers who
desire to speak before a high
school audience have arrived and
are ready for circulation.
Approximately eight of 10
speeches have already been made
by student speakers, and the PRB
now urges all students who do wish
to speak before a high school au-
dience to come to the ALLIGATOR
office as soon as possible and pick
up the outlines and fact sheets
from which to organize their
speech.
It is hoped by the PRB that the
majority of speeches can be made
this semester, and reports from
some of the students show that
dates for speeches have already
been scheduled.
All interested students are again
urged to contact a PRB repre-
sentative in the ALLIGATOR of-
fice as soon as possible.
There will be another general
meting Wednesday afternoon at
4:80 in Florida Union.

Progress Tests
Information
C-11 Thursday, March 11, 8:30
p.m. University Auditorium.
C-12 Thursday, March 11, 6:45
p.m. Students whose last names
begin with A-H will report to the
University Auditorium; I-J to
room 176 of Building E; K to room
175 of Building E; L to room 174
of Building E; M to the Chemistry
Auditorium; N to room 177 of
Building E; 0 to room 178 of
Building E; P to room 179 of
Building E; Q-R to Science 101; S
to Agriculture 108; T-V to Agri-
culture 104; W-Z to Science 212.
Ms 105 Wednesday, March 10,
7:00 p.m. University Auditorium.
All students registered for these
courses are expected to take these
tests, and each student must bring
his own pencil containing electro-
graphic lead. Students will be re-
quired to use their University stu-
dent numbers.

Poet Robert Frost

Speaks Here Monday
Robert Frost, widely known
poet and lecturer, and called by
some "the greatest living poet of
today," is scheduled to speak in
University Auditorium at 8 p.m.
Monday night. His topic is to be
"Mark IV 12."
This is not the first time the
famous writer h a a visited the
University of Florida. He spoke
here with tremendous success in
1940.


Business Manager

Surveys Campus

Beautification-
With the planting of innumer-
able varieties of trees, sowing and
resoding of grass, placement of
shrubbery, laying of sidewalks,
redecorating of classrooms an d
offices, and filling in of several of
the treacherous Gator (ulches,
the rehabilitation program of the
campus is rapidly nearing com-
pletion.
According to University offi-
cials, the recently organized beau-
tification project will have been
finished with respect to the major
scars and eyesores within the
next few weeks. However, addi-
tional maintenance and further
improvement is to be continued,
until every square foot of the
campus is in tip-top condition.
George F. Baughman, Univer-
sity business manager, said this
week that he and his office are
very grateful for the help stu-
dents have given his department
in this program. He asked that
continue with their cooperation
with all the work that has yet to
be done.


Progress Tests
In Aud. Tuesday
C-31' Literary Comprehension
Test will be given Tuesday night
at 8:30 in University Auditorium.
All C-31 students are expected to
take this test, and each must bring
his own pencil containing electro-
graphic lead. Students will be re-
quired to use their University stu-
dent numbers.
Ms 106 progress test will be giv-
en Tuesday night, at 7:00 in Uni-
versity Auditorium. All Ms 106
students are expected to take this
test, and each should bring his
'electrographic lead pencil and Uni-
versity student number.


The Florida Alligator, Friday, March 5, .1948


BUILDING NEARS COMPLETION


Union To Be Center


For Student Activities
The Business Manager's office
announced today that outside con- scholastic activities. New lounges
struction on Florida Union Annex and recreational rooms will be
will be completed within a few provided; relieving the congestion
days. of the constant flow of traffic in
The project, started several the building.
years ago, had been delayed by
the shortages of materials, but
within the last several months,
these shortages have been allevi-
ated and work has progressed. ""Z]fl&
Work will next be started in the
interior of the building and con-
tracts will be let to various con-
struction companies for remodel-
ing materials for rooms, walls,
and hallways of the building pro-
per. Interior architectural plans
are finished and only completion -\
of the outside holds up the refin-
ishing of the inside.
Florida Union, once the propos-
ed Student Exchange Building is
finished, will be strictly a Flor-
ida Union no bookstore and no
soda fountain which will house
the offices of the various student
organizations. It will be the cen-
ter of student social life and non- 0C


vance. Tickets are SOc each.


DANCE
AND A MOVIE

Saturday, March 6
Airbase Gym
7:30 p.m.
Admission 50c a couple
Proceeds For A Washing Machine
For Trailervet III


Newberry's
TEXACO STATIONS

Neighborhood'

Service
814 North 9th Street

Downtown
Service
KMaonln & West Main


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THE ALLIGATOR

Former "Sunshine Fountain"
Half Block N. of Univ. on Ninth


Delicious Sandwiches

Donuts

Homemade Desserts

The Best Cup of Coffee

And

The Cleverest Greeting Cards
Fine Writing Papers

Exquisite Gifts For Every Occasion


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10D


Ag. Club's Fish Fry
Tickets Are On Sale
Until Monday Noon
Professor H. S. Newins, School
of Forestry, will speak to the Ag.
Club Monday night.
At the last meeting Dr. Veldhuis
gave a talk on citrus by-products
and their future outlook.
Tickets are now on sale for the
fish fry to be held in College Park
Monday: night, March 15. Tickets
will not be sold after Monday
noon; they must be obtained in ad-
vance. Tickets are 50c each.





.4 The Florida Alligator, Friday, March 5, 1948






Spot *



FLORIDA'S NEW GYM IS TO BE COMPLETED by
February, 1949, says Dean Dutch Stanley of the School of
Physical Education, Health and Athletics. No definite
schedule lhas been set by the contractors, but steel con-
struction will start soon it was learned by this writer. The
$1,600,000 gym is to be the most outstanding sports arena
of the South. It will have the most complete facilities and
will house more departments than any other gym in the
South. The south end will be a separate gym, without
bleachers, for the Physical Education Department.
The west side will house the office of the dean and
his staff. The playing floor of 27.960 square feet will
have a seating capacity of around 10.000. According
to Stanley it will be the show place of Florida. The
old brick gym will be turned over to coeds for their
use.
There is some doubt as to the destiny of the new gym or
wooden barn. Our suggestion would be to give it to the
Intramural Department for their exclusive use. Our In-
tramural Department, the best in the South, is really a
credit to the University and needs this extra space.

GATOR SWIMMERS TAKE ON CLEMSON here
tomorrow afternoon and comparing past records the
boys from this school should grab a one-sided vic-
tory. Last year the Gator tankmen took a 51-23 meet
from the Tigers and Florida has far better swimmers
this year than last. With Bill Pepper, Lou Brown,
.and others grabbing all these first place points they
are tough for anybody. With only one senior on the
squad the Gators should be a big threat for the SEC
in 1949.

LAST NIGHT AFTER THIS COLUMN was written the
University of Florida basketball team trotted onto the
same floor with one of the top cage teams of history. By
now most of you readers know what the score was, and we
hope it was favorable. Naturally, it would be one of the
major upsets in the history of the hardwood game if the
Gators won. Our vote goes to Kentucky by 20 points over
a courageous Gator quintet.

