Citation
The Independent Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Independent Florida alligator
Portion of title:
Florida allgator
Portion of title:
Alligator
Alternate Title:
University digest
Alternate Title:
University of Florida digest
Place of Publication:
Gainesville, FL
Publisher:
Campus Communications, Inc.
Creation Date:
January 4, 2005
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2005
Frequency:
Daily (except Saturdays, Sundays, holidays and exam periods, Aug.-Apr.); semiweekly (May-July)
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. (some col.) ; 36 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
Online databases.
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Online databases ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.651781 x -82.336258

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form:
Also available online.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 65, no. 75 (Feb. 1, 1973)-
General Note:
"Not officially associated with the University of Florida."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000470760 ( ALEPH )
13827512 ( OCLC )
ACN5549 ( NOTIS )
sn 86010448 ( LCCN )
0889-2423 ( ISSN )

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Florida alligator

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VOLUME 112 ISSUE 57Published by Campus Communications, Inc. of Gainesville, Florida CELEBRATE MARDI GRAS atWITH BEAT THE CLOCK!Starting at 7 pm$1 Abita Purple Haze pints $1 Hurricanes on tap $1 Hand Grenades Shotsprices goes up $1 every hourDJ starts at 7 pm No cover for the 1st 200 guests (21 & up) 1728 West University AvenueTHIS TUESDAY By Christina MoralesAlligator Staff WriterChallenge Party presidential candidate Janae Moodie falsely denied serving on a 2016 Senate committee focused on online voting during a debate Sunday. presidential debate hosted by the Black Student Union, Inspire Party presidential candidate Revel Lubin said Moodie and Impact Party presidential candiVoting Ad-Hoc Committee in 2016. The committee was responsible for drafting codes for online voting. Moodie denied this in the heat of the moment, but later said she forgot she had a role. Moodie said when she was with Impact Party, she supported online voting but was pressured to behave in a way the party wanted. I do remember being committed to online voting in the past, she admitted after the debate in an interview. It was a lapse in memory of the heat of the moment. the debate after Lubins comment, he also served as a member of the committee. In an interview after the event, he said he shook his head in disagreement with Moodie stating she was not on the committee herself. Ive never denied being on that denied that and Im not denying it now. dozen issues debated at the historiBallroom, which about 250 students history there are three black students running for Student Body president. At the debate, candidates introduced their partys platforms. After introductions, BSU president Dwayne tions on topics like retention of black line voting, Richard Spencer and the Student Body presidents role on the students to have a safe space to voice Student Body presidential candidates partake in debateCourtesy to The AlligatorChristian Aguilar, Carlos Aguilar, Alex Aguilar and Claudia Aguilar pose for a photo on Alexs 15th birthday. Christina Morales / Alligator StaffStudent Body President candidates Ian Green, Janae Moodie and Revel Lubin answer audience questions at the Black Student Union debate Sunday in the Reitz Union Ballroom. A candidate falsely denied serving on a committeeBy Jessica GilesAlligator Staff WriterAAlex Aguilar still remembers how his older brother Christians home for the next four years. It was like a kid in a candy shop, Alex said. He was completely entranced with this place. Despite their two-and-a-half year age gap, they started planof friends, hobbies, long car rides. The college experience, together. semester of his freshman year on Sept. 20, 2012, according to Alligator archives. The 18-year-old dents disappearance launched a nearly monthlong search, which ended when hunters in Levy County discovered Christians remains, according to Alligator archives. Almost two years after Christians disappearance, his friend, Pedro Bravo, was found guilty Christian and sentenced to life in prison, according to Alligator archives. The state believed the murder was driven by Bravos jealousy of Christian, who had begun dating Bravos ex-girlfriend. Alex said after a week of tian alive had faded, but it didnt make the news that his brothers remains had been discovered any less devastating. It was very emotional, Alex said. Six years after his brothers himself reaching a milestone in May he had always pictured mencement. tian as a template to follow, he said. Watching his older brother SEE DEBATE, PAGE 4 SEE STUDENT, PAGE 4

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Subscription Rate: Full Year (All Semesters) $100The Alligator. The Alligator The Independent Florida Alligator The Alligator The Alligator The Alligator ISSN 0889-2423 alligators alligator.org/calendarLocal Events / News in Brief Todays WeatherAM NOON PM 2 ALLIGATOR MONDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2018 or email WHATS HAPPENING?Speed dating The Florida Council for Incarcerated Women and Girls in partnership with the River Phoenix Center for Peacebuilding and the Alachua County Reentry Coalition will host a speed dating event at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Leonardos 706. There is no cost to stop by, but to participate its $10 at the door or $5 during presale. For more information, call or text 352-246-4123. Free lunch, talk about God Ravi Zacharias International Ministries is visiting UF today until Feb. 16. Theyll host free lunches at the Reitz Union at 11:45 a.m. and 12:45 p.m., engaging students in topics regarding spirituality and God. Talks, given by RZIM team members, address questions such as Is God sexist? and Who is Jesus? For more information, visit facebook.com/.HungryUF/. Got something going on? Want to see it in this space? Send an email with Whats Happening in the subject line to jtavel@alligator.org. To request publication in the next days newspaper, please submit the event before 5 p.m. Please model your submissions after the above events, and keep them to 150 words or fewer. VOLUME 112 ISSUE 57NEWSROOM Editor Managing Editor, Online Managing Editor, Print Beats Editor Freelance Editor Investigations Editor Opinions Editor Sports Editor Assistant Sports Editor alligatorSports.org Editor Editorial Board Photo Editor the Avenue Editor Copy Desk Chiefs Copy Editors DISPLAY ADVERTISING Advertising Director Intern Coordinator Sales Representatives CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING BUSINESS Administrative Assistant Comptroller Bookkeeper ADMINISTRATION General Manager Assistant General Manager Administrative Assistant President Emeritus SYSTEMS IT System EngineerPRODUCTION Production Manager Assistant Production Manager Advertising Production Staff Editorial Production Staff The Board of Directors of Campus Communications, Inc., publisher ofEditora paid position as head of the Editorial Division and as an unpaid member of the Board of DirectorsManaging Editor/Print and Managing Editor/Onlinepaid positions and unpaid members of the Board of Directors. each weekday between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. from now until Friday, March 2. Look for the Alligator sign located in the lobby. Further written information is available at the 15 minutes at that time to read information regarding the application process. The application must be returned to The Alligator by Tuesday, March 13 at 4 p.m. THIS IS AN ABSOLUTE DEADLINE. Interviews and selections by the Board of Directors will be held at Friday April 6 at 9 a.m. Applicants must be present at that meeting to be considered. Applicants must be degree-seeking college or university students. Preference will be given to those who have experience with The Independent Florida Alligator. Campus Communications, Inc. is an Equal Opportunity Employer andannounces the opening of the following positions for the summer semester:

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MONDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2018 ALLIGATOR 3 HE WAS ARRESTED ON A FELONY CHARGE. By Robert LewisAlligator Staff WriterA man ended an argument in downtown Gainesville by showing a fake badge and saying he was an undercover deputy Friday night, Gainesville Police said. Michael Allen Underwood, 45, was arguing with a man about his panhandling on the corner of Southeast Second Avenue and Southeast First Street when he showed the man a badge and said he was an Alachua County Sherto an arrest report. When the man questioned Underwood, he threatened to have him arrested. Underwood raised his hand, like he would punch the other man, police said. asked Underwood for the badge them a black bi-fold wallet with two badges inside, according to the report. One star-shaped badge read Sheriffs Jr. Deputy League Hillsborough County, and the other shield-shaped badge said City Police. Underwood told police he showed the other man a badge, told him he was a detective and he could have him arrested and then raised his hand back but stopped, according to the report. He denied being a real poUnderwood was arrested on a felony charge of impersonatand was taken to the Alachua County Jail where he remains, as of press time, in lieu of a $5,000 bond. @Lewis__Robert rlewis@alligator.orgGPD: Gainesville man shows fake badge, impersonates policeUnderwood The Board of Directors of Campus Communications, Inc., publisher ofStudent Member at LargeCampus Communications, Inc. is an Equal Opportunity Employer andannounces the opening of the following positions for the summer semester: each weekday between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. from now until Friday, March 2. Look for the Alligator sign located in the lobby. Further written information is available at the 15 minutes at that time to read information regarding the application process. The application must be returned to The Alligator by Tuesday, March 13 at 4 p.m. THIS IS AN ABSOLUTE DEADLINE. Interviews and selections by the Board of Directors will be held at Friday April 6 at 9 a.m. Applicants must be present at that meeting to be considered. Applicants must be degree-seeking college or university students. Preference will be given to those who have experience with The Independent Florida Alligator.By Davio RodriguezAlligator Contributing WriterBrent Smith imagined Wyatts Coffee as a place for coffee experts and amateurs to feel welcomed. Picture Central Perk from Friends, Smith said. The cafe was once located in Midtown, but due to parking limitations, they decided to relocate downtown, Smith, the retail operations director for Hyppo LLC, which owns Wyatts, wrote in an email. After 16 weeks of construction, it held its soft opening Friday at 202 SE Second Ave. Wyatts will continue training its staff in preparation for its grand opening scheduled Feb. 23, Smith said. While most of the grand opening details are still to be announced, free coffee will be given to those who follow or like the cafe on social media. The cafe will also introduce a new line of espresso drinks and plans to serve alcoholic drinks in the future, Smith said. Smith said Wyatts will serve its regular drip-brew coffee, tea and their Japanese-method cold-brew coffee, which is coffee brewed with hot water then immediately chilled in an ice-bath via copper tubing. Sarah Yoder went to Wyatts for the second time Sunday and sipped on a cold-brew coffee. The 21-year-old UF nursing senior said she works at Pascals Coffeehouse, but the two cafes have different be sweeter and lighter, she said. The coffee here is a lot bolder, she said. Its for a deeper palette. Davio Rodriguez / AlligatorEmily Hart, a 20-year-old UF psychology student, scoops fresh coffee grounds from a bag on Sunday afternoon at Wyatts Coffees new downtown location at 202 SE Second Ave. Heres what it

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By Elliott NasbyAlligator Staff WriterThe Student Government Supreme Court ruled unanimously that a student code that allows students to pass legislation through initiatives is unconstitutional. In a hearing Thursday night, 19-year-old UF political science sophomore Zachary Amdiscuss an initiative he hoped would be on the ballot in the next election cycle, which is scheduled for Feb. 20 and 21. Amrose intended to reduce the required amount of signatures required in petitions requesting to place an initiative on the ballot from 1,200 to 500. Signatures from two percent of the Student Body population are needed to put an initiative that would amend student code. It wouldve allowed students to be involved with their own Student Government in an easier way, he said. Justice Chris Boyett said Amrose was attempting to change student law by bypassing the student senate. Boyett said students hold the fundamental right to seek policy changes. However, they must do it through amendments to the constitution only, and not through petitioned initiatives. It seems like this act is basically trying to hijack the legislative authority of the senate, Boyett said. The other justices said students may petition for initiatives to be on ballots in elections, but petitions cant themselves call for changes to law. Justices have yet to release the written opinion of the court. Theres just a lot of ambiguity as to what the word initiative means in the constitution, Justice Carter Wallace said. Amrose said he thinks students have a fundamental right, listed in the constitution, to seek law changes through initiatives. Amrose cited policy codes within the Student Government Initiative and Referendum Act about how students may generate initiatives, which appear as yes or no questions on ballots during elections. The initiative can then become law after receiving a majority of the student vote. He said this decision could impact other student-led initiatives, such as online voting. This is an outrage, it is a power grab, he said. This should be protested, and this is not the end. @_ElohEl enasby@alligator.orgUF Supreme Court vetoes initiative, declares it unconstitutional independent became a roadmap for how Alex wanted to live his life. Its kind of a mix of I want to do this for myself, but in a way, Im always motihe started, he said. Although Christian fell in love with UF the minute he set foot on campus, Alex didnt always have his heart set on attending the university. He thinks the academics and overall appeal of the UF atmosphere prompted him to choose it in the end, but he knows part of it was the desire to carry on Christians legacy. ing that he was the reason I came here, he said. Despite different personalities, the brothers were bonded together by their education, said their father Carlos Aguilar. They both enrolled in challenging courses at Doral Academy Preparatory School to boost their GPA and excelled in their classes. Alexander was always competing, in a nice way, with Christian, he said. Their friendly competition and Christians position as a role model often pushed Alex to succeed, Carlos said. Christian was his model, he said. Christian was the person that he wanted to gain his respect and his admiration. Alyssa DBazo, 23, remembers the way Alex would stick around Christian in high school. DBazo, now a second-year student at the University of Miami School of Law, met Christian during their freshman year of high school. She remembers him as an introverted, funny and empathetic friend. He would do anything for the people he cared about, DBazo said, including stayhours at a time, she said. I admired that about him, she said. I always told him I was very impressed with how much he put up with me. Over the past few years, DBazo has seen some of Christians characteristics in Alex, like his sense of humor. She said Alex is one of the funniest people shes ever met. You see these little glimpses, and its been really comforting, she said. After using his brother as a guide for so many years, Alex said adjusting to life a while without the footsteps of his older brother to follow. He said he relies on If there was, like, anything that I learned from him, its that if you stay focused and just work hard on something its going to be pretty possible to achieve, he said. Enduring the tragedy of his brothers death gave Alex a maturity that most of his peers dont have, Carlos said. While hes happy to see his son maturing, he sometimes wishes the circumstances were different. Hes very mature, grown-up, he knows what he wants, Carlos said. Sometimes its good, but sometimes its sad for us that he didnt enjoy a few things that he normally would do with his brother. From football games to animal research opportunities, throughout his four years at UF, Alex wonders what his brother would do and has tried to experience everything his college has to offer. (Christian) just wanted to see different things and experience different things on took to heart, he said. Alex never let an experience slip into animal research. When one opportunity ended, he simply began his search for another, Borrell said. He always put himself out there, he said. Hes really hard working. Alex is looking ahead to the next chapter of his life after graduation. He wants to pursue a career in veterinary medicine and recently found out he has been accepted to veterinary school in London, England. Carlos said he couldnt be more proud of both Alex and Christian. He never doubted for a moment his sons would be successful and caring people. Alexs upcoming graduation from UF not only honors his brothers memory but also makes a meaningful name for himself, Carlos said. God gave me two precious gifts, he said. We still miss Christian, but we know that Alexander is another precious gift that is just becoming more precious every time that he grows. @jessica_giles_ jgiles@alligator.orgtheir concerns. I think the biggest thing we differed on was being able to make tangible change and not just talk about the what if, he said. We all agree there needs to be a change, but I displayed how its going to be done. During the debate, Moodie said the best way to help with retention rates among black students is outreach. She said UFs black population, currently at 6 percent, has been dwindling. We have to be strategic in the way that were reaching different corners of campus, Moodie said. Although we want the content to be rich, we actually need to be intentional. Green said its not just about outreach, its about education. Every student knows that Student Government elections are coming up, but its about educating them on the issues, Green said. Lubin said hed like to focus on UF programs like the College Reach Out Program, which helps students from low-income areas in east Gainesville. My big idea is bridging those gaps rather than separating us, although we have similar ideas and things we want to implement, he said. We need to raise awareness for these programs that already exist. Nyasha Joseph, a UF anthropology senior, took notes in a blue binder on the biggest points of the debate to bring back to her friends. Joseph said she was focused on what candidate offered the most comprehensive platform. She was impressed with Moodies performance, she said. I think the things Ill kind of harp on would be who did I see passion within and at which points, who came up with the most tangible plan and who came in with original ideas that were important to the students, the 21-year-old said. @Christina_M18 cmorales@alligator.orgThey discussed outreach He will graduate six years after his brother diedDEBATE, from pg 1STUDENT, from pg. 1Here are some statements The Alligator staff fact-checked during the debate. For the full list, visit alligator.org. Candidate Janae Moodie said: I did not sit on that committee.This is false. Janae admitted after the debate she did, in fact, sit on the committee in Spring 2016. She attributed the false claim to a lapse in memory. Candidate Ian Green said: Its been a while since the chair of Florida Student Association was from UF. Candidate Revel Lubin said: women on college campuses are sexually assaulted. This is partially true. The Alligator found three different sources that state one in

