Citation
The Independent Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Independent Florida alligator
Portion of title:
Florida allgator
Portion of title:
Alligator
Alternate Title:
University digest
Alternate Title:
University of Florida digest
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, FL
Publisher:
Campus Communications, Inc.
Creation Date:
January 4, 2005
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2005
Frequency:
Daily (except Saturdays, Sundays, holidays and exam periods, Aug.-Apr.); semiweekly (May-July)
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. (some col.) ; 36 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
Online databases.
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Online databases ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.651781 x -82.336258

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available online.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 65, no. 75 (Feb. 1, 1973)-
General Note:
"Not officially associated with the University of Florida."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000470760 ( ALEPH )
13827512 ( OCLC )
ACN5549 ( NOTIS )
sn 86010448 ( LCCN )
0889-2423 ( ISSN )

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Preceded by:
Florida alligator

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We Inform. You Decide.www.alligator.orgNot officially associated with the University of Florida WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2018 FOLLOW US ONLINE FOR UPDATES @FloridaAlligator @TheAlligator_ @TheAlligator GATORS LOSE TO BEARSFloridas baseball team struggled against Mercer on Tuesday night at McKethan Stadium, resulting in its ninth defeat of the year, pg. 18One year later, Impact party keeps promisesA breakdown of how the executive ticket completed goals, pg 13A UF student is graduating after nearly 18 years She started at UF in 2000, pg 3VOLUME 112 ISSUE 85Published by Campus Communications, Inc. of Gainesville, Florida FEATUREBy Elliott NasbyAlligator Staff WriterAlexa Tirse was devastated three years ago when she thought she was denied admission to her dream school, UF. It wasnt until a few days later that she went back to the letter and learned she hadnt been turned down. Her mother had seen on Twitter some students were offered admission through the newly launched Pathway to Campus Enrollment Program. It took me a while to process things, the 21-year-old said. three paragraphs, discovering she was one of about 3,000 extended an offer to PaCE in its inaugural year. Now, Tirse, a UF English senior, will graduate a year earlier than expected alongside nine othclass. It was not necessarily what I had planned, but I overcame the obstacles and made the most out of it, said Tirse, who will be attending Cornell Law School in the Fall. UF President Kent Fuchs said ibility of the program and its online classes to excel in other areas. They are true trailblazers, Fuchs said. And it is really special that they are actually graduating ahead of others in their class. The PaCE program, launched in February 2015, is a hybrid degree that enrolls students online their 60 credit hours before transitioning them to a traditional on-campus enrollment. While online, students pay 25 percent less than normal for their tuition and arent opted in to activity fees unless they are in Gainesville, said Evie Cummings, the director of UF Online. PaCE is unique from other online programs in the country because students are taught by the same faculty who teach on campus, Cummings said. These students are Gators Without a rigid in-class schedule, Zachary Silver, a UF sociology senior, stayed at his home in Orlando to help the family care for their ill grandfather, who died in February. portunity to help out with him a little more, Silver said. Whether it was driving to and from doctors appointments or watching Spanish League soccer games, Silver and his grandfather had always been close, and it was special that he could be there for him, Silver said. The family gathered almost every Sunday evening for dinner, he said. Alexa Trout, another PaCE student who will graduate in May, recovered from running in the New York City Marathon with her legs up in bed and her laptop open to her coursework. Ahead of the race, Trout, a UF public relations senior, ran a total of 550 miles to train. Her training weeks. Theres no way I couldve done it if I was taking traditional classes, the 21-year old said. @_ElohEl enasby@alligator.orgBy Elliott NasbyAlligator Staff WriterA noose in Weimer Hall. Slurs on a whiteboard. Richard Spencer. One racially charged incident after another, and Bianka Ramirezs perception of UF was changing. So she sought answers. Where could students of color, like herself, go to feel safe? Where could confused, angry or alone together? It was like something woke up in me, Ramirez said. She soon learned the place she sought, a two-story wooden building that stood along West University Avenue, was demolished in August. Now the space is an empty lot encased by green mesh, littered with Bud Light cans and crabgrass, awaiting a $7.8 million reconstruction. The Institutes of Hispanic-Latino Cultures, commonly known as La Casita, and the Institute of Black Culture, known as the IBC, were some of the identity. Now demolished and a year behind reconstruction schedule, some students like Ramirez feel pressured to keep memories alive. The 90-year-old buildings, crumbling and termite-infested by the time of their demolition, had hard-fought histories that students like Ramirez worry wont be passed down, especially as more students who never learned about the old spaces come in. On April 15, 1971, more than a decade after UF desegregated, black students planned a peaceful protest to occupy UF President Stephen African American cultural space on campus, but the demonstration quickly escalated when a rock was thrown and police were called, according to Alligator archives. By the end, 66 students were arrested, many of whom were either expelled or left school. Ten months later in February 1972, OConnell formally dedicated the Institute of Black First 10 students to graduate from PaCE program this Spring Students struggle to keep memory of IBC, La Casita alive THEY WERE SHOT AND KILLED FIVE DAYS AGO. By Robert LewisAlligator Staff WriterWith a New York Police Department patch clutched in one hand, 9-year-old Kaden Rogers drove by him. Dressed in a shirt that said I Back the Blue, Kaden stood at the edge of South Main Street outside the Bell High School gymnasium Tuesday morning. when I grow up because they are the real superheroes without powers and stuff, Kaden said. Kaden said Deputy Taylor Lindsey, 25, and Sgt. Noel Ramirez, 29, were brave. The deputies were eating at Ace China restaurant on Thursday when John Hubert Highnote, 59, of Bell, Florida, shot and killed them, according to Alligator archives. Five days after the shooting, Kaden and black and blue ribbons and We Back our Blue and Gilchrist Strong signs watched the procession of more than 100 law enforcement agencies from across the country escort two black hearses from the school for about 45 minutes down small country roads to Bronson Cemetery. Before the procession, the deputies were memorialized in a service in the schools gym. About 2,000 people, including law enforcement folding chairs on its court. Those who spoke at the ceremony, including Gilchrist County Sheriff Bobby Schultz and Schultz said Lindsey told his mother when he was young that he wanted to ptrol, before he could say the word patrol. He said Ramirez once read that his name was on the Outstanding List and was so excited that he went to lunch to celebrate but was less thrilled when told that meant he had outstanding reports. Theres no way that I could do them jus-Never be forgotten: Thousands honor killed deputiesDavio Rodriguez / Alligator South Main Street in Bell, Florida for the two deputies who were shot in Trenton. SEE DEPUTIES, PAGE 4

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Subscription Rate: Full Year (All Semesters) $100The Alligator. The Alligator The Independent Florida Alligator The Alligator The Alligator The Alligator ISSN 0889-2423 alligators alligator.org/calendarLocal Events / News in Brief Todays WeatherAM NOON PM 2 ALLIGATOR WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2018 or email WHATS HAPPENING?Florida Museum presents Science on Tap The Florida Museum, Digital Worlds Institute and First Magnitude Brewing Co. will present the first Science on Tap event showcasing the tree of life tonight from 5 to 9 p.m. All proceeds will directly support the University of Florida Biodiversity Institute. For more information, visit floridamuseum.ufl.edu/event/science-ontap-tol or call 352-727-4677. Midnight Fun Run UF RecSports is calling all superheroes for a Midnight Fun Run tonight. The event is open to faculty, staff, students and guests. Each participant will receive an event T-shirt and breakfast following the race. Registration is available on RS Connect. Runoff election early voting Early voting sites for the 2018 City of Gainesville runoff election will be open until Saturday. Hours of operation are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., except Tuesday and Thursday when locations will be open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. The early voting locations are Cone Park Branch Library at 2801 E. University Ave., Millhopper Branch Library at 3145 NW 43rd St. and the Supervisor of Elections Office at the Josiah T. Walls Building at 515 N. Main St. What Were You Wearing? art exhibit The What Were You Wearing? art exhibit is being displayed until Monday on the third floor of the Ustler Hall Library. STRIVE at GatorWell and the American Student Medical Association have collaborated with anonymous UF student survivors to show the outfits they wore during their attacks. For more info, call 352-273-4450. Asian Pacific Islander Desi American Heritage Month April commemorates the first Japanese immigration to the U.S. on May 7, 1843. It also honors the Chinese immigrants who worked to complete the transcontinental railroad May 10, 1869. Asian Pacific Islander American Affairs will celebrate Asian Pacific Islander Desi American Heritage Month with events until today. The 2018 theme is the Japanese concept of ikigai, meaning a reason to live. Talking Gators Toastmasters Talking Gators Toastmasters, which helps people get more comfortable speaking in public, meets at 5:45 p.m. every Tuesday in Steinmetz Hall, Room 1031. Meetings are free to attend and open to all. For more information, visit talkinggators. toastmastersclubs.org. Florida Museum to host STEAM Wars May 4 The Florida Museum invites Star Wars fans for a fun event mixing cosplay and science on International Star Wars Day! STEAM Wars is a Star Warsinspired event featuring STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics) disciplines on May the fourth. For more information, visit floridamuseum.ufl.edu/event/steamwars or call 352-273-2055. Got something going on? Want to see it in this space? Send an email with Whats Happening in the subject line to mmcmullen@alligator.org. To request publication in the next days newspaper, please submit the event before 5 p.m. Please model your submissions after the above events, and keep them to 150 words or fewer. Improperly formatted Whats Happening submissions may not appear in the paper. Press releases will not appear in the paper. Correction In an article published Monday titled "Gainesville Police: Man shot, killed near Satchel's Pizza," The Alligator incorrectly reported the man died near Satchel's. The article has been updated to more accurately reflect that the shooting happened in northeast Gainesville and was not near Satchel's. VOLUME 112 ISSUE 85NEWSROOM Editor Digital Managing Editor Engagement Managing Editor Beats Editor Freelance Editor Investigations Editor Opinions Editor Sports Editor Assistant Sports Editor alligatorSports.org Editor Editorial Board Photo Editor the Avenue Editor Copy Desk Chiefs Copy Editors DISPLAY ADVERTISING Advertising Director Intern Coordinator Sales Representatives CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING BUSINESS Administrative Assistant Comptroller Bookkeeper ADMINISTRATION General Manager Assistant General Manager Administrative Assistant President Emeritus SYSTEMS IT System EngineerPRODUCTION Production Manager Assistant Production Manager Advertising Production Staff Editorial Production Staff Cannot be combined with price matching, food or cosmetics purchases. One coupon per customer. Discount only valid at Butler Plaza GNC location. Daily specials. Expires 04/27/18.3914 SW Archer Rd$5 OFFANY $25 PURCHASE352-377-6020