HANK GARDNER, F CLUB PREXY, is no doubt one of
Florida's leading boosters. It seems that Gardner had a
rather queer dream the other night. During his night of
peaceful sleep he heard station WRUF blast out that the
Gator basketball team had made history by upsetting Ken-
tucky by 20 points. No man can be expected to pull any
harder than Hank.

WHEN COLUMINISTS ON THE SAME PAPER have
to criticize each other to fill up space then their nose
for news has turned from reader interest to personal
interest. Attention Marty Lubov and Elgin White. 7


WIMPIE'S
739 WEST UNIVERSITY AVENUE
Open Til 7:30 P.M.
NO WAIT FOR.-
TENDER FRANKFURTER'S,
WELL-DONE HAMBURGER'S
"For Your Quick Snack"


1
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T
7
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Baseball Squad


Cut As Opening


Game Date Neai

With the official lid lifting c
the Gators' 1948 baseball cam.
paign less than three weeks away
Coach Dave Fuller has begun t
tighten the screws on his bumpe
crop of diamond hopefuls.
Many an excess .ound will tak
the form of sweat during the nu
merous practice, games which wi]
be held from here on out in an ef
fort to round the team into top
shape for the opener with Ala
bama on March 22nd.
After giving every man a
chance to show his stuff unde
game conditions in an all after
noon practice last Saturday, Ful
ler began to wield the axe.
Squad Cut
To date 30 men have been trim
med from the once bulky s q u a d
of 69. The remain A9 include 10
infielders, eight catchers, eigh
outfielders and 13 pitchers.
T h e infielders are Bishop
Brown, Fielding, Forbes, Hudson
Milligran, P i g g o t, Reynolds
White and Whittington.
The catching corps consists of
H. Bishop, Bains, Garcia, Irley
Ramseyer, Scarborough, Walker
and B. Davis.
The outfielders are Berquist
Bracken, C. Davis, Ledeaux,
Poole, Powell, Schact and Strat-
ton.
The hurling staff is composed
of Adanis, Dickens, Edwards,
Fussell, Gaines, Hurst, Montsdi-
oca, Owens, Stiegal, Pope, Marrin
belle, Stradley and Rutowski.

Intramural
Results


Independent Softball
All Stars 22, Bobcats 2; Avon-
dales 17, Baptist 2; Gator Club 12,
Presbyterian 8; Killers 9, CLO 2;
Wesley 23, Conchs 2; Seagle 5,
Killers 2; Presbyteriar: 12, Crane
8; Hell Cats 3, Pensacola 0.
Frat Volleyball *
SN over ATO, 15-9, 12-15, 15-7;
TEP over XP, 15-3, 15-2; BTP
river AGR, 15-4, 15-4; LXA over
DS, 15-8, 18-15, 15-16; PKA over
KA, 35-8, 15-10; KA over KO 15-
r, 11-15, 15-1; SN over SX, 15-1,
15-0; PGD over TX, 15-2, 5-15,
15-4; PKP over PKT, 14-16, 15-10,
.5-10; DX over BTP, 15-1, 6-15,
15-8.
Dorm Handball
Singles: Murphree L-M over
Buckman B-C, 21-4, 21-16: Mur-
phree A-B over Sledd C-G, 13-21,
1-14, 21-19; Buckman B-C over
'homas C-D, 21-5, 21-10; Murph-
ee L-M over Murphree C-D, 21-
21-8; Murph*ee A-B over Temp.
R., 21-3, 21-4.
Doubles: Temp. 0 over Murph-
ee L-M, 21-4, 21-8; Murphree A-
S over Temp. H, 21-3, 21-6; Temp.
) over Sledd C-G, 21-16, 21-13;
remp. H over Temp. K, 21-7, 21-
; Murphree A-B over Fletcher
4-N, 21-4, 21-0.


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419 North Ninth Street


"Ready To Cook Or Cooked To o Home"


WE PREPARE QUICKLY


SEAFOODS AND CHICKENS

COOKED OR RAW

Packed To Carry Out We Do Not Serve


Half Fried Chicken

Golden Brown $1.00

Fried Select Oysters

Dozen 90c


Fried Large Shrimps

Dozen 85c

Fried Sea Scallops

Dozen $1.00


We Have The Finest

BOILED SHRIMP

1.25 Pound
Appetizers And Cocktail


FISH
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SERVED WITH

French Fried Potatoes, Cold Slaw, Tartar Sauce or
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Open Daily.. 11 A.M.-9 P.M.
Sunday ... 12:30 A.M.-8 P.M.

Sorry, We Can Take No Phone Orders 'Til Further Notice
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- Intra-Squad Tennis Meet

t Moves Into Second Week
By Sandy Schnier
Gator tennis fans can treat themselves to the low-down
on their 1948 varsity squad next Monday, Tuesday, and
Wednesday afternoons when the second week of an "up-
Sthe-ladder" tournament get underway on the clay courts
, just west of the drill field.
Little Joe Dunayer, former Miami Beach High School
star, will battle Byron Wise, Gainesville city champion, on
one court Monday while Don Kaplan and Phil Wanger
meet on the other. Both matches
will begin at 2 p. m.
At 3:15 Frank Skillman and T
Bill 'Cohen pair off, and Bill IurpII a s,
Oughterson and Jack Borling
- start on the other court. Frank T Mm 0 l il
- Wood and Co-Captain Bobby Rig- Temp. In Finals
gins play at 4:30.
Five matches are on tap Tues- Of Dor Handba S
day with Co-Captain Harry Ter- VI Dorm Hland ali,
rell and Reece Cooper, and Bor-
ling and Oughterson starting off Murphree L-M and Murphree
at 2 p. m. Skillman takes on Wan- A-B singles teams moved into the
ger, and Dunayer and Kaplan finals of the Dorm League Intra-
open up at 3:15 p. in. Wise and mural handball tourney by push-
Cohen end the day with a 4:30 ing past semi-final opponents
match. Wednesday, while Murphree A-B
Wednesday's schedule has Wan- also reached the final round in
ger vs. Wood at 2 p. m.; Terrell doubles competition, being paired
vs. Dunayer and Borling vs. Cohen in the title round with Temporary
at 3:15, and Riggins vs. Oughter- O. Both final round contests were
son and Wise vs. Cooper at 4:30. scheduled for yesterday after-
Coach Herman Schnell reported noon.
that these matches would deter- Murphree A-B's Bowers reach-
mine playing rank this season, but ed the payoff round by edging out
that the ladder is to be set up Delgado of Sledd C-G in a close
subject to change at any time. semi-final match, two games to
First match for the Gators is one. Delgado took the first game,
against Florida Southern in Lake- 21-13, but lost his place in the
land March 26. tourney by dropping the next two
This week's results: to Bowers, 21-14 and 21-19.
Kaplan downed Wanger, 7-5, Set to oppose the A-B singles
6-2; Cooper outlasted Oughterson, ace in yesterday's championship
6-4, 4-6, 6-2 in a hot battle; Ter- tussle was Leader of Murphree
rell took Borling, 6-4, 6-3; Ought- L-M, who won over Graves of
person defeated Terrell in a close Buckman B-C, 21-4, 21-16, in the
one, 4-6, 6-3, 6-4; Cooper beat other round-of-four singles tilt.
Borling, 7-5, 6-4; Wood won over Murphree A-B's doubles combi-
Cohen, 6-4, 6-2; Kaplan downed nation of Perritt-Lott copped a
Skillman, 6-4, 3-6, 6-4; Dunayer semi-final contest from Holtsberg
came back to whip Wood. 2-6, 7-5, and Bittick of Temp. H, 21-3, 21-6,
6-1, and Oughterson took Wanger, to enter the doubles finals against
6-4, 6-3. the Horowitz- Sherman duo of
Temp. 0, 21-4, 21-8 winners over
ans TaeMIA W* inS Jewett and Kittinger of Murphree
Hans Iae1ZIer L-M Wednesday,