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MONDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2018 ALLIGATOR 5 By Rachel PorterAlligator Contributing WriterUF houses a $9 million supercomputer that has attracted researchers to UF and helped make it a top-10 university. The computer, called HiPerGator, was created in 2013, said Erik Deumens, the director of UF Research Computing. It is the third-fastest U.S. university supercomputer. The computer processes information using approximately 50,000 cores, which is the unit used to measure the amount of processes able to be done on a computer, Deumens said. Most cell phones and laptops have about four to eight cores. The name HiPerGator stands for HighPerformance Gator and costs about $2.5 million to run annually, including staff and operational costs, Deumens said. It is funded by UFs annual research computing budget. The HiPerGator is located at the UF Data Center off Waldo Road but is remotely used by faculty, Deumens said. Researchers can log in and access data from anywhere in the world using their laptops, similar to cloud services. The computer can be used by about 500 researchers at any given time, Deumens said. The computer helped UF earn a top-10 spot because of the increased faculty-tostudent ratio, Deumens said. Political scientists have used the computer to predict voting behavior using data from polls to determine which candidate is likely to win, Deumens said. It is an asset that really helps faculty, valuable to have it. Stephen Coombes, a UF applied physiology and kinesiology assistant professor, uses the HiPerGator to complete research to map pathways in the brain using brain imaging collected from humans. Without the HiPerGator, the research wouldve taken years to process, Coombes said. UF is home to the countrys third-fastest university supercomputer, worth millionsCourtesy to The AlligatorUFs HiPerGator, a $9 million supercomputer, was created in 2013. It is the thirdfastest U.S. university supercomputer and costs $2.5 million to run annually. By Robert LewisAlligator Staff WriterA former Gainesville Regional Airport employee was charged with stealing nearly $49,000 from the airport between April 2016 and March 2017, Gainesville Police said. Paul Adjan, 65, worked as the airports facilities manager during this time and stole $48,702 from the parking lot payment machines he was responsible for emptying, according to an arrest report. He was one of two people who had access to all three keys required to take cash from the machines. Starting April 2016, Adjan collected money Fridays and Mondays, police said. While he did place Mondays money was not accounted for. Parking machines create a time stamps each time cash is pulled. Based on the security badge swipe-in logs, Adjan was the only employee at the airport each time even on a vacation day, according to the report. Adjan told police he did not steal the money, according to the report. He could not be reached for comment. He was charged Feb. 5 with grand theft, money laundering and aggravated whitecollar crime, according to court records. He was arrested Friday and taken to the Alachua County Jail, where he was later released on his own recognizance. @Lewis__Robert rlewis@alligator.orgFormer airport employee charged for parking payment theftAdjan By Jessica GilesAlligator Staff WriterMerrillee Malwitz-Jipson has paddled up the Santa Fe River into Gilchrist Blue Springs hundreds of times, but when she did so Friday, it felt completely different. It was absolutely the most unusual experience, she said. seen the spring since the state of Florida made it a public park. Gilchrist Blue Springs State Park, which is about 30 miles away northwest of UF, celebrated its grand opening Friday with a ribbon-cutting ceremony and free admission. The park, which had been privately owned and operated as Blue Springs Park for 60 years, has six natural springs and areas to swim, paddle, hike and camp, according to a news release. The park will be open from 8 a.m. to sundown every day. Admission is $6 per vehicle and $4 for a single-occupant vehicle, according to the website. Visitors can lay out on about 50 yards of white beach-like sand or leap off the platform to the spring. Malwitz-Jipson said Gilchrist Blue Springs is one of her top three favorite springs in Florida. When you go there, you cant take an ugly picture, she said. Every picture is just as majestic as Florida springs can possibly be. @jessica_giles_ jgiles@alligator.orgNew park opens in High Springs