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WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2018 ALLIGATOR 3 rfntrb rrf r fnt b t tt t tt bt trt t t tr t n t t tttt rr rtr t ttb r n br t ttttn rnn tr nrn nt b rrb ttr b bt tt nn rrb n 3501 SW 34th St (352) 377-5733 3501 SW 34th St (352) 377-5733NYX, Hair Pieces Extensions, Wigs Newberry Square location NOW OPENARCHER BEAUTY By Amanda RosaAlligator Staff WriterWhen Michael Cizek graduates in May, hes saying goodbye to more than just the UF campus. Hes parting ways with an icon: an orange and blue 1968 Schwinn Twinn dubbed the Gator Tandem. Cizek, a UF international business senior, has ridden the Gator Tandem across the Homecoming stage, down Southwest 34th Street and on the 50Cizek posted the bike for sale on the UF Student Football Ticket Exchange with a price tag of $1,000 April 8. Since his post, four students and university staff members showed interest in the bike. Cizek rode the Gator Tandem on occasion around campus, usually offering rides to friends or picking up strangers on the way to class. Hes known for honking its little blue horn to greet people. You get to meet a new friend. You get to go someplace you werent expecting, he said. Its like Uber driving but way more fun. Ben Gonzalez, a UF sports management graduate student and Cizeks freshman-year roommate, wasnt surprised when Cizek bought the bike their freshman year. He said Cizek had a habit of impulse buying on Craigslist. The 22-year-old said seeing the bike brings him back to freshman year. Things didnt matter as much, and we were able to enjoy the college experience before getting all wrapped up in doing well in school UF senior to sell Gator Tandem featured in Tandem Two BitsBy Jessica CurbeloAlligator Contributing WriterDuring her time as a student, Lindsay Coco Hames has seen fax turn into email, Tim Tebows college career come and go and her bands song featured in the movie Whip It. At 35 years old, Hames is graduating this semester with her b0achelors degree in English, which took about half of her life to complete. She started at UF in Summer 2000 as an English major, but she struggled to keep up with the course load as her music career started to take off. You get to that point where you cant believe youre about to be done with this, Hames said. Im proud of myself. The self-taught singer, guitarist and songwriter started her UF career by scheduling her time between on tour and on campus. But eventually, she left UF at the end of 2002 to tour full time. Hames promised her father, a UF Law School alumnus, she would New York City and then to Los Angeles in 2003, where the desire to While she bounced between cities, Hames started working with the universitys Department of Continuing Education, now known as Flexible Learning, she said. The program offers year-round online, self-paced courses for students. While touring in Europe in 2017, she learned her father was sick and back to America to be with her father when she remembered the promise she made to him. He asked her when she would graduate. I made a joke, saying, I could You know, I promised you that one then youll never die, Hames said. In Fall 2017, Hames went back to school. She and Ryan Braun, an advisor at the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, came up with a plan so she could graduate in two semesters by taking online classes while she was in Memphis, Tennessee. Records at UF dont show if Hames holds the record for the longest time taken to complete a bachelors degree. Braun said, however, many students take long gaps before returning to their education. There are still barriers to higher education, but geography is becoming less and less one of them, Braun said. In less than two weeks, Hames lowing the footsteps of both her parents and her older sister. Its OK that it took 18 years because I didnt miss anything, she said. It took half her life, but this UF student, singer is graduating

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4 ALLIGATOR WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2018 Coach Mullen to speak May 24, 2018 7 pm. Holiday Inn (13th & Univ.) Free to guests, $25 for guests.Apr. 26, ESPNs Mark Schlabach, free to all Discounts at local businesses, including food, drinks, and golf; see website for complete list www.FGTC. org or www.facebook.com/ FightinGatorTouchdownClub or @FGTCgators Access to buy football season and away game tickets Contributed over $400,000 to endowment for athletic scholarships Monthly guest speakers Jan-July, and weekly mid-Aug to mid-Nov, with upcoming HAPPY HOUR EVERY DAY 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. $4 Martinis on Wednesdays Visit us for the finest in pan asian faire. Aged angus, fresh sushi and an atmosphere that will keep you coming back for more!LUNCHTu Fri 11:30 3 p.m. Sun 12 p.m. 3 p.m.DINNERSun Thu 5 10 p.m. Fri Sat 5 11 p.m. Culture. La Casita, founded in May 1994, was given by the university unfurnished, leaving its student founders to fend and piece together the home on their own, according to Alligator archives. Ramirez worries the university isnt doing enough to pass on the legacy. Currently, most students rely on word of mouth, she said. We need more of an institutional memory, she said. The last time students were allowed in the buildings was December 2016. In the meantime, students have been using La Salita or the Black Enrichment Center, spaces within UFs Multicultural and Diversity AfKalimah Ujaama, a UF political science and African American studies junior, said she went to the IBC nearly every day before the Reitz. Ujaama said the absence of the house gives more power to MCDA because the longer it takes to build, the further removed incoming students are from the history. Its kind of like slave logic to be honest, the 22-year-old said. Its not with malicious intent, but it something thats being created by the lack of urgency. When she can, Ujaama tries to tell younger students about the history of the old buildings. The buildings histories havent been formally taught until this Spring through a course titled Black and Latinx History of the Gator Nation, said Ryan Morini, the associate director of the Samuel Proctor Oral History program and professor of the class. To be blunt, UF has been afraid of confronting its history, Morini said. Weve wouldnt say this institution as a whole has been supporting it. Will Atkins, the senior director for Multicultural and Diversity Affairs, said his ofmake the construction process as transparJune 2017 when they pitched combining the two cultural spaces into one building. The proposal sparked No La IBCita, a student movement that fought to keep the houses separate. In July 2017, MCDA announced the buildings would stay separate but the redesign would setback the project nearly a year, according to Alligator archives. construction, but its expected to start this said. interactive feedback sessions with students stitutes, DLR Group. The process went on longer because proposals went over budget, which Atkins said was expected. He said they wanted to listen to all student suggestions, then go back and adjust. We want to do it right, and we dont want to rush through it, he said. Beaudelaine Mesadieu, a UF construction management and interior design freshman, joined the project committee to get more experience. She said there arent as many freshmen who go to planning meetings compared to upperclassmen who knew the old institutes. At meetings, students can spend up to three hours debating color schemes and room arrangement, she said. Im not so emotionally attached, so Im not so biased with it, Mesadieu said. While the designs await approval for construction, many younger students conKeanna Nembhard, a UF political science freshman, said the Black Enrichment Center inantly white institution she attended. I was really concerned about having a community here or feeling included, Nembhard said. Before arriving on campus in August, much of what she knows about the IBC came from the outraged No La IBCita movement she saw on Twitter. It showed her how important the spaces were to some people, she said. David Rojas, a UF biomedical engineering senior who used to frequent La Casita, ing current Hispanic and Latino students. He said after the protests, the tears and sense of loss, everyone had to return to their schoolwork, seniors had to prepare to graduate and people had to leave behind the building that once was. The reality is that we do have to move on with our lives, he said. Now, Rojas, 21, claims the same gray desk in the Reitz Union space, nestled against the rooms far wall, nearly every Monday and Wednesday. When he looks up from his biochemistry book, he sees freshmen Mauricio Perez Rodriguez and Mayra Rodriguez laughing about the day, or stressing about their class registration. He sees Alberto Barcenas napping on the rooms blue carpet, which he insists is more comfortable than the couches. He knows there are still old friends who busy or too angry with how things ended with how things are going. But Rojas doesnt blame them. Theyre attached to the old building, he said. And or the future building. @_ElohEl tice. Theres no way that I can articulate what they meant to us, Schultz said. Kim Davis, a High Springs resident and UF alumna from the 1980s, stared at the two caskets on the stage in front of her, each covered in guarding them. She knew the men inside both caskets. She used to hire Ramirez, when he wasnt working for ends at Gilchrist Blue Springs State Park. The deputies may be gone, but theyll never be forgotten here in Gilchrist County, Davis said. After the ceremony ended at about noon, attendees exited and stood outside the gym as both caskets were carried to the hearses and about 45 bagpipers and drummers from different agencies played Amazing Grace. Members of the Patriot Guard Riders stood on both sides of the road leading to Bells South Main Street holding American The music stopped, and the only sound was Ramirezs father crying and calling out in Spanish. As one deputy held him, he said My son, they killed my son. At the cemetery, three helicopters from the bagpipers and drummers played for the deputies one last time. Gainesville Police Sergeant Renee Guyan was emonial shots into air to end the funeral service at about 3:30 p.m. with a 21-gun salute. Its a way to support the family and show how much their family members service means to the community and to us, she said.Reconstruction has been delayed about a yearSeven police ceremonial shots DEPUTIES, from pg. 1

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WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2018 ALLIGATOR 7A dime holed up inside a pocket of his pants was the only thing my grandfather carried with him the day he left Cuba. In a way, the rest of his life and his familys lives depended on that coin. As he boarded a plane headed to Miami gripping my grandmothers hand, he planned to use the money to call a friend who would pick him up from the airport. He led a dictatorship. He escaped police oflious actions. He aid goodbye to 35 years lived on the island. When he got to the U.S., he worked as a taxi driver for Diamond Cab Company. He worked hard. Eventually, he was offered a job in Honduras. He uprooted his family, moved to a small country in Central America and worked harder. He worked as a car salesman and a construction manager. My grandmother worked, too. She was a teacher at an American school. But when the U.S. Southern Association of Schools and Colleges demanded all staff members to bring their degrees in, and she couldnt exactly So my grandparents did what they always did. They continued to work hard. They founded a private bilingual school, which celebrated its 50th anniversary last May. When I was a little girl, my dad woke up every morning and drove to that same school at about 5 a.m. to make sure the buses left in time to pick up the students. Every evening, I hugged him hello when he got home. I remember how he smelled a combination of sweat and worn out cologne from the long work day. My mom stayed at home and worked just as hard (or maybe even harder) raising four closely aged children. I remember how she smelled always like some sort of food from cooking. Listening with open eyes, raised brows and hung jaws, my three brothers and I heard my dad recount our grandparents story countless times when we were kids. Every single time, way. Work hard, he would say. If you work hard, you can do anything you want. Working hard is what allowed me to get a scholarship and enroll at Florida Gulf Coast University in Fort Myers in 2014. Its what helped me grow at Eagle News, the schools weekly publication. Working hard is what brought me to Gainesville and made me a Gator. Its what empowered me to get through long nights and nerve-wracking tasks at The Alligator. The most important lesson Ive learned in my 21 years is hard work can get you anywhere. A strong work ethic is the best superpower you can have. It doesnt matter if you have no talent or no resources or neither. If you work hard for your dreams, I promise youll make them a reality. I dreamed of someday moving to the U.S. to study among some of the most brilliant minds and on some of the richest spaces on Earth and I did it by working hard. Looking back, I can see my grandparents dream was to protect their family. My parents dream was to see their four children happy. Hard work gave them that. Working hard until your back hurts and your eyes twitch and you feel like you have never been more exhausted in your life just to think the same thought again each day after matters. Not only because itll enable you to achieve your goals, but also because working hard builds character. It gives you a purpose in life. Jimena Tavel is a UF journalism senior. She is the engagement managing editor of The Alligator. Dream. Then work hard for your dreams. Column Jimena Tavelopinions@alligator.orgIts easy to lose your voice. Maybe its that moment of hesitation before you answer a question, or the pressure in your chest that makes you think twice before speaking up. Maybe its the fear that even if you did talk, no one would listen. I lost my voice when I was 5, after my younger brother was diagnosed with Aspergers Syndrome, a form of autism thats considered high-functioning. The label didnt change the way I saw my brother. Until that point, I assumed all brothers had quirks like mine: he preferred a green plate at dinner, disliked physical contact and could talk to you about space and physics well past your point of understanding. But I quickly learned others didnt see him as I did. Questions of Whats wrong with your brother? left me silent, a tightness in my throat and my eyes trailing to the ground. Eating lunch alone became routine. But that was mild compared to the treatment from teachers who yelled at me when my brother misbehaved and gave me detention when I left class to walk him to my moms minivan. I navigated school silent and unnoticed, and because of that, I learned to listen and observe. As my parents waged battles to get my brother the resources he needed, they showed me the importance of standing up for those who cant defend themselves. So when I got to college, I sought to reclaim my voice and to pick a career where I could give a voice to the voiceless. Its because of that I stumbled into a dilapidated building at 1105 W. University Ave. The Independent Florida Alligator. ligator, Ive learned to not only speak up for myself, but for others, as well as expose problems and ask questions. I owe that to my friends and colleagues. Even though we eventually left the building where I found myself, the people who helped me. The building never made the paper, but the people did. Now on 13th Street, three years later, I still found myself surrounded by loud, passionate, ink-and -coffee-stained student journalists. But in working to give others a voice, we almost lost ours. A free press is vital to democracy, and there is a real threat to the freedom for student journalists across the country to report on their respective institutions. Thats why we started an initiative to save student newsrooms, bringing attention to the challenges facing student media. The voice of student journalists and the community members they cover is worth preserving. Freedom of the press is freedom of the people. Maybe youve never felt voiceless. And if so, thats great. But maybe you feel this way now. If thats you, know it wont always be that way. You will help along the way. So surround yourself with passionate people, and make it your mission to work with them. They will push you to be better. They will inspire you to think bigger. They will be the people with whom you change the world. And always keep your past in the back of your mind. It will drive you forward. Caitlin Ostroff is a UF journalism and political science senior. She is the digital managing editor at The Alligator.Column Caitlin Ostroffopinions@alligator.orgMay 5th marks the end of my journey at UF, but it also marks the beginning of my unexpected journey here. On a day much like today, at the end of the Spring semester two years ago, I was looking to add some je ne sais quoi to my college experience. I came across The Alligators website, and luckily, they were in need of photographers for the summer. They took a chance on me, a pre-med student, who did not know diddly-squat about journalism. useppe, the editor-in-chief of The Alligator Sunday, June 12, 2016. He asked me to join him on the drive south to Orlando to cover the Pulse shooting, but I declined because I had to study for my organic chemistry exam. Twenty minutes passed, and I called him back. I didnt understand what it was, but I knew I had to go. A sense of duty ensued. I remember getting out of the car near the OneBlood Blood Donation Center and seeing the long line of people ready to donate. I remember walking along Orange Avenue. Every direction I faced there were countless expressions of frustration, desolation and anxiety. There was erratic breathing in the air as people heavily sobbed and tears trickled down their cheeks. We heard word of a small vigil at Lake Eola Park and followed a crowd of 200. The sky was grey and eerie, and raindrops lightly sprinkled across the faces of the mourning. I saw how strangers lent each other a shoulder to cry on and how grief slowly turned into a powerful strength of love as each speaker lifted the spirits of those present. The commonality of grief among the crowd was one of the many things and when we lose people we love, it hurts. It hurts so much that it breaks us open, allowing us to be vulnerable and more willing to express our emotions. Words cant describe how much it pressing up against your chest. I failed my organic chemistry exam with a 59, but it was all worth it. I remember being backstage at a local drag show where I witnessed the transformative nature of a drag queen. I she effortlessly blended her makeup, brushed her hair, glued her fake nails and strut across the stage in leotards, corsets and dresses all while wearing heels. I also remember feeling the fear in graduate student voices protesting on Turlington Plaza a recent federal visa and immigration ban brought upon by an executive order. The uncertainty of whether they would be able to stay in the country after completing their studies was petrifying. Although Im not a student visa holder or a drag queen, documenting their challenges by photos and video provided me with a small glimpse into their world. For a few minutes, I felt what they felt. If it werent for The Alligator, I would have otherwise walked past the protest and thought nothing of it. Instead, I heard about people leaving their families. Being there extended my own political and social concerns and allowed me to humanize each subject. I remember getting accepted and it being one of the happiest moments during my college experience. I remember going out on my rush of self-actualization, and it made the corners of my lip squirm. I remember how each editor has pushed me to be better, how nervous I was shooting each protest still gives me a rush of adrenaline and how Jimena and I ended up in Georgia on our way to Tallahassee (for a protest, of course). Photojournalism has expanded my world. I have been made aware of my own privileges, but most importantly, I have learned about humanity. I have been taken outside of myself and become a better listener and a more empathetic person. Theres more to learn and experience in life besides organic chemistry, and little did I know, two years ago I would embark on my best experience at UF. Thank you, and see you later, Alligator. Alan Alvarez is a UF psychology senior. He is the photo editor at The Alligator. Column Alan Alvarezopinions@alligator.orgThe most important lesson Ive learned in my 21 years is hard work can get you anywhere. Jimena Tavel Engagement Managing Edior

