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The Florida alligator
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028291/00006
 Material Information
Title: The Florida alligator
Alternate title: Summer school news
University of Florida summer gator
Summer gator
Alternate Title: Daily bulletin
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Orange and blue bulletin
Page of record
Physical Description: v. : ; 32-59 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: the students of the University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Creation Date: October 26, 1945
Publication Date: 1912-1973
Frequency: daily except saturday and sunday (sept.-may); semiweekly (june-aug.)[<1964>-1973]
weekly[ former 1912-]
weekly (semiweekly june-aug.)[ former <1915-1917>]
biweekly (weekly june-aug.)[ former <1918>]
weekly[ former <1919-1924>]
weekly (daily except sunday and monday june-aug.)[ former <1928>]
semiweekly[ former <1962>]
weekly[ former <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates: 29.665245 x -82.336097 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note: Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note: Has occasional supplements.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000972808
oclc - 01410246
notis - AEU8328
lccn - sn 96027439
System ID: UF00028291:00006
 Related Items
Preceded by: Orange and blue
Succeeded by: Independent Florida alligator

Full Text




TM-it !CI A 1ewPatrickoWrites
THl F FLO IA New Book On


A I C I ATID Florida History


THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Gainesville, Fla., Friday, Oct. 26, 1945


Elect Thirteen

To Florida

Blue Key

Leadership Frat
To Be Reactivated
Thirteen outstanding s t u d e n
leaders were honored Wednesday
night when faculty, alumni and
student Florida Blue Key members
met and selected these men for
pledgeship.
They will become active mem-
bers when they are voted upon
when the chapter becomes reacti-
vated in February or at the return
of six more active student mem-
bers.
During their apprenticeship pe-
riod they will participate in the
regular activities of the chapter
with alumni, faculty and student
members.
Those ,honored are listed with
their outstanding fields of campus
activity:
Jerry Bassett, Chancellor of the
Honor Court. Student Government,
Politics and Service.
Bill Colson, President of the
Student Body. Student Govern-
ment, Organizations, and Service.
Myron Gibbons, Leader in Or-
ganizations, Service, and Scholar-
ship.
Eddie Kelly, Past Editor of the
Florida Alligator. Publications,
'Organizations, and Service.
Herman Lee, Past Secretary of
Labor. Politics, Service and Stu-
dent Government.
George L. Moss, Past Clerk of
the Honor Court. Student Govern-
ment, Forensics and Scholarship.
David Martin, Chief Announcer
at the Radio Station. Radio, Fo-
rensics, and Public Relations.
Jack Murray, Past Chancellor of
the Honor Court. Student-Govern-
ment, Forensics and Service.
Talmadge Murray, Sec. Treas.
of the Student Body. Student Gov-
ernment, Organizations, and Poli-
tics.
Harry Parham, Clerk of the
Honor Court. Student Government,
Athletics and Student Military.
William Rion, Past President of
the Student Body. Student Gov-
ernment, Service and Organiza-
tions.
Wilkie Schell, Past Business
Manager of the Seminole. Publi-
cations, Organizations and Student
Government.
Johnny Walker, Editor of the
Florida Alligator. Publications,
Organizations, and Scholarship.


Foote Authors

New Textbook

Dr. P. A. Foote, Director of
the University's School of Phar-
macy, is co-author of the new
textbook "American Pharmacy,"
published by the J. B. Lippincott
Company.
The 'book was planned by sev-
eral deans of pharmacy who
acted in an advisory capacity and
was edited by Dr. R. A. Lyman,
editor of the American Journal
of Pharmaceutical Education. Dr.
Foote's illustrated section deals
with powders, capsules, cachets,
oil-sugars, candy medication, and
triturations.
Subject matter for the book
was written by specialists repre-
senting colleges and the pharma-
ceutical industry.

HIKING PARTY PLANNED
FOR TOMORROW
A hiking party bound for Hog
Town Creek Sink will leave the
east steps of Florida Union ,.t
7:30 a.m., tomorrow. The party
will eat lunch at the destination,
and return to the campus at 5
p.m.
Persons interested in nature
study are invited to go along.
The party will be supervised by
Professor C. E. Mounts.


i Tigert Writes

For Magazine

Military Training Is
Subject Of Article
/"
Dr. John J. Tigert, president
of the University of Florida, is
t the author of the leading article
in a symposium in the Septem-
ber issue of Social Action, na-
3 tional magazine edited by the
r Council for Social Action in the
United States.
Dr. Tigert's article on "Why I
Favor Compulsory Military
Training" was written before the
advent of the atomic bomb and
the end of the war. It is pre-
ceded by a statement reading:
"'The need of a prepared group
of men for defense does not dis-
appear with the atomic bomb.
The number of men mkay need
modification. We cannot yet say
that atomic energy will dispense
entirely with infantry and some
other arms of the service. It is
too early to predict all of the
effects of the atoniic bomb. The
general argument for prepared-
ness still stands."
The entire issue of the maga-
zine is concerned with the prob-
lems of compulsory military
training in peacetime. Other ar-
ticles include "Why I Oppose
Compulsory Military Training"
by Walter W. Sikes, a leader
among the peace churches; an
analysis of group alignments on
peacetime compulsory' training
and a view of the legislative
situation.