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Black students face a lot of pressure from parentsOn Wednesday, Jacob Copeland signed as UFs wide receiver, and the video of the process went viral. Like most talented high school athletes, Copeland had a handful of desirable options to choose from. His mother stood right by his side through the stressful decision until he made his choice. Upset her son didnt pick the University of Tennessee, she stormed away from the table and out of the view of the camera. The video immediately went viral through UF and the rest of the nation. The public cast shade at his Viewers believed Copeland didnt deserve to be deserted during such an important time in his life. Although parents typically stand by their childrens sides through the process of choosing a college, their personal goals for their childs education often sway their judgment. Parents make up their minds about college before their children do. Although the student may have their eyes set on one institution, the parents may lock eyes on another and dissuade their children with their biased opinions or, in some cases, by force; this is often the case for black teens, especially those who Copelands situation parallels the struggle black teens face as they prepare for college. The college experience can be lonely as a minority and, in addition to their own self criticism and doubt, black students will never face a harder critic than their parents. Black college students represent a small portion of campus populations, making up less than 10 percent at most universities, excluding historically black colleges and universities. Although our peers encourage us to follow our dreams, black students may have to put their personal aspiration on the back burner while they attend to the wishes of their parents. As simple as it may be to ignore them, parents tighten their grip on their children whenever their plans are ignored. By switching majors, dropping a class or choosing a different Greek chapter, black students may bring disappointment to their parents. This is not because it was a bad decision but because it was not the decision their parents had wanted. After months of anticipation, UF acceptances rolled out Feb. 9th. The results came as good news to many but bad news to a greater number. Todays applicants are not making their college decision alone; their parents have just as much of a say, if not more. One student may have dreamed of attending a top-tier school in the Northeast but have to stay local due to their parents desire for their children nancial circumstances. At the end of the day, our parents just want the best for us. The overused movie line Its not my dream, dad, its yours compares to the reality black college students face. Parents believe their plan is the most successful plan and that its disrespectful when their children dont follow suit, but dont understand the other challenges at to the press as being the one who left. His mother failed to understand the decision is for her son to make, regardless of how much time and effort she put into his football career. Black parents often take ownership of decisions theyve invested ample time into; they forget all of the time and effort is just part of the job. The independence of the college experience is perforated by our parents actions and decisions, taking away the longawaited freedom so many of us dream about. Madisyn Jones is a UF accounting sophomore. Her column focuses on millenial black culture.EditorialWe learn history the good and the bad parts of it so we can use that knowledge to improve the future. We can avoid mistakes made by our predecessors, and we can build upon the successes they achieved. History allows us to continually advance society and steadily make way for a better world. The lessons learned are something we need to cherish and protect. In elementary, middle and high school, many of us had the honor and privilege to hear Holocaust survivors speak about their experiences. They would share harrowing accounts of living in fear and hiding in attics and swamps. They would detail the horrors of ghettos and concentration camps. They would share the utter heartbreak and agony felt when losing a loved one or watching their friends and neighbors get carted away, knowing theyll never be seen again. They would deturn to home again at least not the home they once knew. These personal accounts became essential components of our historical education. Their stories provided something that could not have been learned through a textbook, something names and death tolls. They provided something powerful. camp and the stepsister to Holocaust victim Anne Frank, chose to share her story. According to The Washington Post, the 88-year-old is diving into everything from cutting-edge hologram technology to controversies about Justin Bieber to keep people thinking about the lessons of the Holocaust. On her U.S. speaking tour, Schloss has warned her audiences about the dangers of being a bystander. She explains not everyone in Germany was anti-Semitic, nor did they all support Adolf Hitler. Many Germans had good Jewish friends but, as Schloss put it, they took the easy way out. She leaves her audience with an invaluable lesson: to avoid indifference and to speak out when you see injustice being done. Schloss is just one example of the many Holocaust survivors who speak to audiences and teach history in a way that far exceeds that which can be found on the pages on a book. Unfortunately, as time goes on, the number of survivors who are still alive is diminishing quickly. In January 2017, it was estimated that only 100,000 survivors were still alive in the U.S. Efforts have been put in place to preserve the life and knowledge of the few survivors left. Schloss is part of a new project by the Steven Spielberg-founded Shoah Foundation, survivors. As published in the Post, the interviews are used and share stories something necessary as the number of survivors decreases. Projects like these offer us a glimmer of hope in terms of preservation, but there are also steps we can take personally to ensure these stories stand the test of time. We need to take the lessons, like the ones Schloss provides in her speeches, to heart. We need to live our lives according to the warnings weve received. Those of us who have to make sure their stories live on and are heard by future generations. This goes for all parts of history, especially genocides and other heinous events not just the Holocaust. The further removed we become from history, the less real it becomes and the less serious we take it. This is what we need to avoid. We have a responHeed the warnings of history Melissa Gomez EDITOR A bby M iller OPINIONS EDITOR Caitlin Ostroff MANAGING EDITOR, ONLINE Jimena Tavel MANAGING EDITOR, PRINT Madisyn Jonesopinions@alligator.org

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MONDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2018 ALLIGATOR 7 Up until this past Friday, the Alachua County Jail was accepting comments and concerns about the way in which it operates and manages. Of the submitted letters, each one had nothing but positive things to say. However, many inmates in the jail do not feel the same way. They are obviously not supposed to like jail. They are being punished for committing a crime, and it should be an undesirable place to spend their days. But it should be undesirable because an inmate has no freedom, is living in a cell and is being told what to do and where to be all the time. It should not be undesirable because they are being treated inhumanely. Some inmates, including those serving their time in the Alachua County Jail, have mental health issues. People with mental health issues have a hard life as it is. It is bad enough when outside forces act upon you, causing you discomfort and stress. Those with mental health issues deal with all of that, plus the same feelings coming from within. Additionally, some have to deal with backlash and consequences of others not understanding them or being unable to get the help they need and deserve. This is a struggle many people face, but many people have friends and family in their corner to advocate for them. Maybe their boss doesnt understand when they need a personal day off because their anxiety is overwhelming them, but their best friend is there for them 24/7 and understands if they cancel plans. Maybe their friend doesnt always understand why it is so important they turn around to go back for their medication, but their mom does, and she would bring it to them anytime, anywhere. These hypothetical people still have it hard, as does everyone who suffers from a mental illness. However, they are free. If they dont like the way someone is treating them, at the very least they have the legal ability to go elsewhere. Inmates dont have this option. They can seek solace in fellow inmates, but jail sometimes isnt the best environment for this. Some are allowed visitation with friends or family, but this can be highly ineffective if a person is in a bad place mentally. Additionally, they very well could be in solis placed in a suicide watch cell, they are alone. They are kept in a padded cell, so they can be monitored, understandably. But this is inhumane. In a persons absolute darkest hour, shutting someone completely off from everyone and everything in the world other than themselves and a jail cell is not the way to help them. People in jail are not lesser than the rest of us. Maybe theyve made mistakes. Maybe they should be held accountable for their actions. I do not disagree with the idea of the prison system itself. I think people should not be permitted to commit crimes and then be sent back out into the world with no consequences. However, I As I mentioned in an earlier column, our criminal justice system focuses more on punishment than on rehabilitation. If a person suffers from mental illness, they should still be held accountable for their actions. However, when in prison, they should not be treated exactly the same as someone without these issues. Withholding medication prescribed by a psychiatric professional is inhumane. Tossing someone who mentions having suicidal not a solution. It is a way to avoid having blood on your hands. So, I ask our own county jail and jails across America: What are we doing? These are people. We need to be better to each other. We can ensure people serve their time while still valuing their mental health and humanity. Taylor Cavaliere is a UF journalism and psychology junior. Her column focuses on mental health.In preparation for writing this column, I perused the internet for its most famous, most well-liked quotes about patience. Patience, I have heard time and time again, is a virtue. Good things come to those who wait, so we must remain strong and persevere as the hands of lifes clock tick onward. Stand resolute, stay hopeful. If this is how Im characterizing the law-school application process, I must sound pretty dramatic. I admit that. Its easy to get swept up in the game of numbers, to anxiously search the internet with super-fun queries like application status, median GPA and, my favorite and most desperate plea, When will I hear back??? (That last one is a true winonline forum guaranteed to give you mild heartburn.) So whats an anxious and impatient law-school hopeful to do? The answer must lie somewhere between plunging into panic attacks in the middle of the afternoon and achieving nirvana while sitting on a yoga mat for the rest of the semester. I, myself, toggle back and forth. Day to day, week to week, a soft yet annoyingly consistent voice in the back of my head murmurs, What if, what if, what if? Hence, this column. I write to offer my own experiences applying to professional programs and waiting to hear back. I write with the hope other people may relate and perhaps feel soothed by our common patience with waiting or lack thereof. I write because I am simultaneously excited, afraid, inspired, ready and sentimental when I look at where I am and how the world is changing rapidly around me. So lets take this on together, shall we? What has helped me most throughout this nervous waiting game has been remembering why I started this process in kick in, theres a frighteningly smooth transition from Im here to pursue my purpose to Im lost, and Im not even sure how I got here. Remember the scene in the classic series SpongeBob SquarePants in which Squidward tells SpongeBob to empty his mind of eving, and SpongeBob panics so hard he forgets his own name? Yeah, its like that. We focus so hard on the minutiae of life, the stressors of any given moment, that we forget the passions that brought us to these important, formative experiences like deciding what we want to do postour way back. This terrible yet, I argue, temporary switchover is natural when we lose sight of our callings: the problems that plague our minds when we read the news, the solutions we mull over when were falling asleep at night, the wild spark of wonder that comes over us when we see art and listen to music. These are the sorts of emotions and experiences that motivate us to seek out certain careers, apply to certain programs and dream a little bigger each night. Whats the upshot of all this? Well, here are some of my main takeaways. For one, no matter what happens, you can or decision in your life. You can begin writing your next chapter wherever you land. When you tire of waiting, when the road looks weary, hang on for the dream. Its worth waiting for. Oh, and one more lesson learned: Theres a lot of important life messages to be taken from SpongeBob SquarePants, if only we have the time to look. Mia Gettenberg is a UF criminology and philosophy senior. Her column focuses on education.We must value inmates' mental health Waiting to see if you got into a graduate program is an artColumn Column Taylor Cavaliereopinions@alligator.org Mia Gettenbergopinions@alligator.org