Next sport on the D s


softball, which gets under way
V Oli i |CT ~Monday with four opening round
games. Defending champion in the
th 3 2 Point Total diamond sport is the Alachua Air
'S Base nine.
Hans Taenzler, flashy G a t o r
cage center, copped the Universi- Three Gator Seniors
ty of Florida high scoring bas-
ketball race this season with a The 28 lettermen engaged in
regular season total of 322 with University of Florida spring foot-
Harry Hamilton, forward, in sec- ball drills consist of 11 sophomores,
ond with a 283 total. 14 juniors, and three seniors. The
Taenzler grabbed the lead the seniors who make '48 their last
first two games and was near the season are quarterback Doug
top all season. Hamilton made a Belden, halfback Bobby Forbes,
strong bid mid-season, but the big and guard Fletcher Groves.
Jacksonville center put on t he
steam to run up his big total. Gator Lettermen
Taenzler's total score is believed
to be the highest number of points Fourteen lettermen, paced by
ever scored by a Gator cager. captain hurler Bobby Ennis, of
Other scoreres and totals ar e: Tampa, are trying for their old
Julian Miller 188, Bill Atkinson positions on the University of
120, Bill Welch 101, Harold Has- Florida track team which opens its
kins 90, Lamar Bridges- 77, Hen- season with the Florida Relays on
ry Cornell 63. March 27th.


Swimmers


Wesley Sets Pace


In Softball Tourney
By Julian Clarkson
Wesley Foundation pounded out a 23-2 victory over an
outclassed Conch Club nine Tuesday afternoon to cinch
first place in the fourth bracket of the Independent Lea-
gue intramural softball tourney, but other bracket winners
had not been determined through games of Wednesday.
The first bracket faced possibility of a three-way tie
pending the result of yesterday's clash between a vastly
improved Hell Cat team and the Bobcats. The second
bracket outcome rode on the
Avondale-Crane Hall tilt yester-
day with the Avondales seeking m
their fourth straight win, while iIgma Nus Loom
yesterday's tussle between the
Tarpons and Seagle, both unbeat- Th
en, decided the winner of the As Inreal In Mural
third bracket.
Finals Next Week Wl
* The deadlock in the first group V lleyball Battle
will either be settled Monday, or
will require two days in the event The Sigma Nus loomed as a
of a Hell Cat win yesterday. Any threat to the Ititramural volley-
other bracket ties will also be ball crown in the Fraternity
played off early next week with Orange league this week by de-
the finals on tap for the latter eating Alpha Tau Omega, Tues-
part of the week. day.
Wesley's smashing win over the In the first bracket of the com-
Conchs found the fourth bracket petition in the Orange League the
champs on the rebound after SPE's and Delts were both uri-
barely nosing out the Saints, 1-0, defeated at press time. In games
on Monday in the face of a no-hit- this week SPE beat Kappa Sigma
ter that Neet, Saint moundsman, and PKA, winning both in two
served up to them. The Wesley games. PKA was defeated 11-15,
nine snapped out of its lethargy 7-15 and KS lost 8-15, 9-15. KA
in a big way against the Conchs, played two matches beating KS
unleashing a powerful 19-hit bar- 15-7, 11-15, 15-1 and lost to the
rage, including a triple and a Pikes 8-15, 10-15.
homer by winning pitcher Zim- In the second bracket, ATO aft-
merman, mainstay of the team. er making a strong bid for the
Meanwhile the Saints wound up title by defeating Phi Delta Theta
with a 4-1 record to finish, a and Sigma Alpha Epsilon lost a
strong second, hard fought match to Sigma Nu.
Bracket Tie The Sigma Nus have yet to play
The first bracket was -compli the Phi Delts, and in case of
cated further Wednesday by the a Phi Delt victory the bracket
All-Stars' 22-2 massacre of the could end in a three way tie be-
Bobcats, which gave the Stars a tween ATO, PDT, and SN. In
3-1 mark, the same record held by games this week SN beat ATO 15-
Mortar and Pestle. The Hell Cats 9, 12-15, 15-7; ATO beat SAE
also had a chance to finish at 3-1 1S-12, 15-8; SAE whipped SX 15-
by whipping the Bobcats yester- 9, 13-15, 15-6; and SX lost to
day SN 1-15, 0-15.
Next week's schedule will be as
follows: Monday-KS vs. PKA, SX
vs. ATO. Tuesday-DTD vs. KA,
Pi Kaps Take Two PDT vs SN
The finals will be held on Thurs-
Ma day.
at T RDrawings for golf, will be held
S i in the Intramural office on Wed-

On Top In League nesday.
Swimming Meet
Pi Kappa Phi emerged as a Members of the varsity and
dark horse in the Blue League freshmen swimming team will hold
volleyball tournament this week an intra-squad meet at the pool
by defeating the crack Phi Kappa starting at 3 p. m. Saturday it was
Tau team in a close contest Wed- announced this week. The meet
nesday. will be under regular dual intercol-
The Pi Kaps remain the only legiate rules and regulations.
undefeated team in the first brac-
ket by virture of their win. In
games this week Phi Kappa Tau Busy Day
won two and lost one beating DS April 17th will be a busy day for
15-2, 15-2 and PGD 15-10, 15-12 University of Florida athletes.
and lost to PKP 16-14, 10-15, 10- The Gators play Rollins in base-
15. The leading Pi Kaps also ball, Mississippi in track, Stetson
beat TX 15-2, 5-15, 15-4. LXA in tennis, and Rollins in golf. All
beat DS 15-8, 13-15, 15-6. but the tennis matches will be in 3
In the second bracket the Pi Gainesville.
Lams continued their champion-
ship march by taking all comers 15-10, 15-7. In other games DX I
to remain the only undefeated beat AGR 15-2, 15-13; BTP defeat-
team in the bracket. In the clos- ed CP 11-15, 15-7, 15-9; BTP I
est game of the week PLP de- whipped AGR 15-4, 15-4; TEP p
feated TEP 15-12, 4-15, 15-13 to walloped CP 15-3, 15-2; and DX r
gain the lead. They also beat DX beat BTP 15-1. 6-15, 15-8. t


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Pictured above are the Hellcats and Killers, finalists in the Intra-
mural Department Independent League bowling. The Hellcats won
the title. Front row Killers: T. L. Bailey, C. Chafln, N. Hope, D. Har-
rison, and J. Sommers; back row, Hellcats: J. Adaltington, C. Perry-
man, N. Allen, Al Lowman.