Los Picaros

Elect Officers

Los Picaros de Quevado, hono-
rary Spanish speaking fraternity,
elected officers for the current
semester when they mt Monday
at 7:30 p.m. in Florida Union.
They are: Tito Guerra, president;
E. Soler, secretary; Mrs. Michel,
treasurer; Nunez del Prado, .ca-
pellan.
The new president said Los
Picaros has 52 members on the
rolls this year. Plans are being
discussed for increased fraternity
activities with a greater degree
of cooperation from the active
members, Guerra further stated.


Ag. Club Tries'

Public Speaking

Recent meetings of the Agricul-
ture Club have realized one of the
principle purposes of the associa-
tion, to gain experience as public
speakers.
Various members have address-
ed the assembly with the result
that they have gained valuable
experience in conducting public
gatherings, and at the same time
the men have come to know each
other more personally.
Topics ranged from Marion
County agriculture to. such diversi-
fied subjects as bull fighting, DDT
in health control, and Mid-Western
farming.
Members will meet Monday at
6 p. m. in the College Park for
an outdoor lunch.

ATKINS IS TOP
CAMPUS ENTRY IN
"PALOOKA" CONTEST
Word was received on the
campus just before press-time
that Elmer Atkins had been
picked as the University's
leading entrant in the "Joe
Palooka" contest sponsored by
the St. Petersburg Times.
Winner for the state of
Florida was announced to be
Joe Kirkwood of Daytona
Beach.
Atkins is a .member of the
football squad and an 'SAE.


To Be Published By
University Press

"Florida Under Five Flags," an
illustrated brochure sketching the
highlights of the development of
Florida, will be published by the
University of Forida Press late
in November, Dr. John J. Tigert,
president, revealed today.
Written by Rembert W. Pat-
rick, professor of Social Science
at the University and author of
"Jefferson Davis and His Cabi-
net," the new book represents the
University's contribution to the
Florida Centennial.
Containing ten chapters and
115 duotone illustrations of
Florida culture gained from
libraries and private sources,
the book is designed primarily
for the general public and
students of Florida history
who desire a compact col-
lateral text.
Contains 10 Chapters
The ten chapters in the bro-
chure survey Florida's develop-
ment under five varying cultures
and chapter headings range
through, "Discovery," "Settle-
ment," "Conflict," "Under Chang-
ing Ownership," "United States
Territory," "Ante Bellum State,"
"Civil War and Reconstruction,"
"Pushing Back the Frontiers,"
"Urban State," and "Today and
Tomorrow."
The brochure contains a fore-
word by Julien C. Yonge, editor
of the Florida Historical Quarter-
ly and outstanding Florida his-
torian.
Professor Patrick, a native
of South Carolina, is an au-
thority in the field of Confed-
erate history, and has more
recently contributed articles
on Florida history to the Flor-
ida Historical Quarterly, and
a series of Florida Centen-
nial features for the news-
papers of the state.
The book is being published by
the University Press operated by
the University of Florida.


Alpha Phi Omega

Meets Thursday

Liggett L. Karney, president of
Alpha Phi Omega, announced to-
day that there will be a meet-
ing of the chapter Thursday at
7:30 p.m. in Florida Union.
Those who have ever been
affiliated with the Boy
Scouts of America are eligible
for membership in Alpha Phi
Omega and areuirged to at-
tend this meeting.
Alpha Phi. Omega, formerly an
outstanding campus service or-
ganization, was reactivated last
spring. This meeting is for the
purpose of acquainting the new
students with the aims, past ac-
complishments, and future plans
or the organization.


Seminole Meets

Monday Night

A meeting of the staff of the
1946 Se-ninole will be held Mon-
day night at 7 in the Seminole
office in the basement of Florida
Union.
Liggett L. Karney, business
manager, announced today
that all men who are interest-
ed in working on the business
staff of the Seminole must
attend the staff meeting.
Karney stated that the men in
attendance at this meeting would
make up the business staff of the
1946 Seminole. Staff appoint-
ments will be made Tuesday......


Pep Club Says -

Let's show our spirit at the
Saturday game by sitting on
the fifty-yard line, and cheer-
ing the team to victory!
All students who can, wear
rat caps! Florida Pep
Club.


National War Friyv,

Set At $3,000 Fo ii


University Adds Student Goal Is $700

Courses In As Campaign Opens
BReal Estafe Seven hundred dollars is the
Real Estate contribution University of Flor-
The University of Florida's De- ida students will make to the
apartment of Real Estate will in- National War Fund Drive, which
augurate a modified program the opened this week on the.campus
second semester of this year in:with completion of campaign
advance of the full curricula to be plans by representatives from the
incorporated next fall. Dr. Walter student body and faculty.


J. Matherly, dean of the Cbllege of
Business Administration, announc-
ed yesterday.
Established in 1945


Established by an act of the
1945 Legislature, the Department
of Real Estate in the College of
Business Administration will be
one of the first of its kind ever
offered in an American university,
Dean Matherly said.
Although two courses will be
offered the second semester of
the current 1945-46 school year,
the full 'program of courses will
not be 'worked out before next
September.
The new department has been
established by funds appropriated
from surpluses of the Florida Real
Estate Commission. Establishment
of the department climaxes active
interest in the program by the
Florida Realtors Association and
the individual efforts of profes-
sional realtors including Jay Hear-
in, of Tampa, president of the
Florida Realtors Association, and
member of the State Commission,
and Brown Whatley, of Jackson-
ville, chairman of a -committee ap-
pointed to represent the associa-
tion before the Legislature alid
the State Board of Control.
Professor To Be Appointed
Designed to offer instruction in
real estate principles, Dean Math-
ereely said that a head professor
for the department 'would be ap-
pointed by January 1, 1946.
Plans for the instruction 'pro-
gram include short courses in
real estate problems to, be of-
fered with small registration
fees either at the University or
.in the various cities over the
state.
The program of instruction will
include courses in: Principles of
Land Utilization; Fundamentals of
Property Evaluation; Principles of
Property Administration; Princi-
ples of Real Estate Brokerage;
Principles of Real Estate Finance;
Fundamentals of Real Estate Law;
Principles of Community Develop-
ment; Fundamentals of Home
Building; and Principles of City
Planning.
Also planned in the program 'of
instruction is a .course on Business
Ethics which will be offered to
all students in the College of Busi-
ness Administration.