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The Alligator will be withheld if the writer shows just cause. We reserve the right to edit for length, grammar, style and libel. Send letters to opinions@alligator.org, bring them to 1105 W. University Ave., or send them to P.O. Box 14257, Gainesville, FL 326042257.Columns of about 450 words about original topics and editorial cartoons are also welcome. Questions? Call 352-376-4458.Editorial WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2018 www.alligator.org/opinions For the past 45 years, 2 months and 25 days, The Alligator has been independent. Its a title we earned one we made the second word on our masthead after an editor in 1971 published a list of abortion clinics in protest of state law. The rift between the student staff and then UF president, Stephen C. OConnell, got so tense that the state attorney general ruled that to protect the First Amendment rights of the student journalists, UF and The Alligator should split. Though the editors didnt plan the papers independence, they saw the value: the freedom to cover UF without restriction, to not worry about budgetary slashes if reporters offended the administration or Student Government. paper on Feb. 1, 1973, much of the editors concerns could be copied and pasted into todays. It talks about the need of student-run newspapers across the country. A few weeks ago, the board of The Daily Campus at Southern Methodist University voted to dissolve its paper and go back to the a well-founded history of being bold. After seeing the Daily paign to #SaveStudentNewsrooms, highlighting nationwide Its made a considerable amount of noise in the last 20 days, and in that time weve seen numerous other papers recount how their staff works for no pay, how administrations have prevented interviews with university employees and even universities suing their own students. We work hard to keep you informed so you can cast your ballots in local elections, SG elections and even the presidential election. We have writers run out of class for breaking stories, and some wake up at the crack of dawn to pursue others. In between classes, exams and life, our staff is here because the long hours and low pay are worth it. We want you, dear reader, to know that we hope you hear our message in our last paper of the semester: We need your help in making sure The Alligator is here to stay for years to come. If you pick up a paper, thank you. If you reach out to share your stories, thank you. As The Alligator joins other student-run publications in the push for more awareness, cation. We still provide content online every day. read, For years The Alligator has come to you free. And port. tors. Our staff earns meager wages for the work they put in. Newsprint costs are going up from tariffs. We will continue publishing for free, but independent student journalism comes with a cost. It needs your support. Viva the Independent Florida Alligator. Viva the Independent Florida Alligator. ColumnFrom the editor-in-chief: Journalism aint dead. Chill.This is supposed to be the moment where I look back at my time at The Alligator and I could tell you about the late nights, hard-fought stories and small victories in I should tell you about how I started here as a freshman who felt a tug in her chest to work alongside other student journalists who became like family. But I will not. and I can tell you then. Here, in this space I cherish deeply, I want to tell you about my future. And yours, too. In the next year or so, I will (hopefully) have a job that I love. I will meet passionate people who care about keeping their communities informed. I will write. ever, Ive always been a believer in confronting a problem directly, even if it makes my stomach churn. So lets talk about it. If youre reading this column, maybe by chance or on purpose, you know The Alligator. You know journalism. My hope is if a story ever made you cry, gasp or scream, you care about the fact that journalism is suffering. Student newsrooms in particular do the best they can, but like all professional newsrooms, theyre struggling to survive. Because the story that made you cry, gasp or scream made someone else feel something, too. At The Alligator, I have poured hundreds of hours over my own stories to make sure they capture the people behind them. But journalism needs people to care as we search for sustainable business models. The bottom line: The stories of your community will go uncovered if there are less people able to write about them. being ignored. Not because people dont care but because they have so much going on already. Not only to become a career only people with money are able to afford pursuing. Perhaps one of the most troubling trends is the idea that low-income students who cannot afford to take an unpaid summer internship will be dissuaded from pursuing this career. But their voices are needed. Because heres the thing about journalism: Its advice I have ever heard from a UF journalism professor: because the stories we write are rooted in the art of storytelling. I truly believe journalism, even if it goes completely digital in my lifetime, will continue to tell the stories about communities that have been ignored for a long time. A strong democracy needs a free press. Freedom of the press is freedom of the people. We are lucky to have an independent press in the U.S. of that I have no doubt. In the last of this space, I want to thank everyone who has helped me pursue this craft called journalism. The reason I have gotten the opportunities Ive had is because there were editors who took a chance on me, friends who wanted to see me grow and family who supported me through it all. A mi mam: Gracias por todo. Nunca me dijiste que no iba a poder completar esta carrera, siempre dijiste que deba que hacer lo que me hiciera feliz. Te quiero, por siempre. This column is supposed to be a farewell to the newsroom that took me in, but I know from our alumni the ties to The Alligator are never truly cut. You write your own reality, but I hope you write it with the idea of a free press. Because guess what? Journalism aint dead. Chill. Melissa Gomez is a UF journalism senior. She is the editor-in-chief of The Alligator. The views expressed here are not necessarily those of The Alligator.Melissa Gomez EDITOR A bby M iller EDITOR Caitlin Ostroff DIGITAL EDITOR Jimena Tavel EDITOR Melissa Gomezopinions@alligator.org