Pi


roday


Gator Tankmen


Favored To Cop


Fourth Victory
By John Wi=iford
Florida's swimming team, rapid-
ly gaining back their old prewar
reputation as being the big bys
of the Southeastern Conference
will square off against Clemsona's
splashers here this afternoon at 4
o'clock in their first home meet.
The Gator tankmen have split
six meets this season, winning,
from Georgia, Emory and Duke,
and dropping close clashes to
Georgia Tech, North Carolina and
N. C. State. When Coach Frank
Genovar's mermen shoved the
Emory team all over their own
pool last week to break the At-
lantans' 14 straight winning.
streak, the conference pencil-.
pushers built'it up as a "slip oy':
Emory's part." But when the-
Orange and Blue swimmers came
within three points of upsetting
the top-rated Ga. Tech squad-
breaking the Tech pool record in
one event while doing so-the
scribes couldn't help ranking the
Floridians as one of the confer-
ence's top pooQI contenders.
The local Saurians are expect-
ed to boost up their side ot the
ledger another notch when they
play host to the Clemson aggre.
nation, as the Tigers have lost to'
both Georgia and Emory. How-
ever, the unpredictable South Car-
olina outfit, recent winners of the
three-way South Carolina collegi-
ate state meet against the V. of
S. C. and Furman, lists a few
individual standouts that have
posted quite impressive records
this season.
One of these is Henry Walker,
Tiger sprint specialist, wilt could-
n't have picked a worse opponent
to try to stand out against. 'The
Clemson star will be up against
Lou Brown, one of the Soutn''s
youngest and flashiest collegiate
swimmers, who has yet to be de-
feated in competition this year min
the 100-yard free style event.
Brown's 52.3 second clockworK
against Tech was 1.1 seconds
faster than the existing Souti-
eastern Conference record.
Another hot race is expected,
when Florida's Bill Pepper
matches strokes against' iem-
son's Parker, winner of both the
220 and 440 yard swims in the
South Carolina state meet, Pep-
per holds six straight triumphs
against no losses in the 440.
Rod Brisendine, Clemson diving
ace, will be up against Florida's
two Bills-Bill Bracken and Bill
Harlan on the springboard.
Bracken, rated one of the confer-
ence's best flipsters, walked away
with three straight first places
in the Gators' recent Georgia
tour.
Florida's tentative list of en-
trants in each event: 50 and 100
yard free style, Lou Brown and
Henry Martin; 220 and 440 yard
free style, Bill Pepper and John
Cornell; diving, Bill Bracken and
Bill Harlan; breastroke, Bud Mc-
Dougal; backstroke, Tom Brown
and Fred Teed; 400 yard relay,
Martin, Teed, Brown, T., and Pep-
per or Cornell; 300 yard medley
relay, Brown, T., McDougal and
Brown, L.









Florabel Wolff Sunshine State Led Abe
l li To Publisher For Book
W i.Pi l Abraham Lincoln was never in Nave States, Eeeking
Florida, but a book about the Under Spanish Laws,"


University Cafeteria


Serves Students' Needs


New $800,000 Addition To Cafeteria Will
Increase Seating Accommodations
By Hayes Kennedy stock Is approximately $25,000.
The head chef at the University
The first cafeteria in operation Cafeteria has been employed at
on the University of Florida camp- that position tor the last 17 years.
us wah located at the end of W. P. Long, the cafeteria manager
Thomas Hall. In 1912 the first has held his post for the past two
permanent cafeteria building was years and has executed all his
erected and is still in use today. duties with great efficiency.
During the years 1912-1929 the On the whole a wide variety of
.meals were served family-style, high-grade food is served at the
and from this time on have been cafeteria at low prices, providing
served cafeteria style, an economic advantage for the
Short-order breakfasts are majority of students who eat their
served from 7 a. m. until 8:30 meals at the cafeteria.
a. m. in the main cafeteria, and

fasts are served from 8 'til 10 in U al ney
the banquet hall. Lunch is served
from 11 a. m. til 1:45 p. m. in
both dining rooms. Supper is
served from 5:45 until 7 p. m. cs D TOrs
The Campus Club, which is run
in conjunction with the cafeteria,
serves meals continually from 8 a. Wednesday, the Florida Debate
m. until 10 p. m., presenting a wide Society sent a group of six men
variety of short orders. Five thous- to attend the annual South Atlan-
and meals per day are served in tic Debate Tournament in Hick-
the cafeteria and the Campus Club ory, North Carolina, which began
combined. There are 230 students March 4 and will continue
employed by the cafeteria, through the 6th.
Upon completion of the $800,000 Along with varsity debaters
addition to the cafeteria, the seat- Jerry Gordon, Alan Westin, Leon
ing accommodations will be in- McKim, and Bill Castagna who
creased to 1,144 at one sitting, will enter- important debate com-
serving from five separate lines, petition at the tourney, were Earl
Only the latest electrical equip- Faircloth and Elliot Shienfield
ment will be used in this modernis- who will participate in the ora-
tic building. To be found in this torical and radio contests respec-
equipment are such things as elec- tively.
tric steam-tables, electric ovens This is a crucial tournament for
and stoves, ana electric dish-wash- the Gators because tLh showing
ers. In all the equipment is valued they make at this tourney will
at $135,000, not including $25,000 partially determine whether t n e
worth of new chairs and tables. University of Florida will be one
Being completely air-conditioned, of the representatives from the
this edifice will be practically southeast at the West Point Na-
sound-proof. Completion of the tional Debate Tournament to be
new cafeteria is expected by the held at a later date.
summer school session, at which There will be some 30 teams
time the main cafeteria and the present from the South Atlantic
banquet hall will be reconditioned area at the tournament in Hick-
.to match the new addition. ory. Last year Florida received an
Approximately. five tons of over-all rating of second place in
footatuffs are consumed each this event.
day, and only fresh-frozen foods j
or fresh vegetables are served
during the time they are in sea- I PATRON IZE
son. There is a wide variety of
food served every day from C I
which the student may make his College Inn
selection, including a choice of
five or six vegetables, eight Barber Shop
salads, and two or three meats.
The current inventory of foods in


Role In 'Joan'


Singer Norma Raymond shows
you the dress that ran Juan
Peron off -he front page when
she wore it in Buenos Aires.
The Clevelander went for a stroll
when she got off the liner Ar-
gentina and had to dash through
stores to get away from a thou-
sind men who followed her.
Final ly she was taken into pro-
tectivc custody by police.