TEP AND PI KAPPA PHI
LEAD WAR FUND DRIVE
Last minute results of the
National War Fund Drive
.before press-time showed that
two fraternities had turned in
100 per c e n t donations.
These were TEP, which was
first, and Pi Kappa Phi. The
Inter Fraternity Conference 1
also voted to contribute $25. f


I


Prof. DeWitt Brown Has Led

Florida Band For Generation


C
tl
t(
P


By TED NELSON
The year 1945 marked the
twenty-fifth season that Prof.
R. DeWitt Brown has served
on the faculty of the Depart-
ment of Music at the Univer-
sity. Now, as he enters his
twenty-sixth year with many
terms as director of music be-
hind him, he has a tough job
to face in reorganizing his
two charges, the University
band and orchestra.
Famous Alumni
The orchestra, managed by Bob
McCorkle, is an aggregation of
48 student musicians who may
be seen and heard practicing in
the auditorium virtually every af-
ernoon. The orchestra, although
predominantly a student affair, is


open to any person of any age
who can meet the standards. In
both cases, the armed services'
demands have hit the rosters hard.
Professor Brown was asked
to name a few of the bands-
men who have attained ma-
jor successes in music. He
mentioned Jam es Melton,
Metropolitan star, first, and
the little-known fact that
"Jimmy" was a saxophonist
back in the '20's under the
Florida bandmaster.
Others he recalled were Dean
Hudson, famed band leader ap-
pearing twice on th~s campus
in the past year, who went un-
der the cognomen of "Bud"
Brown when he was an under-
ContinueG On Page Two


Three thousand dollars will
be the contribution of the en-
tire campus to the War Fund
Drive. Twenty-three hundred
dollars is the quota to be con-
tributed- by the faculty and
University employees. T h i s
year's quota is larger than last
year's, and each student and
University employee is being
asked to contribute something
toward making the drive suc-
cessful.
Bill Colson, president of the
Student Body, is chairman for
students, and Dean R. C. Beaty
is chairman for the campus.
Monitors in the dormitories are
being asked to contact every stu-
dent in their section. Fraterni-
ties are being contacted by a man
in each fraternity. Every organ-
ization has been urged to con.
tribute 100 per cent.
Tigert May Speak
It is hoped that President Ti-
gert can speak to an assembly
at the close of the drive on No-
vember 5 at which time names
or organizations that have con-
tributed 100 per cent vilill be
made known. Each man is urged
to give credit to his organization
when his contribution is made.
In cases where a person is a
member of two or more organ-
izations credit can be given to
the organization of his choice.
Contributions are being re\
ceived at the Florida Union deslh
by Bill Rion, and at Dean Bea-
ty's office.
"'The need for help for war dis-
rupted families and individuals is
greater ncw than ever," Dean
R. C. Beaty, chairman of the cam-
pus drive, said this week.
"The University of Florida has
participated in many campaigns
in the last years to raise money,
including the Red Cross. Each
campaign has been successful due .
to the fact that each student was
personally interested in the success
of the campaign. Brothers, rela-
tives, and friends have been help-
ed by money that students of this
campus have given."
"This year the last of the
War Fund Drives is being con-
ducted," Dean Beaty continued.
"Because the war is over, many
persons have become slack in
contributing to worth while
causes.
"The war is over, that is true,
but the devastation and ruin of
war is just being felt by many.
Each student should give some-
thing, no matter how small-or
how large-and each will be ap-
preciated and used to the best ad-
vantage.
"Give something to the War
Fund Drive. Persons we have nev-
er met, and may never meet, are
looking to us for help. Let us not
fail."