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8 ALLIGATOR MONDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2018Celebrating Black History Month Rock n Soul StyleSteph Strickland / Alligator StaffBlake Hines (left) dances along to the music at the Black History Month Concert on Bo Diddley Community Plaza. His mother, April Hines (right), stumbled across the concert Sunday afternoon and decided to stay to enjoy it. Steph Strickland / Alligator StaffBilly Buchanan and his Rock n Soul Revue perform onstage on Bo Diddley Community Plaza following the performance of trumpeter Longineu Parsons on Sunday afternoon.Steph Strickland / Alligator StaffJake Mitchell, 73, dances in the crowd along to the soul, blues and rock classics featured at the Black History Month Concert on Bo Diddley Community Plaza on Sunday afternoon. Mitchell is a member of Little Jake & the Soul Searchers, another well-known musical group in this genre.

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MONDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2018 ALLIGATOR 9Will Clewis / Alligator Staff From left: UF students Cinthya Bazurto, an 18-year-old animal sciences freshman, and Laura Uribe, a 20-year-old political science junior, create clay pots on spinning pottery wheels at the UF School of Art + Art Historys Art Bash event Friday night. Uribe said she felt it was important to support the arts. Will Clewis / Alligator StaffFrom left: Juana Diaz, a 20-year-old UF art junior, assists Chris Patton, a 27-year-old UF computer science graduate student, with making an ink print design labeled Alagarto Printmaking Guild at the UF School of Art + Art Historys Art Bash event Friday night. Patton said he was blown away by the quality of the students art on display. Will Clewis / Alligator StaffFrom left: UF students Janelys Camelo, a 19-year-old graphic design sophomore, and Hali Reeves, a 20-year-old graphic design sophomore, look at the Thick Wit Tea + Mustard and Bennetts Tea + Mustard displays at the UF School of Art + Art Historys Art Bash event on Friday night. Camelo said she submitted a project for class called Dragazine, which shows drag as an art form. Will Clewis / Alligator StaffCarin Sankus, a 32-year-old UF art third-year graduate student, lifts a clay piece from a kiln and places it in sawdust, giving it a black color through a smoking process. The overall Students take on a night of creativity at UF Art Bash

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10 ALLIGATOR MONDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2018 DISPLAY: (352) 376 4482 CLASSIFIEDS: (352) 373 3463 SPRING BREAK 2018We will not be not publishing 3/5-3/9, we will have these advanced deadlines. The DEADLINE for : Monday, March 12 th is Thursday, March 1 st at 4 p.m. advertising. Copy and payment due by 4pm By Kyle FrayAlligator Contributing WriterHurricane Irma left Joshua Layton homeless for a month after a tree fell through the roof of his house. This was one of the worst things I had to deal with, he said. So situations like Laytons dont happen again, the Florida Division of Emergency Management granted Alachua County a $194,000 grant Feb. 1, said Susan Meadows, a Hurricane Loss Mitigation Program coordinator for Alachua County. The county can use the funds to reinforce housing structures so theyll survive storms like Irma. The Hurricane Loss Mitigation Program is expected to help more than 35 homes, Meadows said. The deadline to apply on the Alachua County website is March 9. The program will assist with housing needs such as roof coverage, installation of hurricane straps and hurricane resistant windows, Meadows said. Distribution of the grant is determined by the applicants annual household income and the amount of residents in the house, Meadows said. Were trying to get applications for those in need, Meadows said. We want to help as many as we can. Layton, a 23-year-old UF sociology senior, said the tree that fell on his house caused multiple holes, landed on the houses power line and broke the main gas line. I dont believe a county grant would have made a difference since the majority of the damage was caused by this huge tree, he said. However, there are many others County receives grant to prep houses for hurricanesBy Katherine McGuinnessAlligator Contributing WriterUF researchers discovered a faster way to obtain an environmentally friendly sunscreen ingredient to replace others that may damage marine life. Yousong Ding, a UF medicinal chemisresearchers focused on cutting down the time it takes to produce shinorine, an ecofriendly ingredient used in sunscreens. The ingredient is a non-toxic and biodegradable amino acid. We hope to provide a more cost-effective green sunscreen to customers, the 38-year-old researcher said. The research is based on the production of shinorine in the wild, which is found in red algae, Ding said. Red algae is common in tidal zones in the ocean and grows off the coast of Florida, Ding said. It can take about a year for the red algae to produce shinorine that can be harvested, which is too long to be used commercially. Shinorine is produced by cyanobacteria, a photosynthetic blue-green bacteria, Ding said. Researchers can harvest it on a cellular level in a controlled environment. For the study, they focused on genetically engineering the cyanobacteria to produce shinorine in as soon as 13 days, Ding said. Ding declined to say which environmentally harmful chemicals in sunscreen shinorine could replace. Craig Downs, the executive director of Haereticus Environmental Laboratory in Clifford, Virginia, said he knows of some chemicals in sunscreen that damage the environment. One of those chemicals is benzophenone-3, or oxybenzone, which is used in sunscreen to protect the skin by absorbing ultraviolet light, Downs said. Downs said aquatic animals can absorb oxybenzone through their gills, stomach and skin. The chemical can disrupt the hormone levels in the organisms. He said he recently heard about Dings research with shinorine and became interested in the study. I think any new ingredient that absorbs UV radiation and can be turned into a human-safe and ecologically safe SPF drug is fantastic, exciting and innovative, he said. Lindsey Crown / Alligator StaffSWINGING THE NIGHT AWAY