Trends In Housing

To Be Discussed

Al AIA Meeting
Student associate members of
the American Institute of Archi-
tects will have an opportunity to
attend the Florida North Chapter
meeting-Monday night in Peabody
Hall.
A preview of the Museum of
Modern Arts housing exhibition,
now on display in the School of
Architecture and Allied Arts, will
start at 7 o'clock.
The program of the chapter
meeting will be on trends in
housing. Jefferson M. Hamil-
ton, associate professor of ar-
chitecture since 1947 at the
University of Florida, will talk
'on the subject of "Trends in
Housing Legislation."
Hamilton was assistant to the
director of the Housing Division,
*PWA, in Washington in 1933 and
1934. For the next nine years he
was the regional administrative
officer and technical consultant,
HOLC, in Baltimore. Hamilton
was a member of the firm, Adams
and Hamilton, Tampa, from 1925
to 1930, and later was a designer
for the firm of Voorhees, Gmelin
and Walker of New York City.
Other speakers and subjects
will include "Housing Technique
and Education," by Sidney Car-
ter, who has received a master
of regional planning degree
from Harvard, and "Problems
in Housing Project Manage-
ment," by Bay O. Edwards.
Ivan H. Smith, Jacksonville ar-
chitect and graduate of the 1929
class, University of Florida, will
speak on the subject of "The
Architect's Participation in Hous-
ing." Smith was graduated from
the University of Florida in 1929
with a BS degree in architecture,
anti is now a member of the firm
Reynolds. Smith and Hills, archi-
tects and engineers, Jacksonville.
He is associated with Guy Fulton
on the two new building additions
at Florida and one at Florida State
University.


7.95


sunshine state led him t oa pub-
lisher for the only book Lincoln
ever wrote.
Until the Robert Todd Lincoln
collection was opened last July, it
was something of a mystery how
Lincoln chose a publisher for his
book containing his speeches in
the debates with Stephen A.
Douglas!.
How Lincoln solved his dilem-
ma over choosing publisher was
solved by Dr. William E. Barrin-
ger, University of Florida asso-
ciate professor and author of
several books on Lincoln who dis-
covered a letter on the subject in
the microfilm copy of the Robert
Todd Lincoln collection in the
University Library.
A copy of a letter dated June
26, 1858, shows that Follett, Fos-
ter and Company asked Lincoln
for a testimonial on "The Exiles
of Florida, or the Crimes Com-
mitted by Our Governm nt
Against the Maroons, who Fled
from South Carolina and Other


Protection
a book


they had published for Joshua R.
Giddings, an Ohio Abolitionist
congressman.
Since Abe Lincoln -did not wish
to be identified with the Aboli-
tionist faction of the Republican
party, the company got no testi-
monial, but when Lincoln wanted
a publisher for his book it was
this company that he chose.
If a fellow trys to kiss a woman
and gets away with it, he's a man:
if he tries and doesn't get away
with it, he's a brute; if he doesn't
try but would get away with it if
he tried, he's a coward; But if he
doesn't try and wouldn't have got-
ten away with it if he had, he is
wise. -Pelican
The dimmer the porch light, the
greater the scandal power.
How fat she is
She used to wasn't
The reason is, she
Daily doesn't.


David Hooks and and Florabel
Wolff will play the lead roles of
the Director and (the Inquisitor)
and Mary Gray (Joan) in the
Florida Players' production of
"Joan of Lorraine," a play in two
acts by Maxwell Anderson, to be
presented March 16, 17, 18, 19 at
8:15 p.m. in P. K. Yonge Auditor-
ium.
Others in the cast include: Leon-
ard Mosby as Al, the Ptage Man-
ager; Greta Andren, Tessie, the
Ass't. Stage Manager (Aurore);
Iris Bishop, Marie, the Costumer;
Stephen Sands, Gardner, (Ber-
trand de Poulongy) (Election);
Robert Murdock, Abbey (Jacques
d'Arc) (Cauchon, Bishop of Beau-
vais); James Dee, Charles Elling
(Durant Lax art); Sanford
Schnier, Dellner (Pierre d'Arc).
John Throne will play the part
of Jo Cordwell (Jean d'Arc);
Murray H. Dubbin, Quirke (St.
Michael) (D'Estivet); Rosemary
Flanagan, Miss Reeves (St. Cath-
erine); Patricia Collier, Miss Sad-
ler (St. Margaret); Her m a n
Shonbrun, Farwell (J e an de
Metz); (Executioner); James E.
Mooney, Noble (La Hire).
Gordon M. Day, Sheppard (Al-
ain Chartier); Ralph E. Wilson,
Les Ward (The Dauphin); Law-
rence F. Mansfield, Jeff's s on
(Georges de Tremoille): Francis
B. MacDonald Kipner (Regnault
de Ch artre s, Archbishop of
Rheims); G. Larry Rodman, Long
(Dunnois, the Bastard of Or-
leans; William B. Ferguson,
Champlain (Father Massieu).

Cafeteria Addition

Ready For Students

In June Or July
The new addition to the Univer-
sity Cafeteria which has been
progressing steadily since its be-
ginning in the latter part of sum-
mer school sessions will be ready
to serve students in the latter
part of June or the early part of
July.
This addition, formerly a n-
nounced to be finished by Easter,
is being built at a cost of $891,-
000. It will accommodate more
than 1,000 extra students thereby
solving one of the University's
biggest problems, feeding.
It will also make possible bet-
ter preparation and handling of
meals by the cafeteria staff. Aft-
er the addition is finished, work
will commence on. the gutting and
remodeling of the present cafeter-
ia to refurnish it in the modern-
istic design of the annex.

A complete stock of glass watch
crystals for round, fancy shapes
and waterproof watches. Prompt
Service.
50o-$1.00---$1.50


Coles Jewelers
423 W. University Ave.


fl*S SRAGEyr5ESMS LIKE .ONL.Y YESTERDAY ESPECIALLY THE WoMEM -- THEY Y ES I TI'E U ENSE
THNGA sm~. TAT W CA1'HE0E A sT Zn WORE 5SHAWLS ONI THEIR EADS, ,.OMESICK THIS WI N ER;
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YEARS If4 LOO I WJGSUNCH $L, I, BOOT5--


_I


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emn 6/FTSfrom


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"After capping his millionth bottle, he began screaming
'Can You Top This? Can You Top This?'"


SL







6 The Florida Alligator, Friday, March 5, 1948




Official Newspaper of the University of Florida, in Gainesville. Florida
Published Wednesday and Friday morning. Application for reentry
as second class matter at the post office at d~inesville, Florida, pending.