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WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2018 ALLIGATOR 7A dime holed up inside a pocket of his pants was the only thing my grandfather carried with him the day he left Cuba. In a way, the rest of his life and his familys lives depended on that coin. As he boarded a plane headed to Miami gripping my grandmothers hand, he planned to use the money to call a friend who would pick him up from the airport. He led a dictatorship. He escaped police oflious actions. He aid goodbye to 35 years lived on the island. When he got to the U.S., he worked as a taxi driver for Diamond Cab Company. He worked hard. Eventually, he was offered a job in Honduras. He uprooted his family, moved to a small country in Central America and worked harder. He worked as a car salesman and a construction manager. My grandmother worked, too. She was a teacher at an American school. But when the U.S. Southern Association of Schools and Colleges demanded all staff members to bring their degrees in, and she couldnt exactly So my grandparents did what they always did. They continued to work hard. They founded a private bilingual school, which celebrated its 50th anniversary last May. When I was a little girl, my dad woke up every morning and drove to that same school at about 5 a.m. to make sure the buses left in time to pick up the students. Every evening, I hugged him hello when he got home. I remember how he smelled a combination of sweat and worn out cologne from the long work day. My mom stayed at home and worked just as hard (or maybe even harder) raising four closely aged children. I remember how she smelled always like some sort of food from cooking. Listening with open eyes, raised brows and hung jaws, my three brothers and I heard my dad recount our grandparents story countless times when we were kids. Every single time, way. Work hard, he would say. If you work hard, you can do anything you want. Working hard is what allowed me to get a scholarship and enroll at Florida Gulf Coast University in Fort Myers in 2014. Its what helped me grow at Eagle News, the schools weekly publication. Working hard is what brought me to Gainesville and made me a Gator. Its what empowered me to get through long nights and nerve-wracking tasks at The Alligator. The most important lesson Ive learned in my 21 years is hard work can get you anywhere. A strong work ethic is the best superpower you can have. It doesnt matter if you have no talent or no resources or neither. If you work hard for your dreams, I promise youll make them a reality. I dreamed of someday moving to the U.S. to study among some of the most brilliant minds and on some of the richest spaces on Earth and I did it by working hard. Looking back, I can see my grandparents dream was to protect their family. My parents dream was to see their four children happy. Hard work gave them that. Working hard until your back hurts and your eyes twitch and you feel like you have never been more exhausted in your life just to think the same thought again each day after matters. Not only because itll enable you to achieve your goals, but also because working hard builds character. It gives you a purpose in life. Jimena Tavel is a UF journalism senior. She is the engagement managing editor of The Alligator. Dream. Then work hard for your dreams. Column Jimena Tavelopinions@alligator.orgIts easy to lose your voice. Maybe its that moment of hesitation before you answer a question, or the pressure in your chest that makes you think twice before speaking up. Maybe its the fear that even if you did talk, no one would listen. I lost my voice when I was 5, after my younger brother was diagnosed with Aspergers Syndrome, a form of autism thats considered high-functioning. The label didnt change the way I saw my brother. Until that point, I assumed all brothers had quirks like mine: he preferred a green plate at dinner, disliked physical contact and could talk to you about space and physics well past your point of understanding. But I quickly learned others didnt see him as I did. Questions of Whats wrong with your brother? left me silent, a tightness in my throat and my eyes trailing to the ground. Eating lunch alone became routine. But that was mild compared to the treatment from teachers who yelled at me when my brother misbehaved and gave me detention when I left class to walk him to my moms minivan. I navigated school silent and unnoticed, and because of that, I learned to listen and observe. As my parents waged battles to get my brother the resources he needed, they showed me the importance of standing up for those who cant defend themselves. So when I got to college, I sought to reclaim my voice and to pick a career where I could give a voice to the voiceless. Its because of that I stumbled into a dilapidated building at 1105 W. University Ave. The Independent Florida Alligator. ligator, Ive learned to not only speak up for myself, but for others, as well as expose problems and ask questions. I owe that to my friends and colleagues. Even though we eventually left the building where I found myself, the people who helped me. The building never made the paper, but the people did. Now on 13th Street, three years later, I still found myself surrounded by loud, passionate, ink-and -coffee-stained student journalists. But in working to give others a voice, we almost lost ours. A free press is vital to democracy, and there is a real threat to the freedom for student journalists across the country to report on their respective institutions. Thats why we started an initiative to save student newsrooms, bringing attention to the challenges facing student media. The voice of student journalists and the community members they cover is worth preserving. Freedom of the press is freedom of the people. Maybe youve never felt voiceless. And if so, thats great. But maybe you feel this way now. If thats you, know it wont always be that way. You will help along the way. So surround yourself with passionate people, and make it your mission to work with them. They will push you to be better. They will inspire you to think bigger. They will be the people with whom you change the world. And always keep your past in the back of your mind. It will drive you forward. Caitlin Ostroff is a UF journalism and political science senior. She is the digital managing editor at The Alligator.Column Caitlin Ostroffopinions@alligator.orgMay 5th marks the end of my journey at UF, but it also marks the beginning of my unexpected journey here. On a day much like today, at the end of the Spring semester two years ago, I was looking to add some je ne sais quoi to my college experience. I came across The Alligators website, and luckily, they were in need of photographers for the summer. They took a chance on me, a pre-med student, who did not know diddly-squat about journalism. useppe, the editor-in-chief of The Alligator Sunday, June 12, 2016. He asked me to join him on the drive south to Orlando to cover the Pulse shooting, but I declined because I had to study for my organic chemistry exam. Twenty minutes passed, and I called him back. I didnt understand what it was, but I knew I had to go. A sense of duty ensued. I remember getting out of the car near the OneBlood Blood Donation Center and seeing the long line of people ready to donate. I remember walking along Orange Avenue. Every direction I faced there were countless expressions of frustration, desolation and anxiety. There was erratic breathing in the air as people heavily sobbed and tears trickled down their cheeks. We heard word of a small vigil at Lake Eola Park and followed a crowd of 200. The sky was grey and eerie, and raindrops lightly sprinkled across the faces of the mourning. I saw how strangers lent each other a shoulder to cry on and how grief slowly turned into a powerful strength of love as each speaker lifted the spirits of those present. The commonality of grief among the crowd was one of the many things and when we lose people we love, it hurts. It hurts so much that it breaks us open, allowing us to be vulnerable and more willing to express our emotions. Words cant describe how much it pressing up against your chest. I failed my organic chemistry exam with a 59, but it was all worth it. I remember being backstage at a local drag show where I witnessed the transformative nature of a drag queen. I she effortlessly blended her makeup, brushed her hair, glued her fake nails and strut across the stage in leotards, corsets and dresses all while wearing heels. I also remember feeling the fear in graduate student voices protesting on Turlington Plaza a recent federal visa and immigration ban brought upon by an executive order. The uncertainty of whether they would be able to stay in the country after completing their studies was petrifying. Although Im not a student visa holder or a drag queen, documenting their challenges by photos and video provided me with a small glimpse into their world. For a few minutes, I felt what they felt. If it werent for The Alligator, I would have otherwise walked past the protest and thought nothing of it. Instead, I heard about people leaving their families. Being there extended my own political and social concerns and allowed me to humanize each subject. I remember getting accepted and it being one of the happiest moments during my college experience. I remember going out on my rush of self-actualization, and it made the corners of my lip squirm. I remember how each editor has pushed me to be better, how nervous I was shooting each protest still gives me a rush of adrenaline and how Jimena and I ended up in Georgia on our way to Tallahassee (for a protest, of course). Photojournalism has expanded my world. I have been made aware of my own privileges, but most importantly, I have learned about humanity. I have been taken outside of myself and become a better listener and a more empathetic person. Theres more to learn and experience in life besides organic chemistry, and little did I know, two years ago I would embark on my best experience at UF. Thank you, and see you later, Alligator. Alan Alvarez is a UF psychology senior. He is the photo editor at The Alligator. Column Alan Alvarezopinions@alligator.orgThe most important lesson Ive learned in my 21 years is hard work can get you anywhere. Jimena Tavel Engagement Managing Edior

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8 ALLIGATOR WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2018 rfrnt rbr rnrfnr r rfn t b f r f f f f b

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WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2018 www.alligator.org/the_avenue Farewell column:Parting words from our editor (p. 11)Locochino: Local band to open for TAUK (pg. 10)WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2018 www.alligator.org/the_avenue Keep up with the Avenue on Twitter. Tweet us @TheFloridaAve. By Emma WitmerAvenue Writer The Swamp Records Showcase will Swamp Records Showcase to be held Thursday night MUSIC Courtesy to The AlligatorChicago-born artist Netherfriends is one headliner for the showcase. By Brooke SteinbergAvenue Contributor Danza Dance Company to host 20th Anniversary Showcase Photo by Grace KingDanzas 20th Anniversary Showcase will focus on alumni connections in particular.

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10 ALLIGATOR WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2018By Gabriella PaulAvenue Writer Local band Locochino to open for TAUK at High Dive show Courtesy of Red Hot Pepper StudioLocal group Locochino has been part of the Gainesville music scene since 2014. By Emma Witmer Avenue Writer

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WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2018 ALLIGATOR 11 Putting into 600 words just what Gainesville means to me is impossible, and discussing all the things I learned or diving into my friendships is even more impossible. I decided to dedicate this column to something The Avenue highlights every week: Gainesvilles entertainment scene. time in school, the memories that stick out most are the ones I made when I stepped out of the college scene and into the local one. Its the memories I made at places like First Magnitude, dancing and singing with friends while the band onstage played Wait For The Moment by Vulfpeck. Its times I interviewed groups like Locochino and spent more time laughing at their jokes than asking questions. Its the raw talent I witnessed at places like The Jam and the feeling of awe I experienced when I saw about 100 locals turn up ing. Its the sight of more than 1,000 students packing out the Florida Theatre for performers like Tchami, and all those conversations I had at art galleries, the Hippodrome State Theatre and tiny downtown bars. And, most importantly, its the friendships I strengthened and the new ones I made through art, music and other forms of entertainment. During college Gainesville taught me you dont need to be in a big city to experience something new each night. In addition to these experiences, writing about the local scene made a tangible impact on me. While many of my classes preferred hard news, The Alligator gave me a place to pursue entertainment. When I was writing stories, it never really felt like work. My editor never said no to an idea, and I tried to bring this openness to my editor role as well. The combination of experiencing and covering the local scene helped me realize a career in entertainment is the one for me. My goodbye to the local entertainment scene wont be the hardest to make, but I wouldnt be the same without that or The Avenue. For those spending more time in Gainesville, Ill say this: Invest in and appreciate your local entertainment scene. Dont be afraid to get out of your comfort zone and reconnect with friends through art and music. Gainesville has so much to offer between our university, college nightlife, local entertainment scene and everything in between. And for anyone reading this, I hope each part of this city brings you as much joy as it brought me these past four years. Natalie Rao is a journalism senior and 2018 Avenue editor.Goodbye Gainesville: What four years of entertainment taught me Natalie Raoopinions@alligator.org

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12 ALLIGATOR WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2018 Jasmine Robinson Hocutt, M.S. Mathematics; Jeramiah Hocutt, Ph.D. Mathematics; Jaylynne Hocutt, B.S. Mathematics. Mom() and Dad() are very proud. We love you all! Go Gators!!! Make a difference!Become a Crisis Line Counselor for The Alachua County Crisis CenterTraining begins:May 19, 2018For more information, please contact: Jan Greene (352) 264-6782 jgreene@alachuacounty.us By Sam CampisanoSports WriterWalking into the locker room at San Franciscos Olympic Club, Andy Zhang was unfazed. The 14-year-old had a chance to meet his heroes: Tiger Woods. Rory McIlroy. Phil Mickelson. Bubba Watson. However, he wasnt interested in getting any autographs. It was July 2012. Zhang was at the U.S. Open, but not as a spectator. He was there on merit. Following a blistering qualifying performance for the event, Zhang was selected as one Casey withdrew because of an injury, Zhang was thrust into the spotlight. He became the youngest person to ever compete at the U.S. Open. His story became national news. He was the talking point of one of golfs most prestigious events. But not all of the talk was positive. Fans wondered if Zhang was worthy of such an event. They wondered if there was an ethical dilemma with having a young teenager compete in an adults game. Zhang was even born came to his defense. Its not too young if you can do it. Thats the great thing about this game. Its not handed to you, he said at the time. You have to go out and put up the numbers, and he did. Speaking to him today, you wouldnt be able to tell that Zhang once had to leave his whole life behind and venture to an unknown country without speaking its language. Despite his lack of citizenship, Zhang has grown accustomed to living in the United States. He was born in Beijing, China, on Dec. 14, 1997. Most of the members of his extended family were farmers while he was growing up. His dad had his own trade business and his mom was a doctor. And living in a country where golf was banned until the mid-1980s for being considered too high-class, the sport didnt seem like a logical career path and it especially wasnt seen as a reason for uplifting a family. But that thought started to become a possibility when Zhang began playing golf at 7 years old. He quickly realized he had talent, and after traveling to Florida for a golf tournament that he ended up winning, a friend raised the idea of Zhang relocating to Florida full time. After giving it some thought seeing the superior facilities in the United States and realizing his potential in golf Zhang and his mother moved to Bradenton, Florida, when he was 10 years old, while his father and sister stayed behind. Neither Zhang nor his mother spoke any in school. Windermere Preparatory School as his mother attempted to sign him up for classes. He was One decade later, Zhang shrugs off the Windermere incident. Its not in his nature to focus too much on himself. But since that day, Zhang has continued to grow both as a person and as an athlete. Despite Zhang not playing particularly well at the U.S. Open in 2012, the accomplishment of him even participating cant be understated. ishing at 9 over at 79. Alongside the likes of defending champion Rory McIlroy, then-No. 1 Luke Donald and former Masters winner Bubba Watson, Zhang failed to make the cut. But the opportunity still gave him a taste of his ultimate goal: playing on the professional circuit with household names like Woods and Mickelson. It also helped put him on the map as a golfer. boost, Zhang said. But he still had four years before college. As he got older, he received interest from schools across the country. By the time he committed to Florida in 2015, he was Golfweeks No. 1 recruit in the class of 2016. From the beginning, the University of Florobvious geographic proximity as he could drive home on weekends. Three of his best friends from junior golf already went to the school. But perhaps the deciding factor was UFs new coach, J.C. Deacon. After legendary coach Buddy Alexander retired in 2014, Deacon was one of several candidates interviewed to replace him. Considered a long shot to get the job, one of Deacons bargaining chips was that he promised to then-athletic director Jeremy Foley that he would bring Zhang to the Gators. And after Deacon was hired, he did just mit to Florida during Deacons tenure. Ive always admired Andy from afar, Deacon said. He was on my mind from day one when I got here. Despite never winning a collegiate tournament, Zhang is currently ranked as the No. 30 amateur golfer in the world. After just two years at UF, he is planning on leaving school to turn professional at 20 years of age when the season ends next month. What Zhang has lacked in hardware he has made up for in consistency. A mainstay in Floridas lineup, he competed for the Gators in all but two of their events this season. He has also gained trust from his coach, who has slotted him into the No. 2 spot in the lineup in three onship, which begins today in St. Simons Island, Georgia. To his coach and his teammates, there is no limit to what Zhang can do in the world of golf. Im guessing well be watching him at The Masters in a couple years, his teammate and close friend Gordon Neale said. Im sure hell have a good career on the PGA Tour. @samcampisano scampisano@alligator.org OPEN SEASON: Andy Zhangs drive to golfs biggest stage Courtesy of UAA CommunicationsFlorida sophomore Andy Zhang played in the 2012 US Open when he was 14 years old, making him the youngest golfer to compete in the event in its history. MENS GOLF