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MONDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2018 Dont get stuck with an extra rent payment. Advertise your subleases in the Alligator Classifieds and save yourself some cash. Call 373-FIND. 4 RoommatesIVE HAD IT WITH YOUR LOUD MUSIC! Is your roommate driving you crazy? Find a replacement in the Alligator Classifieds! 5 Real Estate Sell your house, condo, acreage, mobile home and much more in the ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS! Reach thousands of possible buyers! Mastercard and Visa accepted over the phone, by fax, email or CHECK OUT PLACING YOUR AD THRU OUR ONLINE AT www.alligator.org. or please call 373Find (373-3463) NEW CONDOS-WALK TO UFFor Info on ALL Condos for Sale, Visit www.UFCONDOS.COM or Matt Price, University Realty, 352-281-3551 4-25-43-5 Marina PropertyPriced to sell!!! Private waterfront community. With Concierge Boat Service & boathouse slip Only $139,880 Video: www.WaterfrontLifeFL.net 877.628.3349 Florida Waterfront Marketing, LLC. Licensed Real Estate Broker. 2-9-1-5 6 Furnishings Got a new couch?. Sell your old one in the Alligator Classifieds. Call 373-FIND (3463) to place your ad today. BEDROOM SET $300 BRAND NEW 5 Piece Bedroom Sets Available in Twin, Full, Queen, & King sizes. Can Deliver. 352-3779846. Gainesville Discount Furniture. 3-28167-6 SECTIONAL SOFA $389 NEW in Package w/ warranty. Multiple sizes, colors, & styles available. Can Deliver. Call 352-377-9846. Gainesville Discount Furniture 3-28-167-6 BEDS Brand Name, Brand NEW Pillowtop Mattress & Box Set: Twins $89, Fulls $100, Queens $120, Kings $200. Can Deliver 352377-9846. Gainesville Discount Furniture. 3-28-167-6MICROFIBER SOFA & LOVESEAT $400Brand NEW still packaged w/warranty. Must sell. Can Deliver. 352-377-9846. Gainesville Discount Furniture 3-28-167-6 7 Computers Selling computers, parts, or repair services or just looking for that new rig? Look in the Alligator Classifieds. Call 373-FIND for more information.COMPUTER & LAPTOP REPAIRS Network specialists We buy computers and laptops Working and Non-working 378-4009, 1410 NW 13th Street 3-12-43-7 8 ElectronicsPlace an ad to sell your old stereo, cell phone, and more in the Electronics Section of the Alligator Classifieds. 373-FIND 9 Bicycles In the market for a new set of wheels or just looking to add a second to that collection? Want personalized handlebars or a fitted seat? Check in the Alligator ClassifiedsSAY:"I FOUND IT IN THE ALLIGATOR!" UF Surplus On-Line Auctionsare underwaybikes, computers, furniture, vehicles & more. All individuals interested in bidding go to: SURPLUS.UFL.EDU 392-0370 4-25-18-43-10 Goats for Sale & Lease Horse Boarding 7 miles to UFCharlie 352-278-1925 4-25-43-10 Lucrative accounting practice just 50 miles from UF campus. Owner is looking for the right person or persons to take over practice. Area features opportunity to experience the benefits of an abundance of out door life with the benefits of nearby cultural activities in and around Gainsesville. Anne Hodges, CPA Cross City, Florida (352)-356-1632 2-2118-15-10 SAWMILLS from only $4397.00MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own band millCut lumber any Dimension. In stock ready to ship! FREE Info/DVD: www. NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800578-1363 Ext.300N 2-9-1-10 11 Motorcycles/ Mopeds Alligator Classifieds is the way to get your 2 wheels on the road. Show off your bikes, scooters, and repair services. Call 373-FIND to get your classified in.ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIED ADSGET THE JOB DONE!REACH MORE THAN 50,000 READERS EACH PUBLICATION DAY 12 AutosUnload your lot. Sell your cars through Alligator Advertising for cheap. 373-FIND or place your ad online at www.alligator.org/ classifieds We Buy Junk & Used Cars Trucks, Vans Titled only KT 352-281-9980 sunnyman352@gmail.com 4-25-43-12 Don't forget to tell them:"I found it in The Alligator!" Sunrise Auto Sales Bring W-2 Drive home today!! Free one year oil change $1000 discount off the finest price www.sunriseautosale.net 3523759090 4-25-43-12 Sunrise Auto Rental Easy to Rent!!! NO credit card required! www.carrentalsunrise.com 352-3759090 4-25-43-12 Sun City Auto Sales Bring W-2 Drive home today!! Free one year oil change $1000 discount off the finest price www.sunriseautosale.net 352-338-1999 4-25-43-12CASH FOR CARS & TRUCKS Running or Not Any Condition352-771-6191 3-2-18-11-12 13 Wanted This newspaper assumes no responsibil ity for injury or loss arising from contacts made through advertising. We suggest that any reader who responds to advertising use caution and investigate the sincerity of the advertiser before giving out personal information or arranging meetings or investing money. The American Cancer Society Road to Recovery Volunteers Needed!VOLUNTEER DRIVERS NEEDEDto transport cancer patients to treatment. Flexible schedule. Training and liability insurance provided. Please call352-240-5062 if interested. 1 For Rentfurnished SS & VA ARE WELCOME! Cable Internet Utilities www.campuswalk.co 352-337-9098 4-25-43-1Remember to tell them... "I found it in The Alligator!" 2 For Rentunfurnished Empty Space? Find your next tenants in the Alligator Classifieds. Call 373-FIND to place your ad today! 1BR APT $445/moSmall pet ok. 352-372-1201 or 352-213-3901 6-21-18-55-2 ELLIES HOUSES Quality single family homes. Walk or bike to UF. www.ellieshouses.com 352-215-4991 or 352-215-4990 3-28-15-167-2 Houses Available For Aug 2018Walk, Bike Or Bus. gainesvillequalityrentalhouses.com Call or text 352-339-2342 1-24-18-14-2 FOR RENT NEAR SF HOUSE 4BR/2BA Very cool house summer doesn't need A/C. 352-328-1479 2-918-2-2 3 MONTHS FREE!!MOBILE HOME LOTS FOR RENT. $350/mo. Located between Gainesville & Alachua (N441) 50 years in business. Call 386-462-1660 3-14-18-12-2Now you can easily submit your classified adfor print and/or web editionsright thru our website!Just go to www.alligator.org/classifiedsVisa and Mastercard accepted. 1 For Rent: Furnished 2 For Rent: Unfurnished 3 Sublease 4 Roommates 5 Real Estate 6 Furnishings 7 Computers 8 Electronics 9 Bicycles 10 For Sale 11 Motorcycles, Mopeds 12 Autos 13 Wanted 14 Help Wanted 15 Services 16 Health Services 17 Typing Services 18 Personals 19 Connections 20 Event Notices 21 Entertainment 22 Tickets 23 Rides 24 Pets 25 Lost & Found All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make limitation, or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. All employment opportunities advertised herein are subject to the laws which prohibit discrimination in employment (barring legal exceptions) because of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, handicap, familial status, age, or any other covered status. This newspaper assumes no responsibility for injury or loss arising from contacts made through the type of advertising that newspaper uses great care in accepting or rejecting advertising according to its suitability, we cannot verify that all advertising claims or offers are completely valid in every case and, therefore, cannot assume any responsibility for any injury or loss arising from offers and acceptance of offers of goods and/or services through any advertising contained herein.In Person: Cash, Check, MC, Discover, AMEX or Visa 2700 SW 13th St. M-F, 8am 4pm By Fax: (352) 376-4556 By Mail: P.O. Box 14257 G-ville 32604 Call 352-373-FIND for information. Sorry, no cash by mail. Credit cards or checks only. By Phone: (352) 373-FIND Payment by major credit card ONLY. M-F, 8am 4pm When Will Your Ad Run? Ads placed by 4 pm will appear two publication days later. Ads may run for any length of time and be cancelled at any time. Sorry, but there can be no refunds or credits for cancelled ads. Corrections and Cancellations: Cancellations: Call 373-FIND M-F, 8am 4pm. No refunds or credits can be given. Alligator errors: Check your ad the FIRST day it runs. Call 373-FIND with any corrections before noon. THE ALLIGATOR IS ONLY RESPONSIBLE FOR THE FIRST DAY THE AD RUNS INCORRECTLY. Corrected ads will be extended one day. No refunds or credits can be given after placing the ad. Corrections called in Customer error or changes: Changes must be made BEFORE NOON for the next days paper. There will be a $2.00 charge for minor changes. Online: 3 Sublease 6 Furnishings 10 For Sale 12 Autos