Editor-in-Chief ......................... Pen Gaines
Managing Editor ................... Ted Shurtleff
Business Manager ..................... Ken Richards
BUSINESS STAFF
Hugh Stump, Jr., Assistant Business Manager; Advertising Manager,
Ted Wittner; John Cornell, Circulation Manager; Mel Frumkes, Account-
ant; Brose Olliff, Collection Manager; Ed Prange, Exchange Editor; Mer-
chandising Manager, Everett Haygood.
Steve Sirkin, Assistant Accountant; Harry Yarbrough, Assistant Circu-
lation Manager.
Advertising assistants: Bob Birt, Murry Roth, Herbert King, Hugh Ans-
ley, Phil Harrell, Gene Scarbrough.
Merchandising assistants: Chuck Gilmore, Charlie Abbott, Van Allen,
Ernest Kopp, Bill Perkins.


On Our Own Planning

It is curious to know what people think about planning.
Take budgets, for instance. There are as many for them
as against them. You can say the word "planning" to
many people and they will immediately think of regimen-
tation.
Courses are selected here today because they are crips,
or come at a convenient time of day, but we doubt if that is
true education.
Then, too, people even run into businesses and marriage
without planning. Cities are built without planning and
traffic is congested; it becomes ugly and people move
away.
The world is going ahead now without definite plans for
its occupants. Every nation seems to -want to plan its own
affairs, and world depression follows.
But we are plenty glad that God does not act without
a plan-the seasons come and go, the days come and go.
We could find no meaning for life anywhere.
Since we feel then that "planning" is a discipline, and
that planning does not restrict freedom, only gives it a
framework in which to function, we would like to urge
the mapping-out of your own activities, your own ideas,
along with this planning of our education.
"There is no longer justification for waste of resources
through duplication of efforts which could be avoided
through planning and cooperation."-These were the
words of 0. C. Carmichael, president of the Carnegie
Foundation for the Advancement of Learning, who spoke,
yesterday at a regional planning in education.
We can gather one thing if nothing else from this "plan-
ning" conference, and that is this: We had better not drift
into the future. We had better get a compass and a rud-
der and do some planning of our own way of life.


Education Is A Debt

The University of Florida is now of age. It is no longer
riding among the "un-heard-of" educational institutions. l
During the past two days, and at today's huge inaugural
ceremonies, the University of Florida has entertained some
of the most famous of contemporary educators.
We are definitely taking the leadership in higher edu-
cation, and we students are definitely a part of this grow-
ing institution-so much a part that we can see to it that
we continue up the rungs on the ladder to become the top t
institution in the South, and one of the best in the nation, i
As we have said before, education is a debt due from
present to future generations. What took place here this
week, and what you students will do while you are here f
will insure our carrying out our duty for the coming gen- a
rations. ,
Dr. Miller today will be officially installed as president
of this institution and as his inaugural address will state, a
.the University is stepping into a permanent piece of higher t
education, and each of you must shoulder your own re- s
sponsibility. t
And yet we want to remind you students something c
about the need for educating your own lives first. We b
think of it as a sandpapering job, which smooths out wood k
to a finished article. t
You undoubtedly shy away from' the hard work that lies e
between you and a complete education The lessons are
hard, and you look around to see how happy the birds are d
and how beautiful the world is, and you wonder why all s
the struggle. You must sandpaper all the rough places of i,
study. n
There is a longing in most of us to become better and i
truer men and women. It will cost us, and it will require '
a lot of sandpapering. t
We long,to make this University better. It will cost us, s
and it will also require a lot of sandpapering on the part of n
each individual-whether in campus politics, in the teach- W
ing position, or as a student in our hallway.
The classroom and the campus are charged with pre-
serving the lessons of history. This is your task as well as
the students next to you. of
Thus, education makes us know what we must do for the d
University and for world peace, and our faith in God o-
brings us face to face with our responsibility in terms of t
the brotherhood of man. r


""~a;


AN EDUCATOR'S PRAYER
Let me see, as I don the robes
of my rank and office, that my
world is a small one. Let me rec-
ognize that education extends fur-
ther than my domain of vine cov-
ered buildings. Grant me the
power to comprehend that the
world is a college, that events are
teachers, happiness is the gradua-
tion, character is the diploma.
Let me cast aside the illusion
that college is preparation for
life, for college is actually a part
of the student's life. Let me see
the college years, not as a time
of seclusion, but as a time of
growth and development.
Let me realize that ideas are
as potent as bullets-that words
are merely the shells for the
thought behind them. Show me
that one misguided student can
wreck the world-that one wrong
word can send a brilliant scholar
down the dark trail of medio-
crity.
Let me respect faith, but also
let me remember that doubt is the
driving power of education. Give
me patience with the skeptical
student, for skepticism is merely
the first wail marking the birth
of a philosophy of life.
Let me avoid preaching any
political doctrine to defend de-
mocracy, for democracy needs no
defending in the objective world.
Rather, give me the foresight to
train my students in critical
thought and values of life, and
the iorm of government shall be
democracy.
Give me the power to resist
governmental interference in edu-
cation, for with go ve rnment
comes a single way of thought--
a conservative and status quo re-
action. Teach me to see that a
violent burning of the books is not
necessary for censorship show
me that a copy reader can accom-
plish the same end with his pen-
cil.
Teach me to use my theoretical
knowledge in a practical manner,
so that those who sit before me
can grasp and comprehend the
things about them. Let me show
that history, in its passing, has
left its mark of progress, and that
the world is a single colorful unit
instead of one great mass of
cross-purposes.
Show me that the student's
mind is like his stomach the
amount it consumes is nothing,
for digestion is the vital function.
Let me prepare my material so
hat it may present a challenge
to probe deeper into the things
we do not understand.
Help me to think straight and
present the subject clearly, for a
few subjects thoroughly taught
are infinitely better than a large
number flabbily taught. And
when I am questioned and have
lot the answer, give me the cour-
age to admit my weakness and
he humbleness to seek the an-
swer.
Grant me the serenity to accept
hose things I cannot change, the
courage to change those which can
be changed, and the wisdom to
know the difference. Most of all,
give me the courage, for without
he courage to act, all my knowl-
dge is nothing.
And finally, when my last stu-
Lent leaves the graduation stage
and turns to the arena of the out-
ide world-finally, when my work
s done, take me by your side. Let I
ae find the answer to the burn- E
ng question of all ages. Let me
eck a solution from the greatest a
nd meekest Educator of all
times. Let me finally end the tL
earch ,for which I have devoted
ay life. For the crucifier Pontius
'ilate did not wait for an answer
when he asked Jesus:
"What is truth?"
A proud parent called 'up the F
newspaper and reported the birth
f twins. The girl at the desk t
didn't quite catch the message b
ver the phone. "Will you repeat i
hat please?" she asked.
"Not of I can help it," was the
eply. ,