The Florida Alliqafor
Entered as second-class matter at the post office at
Gainssville, Florida, under the Act of August 24, 1912
'Johnny Walker ............................ Editor
Joe Pero ........ ................Business Manager
EDITORIAL STAFF
]L-ecutive Editor ........................... .. .. . Ted Nelson
b sports Editor ........ : ............................ ...... Bill Boyd
4,3apy Editor ................................... .George Kowkabany
iJroof Editor ................... ................. Emmet Holton
FEATURE STAFF
Fraternity ............................................Tom Edwards
,Sports ......................... . . .Benny Suarez
9I'lheatre ......................... .................... .Don Walker
REPORTERS
Herb Guy, Tom Jarvis, Herb Stallworth, Jean Whaitmore, Aris Rou-
anel, Pat O'Neal.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
THE GHOST OF SIGMUND FREUD
Try-outs are being held for "Uncle Harry," or so it was announced
4n a recent Orange and Blue Bulletin. I am very interested in the se-
lection of the play which Florida "Players is proposing to present.
Last year "The Little Foxes" was a howling success. Everyone
all "ut split his sides over the two uncles. But I was under the im-
pression that "The Little Foxes" was supposedly a serious production
:at least not a comedy. It cannot be denied that the audience enjoyed
the Florida Players rendition. But one wonders at the dramtic-comic
incongruity. The play, "Outward Bound" manifested the same dis-
cordant involvement.
This is all by way of saying I was hoping the Florida Players would
present an out and out comedy, a hilarious comedy with comedy script.
It would certainly pack the auditorium. Somehow heavy drama is a
littlee too much for the present crop of inexperienced actors, who, for
tlhe most part have never been before the footlights before coming to
the University, act in a play or two, 'and then graduate or disappear
fi:om- the P. K. Yonge stage.
I am particularly interested to see what interpretation the cast
w~il put upon "Uncle Harry," which Hollywood just had difficulty pro-
dLuc.ng in a manner satisfactory to the movie censor and czar Eric
Johnscn. It seems the unexpurgated script demands character por-
"ira; al of a man whose love for his sister is more than brotherly. Freud
ai all but a live personage.haunting the stage during this play. What
will the Florida Players do with Mr. Freud's ghost ? If they ignore
aiitn, what will be left of the play?
Reginald Compton.


Frat Fat
TOM EDWARDS
All is quiet among the member-'
,O F'atrnity riow. They have set-
tled (down for a more or less quiet
ta-I weeks. Last weekend was
-jui:et and though the Gator's play
the gridders from Southwestern
Lotisiana Institute, it appears this
-wi[ be another weekend of peace
be a few parties round among the
AumI quiet, even though there will
"variomis houses.
I. looks as if everyone is con-
ser 'ig their energy- for the Geor-
gi'!-Forida game and weekend in
J.A,s'-.nville which will be closely
-folo',ved by Fall Frolics and the
g -';e with Presbyterian college
thie next weekend.
For the weekend in Jackson-
"v il there will be several parties
Fi.i.Jay night, alumni dinners aft-
er the game, and several big-
do',ces for Saturday night.
L'or the next week, Fall Frolics,
S.con'cert and two or three dances
<' e: the course of Friday and Sat-
v.ri-y are already being planned,
ib't the orchestra has not been


and all the plans should be set by
the next week.
The Junior Inter Fraternity
SConference has been making plans
for this year's reorganization. The
Junior I.F.C. is composed of one
freshman from each fraternity and
is designed to promote better co-
operation among the future lead-
ers of the various fraternities.
They plan to elect officers at the
next meeting which is to be held
on November the 6th.
Homecoming was a great suc-
cess. The houses were in the best
shape they have been in years and
the decorations really added the
color to the weekend. Some of
the decorations were quite origi-
nal, but they all had one thing in
common, they all required a lot
of work.
We believe that if some few
students had thought how much
work went into those decorations
some of the acts of that weekend
would not have been committed.
Several fraternities' decorations
were torn up or else Ladly mauled.
Also the figures from in front of
a couple of houses were borrowed


-5' t'nitely decided on. The Inter- and it would be greatly appreciat-
Fr Eternity Confererce has been ed if the borrowers would return
cdici-ering with several name bands figures.


N.W.LAUNDRY

DRY CLEANING


614 W. Univ. Ave.


Phone 257


OUR BRANCH OFFICE

1910 W. University Ave.



or



SEE HERBERT WILLIAMS


Our University Driver


AICTVITI15


METHODIST
The Wesley Foundation will pre-
sent the second in its "Town Hall
Series" on "Science and Religion"
Sunday at 7 p. m., when Dr. A. N.
Payne. will discuss "A Scientific
Approach to the Bible."
The next program in this "Town
Hall Series" will be "Biology and
Religion" Nov. 4 with Dr. Bert
Ames making the presentation.
Other topics in this science series
will be "Astronomy and Religion,"
"Geology and the Bible," "A Scien-
tist Confesses His Faith," and
"The Atomic Bomb Vs. Christi-
anity."
"These "Town Hall" meetings
will be led by outstanding profes-
sors of the University._
The Wesley Foundation will pre-
sent two films Thursday, "The
Book for the World of Tomor-
row" and "Its the Brain that
Counts."
The sermon Sunday mornirig-is
entitled "The Commands of
Christ." Church School begins at
10 a. m. and Morning Worship
at 11 a. m.
,EPISCOPAL
Chapel of the Incarnation: Holy
Communion, Thursday, 7:15; Holy
Communion, Sunday, 9 a. m. Rev.
Mr. Creasy, Chaplain.
Holy Trinity (Downtown): Holy
Communion, Sunday, 7:30; Morn-
ing Prayer, Sunday, 11 a. m.
All Episcopal students and
friends are invited to the Y. P.
S. L. meeting in the parish hall
of the Holy Trinity Church at
6:30 p. m. Sunday. If you plan to
attend the supper at 6 p. in., im-
mediately preceding the meeting,
please notify Elmer Allen at the
S. 1. E. House, phone 803, before
6 p. m. Saturday.

Careers in pharmacy will be
open in the immediate future to
at least 8,500 young men and
women, even after the 8,000 phar-
macists now with the armed
forces return to their profession,
it was indicated recently by Dean
Roland T. Lakey of the Wayne
University College of Pharmacy.
-(ACP).