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WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2018 ALLIGATOR 13 WORLDCivilizationRide the rail trail to its Northern end and discover lots of vegetarian dishes, espresso drinks, housemade desserts, craft beer and sustainable wine. Dine inside the historic Gulf Oil building or outside under the modern portico. 1511 NW 2nd Street. Open for lunch 11-2, Tues-Fri & for dinner 5:30-9 Tues-Sat. welcometocivilization.comORGANICDaily GreenFresh, unique, organic, food! Soups, salads, homemade sweets, juices and smoothies. Vegan/gluten free options. Like us on Facebook. 436 SE 2nd St. w-sat 11-7, sun brunch 10-3 dailygreendowntown.org ITALIANManuels Vintage Room check out one of the best wine lists in town. the chef to put out nothing but goodness from the kitchen using fresh, simple, and local Dinners and private parties for lunch or dinner. Open Tues-Sat 5pm-10pm, Sun 5pm-9pm. 6 South Main St. (352) 375-7372FROZEN TREATSKarma Cream ice cream in town! We also have an impressive selection of organic vegan ice cream, baked goods, sandwiches, fair trade coffee, tea, organic beer and free WI-FI. Mon-Fri 8am-11pm Sat&Sun 10am-11pm BREAKFASTBagels & NoodlesServing breakfast and fresh bagels 6:30 am 3:00 pm. Serving Vietnamese cuisine Pho noodle soup and more. 11 am 9 pm. 1222 W. University Ave. SOUTHERNThe Yearling RestaurantSince 1952 Gators have been coming to grandparents, or greatgrandparents went to frog legs, duck, quail + venison + a wide famous sour orange pie. Now that is a meal Contact Alligator Advertising to feature your business here 352-376-4482 GUIDE TO DINING OUT By Christina MoralesAlligator Staff WriterFormer Student Body President Smith Meyers completed his term Tuesday, and President-elect Ian Green will take over today. Heres a review of what suggestions the Impact Party made during Meyers campaigning that were accomplished or are in progress: Spring 2017: Simplify the degree audit so it is easier for students to understand completed Meyers made the degree audit program user-friendly by working with the One.UF committee to offer the degree audit and other student services through the new UF COMPASS program. safety on campus completed of Transportation and Parking worked together to increase crosswalk safety on Gale Lemerand Drive by adding crosswalks and medians between Museum Road and Stadium Road. Provide healthier food options at campus gyms completed Freshens was replaced with Shake Smart at the Reitz Union and the Southwest Recreation Center, which would bring healthier food options to students on campus. Designate online testing locations completed Six rooms in Library West were designated for ProctorU and online exams where students can reserve the rooms to take exams. The room is equipped with a computer and webcam for testing needs. Expand scooter parking completed Scooter parking for 45 to 55 scooters was added by Library West. Fall 2017: Ensure the input of students is taken into account through a campus-wide referendum regarding the location of a 24/7 SG-funded library completed A survey was created to consider which library to fund. In December, it was announced Library West and Newell Hall would be open 24/7. Lobby for expansion of the Bright Futures Scholarship Program completed This was approved by Gov. Rick Scott at the end of the Florida legislative session. Alleviate mental health concerns of students through the hiring of new psychologists for the Counseling and Wellness Center the growing Student Body completed Eight new mental health counselors were funded permanently in November. Enhance the student experience spring music festival completed The Wetlands Music Festival took place at the end of February, attracting about 3,000 attendees, according to Alligator archives. Other: Laundry grant complete Former Student Body Treasurer Revel Lubin started a program to offer students in need a free $30 laundry card for washers and dryers in residence halls. Lobby for health and wellness center completed Although the funding wasnt approved, Meyers lobbied for the funding for a new center that and a counseling and wellness hub on Norman Field. It wouldve cost about $90 million and been about 260,000 square feet. @Christina_M18 cmorales@alligator.orgOne year later, Impact executive ticket keeps promises

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WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2018 Dont get stuck with an extra rent payment. Advertise your subleases in the Alligator Classifieds and save yourself some cash. Call 373-FIND. 4 Roommates IVE HAD IT WITH YOUR LOUD MUSIC! Is your roommate driving you crazy? Find a replacement in the Alligator Classifieds! 5 Real Estate Sell your house, condo, acreage, mobile home and much more in the ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS! Reach thousands of possible buyers! Mastercard and Visa accepted over the phone, by fax, email or CHECK OUT PLACING YOUR AD THRU OUR ONLINE AT www.alligator.org. or please call 373Find (373-3463) NEW CONDOS-WALK TO UFFor Info on ALL Condos for Sale, Visit www.UFCONDOS.COM or Matt Price, University Realty, 352-281-3551 8-13-25-5 Lake Property Liquidation Foreclosure Resale $39,900 Before Foreclosure sold for $137,900 Financing Available. Being sold off May 5th! Watch Video: www.LakeLotsCloseout.com 877.712.3650 Florida Waterfront Marketing, LLC. Licensed Real Estate Broker. 4-20-1-5 6 Furnishings Got a new couch?. Sell your old one in the Alligator Classifieds. Call 373-FIND (3463) to place your ad today. BEDS Brand Name, Brand NEW Pillowtop Mattress & Box Set: Twins $89, Fulls $100, Queens $120, Kings $200. Can Deliver 352377-9846. Gainesville Discount Furniture. 3-28-167-6 Selling computers, parts, or repair services or just looking for that new rig? Look in the Alligator Classifieds. Call 373-FIND for more information. 8 Electronics Place an ad to sell your old stereo, cell phone, and more in the Electronics Section of the Alligator Classifieds. 373-FIND 9 Bicycles In the market for a new set of wheels or just looking to add a second to that collection? Want personalized handlebars or a fitted seat? Check in the Alligator Classifieds 10 For Sale UF Surplus On-Line Auctionsare underwaybikes, computers, furniture, vehicles & more. All individuals interested in bidding go to: SURPLUS.UFL.EDU 392-0370 4-25-18-43-10 Goats for Sale & Lease Horse Boarding 7 miles to UFCharlie 352-278-1925 4-25-43-10 SAWMILLS from only $4397.00MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own band millCut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship! FREE Info/DVD: www. NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N 4-20-1-10 11 Motorcycles/ Mopeds Alligator Classifieds is the way to get your 2 wheels on the road. Show off your bikes, scooters, and repair services. Call 373-FIND to get your classified in.Now you can easily submit your classified adfor print and/or web editionsright thru our website!Just go to www.alligator.org/classifiedsVisa and Mastercard accepted. 12 Autos Unload your lot. Sell your cars through Alligator Advertising for cheap. 373-FIND or place your ad online at www.alligator.org/ classifieds We Buy Junk & Used Cars Trucks, Vans Titled only KT 352-281-9980 sunnyman352@gmail.com 8-13-25-12 Don't forget to tell them:"I found it in The Alligator!" Sunrise Auto Sales Bring W-2 Drive home today!! Free one year oil change $1000 discount off the finest price www.sunriseautosale.net 3523759090 8-13-25-12 Sunrise Auto Rental Easy to Rent!!! NO credit card required! www.carrentalsunrise.com 352-3759090 8-13-25-12 Sun City Auto Sales Bring W-2 Drive home today!! Free one year oil change $1000 discount off the finest price www.sunriseautosale.net 352-338-1999 8-13-25-12 ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIED ADSGET THE JOB DONE!REACH MORE THAN 50,000 READERS EACH PUBLICATION DAY 2008 Yaris 2-door hatchback. 37mpg hwy, 5-speed, A/C, new tires & brakes,CD, power windows, mirrors, locks, Advanced air-bags, tilt steer. VG-condition, clean. 208K. Bluebook $3,666, sell $2,949. 352-213-8769 Rich 5-15-18-2-12 13 Wanted This newspaper assumes no responsibil ity for injury or loss arising from contacts made through advertising. We suggest that any reader who responds to advertising use caution and investigate the sincerity of the advertiser before giving out personal information or arranging meetings or investing money. The American Cancer Society Road to Recovery Volunteers Needed!VOLUNTEER DRIVERS NEEDEDto transport cancer patients to treatment. Flexible schedule. Training and liability insurance provided. Please call 352-240-5062 if interested. St. Francis House is a homeless shelter located in downtown Gainesville. Our mission is to empower families with children to transition from homelessness to self-sufficiency by providing case management, housing, food, training and educational resources in a secure environment. If interested in volunteering please contact the volunteer coordinator at 352-3789079 ext 317 or sfhcoor@stfrancis.cfcoxmail.com St Francis House depends on monetary support from individual donors and community businesses in order to provide meals to the homeless and the hungry. To make a donation by mail, please send checks payable to St. Francis House P.O. Box 12491 Gainesville Fl 32604 or our website atStfrancishousegnv.org 1 For Rent furnished 3 Subleases 7 Computers 11 Motorcycles/ Mopeds 12 Autos SS & VA ARE WELCOME!$410/BedRoom No Deposit! Furnished Cable Internet Utilities www.campuswalk.co 352-337-9098 8-13-25-1 2 male Grad students seek a male roommate who is clean & studious. Windsor Park 3/3, own bed/bath, on bus stop close to UF. Pool, hot tub, tennis, gym $425/mo + 1/3 util. Joshua 407-342-0617 5-29-18-11-1 Remember to tell them... "I found it in The Alligator!" 2 For Rentunfurnished Empty Space? Find your next tenants in the Alligator Classifieds. Call 373-FIND to place your ad today! 1BR APT $445/moSmall pet ok. 352-372-1201 or 352-213-3901 6-21-18-55-2 ELLIES HOUSES Quality single family homes. Walk or bike to UF. www.ellieshouses.com 352-215-4991 or 352-215-4990 12-5-18-111-2 HOUSE 4BR/2BAAvailable 8/1, lawn care, nice yard, W/D, tile flr, bike to UF. No pets. 3532 NW 7th Ave. See flier $1450/mo. 352-256-8370 5-15-18-21-2 House across from Law house available August 2018! 4/2 full bath renovated, granite counter tops, parking, WD, lawn care and sunroom for studying! Walk to class! $2250 352-317-6353 5-22-18-5-2 Now you can easily submit your classified adfor print and/or web editionsright thru our website!Just go to www.alligator.org/classifiedsVisa and Mastercard accepted. 1 For Rent: Furnished 2 For Rent: Unfurnished 3 Sublease 4 Roommates 5 Real Estate 6 Furnishings 7 Computers 8 Electronics 9 Bicycles 10 For Sale 11 Motorcycles, Mopeds 12 Autos 13 Wanted 14 Help Wanted 15 Services 16 Health Services 17 Typing Services 18 Personals 19 Connections 20 Event Notices 21 Entertainment 22 Tickets 23 Rides 24 Pets 25 Lost & Found All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make limitation, or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. All employment opportunities advertised herein are subject to the laws which prohibit discrimina tion in employment (barring legal exceptions) because of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, handicap, familial status, age, or any other covered status. This newspaper assumes no responsibility for injury or loss arising from contacts made through the type of advertising that newspaper uses great care in accepting or rejecting advertising according to its suitability, we cannot verify that all advertising claims or offers are completely valid in every case and, therefore, cannot assume any responsibility for any injury or loss arising from offers and acceptance of offers of goods and/or services through any advertising contained herein. In Person: Cash, Check, MC, Discover, AMEX or Visa 2700 SW 13th St. M-F, 8am 4pm By E-mail By Fax : (352) 376-4556 By Mail : P.O. Box 14257 G-ville 32604 Call 352-373-FIND for information. Sorry, no cash by mail. Credit cards or checks only. By Phone : (352) 373-FIND Payment by major credit card ONLY. M-F, 8am 4pm When Will Your Ad Run? Ads placed by 4 pm will appear two publication days later. Ads may run for any length of time and be cancelled at any time. Sorry, but there can be no refunds or credits for cancelled ads. Corrections and Cancellations: Cancellations: Call 373-FIND M-F, 8am 4pm. No refunds or credits can be given. Alligator errors: Check your ad the FIRST day it runs. Call 373-FIND with any corrections before noon. THE ALLIGATOR IS ONLY RESPONSIBLE FOR THE FIRST DAY THE AD RUNS INCORRECTLY. Corrected ads will be extended one day. No refunds or credits can be given after placing the ad. Corrections called in Customer error or changes: Changes must be made BEFORE NOON for the next days paper. There will be a $2.00 charge for minor changes. Online:

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WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2018 ALLIGATOR 15 This newspaper assumes no responsibil ity for injury or loss arising from contacts made through advertising. We suggest that any reader who responds to advertising use caution and investigate the sincerity of the advertiser before giving out personal information or arranging meetings or investing money. Total Home looking for a floor associate in downtown Gainesville. Duties include: working sales floor, assembling cabinetry, loading materials and general upkeep. $10/hour. Email resume to totalhome@totalhomefla.com 5-15-1810-14 NOW HIRING for SUMMER '18 Notetakers Editors Production Assistants Apply at SmokinNotes.com 5-17-18-4-14 15 Services Do you have a business that provides a service? Place your ad in the Services Section of the Alligator Classifieds for as little as $3.00 per day. Call us at 373-FIND. Affordable Attorney12 Years Experience Call or Text Sam 24/7 904.600.2683 4-2517-86-15 Want to be a CNA? Dont want to wait? Express Training Services now offers a CNA class which can be completed in one weekend. Perfect for busy college students. www. expresstrainingservices.com/ww 8-13-1825-15 16 Health Services HIV ANTIBODY TESTINGAlachua County Health Dept. Call 334-7960 for appt (optional $20 fee) Need CPR Training?(352) 727-4733 www.GatorCPR.com CNA Prep Classes from GatorCNA.com 7-3-17-108-16 Engineering & Arts Day Camp Hiring Now! Build and play with kids this summer. Need education, engineering, arts majors to help us run this incredibly special camp experience. (FT/PT avail) www.masterbuildercamp.com to apply. 4-20-18-7-14 Paralegal, part-time, for Immigration Law firm. Will train. Must be fluent in Spanish and English. Must make a one year commitment. Resume to: robert.jacobs@rjjimmigration.com. 4-2518-8-14 FAST TYPISTS NEEDED Create your own schedule Close to campus Earn raises quickly Apply at www.ctscribes.com 5-17-10-14 Now you can easily submit your classified adfor print and/or web editionsright thru our website!Just go to www.alligator.org/classifiedsVisa and Mastercard accepted. Experienced Swim Lesson Instructors need ed beginning in May. Please email resume, hours of availability, and 2 references to jwilby@cox.net 5-17-18-5-14 HIRING home/office/apartment cleaners(mf and every other sat). Day and night shifts available. Must own a car. weekly pay $8.50/ hr. if interested please call 352-214-0868 5-15-18-4-14 Makos Aquatics Club of Gainesville Is looking for swim/lesson coaches for May & summer work. $11.00 an hour. Send resume/3 references to kraus.leonard@gmail.com 5-15-18-4-14 Students in Accounting, Aviation, Business/ Sales and computer science needed for various positions. Flexible schedules and competitive pay. Join our team! Learn more at www.gleim.com/employment 8-13-18-25-14 1. ART: Which artist from Iowa painted the iconic American Gothic? 2. BUSINESS: Where is the Target stores headquarters? 3. GEOGRAPHY: What is the longest mountain range in North America? 4. LANGUAGE: What is the meaning of the Latin term ad infinitum? 5. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: When does winter begin in the Southern Hemisphere? 6. NOBEL PRIZES: Who was the only prime minister to win the Nobel Prize for Literature? 7. FOOD & DRINK: What are the ingredients in a Moscow Mule? 8. ANATOMY: What is the most common blood type in human beings? 9. ANIMAL KINGDOM: What is the largest rodent in North America? 10. LITERATURE: How many lines are in a Shakespearean sonnet? Answers 1. Grant Wood 2. Minneapolis, Minnesota 3. Rocky Mountains 4. Going on forever 5. June 21 6. Winston Churchill 7. Vodka, ginger beer and lime juice 8. O positive 9. The beaver 10. 14 2018 King Features Synd., Inc. April 23, 2018King Features Weekly Service 14 Help Wanted 14 Help Wanted 14 Help Wanted 14 Help Wanted 14 Help Wanted

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16 ALLIGATOR WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2018 DRUG PROBLEM?WE CAN HELP! 24 HOURS 7 DAYSCALL NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS1-866352-5323 352-376-8008 www.uncoastna.org pr@uncoastna.org 18 Personals HIV ANTIBODY TESTINGAlachua County Health Dept. Call 334-7960 for appt (optional $20 fee) Don't forget to tell them: "I found it in The Alligator!" 19 Connections Want to make a connection?Place your ad here to look for someone to share a common interest with or for your true love ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIED ADSGET THE JOB DONE!REACH MORE THAN 50,000 READERS EACH PUBLICATION DAY IS YOUR BUSINESS, CLUB OR ORGANIZATION HAVING AN EVENT? DO YOU HAVE A SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT? PLACE YOUR AD HERE AND GET IT NOTICED! $2,500 Healthier Future Essay Scholarship Learn more at: FastSlimBody.com/Scholarship 4-25-20-20 21 Entertainment Get the party started! Place your Entertainment classified today to get people up and about. Call 373-FIND. WALDO FARMERS & FLEA MARKET Vintage & Unique Like EBay in 3DSat & Sun www.WaldoFlea.com 12-5-111-21 Bring VR to your party!Rent Oculus Rift/PC & SteamVR games. Drop at your location Fri, pick up Mon, $250+dep. Call/txt (904) 701-8680. 5-3118-7-21 22 Tickets BUYING OR SELLING TICKETS? Place your ad here and get results!Visit: alligator.org/classifieds Trying to get to and from somewhere? Want to cut back on that gas bill? Place an ad in the classifieds to find trip arrangements or show off your bus and shuttle service. 373FIND 24 Pets Furry, feathery, scaly...no, not your roommate...pets. Find or advertise your pets or pet products here in the Pets section of the Alligator. Because Cats Don't Understand AbstinenceOPERATION CATNIPSpaying/Neutering Free-Roaming Cats Borrow a Trap / Make a Clinic Reservation Make a Donation / Volunteer New Expanded HoursLots of NEW info athttp://ocgainesville.org/ 25 Lost & Found Finders Keepers? If you find something, you can place a FREE FOUND AD in our lost & found section. Be kind to someone whos lost what youve found. Call 373-FIND. SAY:"I FOUND IT IN THE ALLIGATOR!" 1 Dull 6 Stronger than dirt cleanser 10 PCs brains 14 Backspace over 15 Try to throw, at a rodeo 16 Tall concert instrument 17 Solar power, e.g. 20 Animal that sounds dull 21 Those opposed 22 Simplifies 23 Charged particle 25 Gender problem 26 Soul mate 33 Humiliate 34 Grand-scale poetry 35 Its right on the map 38 Slo-mo reviewer 39 Inning with a stretch 42 Michael Collins actor Stephen 43 Any of three 10th-century Holy Roman Emperors 45 Jazzman Jackson 46 Caravan stops 48 Heavy military barrage 51 Exact revenge on 52 Big lug 53 Letters after thetas 56 Until next time, in texts 59 Slanted page? 63 Common transmission feature 66 Sportswear brand 67 Lawman played by Russell and Costner 68 Ill-fated Ford 69 Lady Gagas Cheek to Cheek duettist Bennett 70 Helpful hints 71 Virtual transaction 1 Chefs flavoring 2 Double Delight cookie 3 Tennis great Mandlikova 4 Password partners 5 Litter cry 6 SOS band 7 Month with fireworks 8 Blackjack components 9 Vintage Jag 10 Inexpensive brand 11 Golf targets 12 Try to convince 13 1974 Gould/Sutherland CIA spoof 18 Worst Cooks in America judge Burrell 19 Within walking distance 24 Mine extractions 25 Main idea 26 Syrup brand since 1902 27 Skeptical words 28 Tripartite commerce pact 29 Underworld boss? 30 Be in a bee 31 Florences __ Vecchio 32 Foot bones 36 Lifeline reader 37 Overpower with a shock 40 Give off 41 Boxer Oscar De La __ 44 Fine cotton fabric 47 Provides with, as an opportunity 49 Trial 50 Hot streak 53 __ aint broke ... 54 Minestrone pasta 55 Snagglepuss, e.g. 56 Bangkok native 57 Maryland athlete, for short 58 Slangy affirmatives 60 Tuscan tower site 61 First name in stunts 62 Proofreaders drop this 64 Just out of the pool 65 Dead end? rf ntb rfnrnttb bbrEdited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis 1 __ jacket: soldiers protection 5 Reeded woodwinds 10 Like some humor 13 NASA prefix 14 Grow fond of 16 Elisabeth who played Finlay on CSI 17 Video game preview 19 Window section 20 Naturally bright 21 College sr.s test 22 Elevator name 23 Exemplary 27 Commercial cow 30 Before, in verse 31 Many Louvre paintings 32 Columnist Maureen 33 End of most work wks. 34 Arresting image? 37 Boxing legend 38 Romantic jewelry item 40 A Wrinkle in Time director DuVernay 41 Sewer entrance 43 Past its prime 44 My turn! 45 Soccer score 46 Mineo of film 47 Muse of memory 48 Latin phrase about certain effects of alcohol 52 Johns, to Elton 53 Finish in front 54 Long look 58 Riga resident 59 Social sin ... and what 17-, 23-, 38and 48-Across are guilty of? 62 Significant others, in modern slang 63 __ Creed 64 Windy City daily, familiarly 65 Take a wrong turn, say 66 Spider-Man actor Willem 67 Racy Snapchat message 1 Passing fancies 2 Oniony soup ingredient 3 Military force 4 Powdered drink mix brand 5 Be a debtor of 6 Place for mixed drinks 7 Surgery ctrs. 8 Political refugee 9 Shop 10 Such sad news! 11 Written in mystical, ancient letters 12 Holy moly! 15 Candy box size 16 Thread holders 18 Vague sense 24 Liveliness 25 Of the Great Lakes, only Ontario is smaller than it 26 Diana of Game of Thrones 27 Mild cheese 28 Kinks title woman with a dark brown voice 29 Campaign ad target 33 Naturally evolving 34 Pops __ Vanilli 35 Fertility clinic egg 36 Sticky strip 38 Interlibrary __ 39 Strong sound from the savanna 42 Raises, as a sail 44 Newspaper extras 46 New York lake named for a Five Nations tribe 47 Yucatn native 48 Gee! 49 Musical shortcoming 50 Brightly colored 51 Snicker 55 Send packing 56 Computer operating system 57 Pride Month letters 60 NBA official 61 __ Balls: Hostess treats rfntbn rfnntb ttEdited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis REDUCE YOUR SHOWERTIME BY 2 MINUTESpreserve water TICK.TOCK. 16 Health Services 20 Events/Notices 23 Rides

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WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2018 ALLIGATOR 17 W E T A K E Y O U R W O R K O U T T O T H E N E X T L E V E L MEMBERSHIPS AS LOW AS $19.99A MON TH & $ 0 D OW N A TH LE TI C TR A IN IN G TR X S TR E N G TH TR A IN IN G P E R S O N A L TR A IN IN G TA N N IN G COME SEE ALL THAT WE OFFER!. 24 H o u r A ccess Bo x i n g Cardi o vascu l ar T rai n i n g P erso n al & G ro u p T rai n i n g Sau n a T u rf T rai n i n g .A th l eti c P erf o rm an ce T rai n i n g G ro u p Fi tn ess Cl asse s P ro Sh o p G ro u p ex erci se cl asse s 24 / 7 i n o u r N E W On D em an d stu di o !JOIN N OW A T BA IL EY S G Y M COM 3 4 4 1 W U n i versi ty A ve. G A IN E SV IL L E FL Co rn er o f U n i versi ty & 34 th 3 5 2 3 7 3 4 4 3 9 VISIT US TODAY! S e e C l ub f or d e t a i l s

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Coach Tim Walton and Florida's softball team are facing Florida State today at 6 p.m. at Katie Seashole Pressly Stadium. CALLAWAY FAILS DRUG TESTFormer UF wide receiver Antonio Callaway tested positive for marijuana at the NFL Combine, according to ESPN's Adam Schefter. Callaway was suspended last season for his alleged involvement in a credit card fraud scheme along with eight other teammates. The NFL Draft starts on Thursday and ends on Saturday. Follow us for updatesFor updates on UF athletics, follow us on Twitter at @alligatorSports or online at www.alligator.org/sportsWEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2018 www.alligator.org/sportsWho the hell are you? Do you know? out yet? I sure as hell The Alligator taught me Im not who I thought I was. And thats 100 percent OKYou're Dylan Me Smalls / Goodbye Column Dylan DixonTwitter: @dylanrdixonI Seek out your own Alligator experienceSweet and Bauer / Goodbye Column SEE DIXON, PAGE 20 SEE BAUER, PAGE 20 Ethan BauerTwitter: @ebaueri BASEBALLBy Morgan McMullenSports Writer mmcmullen@alligator.org. Broom handles Gators, cleans up early mess for MercerAlan Alvarez / Alligator Staff Mercer on Tuesday night in Gainesville.