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12 ALLIGATOR MONDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2018 St. Francis House is a homeless shelter and soup kitchen located in downtown Gainesville, and we are looking for help from volunteers like you. St. Francis House depends on monetary support from individual donors and community businesses in order to help feed the homeless and the hungry.If you are interested in volunteering,please contact the volunteer coordinator at (352) 505-3311 ext 4 or sfhcoor@stfrancis.cfcoxmail.comTo make a donation by mail,please send checks payable to St. Francis House P.O. Box 12491Gainesville, FL 32604 www.stfrancishousegnv.org. CASH FOR CARS & TRUCKS Running or Not Any Condition352-771-6191 3-2-18-11-13 14 Help Wanted This newspaper assumes no responsibil ity for injury or loss arising from contacts made through advertising. We suggest that any reader who responds to advertising use caution and investigate the sincerity of the advertiser before giving out personal information or arranging meetings or investing money. Students in Accounting, Aviation, Business/ Sales and computer science needed for various positions. Flexible schedules and competitive pay. Join our team! Learn more at www.gleim.com/employment 6-21-18-55-14 NC Mountain Summer Camp seeks eques trian/riding/barn staffers with commitment to Christ. Mentor, help build confidence, teach riding. Meaningful fun, fellowship, adventure. Twofuncamps.com 2-21-18-8-14 ATT: COMPUTER GEEKS CRAIGSLIST AD PRO LISTER & SEO NEEDED FOR BUSINESS Keep up mult ads w/o flagging Exper only-Graduates preferred text 305 582 9800 or 941 807 0870 2-2118-7-14 15 Services Do you have a business that provides a service? Place your ad in the Services Section of the Alligator Classifieds for as little as $3.00 per day. Call us at 373-FIND. Now you can easily submit your classified adfor print and/or web editionsright thru our website! Just go to www.alligator.org/classifiedsVisa and Mastercard accepted. Affordable Attorney12 Years Experience Call or Text Sam 24/7 904.600.2683 4-2517-86-15 Want to be a CNA? Dont want to wait? Express Training Services now offers a CNA class which can be completed in one weekend. Perfect for busy college students. www. expresstrainingservices.com/ww 4-25-1743-15 HIRING home/office/apartment cleaners(mf and every other sat). Day and night shifts available. Must own a car. weekly pay $8.50/ hr. if interested please call 352-214-0868 2-28-18-22-14 Zumba Instructors Needed! Classes held on UF campus and scheduled month-to-month. Contact: tiffany@lifestylewellnessstudios.com or call 352-507-5002 if interested. 1-24-18-5-14 Don't forget to tell them:"I found it in The Alligator!" COPYTALK: GET PAID TO TYPE! Create your own schedule Close to campus Productivity-based pay up to $13/hr Must be able to touch type 60wpm WWW.CTSCRIBES.COM 1-24-18-8-14 Personal Care Assistant, PT, Multiple Shifts, Mon-Sun. Need mature, energetic, reliable person. Direct experience with autism a plus as postion entails working with severly autistic young man in his home and community. Great opportunity for Special Ed/Applied Behavior Majors. Non-smokers with reliable transportation and able to make a 1 year commitment. Email resume to hilldds56@gmail.com 1-2418-5-14 ATTENTION INDIVIDUALS WITH GRIT Resume building opportunity available at an ever-exciting Law Office. Knowledgeword,excel, PDF. Database experience. Can perform mental acrobatics also a plus. 1 yr+ commitment, part-time to full-time, competitive compensation. paulsrothstein@yahoo.com 2-14-18-10-14 Learn to build a house ( hands on ) from layout, foundation, framing to finishes. Architect/Builder building his own house. Little or no experience ok. Foremost requirement is desire to learn. Full or part time. 786-210-6571 2-12-18-7-14 13 Wanted 14 Help Wanted 14 Help Wanted Reduce your showertime by 2 minutes. PRESERVE WATER TICK.TOCK.

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MONDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2018 ALLIGATOR 13 MATH/PHYSICS TUTORING PhD in mathematical physics. Subjects: algebra, trig, pre-calc, calc or general physics. Rate: $20/hr. youtube channel: tutelar tutoring. email: tutelar@instruction.com 2-1915-15 16 Health Services HIV ANTIBODY TESTINGAlachua County Health Dept. Call 334-7960 for appt (optional $20 fee) Need CPR Training?(352) 727-4733 www.GatorCPR.com CNA Prep Classes from GatorCNA.com 7-3-17-108-16 DRUG PROBLEM?WE CAN HELP! 24 HOURS 7 DAYSCALL NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS1-866352-5323 352-376-8008 www.uncoastna.org pr@uncoastna.org 18 Personals HIV ANTIBODY TESTINGAlachua County Health Dept. Call 334-7960 for appt (optional $20 fee)Want to make a connection?Place your ad here to look for someone to share a common interest with or for your true love 20 Events/Notices IS YOUR BUSINESS, CLUB OR ORGANIZATION HAVING AN EVENT? DO YOU HAVE A SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT? PLACE YOUR AD HERE AND GET IT NOTICED! FREE GRE WORKSHOP. UF Teaching Center offers this workshop M R, 2/192/22 from 5-7 p.m. Math sessions are M & W; Verbal sessions are T & R. Go to www. teachingcenter.ufl.edu, then study skills then "workshops to register. 2-19-18-4-20 21 Entertainment Get the party started! Place your Entertainment classified today to get people up and about. Call 373-FIND. WALDO FARMERS & FLEA MARKET Vintage & Unique Like EBay in 3DSat & Sun www.WaldoFlea.com 2-14-167-21 Progressive talk radio is onWGOT 100.1 FMalong with indie rock, punk, jazz, electronica, folk and more. Visit wgot.org 2-9-18-4-21BUYING OR SELLING TICKETS? Place your ad here and get results!Visit: alligator.org/classifieds 23 Rides Trying to get to and from somewhere? Want to cut back on that gas bill? Place an ad in the classifieds to find trip arrangements or show off your bus and shuttle service. 373FIND 24 Pets Furry, feathery, scaly...no, not your roommate...pets. Find or advertise your pets or pet products here in the Pets section of the Alligator. Because Cats Don't Understand AbstinenceOPERATION CATNIPSpaying/Neutering Free-Roaming Cats Borrow a Trap / Make a Clinic Reservation Make a Donation / Volunteer New Expanded HoursLots of NEW info athttp://ocgainesville.org/ 25 Lost & Found Finders Keepers? If you find something, you can place a FREE FOUND AD in our lost & found section. Be kind to someone whos lost what youve found. Call 373-FIND. 1 Send (to), as an inferior place 9 Partner of Paul and Mary 14 Trite 15 WWII bomber __ Gay 16 Trifling matters 18 Iroquois enemies 19 Editors never mind 20 IRS form IDs 21 One out on the lake, e.g. 24 Cookie holder 27 Focal point in a theater 29 That girl 32 18-wheeler 33 Tablet with Mini and Pro versions 34 John Paul Jones was a commander in it 39 Chevy subcompact 40 Rowlands of The Notebook 41 Originally named 42 May observance for those who died in military service 46 Two-__ tissue 47 Troubled state 48 Has a midnight snack, say 52 __ upon a time ... 53 Kates TV sidekick 54 Statesman born 2/12/1809 whose surname can precede the starts of four long puzzle answers 59 Seors squiggle 60 Schemed 61 Bottomless chasm 62 Ones storming the castle, say 1 Lassos 2 Activist Medgar 3 Russian Revolution leader 4 Diving seabirds 5 Fellows 6 Busy __ bee 7 Bill with Hamilton on it 8 NYC summer hrs. 9 Be a nuisance to 10 Goes in 11 Promote big-time 12 North Pole worker 13 U.K. flying squad 17 East, to 48-Down 21 __ there, done that 22 Ive got this round 23 Prickling with excitement 24 Tokyos country 25 Tequila source 26 Color again, as hair 27 TV forensic series 28 __ Pan Alley 29 Rascal 30 Ramshackle home 31 Hostile force 35 In addition 36 Kennedy and Koppel 37 Grays subj. 38 Dismiss from work temporarily, with off 43 Put spots in magazines 44 Foots 12 45 Side squared, for a square 48 Legendary Spanish hero 49 __ like ours / Could never die ... : Beatles 50 Flooring specialist 51 Mails 52 Paris airport 53 Kendrick of Twilight 54 One step __ time 55 Babys spilled food protector 56 1101, to Romans 57 Chaney of horror 58 Bill for mdse. rfntbn rffnt nbnEdited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis 1 Empathetic words 11 RSVP part 14 One may run for a week 15 Townshend of The Who 16 Revelation setting 17 Olympus neighbor 18 Put forth 19 Metro __ 20 Grounded 22 Horoscope heading 23 Wish for 24 Subject for Linnaeus 27 Relocate in, as after ones career 28 Maternally related 29 Dead Souls novelist 30 Billions network, briefly 31 Fake out 32 __ legend 33 Sugar source 34 Sugar suffix 35 Some pretenders 36 Membre de la famille 37 Celebration honoring a saint 39 Crossed at a shallow spot 40 Rocky of song 41 Munich title 42 Home of Canadas Parliament 43 Secular 44 Phased-out refrigerant compound 47 __Language: 1993 comedy best-seller 48 Ecstatic 51 Amor counterpart 52 Game with wagering restrictions 53 Three-part fig. 54 Bit of rifle range debris 1 Draft orders 2 Juno actor Michael 3 Fighting group 4 Govt. employer of mathematicians 5 Treatment for losing ones head? 6 Going concern? 7 Like a full hold 8 Pierce portrayer 9 Eastern way 10 Sitcom sidekick whose wife sometimes calls him by his last name 11 Bit of bun flavoring 12 Disappointed observation 13 In danger of being ticketed 15 Magnetic? 21 First name in astronautics 22 Stuff 23 The Dance Class painter 24 Easy Street kin 25 Most bicycles 26 Do something 27 Forbidden Planet robot 29 Punsters reward? 32 Impossible 33 Cold reaction 35 Put in a hold 36 Grasping pair 38 Input methods 39 Full of pluck 41 Rumor __ ... 43 Favor one side over the other 44 Fountain choice 45 Drive 46 PC key under Shift 49 Airport in Perus cap. 50 [Head slap] rfntbb rffnt nbnEdited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis 1. When was the last time before 2015-16 that the New York Mets made the playoffs in two consecutive years? 2. Name the last reliever before Travis Wood of the Chicago Cubs in 2016 to hit a home run in a playoff game. 3. In 2016, Derek Carr set an Oakland Raiders record for most passing yards in a game (513). Who had held the franchise mark? 4. When was the last time before 2017 that Rhode Islands mens basketball team won a game in the NCAA Tournament? 5. Name the Toronto Maple Leafs only No. 1 overall NHL draft pick before Auston Matthews in 2016. 6. In 1985, Russian Garry Kasparov became the youngest winner in the history of the world chess championship. How old was he? 7. Who gave boxer Sugar Ray Robinson his first pro defeat, in 1943? Answers 1. It was 1999-2000. 2. Rosy Ryan of the New York Giants in the 1924 World Series. 3. Cotton Davidson threw for 427 yards against Denver in 1964. 4. It was 1998, when the Rams reached the Elite Eight. 5. Wendel Clark, in 1985. 6. He was 22. 7. Jake LaMotta. 2018 King Features Syndicate, Inc. February 12, 2018King Features Weekly Service 15 Services 19 Connections 22 Tickets