Prof. Brown
Continued Frvm Page One
dergraduate at Florida. Fred
McCall, who is today director of
music at Miami Senior High, and
Vernon Whitney and Orren Whit-
ley are among the leaders in
music, the former playing the
dance circuits and the latter
leading Panama City's fine band.
, Concerts Planned
Professor Brown laments the
fact that today's organization,
fine as it is, is still a far cry from
the one hundred-piece band and
six-five-piece symphony orchestra
that graced the icy-covered walls


ASK CASHIER
FOR STUDENT
TICKET 35c


Today & Saturday
FRED ALLEN
JACK BENNY
BOB BENCHLEY

"It's In The Bag"

Tuesday Wednesday
FREDRIC MARCH
BETTY FIELD
in
"Tomorrow, the World"


SO LO (license)




PRIVATE


Tuesday Only
DISNEY FEATURE
"The Three
Caballeros"
In Technicolor


a few years ago.
Last week end he- too
his men, to the Miami game.
When the football season
ends, a series of spring con-
certs will be featured. The
trips recall the men who trav-
eled to Tennessee and Mary-'
land to play the Alma Mater
at those universities in packed
halls.
"I'm just going to keep plug-
ging, away," the professor said of
his plans for the future. That
was qualified' by the expressed
hope that enlargement of both
musical organizations would be
seen in the very near future.


STUDENT RATE
GOOD AT FLA,
SATURDAY'S
ONLY


Sunday Monday
MERLE OBERON
LAURENCE OLIVER
in
"Wuthering Heights"
A reissue


Next Thurs. Sat.
ROBERT CUMMINGS
LIZABETH SCOT
in
"You Came Along"


Wed. and Thurs.
JAMES CAGNEY
SYLVIA SYDNEY
in
"Blood on the Sun"


GIVE TO THE ADULTS .................35
NATIONAL SERVICE ...............-300
WAR FUND CHILDREN ..............9c

TODAY and SATURDAY
JOHNNY MACK BROWN DICKIE MOORE and
in TINA THAYER
"The Navajo Trail" "Jive Junction"

SUNDAY and MONDAY
JOEL McCREA BOB STEELE and
STERLING HOLLOWAY
"WILDFIRE"
"Ragged Angels" In Technicolor


- '---T -BP -


Approved C.A.A. Flight School


for


Instructors rating




INSTRUMENT


COMMERCIAL



Any Course of Instruction Financed


For Additional Information





CALL 2259


o ~r~app~e -- -rm w


litrr


~-BBc--~i~n-~-- ~st L~I~P~--


Adlkg


FmIeld








Gators Meet Southwestern Louisiana


Florida Favored To Win

Tomorrow Under Lights


Lieb Names Chesser
As Game Captain

Florida Gators will take a vaca-
tion from Southeastern Conference
competition this week-end to at-
tempt to boost their season aver-
age against Southwestern Loui-
siana Institute here under lights
tomorrow night.
Nursing only a few minor in-
juries from their 7-6 loss of the
state football crown- to Miami's
Hurricanes last Friday night, Head
Coach Tom Lieb's Gators should
be back in shape by game time.
This is the first time the two
schools have met and both are
eager to get off on the right
foot. The Gators will enter the
game as the favorites.
Chesser Is Captain
Lieb's choice to captain' the Ga-
tors is Joe Chesser, Gator end,
who hails from Quincy, Fla., and
is a sophomore, having played as
4. regular last year. He has played
outstanding ball for the Gators
this season and has been a big
help in the Florida forward wall.
Most of the backs who were out
of the Miami game will be back
in service, while the line who came
out practically unscathed in the
Hurricane tilt will be in top shape
for SLI. .
Most of the drills this week
were pointed to both offensive
and defensive work against
SLI's Notre Dame box style of
play. Lieb hopes to get his de-
fense perfected against the SLI
.offense which he has had scout-
ed only once this season.
In the backfield Coach Bob Pit-
man is still working on his aerial
attack which he hopes will put on
an improved appearance tomorrow
night. Although Bill Gilmartin,
punting expert for The Gators, is
nursing an- injured shoulder, he
will probably be back in the Flor-
ida lineup, as will Ziggy, Sklo-
dowski and Tom Vangelas.
Gerami parks
In SLI the Gators will meet
some tough competition in fast
and scrappy Wingback M. Ge-
rami who is currently sparking
the Louisianans. Gator pass de-


fensp will be pointed to Ends Rey-
nolds and Chaplain who are re-
ported to be good on the receiving
end.
Landry of SLI is reported to be
the best passer as well as a good
runner. Fullback Wilcox will give
the Gator line most of its trouble.
He tops the scales at 190 and is
said to have a lot of drive and
speed.
Getting especial attention this
week is the point after touch-
down kick in which the Gators
have been noticeably weak this
season. Both .E. B. Sap'p, big
225 pound tackle, and Gilmartin
are working in that department
to see what they can do to get
the pigskin to pass between
the goal. posts.
As the season stands the Ga-
tors have two wins, two losses and
a tie to their credit with perhaps
the toughest end of their sched-
ule in Auburn and Georgia yet to
be played. They'll be out to up
their percentage this week-end,
but are making no predictions as
yet.


Georgia Returns
Game Tickets
The University of Georgia has
returned to the University of Flor-
ida 736 seats in the North Stands
for the annual Gator-Bulldog foot-
ball classic in Jacksonville Novem-
ber 10, Coach Percy Beard, acting
director of athletics, announced
yesterday.
Coach Beard made the an-
nouncement yesterday upon re-
ceipt of the ducats from Georgia.
Jacksonville ticket iigencies have
been sold out for several weeks
as has the University Athletic De-
partment and. the return of the
736 seats originally allocated Geor-
gia gives fans new hope in their
efforts to get seats.
The annual grid classic has been
sold out for we6ks. All of the seats
returned by Georgia are in the
North Stands at the Jacksonville
Municipal Stadium.