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WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2018 ALLIGATOR 19 WOMENS GOLFBy Chris OBrienSports WriterCRACK! tee and traveled into the center of the fairway. Na-Yeon Choi stepped off the in 2012, she won the US Womens Open. Kevin Smeltz Chois coach at the time swears hell never forget what he saw next. He was coaching another player who was paired with Choi at the 2016 US Womens Open Sierra Choi was a seasoned veteran on Smeltz knew Sierra had potenagainst elite international competition. box, stalked the ball from behind and took a hack. Scorching down the center of the fairway, the shot landed near before halting 30 yards past Chois ball. Choi, the former No. 2 player in the world, gasped. Coach, how far can that girl hit it? she wondered. Smeltz replied, She can hit it pretty damn far. Florida, is one of the best players in college golf this year, as evidenced Award Watch List, which honors coached some great golfers, said Cheryl Anderson, Sierras former high school coach. North Florida and had one of the top-20 scoring averages in UNF mens golf history before playing professionally for three years and then starting a family with his wife, Lora. Championship, playing on Team TaylorMade Championship and rising as high as third in the Polo ings. To top it off, she was named 2015. Sierra began her college career where she has competed in seven 11th and only three times worse Anderson can still recall the moment she realized Sierra was a speyards away from the pin and elected to hit a 2-iron to try and carry it to the green. dont hit a driver off of anything bethe ball onto the green. girl do anything like it, Anderson and there, This this is the real deal. Sierra committed to play college golf at the University of Florida early on in her high school career. Like, really early. Like 14-year-oldthe time she was 16, she realized decommitted from UF to review her options. time, (Florida) wasnt the perfect school, childhood friend Dre look at Florida, she considered North Carolina, LSU and Wake Forest. After taking a trip to Wake Forest, she fell in love with everything the Demon Deacons had to offer. joyed the staff and said it was one of the main reasons she decided to promised that it isnt always like that. Two weeks after enrolling at Wake Forest, however, Sierra started having problems with her wrist. She felt clicking accompanied by worse. And worse. And worse. And worse. Whether she was told to or chose ask friends and family, they say she pain by Wake Forest coaches and doctors. She was having some pain and anybody. One of Sierras former teammates said Sierra made the decision to play. Shes so competitive she didnt take time off, said the former teammate, who asked to regirl who was completely healthy naments. People (within the team) become isolated. She began wondering if she made the right decision by attending Wake Forest. Moreover, one of her friends and teammates, Mathilda Cappiliez, left to go home and play golf go to Qback of Sierras mind and strokes of She elected to have a minor probit. lingered. while participating in college worktally and physically. er, Sierra said, and as a person, too. one thing she came to do: play golf. said. She loves golf. To be away from home mixed in with being drove her crazy. Her life kept its downward spiral And her faith in Wake Forest lina when he got the call. perdine University, he committed the year the Waves won the NCAA Then a catastrophic car accident left his right arm completely paralyzed and derailed his career. He life. golf. tem of assessment and exercise designed to restore and enhance the website. Sierra had been going to a docbegan to search for other doctors, At the same time, tension connot believe her story. The notion that she was forcing herself to play, began to spread. tween Sierra and the rest of the team appeared to be teetering on the edge of explosion. Read the rest of this story online at alligator.org/sports. @THEChrisOB cobrien@alligator.orgFULL CIRCLE: Sierra Brooks redemption tour hits FloridaChris OBrien / Alligator StaffSophomore Sierra Brooks transferred from Wake Forest to Florida after suffering a wrist injury that

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20 ALLIGATOR WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2018 4 pc Chicken Tenders Snack with Buttermilk Biscuit only $3.99Choose from Supremes or Homestyle TendersBreakfast Lunch Dinner Open Daily: 6 AM 10 PM www.bojangles.com 3120 SW Archer Road (352) 745-7221 AUTO COLLISION EXPERTS 352.371.0215 33 SE 13th Road gt-motorcars.net free BUY ONE BURGER 1402 W.UNIVERSITY AVEOpen until 3am ON FRI & SAT. NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER COUPON OR OFFER. LIMITED TIME ONLY. FREE PREMIUM S I NG LE B UR G ER WITH E V ERY B UR G ER PURCHA S ENEED A STUDY BREAK? GET ONE 40 percent of food in the U.S. is wasted 40 percent of food in the U.S. is wasted REDUCE F D WASTE 8.5-by-14-inch yellow notepad. I could recite entire rosters on demand, whether it was all 15 men on the Utah Jazz or all 53 on the Detroit Lions. I was a walking encyclopedia of sports knowledge, and by the time I reached middle school the only career I had any interest in was one covering athletics. Id tell friends, family, teachers and anyone else who would listen that I was one day going to work for ESPN. Id tell them I had calling. Everyone who knew me in my teenage years knew me as the kid who was going to be a sports writer. And once I received my acceptance letter from the University of Florida, everything appeared to be falling into place. I chose journalhalf of college experiencing different opportunities with the schools radio station. Then after applying for a sports writing position during the middle of my sophomore year I was hired by the Alligator as its mens tennis beat writer. Its one of the greatest things that has ever happened to me, but not for the reason I ever expected. My passion for sports has always been an 11/10, but my passion for writing is probably a 5/10 at best. I didnt think that would matter beating three-pointers and walk-off home runs was all I needed to truly enjoy the job. But in order to thrive in this industry, it doesnt matter how much you love sports. You really, really, really have to love writing like REALLY love writing too. And I never would have found that out in college if I hadnt worked at the Alligator. I covered mens tennis, soccer, womens basketball, baseball and football in my two and a half years with this paper. Attending games was a blast. Talking to athletes was cool as hell. But I never experienced that same feeling of happiness when I sat down to write stories. It simply wasnt my calling. After assessing my options over the past couple semesters, I decided in January I wont be pursuing a career in journalism after graduation. And thats perfectly OK. I couldnt be more did things Ill remember for the rest of my life. Whether it was writing 2,500-word feature stories on deadline, going on 19-hour road trips for football games or receiving the amazing honor of getting to serve as this papers sports editor over the past four months, Ill look back on every second of my time at the Alligator with a fondness I couldnt have acquired anywhere else. And even though the outlook of my future has gone from being crystal clear to murky and uncertain, thats what life is all about. The Alligator taught me Im not who I thought I was, and I couldnt be more grateful to the paper for that reason. Dylan Dixon was a writer and former sports editor for the Alligator. Follow him on Twitter @dylanrdixon.DIXON, from pg. 18 It was one of the worst days of my life. It was one of the best days of my life. Because of that editing, which took place past midnight in an old frat house-turned-newspaper-building full of asbestos and mice running up and down wires into random holes in the wall, I discovered a real passion for humaninterest storytelling. It sounds so cliche to say that, but its honing something because it moved me in a way that nothing else had, in a way that gave me the opportunity to impact other people with my work. depth pieces that explored uniting human principles of dreams, determination and fragility. Whether I succeeded or failed at addressing those themes is up for debate, but regardless, working at the Alligator is what made me passionate about addressing those themes in the Plus I was working with people who, even if their passions werent the same as mine, were passionate about something. Sports. Rights. Equality. Justice. Just about every co-worker in my 3.5 years at the paper has had their own passion and a willingness to explore it with reading this to seek that out in their own lives doing so has brought me more happiness started college. French philosopher Simone De Beauvoir wrote, Making money does not seem to me a very never make much money as a reporter, and most of my colleagues at the Alligator would probably agree. But as De Beauvoir alludes to, I dont give a f---. And that was not an easy summit to reach. for what, exactly? I suppose to make money and live comfortably. The Alligator helped me thing greater than money and ambition alone, and then it reinforced that passion with six enthusiastic friends having dinner at Calhouns On The River in Knoxville, Tennessee, prior to the Gators playing UT, or with the whole newsroom popping champagne at the end of another long semester, or with the nightly food runs to Leonardos and Five Guys and Kabab House that caused me to gain 20 pounds (no exaggeration) since freshman year, or with the friends and challenges that will inspire me for a lifetime. Nothing not a falling out, any argument My Alligator a will remind me of that forever, because as setbacks and misfortune and heartache inevitably reveal themselves in my career and in my life, it sure isnt something I want to forget. Ethan Bauer was a writer and former sports editor for the Alligator. Follow him on Twitter @ebaueri.BAUER, from pg. 18 DYLAN DIXON ALLIGATOR RESUMESPRING 2016: MEN'S TENNIS BEAT WRITER FALL 2016: SOCCER BEAT WRITER SPRING 2017: WOMEN'S BASKETBALL BEAT WRITER/ FOOTBALL BEAT WRITER SUMMER 2017: BASEBALL BEAT WRITER/SPORTS EDITOR FALL 2017: FOOTBALL BEAT WRITER/ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR SPRING 2018: SPORTS EDITOR STORIES PUBLISHED: 202ETHAN BAUER ALLIGATOR RESUMESPRING 2015: COPY EDITOR FALL 2015: CROSS COUNTRY BEAT WRITER/WOMENS BASKETBALL BEAT WRITER SPRING 2016: WOMENS BASKETBALL BEAT WRITER/FOOTBALL BEAT WRITER/ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR SUMMER 2016: BASEBALL BEAT WRITER/ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR FALL 2016: FOOTBALL BEAT WRITER/ ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR SPRING 2017: BASEBALL BEAT WRITER/ FOOTBALL BEAT WRITER/SPORTS EDITOR FALL 2017: FOOTBALL BEAT WRITER SPRING 2018: BASEBALL BEAT WRITER STORIES PUBLISHED: 293