Proposed Student Body Law
In accordance with Article IV, Section 4, Subsection 2 of the Con-
stitution of the Student Body, the Letter-Awards Committee of the Ex-
acutive Council proposed the following law which is printed in part and
which is to be acted upon by the Executive Council and, if approved
by that body, will become effective as an addition to the Laws of the
Student Body:
LETTER-AWARDS LAW
The purpose of this law is to establish a uniform procedure in the
awarding of letters, sweaters and insignia by chartered organizations
or other campus groups, to regulate the types and styles of such
awards from year to year, and to clearly distinguish varsity athletic
letter-sweater awards from those made by non-athletic organizations.
1. No organization chartered shall award letters, insignia, or sweat-
ers, or any combination thereof, unless express provision in its charter
grants the authority.
2. Any organization thus permitted to make an award must submit
to the Executive Council for approval a design copy, to scale and in
color, of such proposed award. If approved, this copy will be placed
on file in the student government office, and all orders by any one or-
ganization must conform to the above-mentioned copy submitted by
such organization before requisitions for proposed award may be pass-
ed by the Executive Council.
3. Sweaters may be awarded to members of a non-athletic organiza-
tion or group only when provided for by charter. Such sweaters shall
not be in navy blue, which color is reserved to sweaters awarded to var-
sity athletes, nor in orange, that color being required of band and in-
tra-mural sweater and otherwise authorized for use only by varsity
cheerleaders. Block "F" or other types of letters awarded in the above
cases will be blue (with orange border optional) and subject to addi-
tional limitations as set forth in section one, except that among non-
athletic organizations or groups only the University of Florida bank
and varsity cheerleaders are authorized to wear the block "F". Intra-
mural letter awards will likewise be in blue.
4. Under no condition will white sweaters be awarded by any organ-
ization or group to its members, except that participants in varsity
sports may be granted such awards in accordance with provisions stip-
uated by the Athletic Department and the Athletic Council. However,
this prohibition may not be constructed to apply to he wearing of white
waters by varsity cheerleaders in connection with athletic events, pep
rallies, or allied official school activities, nor may former cheerleaders
be denied the privil,.e of wearing such sweaters, provided letter in-
signia has been removed.
5. Under no condition will stripes or any other symbols indicating
either rank or position of leadership in an organization or group, or
number of years service therein, be worn on sweaters by members of
any organization, except that these provisions do not apply to sweat-
ers awarded by the Athletic Council to letter-winners in varsity sports.
65. This law will take effect from the date of passage, but will not be
construed to apply to awards previously made or to those who have
been recipients of such awards prior to enactment of this law.

Campus Opinions


We have just finished reading "Early to Bed" by Marty Lubov, and
the letter to the edior by Morton Lucoff, both of them condeming El-
gin White's column of Feb. 27.
Pen, just what are Mr. Lubov and Mr. Lucoff afraid of? Are they
Iso members of a dissenting group on this campus? It seems to us
hat these guys have more fear of what might happen to them rather
han any repercussions that might involve the University of Florida.
Word has circulated on this campus this afternoon that the gov-
ernors will not appear for Dr. Miller's inauguration. We don't know
Khy they won't, but just about everyone that hears that they won't be
lere will have pretty good idea that this stupid protest group was the
cause of it all.
This undoubtedly will have a very adverse effect on the state of
I'lorida and we think it is A terrible thing.
We think that White hit at the core of the thing, and we also think
hat many other students feel the same way. These columns by the Lu-
boys and the letters by the Lucoffs are the essence of a radical bunch
in fear of being exposed.
Congratulations to Elgin White!


Shoes For The Coeds


Vogue Boot Shop TH Pg LA B AE
212 E. University Ave.


ALLE'N



PRINTING



COMPANY


JOB PRINTIN


430 E. Main


West Of Post Office

Phone 620

Gainesville, Fla.


Tom O'Flanagan
Bob Sturrup

American: "Why, that's an
R owl.'
Englishman: "Of course it is,
but 'oo's 'owling?"





TODAY & SATURDAY
JIMMY WAKELY
in
"RIDING DOWN THE TRAIL"
JOHNNY SANDS
in
"BORN TO SPEED"
SUNDAY & MONDAY
PAT O'BRIEN
in
"RIFF RAFF" and
SHELIA RYAN
in
"THE BIG FIX"

TUESDAY ONLY
JOAN CAULIFIELD
in
"THE UNSUSPECTED"
WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY
JUNE ALLYSON
PETER LAWFORD
in
"GOOD NEWS"
In Technicolor


Hubby wandered in at 3 a.m.
after a glorious evening.
In a few minutes a series of un-
earthly squawks howled out of
the radio. Wifie looked in to the
room and discovered him twisting
the dial back and forth frantical-
ly.
"For heaven's sake, what in the
world are you doing?" she ex-
claimed.
'G'way, g'way. Don't bother me.
Someebody's locked in the safe
and I've forgotten the combina-
tion."
A pessimist is one who thinks
.all women are immoral. An opti-
mist is one who merely hopes so.




LAST TIMES TONIGHT


"HEAVEN ONLY KNOWS"
TOM CONWAY
in
"FALCON'S ADVENTURES"
SATURDAY through MONDAY
VICTOR MATURE
in
"KISS OF DEATH"
THREE MESQUITEERS
in
"GUNSMOKE RANCH"
TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY
FRANCHOT TONE
in
"LOST HONEYMOON"
BARBARA STANWYCK
in
"CRY WOLF"
COMING MARCH 16, 17, 18
LAURENCE OLIVER
in
"HENRY V"


Ordinary

Times

By
Buddy
Davis


As I

See 'Em


Elgin White


Boy, what a raking over the
coals the writer received over last
week's colyum! I guess from all
the reaction that has taken place,
the boys whom I aimed at think
I am a doity rat. 0. K., so
I'm a doity rat, fellas. But saav e
me some of the cheese, will ya?
There's enough for all of us.
Now hear this. One bf the big-
gest attractions that has ever
happened at the University of
Florida will take place today. The
inauguration of Dr. Miller is some-
thing everyone should see and
hear. I think that every student
on this .campus will achieve some
realization of just what a higher
education means. The witnessing
of such an event as this will
erase the utilitarian ideas of edu-
cation that some students have.
There's no question about it. This
thing is BIG!
So big that the Mutual Net-
work has seen hit to air this cere-
mony over the entire nation. And
this is a big country.
We have heard from various
sources that many students are
going to take advantage of the
cut in classes to take a little
vacation home. This cut in classes
is not for the convenience of
hitchikers and bus riders to get
to the old home town two hours'
before supper instead of one
hour.
This cut in classes is for the
express purpose of giving the stu-
dent at this University the op-
portunity to witness something
that they will, in all probability,
never see again in many, many
years. Had the classes not been
cut, these angels that are looking
homeward wouldn't have left be-
fore Saturday, anyhow. One day
won't make a heck of a lot of
difference in the lives of you guys
and gals insofar as getting home
is concerned.
But one day like this one is
liable to influence your life in
a manner that you can't even
begin to imagine. If we were play-
ing a championship football game
tomorrow, it would be an impos-
sibility to feret a single student
outside the three-mile limit of
Gainesville. A championship foot-
ball game will never have the
significance that this inaugura-
tion will have. Not even if Florida
were one of the teams play-
ing.
In Dr.' J. Hillis Miller, we have
one of the finest presidents in the
country today. How else could
each individual student at this uni-
versity show his appreciation for
such a leader than to attend his
inauguration this very day?
No student is compelled to go
to this inauguration. No student is
compelled to eat either, but the
food of grandeur, impressiveness,
solemnity, and wisdom that can
be devoured at this auspicious oc-
casion can't be measured in calo-
ries but in centuries of scholastic
achievement.
This thing is BIG! Don't miss.
it!
Ten will get you twenty that
the walking man is Doak Walker,
All American football player.