Florida Adds

U. S. Amphibious
To Schedule
The Florida Gators have added
the U. S. Amphibious Base eleven
at Little Creek, Va., to their
football schedule, November 24,
Coach P. M. Beard, acting Di-
rector of Athletics announced
yesterday.
Addition of the Navy eleven
to the Gator schedule rounds out
Florida's schedule with ten games
instead of the original nine that
closed the season in Gainesville
with Presbyterian November 17.
The new game will be played
in the afternoon at Norfolk, and
will be the Navy's only game
with a collegiate team.

Beaty Returns From
Meeting Of Deans
R. C. Beaty, dean of students
at the University of Florida, has
returned from Atlanta where he
attended a regional meeting of the
National Association of Deans
and Advisors of Men.
Dean Beaty was chairman of
program arrangements for the
four-day meeting, which was con-


cerned with student problems aris-
ing from resumption of peace-
time operations.
GATOR AWARDED D.S.C.
Word was received on the cam-
pus recently that a former Unim-
versity student, Captain Robert
B. Conlon, has posthumously
been awarded the Distinguished
Service Cross.
The decoration was presented
to his widow, in a ceremony at
Governor's Island.
Conlon is the ninth former
University student to receive this
medal out of 10,000 Florida men
in the armed services.
He is the son of Mr. and Mrs.
R. L. Conlon of Hollywood, Fla.
While a student at the University,
he was a member of Delta Chi
social fraternity.


Luncheon
12 to 2


ALLIGATOR STAFF
TO MEET MONDAY
There will be a reorganiza-
tion meeting of the Alligator
Monday at 7:30 p.n. in Flor-
ida Union, Editor Johnny
Walker said yesterday.
Students already on the
staff and those who are in-
terested in newspaper work
are urged to attend. Several
important staff positions are
still open.



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TM-it I~lClIA wPatrickoWrites
TH FLO I oANew BHsook On


AL LIC ATOCD Florida History


THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR Gainesville, Fla., Friday, Oct. 26, 1945


Elect Thirteen

To Florida

Blue Key

Leadership Frat
To Be Reactivated
Thirteen outstanding s t u d e n
leaders were honored Wednesday
night when faculty, alumni and
student Florida Blue Key members
met and selected these men for
pledgeship.
They will become active mem-
bers when they are voted upon
when the chapter becomes reacti-
vated in February or at the return
of six more active student mem-
bers.
During their apprenticeship pe-
riod they will participate in the
regular activities of the chapter
with alumni, faculty and student
members.
Those honored are listed with
their outstanding fields of campus
activity:
Jerry Bassett, Chancellor of the
Honor Court. Student Government,
Politics and Service.
Bill Colson, President of the
Student Body. Student Govern-
ment, Organizations, and Service.
Myron Gibbons, Leader in Or-
ganizations, Service, and Scholar-
ship.
Eddie Kelly, Past Editor of the
Florida Alligator. Publications,
'Organizations, and Service.
Herman Lee, Past Secretary of
Labor. Politics, Service and Stu-
dent Government.
George L. Moss, Past Clerk of
the Honor Court. Student Govern-
ment, Forensics and Scholarship.
David Martin, Chief Announcer
at the Radio Station. Radio, Fo-
rensics, and Public Relations.
Jack Murray, Past Chancellor of
the Honor Court. Student-Govern-
ment, Forensics and Service.
Talmadge Murray, Sec. Treas.
of the Student Body. Student Gov-
ernment, Organizations, and Poli-
tics.
Harry Parham, Clerk of the
Honor Court. Student Government,
Athletics and Student Military.
William Rion, Past President of
the Student Body. Student Gov-
ernment, Service and Organiza-
tions.
Wilkie Schell, Past Business
Manager of the Seminole. Publi-
cations, Organizations and Student
Government.
Johnny Walker, Editor of the
Florida Alligator. Publications,
Organizations, and Scholarship.


Foote Authors

New Textbook

Dr. P. A. Foote, Director of
the University's School of Phar-
macy, is co-author of the new
textbook "American Pharmacy,"
published by the J. B. Lippincott
Company.
The 'book was planned by sev-
eral deans of pharmacy who
aoted in an advisory capacity and
was edited by Dr. R. A. Lyman,
editor of the American Journal
of Pharmaceutical Education. Dr.
Foote's illustrated section deals
with powders, capsules, cachets,
oil-sugars, candy medication, and
triturations.
Subject matter for the book
was written by specialists repre-
senting colleges and the pharma-
ceutical industry.