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22 ALLIGATOR WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 2018 Editors note: Below is a compilation of testimonials submitted by current and former student journalists. Over the past 20 days, we have collected their stories as a way to show how the students working in newsrooms today become the professional journalists of tomorrow. #SAVESTUDENTNEWSROOMSName: Ariana Figueroa College newspaper: The Independent Florida Alligator Where I am now: News Assistant at CNN I would not be the journalist I am today without my student newspaper. And thats not because The Alligator gave me an environment that allowed me to learn how to write, edit and make mistakes. All of those skills are valuable, but the reason I am still in journalism is because of those lifelong friends I made at the paper. Those friends were the ones that calmed my doubts about whether or not Id make needed it most. I would have quit a long time ago if it werent for that support group I found at my student paper. The Alligator gave me the ability to be a leader and grow into the woman I am today, and it gave me a sisterhood I never imagined having. Student papers matter and the experience and friendships made there are priceless. If student papers dont get the support they need and deserve, its going to put limits on what the next generation of journalists can accomplish. Name: Rocio Hernandez College Newspaper: The Nevada Sagebrush (Reno, Nevada) Where I am now: News Associate at The Associated Press Working at the University of Nevada, Renos Nevada Sagebrush was one of the best decisions I made as a student because sitting in your college classrooms can only teach you so much. The student newsroom gave me the opportunity to learn by trial and error. The stakes were higher because it went beyond my professors eyes and a letter grade, and goes out to all the students. I started off as a volunteer, then moved on to assistant news editor and then news editor. I learned the hard work and responsibility that goes into publishing a paper weekly and how to be a leader in the newsroom. But because I was paying for my education on my own without help from my parents, I couldnt stay on staff beyond two years. We just werent getting paid enough for it to continue being worth it for me. But because of the experience I got, I went on to get internships at professional newsrooms. I dont think I would be where I am today without the Sagebrush. Name: Ben Brasch College Newspaper: The Independent Florida Alligator Where I Am Now: The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Hyperlocal Reporter I wouldnt be where I am today with the annoying rat in my apartment wall if not for my student newsroom experience. The people I worked with are so good I shudder to think of us back in the same newsroom. We were all at our worst together in college, but we were getting better, and that meant something. It meant long hours for little pay and the love of the game. It prepared me for damn near every experience so far in my life. When a nocturnal beast fell from the ceiling of the decrepit former fraternity house and into the pit of people designing the newspaper, they ran over to the bar to tell us. The creature was run off and never seen again. Journalism doesnt just happen. We kept our fellow students in mind as we reported on corruption and the days news. We were the only watchdogs of 50,000 other young adults. Few fall into journalism with grace. It takes time (read: money) and patience to get just serviceable.

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SAVE STUDENT NEWSROOMS M ore than 100 student newsrooms across the country are calling to #SaveStudentNewsrooms. Heres what theyre asking. Read their stories.

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E some news. If there is anything The Alligator has prioritized, it has been making sure you know the news you need to know about to make informed decisions. But in this special edition of The Alligator, we wanted to raise a concern about not just the ing student-run publications across the country. As part of the #SaveStudentNewsrooms initiative, we wanted you to hear from the other student-run publications participating today. Below are editorials written by other publications in support of the initiative. As editor-in-chief of The Alligator, I have making a paper we are proud to put out. But I have also seen the damages of low pay, long hours and a demanding profession. Over the last few years, in the face of have had their independence jeopardized. Others have been forced to fold. Across the U.S., student-run newsrooms just like professional newsrooms are struggling to survive. They are hemorrhaging. This is why we started #SaveStudentNewsrooms. We write these articles, attend meetings and hound sources, while juggling classes, exams and, for many of us, part-time jobs. We do it because were passionate and care about our communities. But as student-run publications transition during a digital era, we need the communitys support as well. Freedom of the press is freedom of the people.The Free Press (Boston, MA) Student journalists are the future news reporters of the country. Theres no better platform to learn about this career than to join a student-run publication. News is something that will always remain, whether it be in print or online, and its the current students who will be the ones to provide you the news. College newspapers are also unique in the fact that we have access and insight to a university that no other publication has. Since college newspapers have a focus on their university and the surrounding community, we get the chance to provide a more in-depth coverage about our institution. Local publications may cover college activities, but it is the college newspaper that is the expert on the Student Body. Whats also unique here is that we are all students ourselves, and what better way to represent a university than to have these articles written by the students themselves? Journalists are facing a tough environment in this day and age with the frequent mention of fake news. We handle an extremely challenging job. A student newspaper is the perfect starting point for those with an interest better preparing them for a future career. With this being said, college newspapers are facing tough times ahead. Read the rest of the editorial at usmfreepress.org.College Heights Herald (Bowling Green, KY) The Herald is just over one year removed from being sued by Western Kentucky University after Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear ruled the university had to turn over records of faculty sexual misconduct to the Herald, citing that WKU has an ongoing responsibility to release Title IX records related to sexual harassment by university employees. Can you imagine what coverage of the lawsuit would be like if the Herald did not have editorial independence and published? Anything that might make the university look bad to the public could be taken out, even on controversial issues like sexual harassment that hold consequences for student safety. This is why independent student publications are so important. They carry a responsibility to report accurately and fairly on issues that affect the public, even if it depicts the university in a negative light. While the Herald continues to uphold this responsibility, it does not take away from the fact that student publications across the country are facing serious challenges that are putting our editorial independence at risk. Read the rest of the editorial at wkuherald.com. The Independent Collegiate (Toledo, OH) In 2000, University of Toledo threatened our journalistic freedom to report stories, prompting us to become independent. Eighteen years later, our presence to remain in print is being threatened. To put it simply, the Independent Collegian is dying. Despite the tireless efforts of our students and staff, we are not making enough money from ad revenue to survive. This is the last thing we want to happen, yet its the only thing that will happen if we dont receive any support. We care about our newspaper, but more than that, we care about truth-seeking journalism, a priority in todays era of fake news. Our staff commits to the IC week after week without any mester for nothing more, but their passion for journalism Weve put plenty of thought into this. Trust us, we dont after our 100th year. This is us, as journalists, being very transparent with our readers. This is us asking you to support our journalistic freedom on reporting. This is us asking for your help. Read the rest of the editorial at independentcollegian.com.The Daily Campus (Dallas, TX) As previously announced, the Student Media Company will be dissolving in May after nearly a century, forever altering the landscape of the free press on Southern Methodist Universitys campus. This outcome was, frankly, inevitable, but not because of the actions of the students involved with the media outlets run by the Student Media Company. Students have reported from every corner of Dallas-Fort Worth, created layouts and done what was asked of them for the newspaper, the yearbook and online stories, but the When the former executive director left abruptly in December, our interim director stepped in with a plan to save Student Media Company and the entire concept of an oncampus free press. Many of us expressed our concerns with Student Media This last hope was dashed as the companys board wasnt interested in the slightest. Instead, students received a slightly more formal and bureaucratic version of Nope, its too late. Sorry. No editors in Student Media Company had a vote on the board. Their concerns were expressed and ultimately disregarded. So, now what? The Daily Campus, in all its iterations, has been able to remain an independent news source since 1930. Removing that independence completely disrupts the mission and purpose of a student newspaper both in serving our campus and the greater Dallas community. Read the rest of the editorial at smudailycampus.com. The Tiger (Clemson, SC) Imagine, just for a moment, what life would be like if The Tiger no longer existed. Who would you turn to for informasity of Colorado Student Government when it does something shady? What would you use for last minute wrapping paper when there are no newspapers to be found? Unfortunately, that future isnt far off. We stopped paying our staff in Fall 2014. Today, all of our student journalists do their work for free. The Tiger, like many student-run newsrooms across the about it until now. Needless to say, were not going to go down without a someone criticizes our work. Despite all of the blood, sweat and tears that comes with working here, we will go to the ends of the earth to keep this newsroom operating. Thats why were joining the #SaveStudentNewsrooms movement, and were asking everyone reading this to join in on it, too. We cant save The Tiger, and other student media outlets, without your help. Read the rest of the editorial at thetigernews.com. The Nevada Sagebrush (Reno, NV) publication crisis the entire country is suffering from and has The professional publications that are making it work require a paid subscription or have a high number of donations. Student newsrooms cant ask for their audience students to make donations or pay a subscription. So this leaves student newsrooms to rely on other sources of revenue that all come with a catch-22. newspaper. This is a reality of the majority of student newspapers across the country. This is problematic for a number of reasons. When a university controls the money, they can also control the content published or rather, not published in student newspapers. Last semester, this university faced public relations crises involving racism and diversity issues from students and university departments. The most notorious was when a student was white supremacy march in Charlottesville, South Carolina in of this. However, there was far less coverage about the reaction the university had to this situation and the magnitude of the issues that followed. But The Nevada Sagebrush was there. We have been there writing about student town halls, asking the university administration tough questions and making sure attention on this issue is not going away. Were not saying our coverage was perfect, but it was necessary. If we were funded by the university, who knows if we wouldve been able to write these things and ask these questions. If we were funded by the university, they could cut our budget if they did not like what we were writing. Read the rest of the editorial at nevadasagebrush.com. #SAVESTUDENTNEWSROOMS Editors note: Below is a compilation of testimonials submitted by current and former student journalists. Over the past 20 days, we have collected their stories as a way to show how the students working in newsrooms today become the professional journalists of tomorrow. Name: Isabel Bonnet College newspaper: The Independent Florida Alligator Where I am now: Founder of The Amsterdammer I arrived at The Alligator with nothing but experience in citizen journalism, and I left with an internship at Le Monde. Exactly one year later, I created a student-run newspaper myself in Amsterdam, The Amsterdammer, which uses The Alligator as its model. Every university should have a student newspaper, and if they dont: Do it yourself. Student journalism teaches you what school cant and introduces you to the practical journalism right away. I would have never had the idea or been able to create a student newspaper myself. I will be forever grateful to The Alligator for giving me a place to learn without letting language be a barrier. Name: Joey Cranney College newspaper: The Temple News (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) Where I am now: Government reporter at The Post and Courier Its time for the public to stop underestimating student newsrooms. Rather, they should be embraced for their opportunity to expose wrongdoing in overlooked communities. I worked for The Temple News at Temple University, starting as a freshman sports reporter in 2010 and graduating in 2014 as the papers editor-in-chief. The Temple News is not just a student newspaper its a century-old institumost populated city. If your alma mater has a student newspaper thats in danger of folding, you shouldnt consider the issue as a should consider it a loss for you and your community. Name: Ken Schwencke College newspaper: The Independent Florida Alligator Where I am now: News Apps Developer at ProPublica When former a former managing editor at my student newspaper, The Alligator, noticed a map Id published and asked me to work with her, it was the start of my career. As anyone reading this knows, the experience at a student newsroom is incomparable: working on deadline, to decide whats news and to go after stories you think matter. Its a freedom you might not get for a decade into your actual career and a crucial time to try new things and make mistakes. So for all that, Im thankful. It taught me more than class ever could, and without it Id be something awful, like a lawyer. Name: Alexandra Gomes College Newspaper: The Gatepost (Framingham, Massachusetts) Where I am now: Reporter at The Sun Chronicle My journalism career started at a small, weekly student-run newspaper called The Gatepost, which serves the Framingham State University community in Massachusetts. Fellow student journalists taught me how to interview, transcribe, write, deal with police (on and off campus), shoot photos and videos, design a front page,and so much more. The kind of work we did there was relevant and important and oftentimes led to positive changes in the university and administration. It was work that we could pendent. Without independent student newspapers, colleges and their overlords are accountable to no one. Name: Mia Gettenberg College Newspaper: The Independent Florida Alligator Where I am now: Harvard Law School passion and dedication of local journalists. We need students to continue pursuing their dreams in journalism, a profession increasingly coming under scrutiny in this political age, the world around us and know where to devote our attention and resources. I always loved the news, though I never wanted to enter journalism myself. From the start, I knew I wanted to one day attend law school and pursue my interests in educational, environmental and civil-rights issues within the legal realm. However, my experiences at The Alligator and the friends I made along the way helped shape me into the person I am today academically, professionally and personally. Name: Rick Hirsch College newspaper: The Independent Florida Alligator Where I am now: The Managing Editor at the Miami Herald I worked at The Independent Florida Alligator while studying journalism at the University of Florida. In the summer of 1979, serial killer Ted Bundy went on trial in Miami for the murder of two female students at Florida State University. On a whim, I drove home to Miami to we published live with his guilty verdict. That story won for general news writing. Only at The Alligator could I have the opportunity to be so ridiculously ambitious. We reached high, worked hard and learned daily journalism from my student peers many of whom became friends for life.