File Thirteen


Sue: "Pull your dress down, the
men can see your knees."
S a 1 (obediently): "H o w's
that?"
Sue: "Holy smoke, pull it up
again. Now you can see your
brassiere."
"' *


The


College


Inn


Wholesome Food


Appetizingly Served


In Clean Surroundings



If you haven't found the kind of food

you've been looking for lately, try us





HOT SHOPPE
737 University Avenue

Open From 2:00 P.M. To 1:00 P.M.


Donna Juanna .... a side-saddle The Leader ........ "Jerky Joe"
sister Seykora
Don Juanna ..... her flat-footed "Killer" Johns .... a trigger man
father with a Colt in his nose
Big Tex ....... a Serutan addict Joan of Lorraine ...... Florabel
(Rudy Thornberry) Wolff (How did she get into
Tia Juanna ...... only 17 miles this story?)
from San Diego Red Rock Rosie ...... Rosemary
Mary Juanna .... they drugged Flanagan
her in Waitresses in the Filthy Spitoon
Ida Juanna ........ poppa might Saloon .... Zeta Tau Alphas
catch us Tough Hombres ........ Hooks
Damdifa Juanna .... Jane Snow Dusenbury, Steis and Funk,
(Brr .) and a cast of four zebras,
"Cactus-Face" Ledoux .. a bush three mules, a stray pussy.
league publisher willow, 15 professors, and a
"Wild Bill" Lowry .... copy -boy psychopathic yo-yo.
Editor's Note: With a mini- infested street into the garbage-
mum of editing the copy turned infested newspaper office. The
In by "Humorists" Harold Her- copy boy, an inconspicuous-look-
man and Sandy Schnier, we ing chap, took his feet off the
herewith 'present Chapter IV of linotype machine, flipped the
Donna Juanna. ashes of his hand-rolled Bull Dur.
--- ham, and looked at the bandits
SYNOSIScooly. He couldn't help it. It was
SYOPSI 32 below zero.
As you remember, we left Don- But Tex, knowing full well that he
na hanging limply by the hem of was outnumbered, did not storm
her gym-shorts from a crotch of the office. Instead, he crawled on
a pussy-willow. She had been his belly around to the back of the
there for weeks on end without newspaper office and went in. To
benefit of food, water, the GI Bill, his surprise, Mary Juanna, attired
and the warm, loving companion- in a peach-and-cream negligee,
ship of Big Tex. Let us face it, was lying oh so peacefully on a
readers, she was in a spot. Would sofa, snoring to beat the world.
her subsistence cneck ever ar-
er subsistence nec? ever ar- Tex, although he loved and rev-
ered Donna, acted on the same
CHAPTER IV sub-rational impulses he had learn-
Big Tex trotted slowly into the ed in C-52 and went over to Mary
Oklahoma Strip on his faithful on the sofa. She woke with Tex's.
filly, "Teaser." The horse galluped hot breath hovering oh so danger-
up to a poll to take a pause that ously over her ripe, luscious, mel-
refreshes. "Teaser" liked Cokes. low, sweet, embraceable, enchant-
Twenty minutes later, Tex rode ing, alluring, wonderful, delicious,
into Strangulation Gulch. Little nutritious, lovely, exotic, blissful,
did anyone know (save the au- captivating, ravishing, ecstatic,
thors) that Tex was out to get enraptured( fascinating, tantaliz-
even. He was odd for quite a few ing, delightful, pouted parted lips.
years. Now, with revenge fairly He could not resist.
oozing' from his right ventricle, He smothered her lips and face
Tex stride into the Filthy Spi- and neck with onions. He was
toon Saloon, looking for that most hungry. (Here the managing edi-
despicable of all varmints, the tor picked up his blue pencil. He
Leaders didn't want the authors to appear
"Has anyone here seen Jerky- personally before President Miller,
A dog barked back, "Yeah, he's so he censored many provocative
in the back room shooting Pool." phrases which, unfortunately, left
Tex sauntered into the back NOTHING to the imagination).
room. Pool was on the pool table What was happening to Tex?
lying in a pool of Pool's blood, (Only us and the managing editor
delaying in a poknow). "Could this intoxicating
"Call your shot, pardner!" yell- hunk of woman overpower his af-
ed Tex. fection for Donna? But yes. He
"Eight ball in the side pocket," thought not of Donna, hanging
answered the Leader. languishly from the crotch of that
Tex squeezed the trigger of his tree, 40 miles to the west, while he
trusty M-1 as one of the cafe's (here again the managing editor
hostesses came in. The Leader became pious.)
shot. He had to have Mary-no one
Gunsmoke filled the tiny cu- could cook onions like her.
bridle. Some one coughed. It was Three solar eclipses later, happy
the hostess on the floor. For both and grinning from spur to spur,
Tex and the Leader had fired Tex finally opened the door that
wildly and plugged the hostess in- led to the front of the newspaper
stead. From her forehead came office. The Leader and his men
a Surging stream of blood. One of had gone. They couldn't wait.
her eyes was shot out. Bullets So Tex, to cut the yarn short,
had riddled her in two. One arm, rode 40 miles westward. On sight-
severed at the fibula, lay across ing Donna, he waved briskly, an
the room, fingers clasped in ag- with his chins jutting proudly
Tex looked down at her and ahead of him, said: "See ya around
asked: "Does it hurt?" the campus, baby." And immedi-.
The hostess, with her last re- ately returned to Mary (sigh) and
maining breath, looked up at him some more (sigh) onions.
and replied, "Only when I laugh."
The peace of the mesa had Will Donna always be up a tree?
again been disturbed. Will she ever re-capture Tex's
Outside the chase began. The amours? Will Mary burn the
Leader, picking up his cohorts at onions? And if so, will Tex eat
p hLr- ra" n a"cossthe srha-pe- 'em?


MeL CDar, rn.cr LM '-S-


STREET'S BICYCLE SHOP
Wrizzer Bike Motors Agency

See Us


For Rolling Smoothness


Phone 2324 725 W. Univ. Ave.


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