HIKING PARTY PLANNED
FOR TOMORROW
A hiking party bound for Hog
Town Creek Sink will leave the
east steps of Florida Union ,.t
7:30 a.m., tomorrow. The party
will eat lunch at the destination,
and return to the campus at 5
p.m.
Persons interested in nature
study are invited to go along.
The party will be supervised by
Professor C. E. Mounts.


i Tigert Writes

For Magazine

Military Training Is
Subject Of Article

Dr. John J. Tigert, president
of the University of Florida, is
t the author of the leading article
in a symposium in the Septem-
ber issue of Social Action, na-
3 tional magazine edited by the
r Council for Social Action in the
United States.
Dr. Tigert's article on "Why I
Favor Compulsory Military
Training" was written before the
advent of the atomic bomb and
the end of the war. It is pre-
ceded by a statement reading:
"'The need of a prepared group
of men for defense does not dis-
appear with the atomic bomb.
The number of men mkay need
modification. We cannot yet say
that atomic energy will dispense
entirely with infantry and some
other arms of the service. It is
too early to predict all of the
effects of the atoniic bomb. The
general argument for prepared-
ness still stands."
The entire issue of the maga-
zine is concerned with the prob-
lems of compulsory military
training in peacetime. Other ar-
ticles include "Why I Oppose
Compulsory Military Training"
by Walter W. Sikes, a leader
among the peace churches; an
analysis of group alignments on
peacetime compulsory' training
and a view of the legislative
situation.


Los Picaros

Elect Officers

Los Picaros de Quevado, hono-
rary Spanish speaking fraternity,
elected officers for the current
semester when they mt Monday
at 7:30 p.m. in Florida Union.
They are: Tito Guerra, president;
E. Soler, secretary; Mrs. Michel,
treasurer; Nunez del Prado, .ca-
pellan.
The new president said Los
Picaros has 52 members on the
rolls this year. Plans are being
discussed for increased fraternity
activities with a greater degree
of cooperation from the active
members, Guerra further stated.


Ag. Club Tries'

Public Speaking

Recent meetings of the Agricul-
ture Club have realized one of the
principle purposes of the associa-
tion, to gain experience as public
speakers.
Various members have address-
ed the assembly with the result
that they have gained valuable
experience in conducting public
gatherings, and at the same time
the men have come to know each
other more personally.
Topics ranged from Marion
County agriculture to. such diversi-
fied subjects as bull fighting, DDT
in health control, and Mid-Western
farming.
Members will meet Monday at
6 p. m. in the College Park for
an outdoor lunch.

ATKINS IS TOP
CAMPUS ENTRY IN
"PALOOKA" CONTEST
Word was received on the
campus just before press-tine
that Elmer Atkins had been
picked as the University's
leading entrant in the "Joe
Palooka" contest sponsored by
the St. Petersburg Times.
Winner for the state of
Florida was announced to be
Joe Kirkwood of Daytona
Beach.
Atkins is a .member of the
football squad and an 'SAE.


To Be Published By
University Press

"Florida Under Five Flags," an
illustrated brochure sketching the
highlights of the development of
Florida, will be published by the
University of Forida Press late
in November, Dr. John J. Tigert,
president, revealed today.
Written by Rembert W. Pat-
rick, professor of Social Science
at the University and author of
"Jefferson Davis and His Cabi-
net," the new book represents the
University's contribution to the
Florida Centennial.
Containing ten chapters and
115 duotone illustrations of
Florida culture gained from
libraries and private sources,
the book is designed primarily
for the general public and
students of Florida history
who desire a compact col-
lateral text.
Contains 10 Chapters
The ten chapters in the bro-
chure survey Florida's develop-
ment under five varying cultures
and chapter headings range
through, "Discovery," "Settle-
ment," "Conflict," "Under Chang-
ing Ownership," "United States
Territory," "Ante Bellum State,"
"Civil War and Reconstruction,"
"Pushing Back the Frontiers,"
"Urban State," and "Today and
Tomorrow."
The brochure contains a fore-
word by Julien C. Yonge, editor
of the Florida Historical Quarter-
ly and outstanding Florida his-
torian.
Professor Patrick, a native
of South Carolina, is an au-
thority in the field of Confed-
erate history, and has more
recently contributed articles
on Florida history to the Flor-
ida Historical Quarterly, and
a series of Florida Centen-
nial features for the news-
papers of the state.
The book is being published by
the University Press operated by
the University of Florida.


Alpha Phi Omega

Meets Thursday

Liggett L. Karney, president of
Alpha Phi Omega, announced to-
day that there will be a meet-
ing of the chapter Thursday at
7:30 p.m. in Florida Union.
Those who have ever been
affiliated with the Boy
Scouts of America are eligible
for membership in Alpha Phi
Omega and areuirged to at-
tend this meeting.
Alpha Phi. Omega, formerly an
outstanding campus service or-
ganization, was reactivated last
spring. This meeting is for the
purpose of acquainting the new
students with the aims, past ac-
complishments, and future plans
or the organization.


Seminole Meets

Monday Night

A meeting of the staff of the
1946 Se-ninole will be held Mon-
day night at 7 in the Seminole
office in the basement of Florida
Union.
Liggett L. Karney, business
manager, announced today
that all men who are interest-
ed in working on the business
staff of the Seminole must
attend the staff meeting.
Karney stated that the men in
attendance at this meeting would
make up the business staff of the
1946 Seminole. Staff appoint-
ments will be made Tuesday......


Pep Club Says -

Let's show our spirit at the
Saturday game by sitting on
the fifty-yard line, and cheer-
ing the team to victory!
All students who can, wear
rat caps! Florida Pep
Club.


National War F 1il o

Set At $3,000 Fo i s


University Adds Student Goal Is $700

Courses-In As Campaign Opens
BReal Estate Seven hundred dollars is the
Real Estate contribution University of Flor-
The University of Florida's De- ida students will make to the
apartment of Real Estate will in- National War Fund Drive, which
augurate a modified program the opened this week on the.campus
second semester of this year in:with completion of campaign
advance of the full curricula to be plans by representatives from, the
incorporated next fall. Dr. Walter student body and faculty.