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Senior Taylor Tomlinson and the Florida women's golf team sit in eighth place at 12 over par following Day 1 of the Northop Grumman Regional Challenge. UF men's and women's tennis teams lose on SundayThe Florida men's tennis team was defeated by Ohio State 5-2 in Columbus, Ohio, dropping its record to 4-2, while the Gators women's tennis team fell to Georgia Tech 4-2 at the ITA National Team Indoor Championships in Madison, Wisconsin, reducing its record to 3-4. Follow us for updatesFor updates on UF athletics, follow us on Twitter at @alligatorSports or online at www.alligator.org/sportsMONDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2018 www.alligator.org/sportsLACROSSEBy Tyler NettunoSports Writer Hicklens career day lifts Florida past Colorado in season openerAlligator File PhotoFlorida goalkeeper Haley Hicklen (29) recorded a career-high 14 saves in UF's season-opening 16-9 win over Colorado on Sunday. MEN'S BASKETBALLBy Jake DreilingerSports Writer Strong defense sets bar for Gators against South CarolinaSEE LACROSSE, PAGE 16 SEE MEN'S B-BALL, PAGE 16 I Why aren't we talking more about curling? It's the greatest sport of all time.Morgan Meets the Eye / Opinion Morgan McMullenSEE COLUMN, PAGE 16

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MONDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2018 ALLIGATOR 15WOMENS BASKETBALLBy Morgan McMullenSports WriterJust over a minute into the third quarter, South Carolina forward Aja Wilson mirrored Florida forward Paulina Hersler abandoned her on Sunday afternoon in Columbia, South Caro able. rebounds. Wilson also served as a deterrent in control. in the second half red hot. The junior transfer the arc. mmcmullen@alligator.orgAlan Alvarez / Alligator StaffFlorida womens basketball coach Cameron Newbauer witnessed his team lose its 10th SEC game of the season on Sunday in a 64-57 defeat to South Carolina. Every day is a challenge, he said. And our team is taking it that way. SOFTBALLBy Mark StineSports Writer Hoover. tie Chronister out the side in ter. Catcher Janell Wheaton threw only one out. Wheaton also found Floridas a double over the head of center USF. the second. Hoover. from Worrell in the bottom of the third and a solo home run by Am scored six runs. and extend the lead to 11. need to say. @mstinejr mstine@alligator.orgGators complete opening weekend GYMNASTICSBy Alana GomezSports Writer the team sat down and described its After Florida eventually defeated coach Jenny Rowland recalled that her career. end. can has made strides since the Gators to fellow teammate junior Alicia for her whole routine, she said. Im son. a routine. Its awesome to be able to cheer me. The teams veterans continue to secutive time this season with a score in bars and vault. build on every event, build on every a fun season. @alanaa_gomez agomez@alligator.org remain in mid-season formChronister

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Florida and Colorado traded goals early in the game with four total ties in the helped the Gators earn a three-point lead promptly rattled off six straight goals to shows. in addition to scoring a goal and an assist. UF coach Amanda O'Leary said. They did its next matchup with No. 1 Maryland on a top-20 team in Colorado was certainly the start to the season the Gators were looking tinue to assimilate to the rest of the team tential. men and seniors. @TylerNettuno tnettuno@alligator.org LACROSSE, from pg. 14Gators defeatleast up to the standard of its coach. held the Gamecocks to just six points off its 14 only one of its last 15 shots. The Gators showed what they can do when they keep up the preson Jan. 24. @DreilingerJake jdreilinger@alligator.org MEN'S B-BALL, from pg 14Alligator File Photo nated from playoff contention. Curling is the ultimate spectator sport. dont. own rules in your head. You formulate your Olympic curling season. Morgan McMullen is the online sports editor at the Alligator. Contact him at mmcmullen@alligator.org. COLUMN, from pg. 14