J. Matherly, dean of the College of
Business Administration, announc-
ed yesterday.
Established in 1945


Established by an act of the
1945 Legislature, the Department
of Real Estate in the College of
Business Administration will be
one of the first of its kind ever
offered in an American university,
Dean Matherly said.
Although two courses will be
offered the second semester of
the current 1945-46 school year,
the full 'program of courses will
not be 'worked out before next
September.
The new department has been
established by funds appropriated
from surpluses of the Florida Real
Estate Commission. Establishment
of the department climaxes active
interest in the program by the
Florida Realtors Association and
the individual efforts of profes-
sional realtors including Jay Hear-
in, of Tampa, president of the
Florida Realtors Association, and
member of the State Commission,
and Brown Whatley, of Jackson-
ville, chairman of a -committee ap-
pointed to represent the associa-
tion before the Legislature alid
the State Board of Control.
Professor To Be Appointed
Designed to offer instruction in
real estate principles, Dean Math-
ereely said that a head professor
for the department 'would be ap-
pointed by January 1, 1946.
Plans for the instruction 'pro-
gram include short courses in
real estate problems to, be of-
fered with small registration
fees either at the University or
.in the various cities over the
state.
The program of instruction will
include courses in: Principles of
Land Utilization; Fundamentals of
Property Evaluation; Principles of
Property Administration; Princi-
ples of Real Estate Brokerage;
Principles of Real Estate Finance;
Fundamentals of Real Estate Law;
Principles of Community Develop-
ment; Fundamentals of Home
Building; and Principles of City
Planning.
Also planned in the program 'of
instruction is a .course on Business
Ethics which will be offered to
all students in the College of Busi-
ness Administration.

TEP AND PI KAPPA PHI
LEAD WAR FUND DRIVE
Last minute results of the
National War Fund Drive
,before press-time showed that
two fraternities had turned in
100 per c e n t donations.
These were TEP, which was
first, and Pi Kappa Phi. The
Inter Fraternity Conference 1
also voted to contribute $25. f


I


Prof. DeWitt Brown Has Led

Florida Band For Generation


C
tl
t(
P


By TED NELSON
The year 1945 marked the
twenty-fifth season that Prof.
R. DeWitt Brown has served
on the faculty of the Depart-
ment of Music at the Univer-
sity. Now, as he enters his
twenty-sixth year with many
terms as director of music be-
hind him, he has a tough job
to face in reorganizing his
two charges, the University
band and orchestra.
Famous Alumni
The orchestra, managed by Bob
McCorkle, is an aggregation of
48 student musicians who may
be seen and heard practicing in
the auditorium virtually every af-
ernoon. The orchestra, although
predominantly a student affair, is


open to any person of any age
who can meet the standards. In
both cases, the armed services'
demands have hit the rosters hard.
Professor Brown was asked
to name a few of the bands-
men who have attained ma-
jor successes in music. He
mentioned Jam es Melton,
Metropolitan star, first, and
the little-known fact that
"Jimmy" was a saxophonist
back in the '20's under the
Florida bandmaster.
Others he recalled were Dean
Hudson, famed band leader ap-
pearing twice on th~s campus
in the past year, who went un-
der the cognomen of "Bud"
Brown when he was an under-
ContinueG On Page Two


Three thousand dollars will
be the contribution of the en-
tire campus to the War Fund
Drive. Twenty-three hundred
dollars is the quota to be con-
tributed- by the faculty and
University employees. T h i s
year's quota is larger than last
year's, and each student and
University employee is being
asked to contribute something
toward making the drive suc-
cessful.
Bill Colson, president of the
Student Body, is chairman for
students, and Dean R. C. Beaty
is chairman for the campus.
Monitors in the dormitories are
being asked to contact every stu-
dent in their section. Fraterni-
ties are being contacted by a man
in each fraternity. Every organ-
ization has been urged to con.
tribute 100 per cent.
Tigert May Speak
It is hoped that President Ti-
gert can speak to an assembly
at the close of the drive on No-
vember 5 at which time names
or organizations that have con-
tributed 100 per cent Wvlill be
made known. Each man is urged
to give credit to his organization
when his contribution is made.
In cases where a person is a
member of two or more organ-
izations credit can be given to
the organization of his choice.
Contributions are being re\
ceived at the Florida Union deslk
by Bill Rion, and at Dean Bea-
ty's office.
"'The need for help for war dis-
rupted families and individuals is
greater ncw than ever," Dean
R. C. Beaty, chairman of the cam-
pus drive, said this week.
"The University of Florida has
participated in many campaigns
in the last years to raise money,
including the Red Cross. Each
campaign has been successful due .
to the fact that each student was
personally interested in the success
of the campaign. Brothers, rela-
tives, and friends have been help-
ed by money that students of this
campus have given."
"This year the last of the
War Fund Drives is being con-
ducted," Dean Beaty continued.
"Because the war is over, many
persons have become slack in
contributing to worth while
causes.
"The war is over, that is true,
but the devastation and ruin of
war is just being felt by many.
Each student should give some-
thing, no matter how small-or
how large-and each will be ap-
preciated and used to the best ad-
vantage.
"Give something to the War
Fund Drive. Persons we have nev-
er met, and may never meet, are
looking to us for help. Let us not
fail."