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The Independent Florida alligator
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028290/01495
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Title: The Independent Florida alligator
Portion of title: Florida allgator
Alligator
Alternate Title: University digest
University of Florida digest
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some col.) ; 36 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Independent Florida Alligator
Publisher: The students of the University of Florida
Campus Communications, Inc.
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Gainesville, Fla
Publication Date: 02-01-2012
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: daily (except saturdays, sundays, holidays and exam periods, aug.-apr.); semiweekly (may-july)
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Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
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Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Online ed. available via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 65, no. 75 (Feb. 1, 1973)-
General Note: "Not officially associated with the University of Florida."
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alephbibnum - 000470760
lccn - sn 86010448
issn - 0889-2423
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VOLUME 106 ISSUE 91 WWW.ALLIGATOR.ORG WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 Today We Inform. You Decide.Not officially associated with the University of Florida Published by Campus Communications, Inc. of Gainesville, Florida Man charged with attempted robbery at The PolosHe was arrested a quarter mile away from the apartments, pg 3. Gov. Scott launches investigation of Florida Highway PatrolFlorida Department of Law Enforcement to investigate, pg 5. Despite a No. 1 ranking, UF is still looking for answers out of the bullpen after the departures MEREDITH RUTLAND, ADRIANNA PAIDAS and JULIA GLUM Alligator Staff Writers The votes arrived in bursts of tens, twenties, hundreds. One by one, candidates rolled into the Supervisor of ElecAlmost every eye was on the projection screen until a single red bar slid higher than the rest. Then a future commissioner smiled. Yvonne Hinson-Rawls was elected to the District 1 seat of the Gainesville City Commission on Tuesday with 1,126 votes 54.29 percent of the total District 1 votes. However, two candidates wont be able to relax just yet. The at-large 1 seat will go to a runoff because none of the eight candidates was able to secure a majority of the votes. Lauren Poe, Santa Fe College associate professor and former Gainesville city commissioner, and Nathan Skop, lawyer and former Florida Public Service commissioner, will face off in a Feb. 28 runoff election. They had the highest number of votes, with Poe securing 4,402 votes and Skop earning 2,944 votes. A total of 24,864 people voted about 25 percent of registered voters. This years election turnout was higher than last years Students remember UF faculty member for his laughter and his attention to detail, See story, page 8 79 /55 FORECAST 2 OPINIONS 6 CLASSIFIEDS 9 CROSSWORD 11 SPORTS 13 Alex Catalano / Alligator Staff results came in Tuesday night. Hinson-Rawls wins District 1, at-large 1 seat goes to runoffSEE ELECTION, PAGE 4I-75 ACCIDENT TYLER JETT Alligator Staff Writer The last couple of months contained some of the happiest moments in Christie Nguyens life, a life that came to a tragic end on Interstate 75 on Sunday morning. The 27-year-old lifelong Gainesville resident, whose name was released by the Florida Highway Patrol on Tuesday, was a UF alumna and a Santa Fe College student. Nguyen was headed north in a Toyota Matrix on Sunday. Jason Raikes, her boyfriend and a source of recent joy, died beside her. He was driving. Speaking to his parents and to my parents, its pretty clear they were meant to be with each other, her brother Nelson said. [None of the parents] had seen them happier. They were very much in love. They were talking about settling down. In addition to Nelson, Christie leaves behind her father, Andrew; her mother, Linh; and her 6-year-old son, ball Wiles Elementary School. The Alligator couldnt reach any of Raikes relatives, who, according to WJXT in Jacksonville, live in Richmond, Va. Christie was artistic and talented, NelSanta Fe student and boyfriend die together in I-75 accidentsNguyen SEE CRASH, PAGE 4Runoff election to take place Feb. 28 A THIRD BODY WAS DISCOVERED IN A DODGE PICKUP. JON SILMANAlligator Staff WriterThe death toll is now 11 in the Interstate 75 crashes that also injured at least 22 people early Sunday morning. According to the Orlando Sentinel, the Florida Highway Patrol announced Tuesday night that a third victim was found in a Dodge pickup. In the aftermath of the crash, the pickup was on top of a crushed Pontiac Grand Prix. Another passenger and the driver of the truck were also killed. Their names have not been released. The rise in the death toll is due to the continued investigation by the Medical ExOther names and identities were also released by the FHP in the days following the incident. the remains of 22-year-old Vontavia Robinson of Williston. A family believed to be from a Brazilian Restoration church in Georgia, travelling from a three day conference in the Orlando area, were also victims of the crash. According to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Edson Carmo, 38, was the pastor of the church and driver of a 2012 Dodge Caravan. His passengers included Roselia DeSilva, 41, Jose Carmo Jr., 43, Adrianna nesaw, Ga. They were all killed. Lidiane Carmo, 15, the sole survivor from the van, was still at Shands at UF as of Tuesday night.Death toll in crash rises to 11

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News Today Subscription Rates: One Semester (Fall or Spring) $18 Summer Semester $10 Two Semesters (Fall or Spring) $35 Full Year (All Semesters) $40The Independent Florida Alligator is a student newspaper serving the University of Florida, pubThe Alligator The Alligator is The Alligator VOLUME 106 ISSUE 91 ISSN 0889-2423 The Alligator The Alligator 2, ALLIGATOR WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 TODAYFORECAST WHATS HHAPPENING?Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War traveling exhibition Today, 2:30 p.m. Library West, third floor The exhibition opening will be followed by faculty presentations by Patricia Hilliard-Nunn and Sharon Austin at 3 p.m. in Smathers Library, Room 1A. A Q&A session and reception will follow. Radical About Christ Bible study Today, 5 p.m. Little Hall, Room 201 February is the month of love. Radical About Christ presents The Month of Unconditional Love. The first topic to be covered is Understanding Love. CHISPAS General Body Meeting Today, 7 p.m. Reitz Union, Rooms 276-77 Interested in human rights and community service? All students are welcome. Free pizza will be provided, and all who attend will have the chance to win a free T-shirt. UF in Haifa study-abroad dinner Today, 7 p.m. Hillel, 2020 W University Ave. Join Hillel for a free dinner sponsored by the University of Haifa to find out more about study abroad and graduate degree programs in Israel. Action through awareness Today, 7 p.m. Reitz Union Rion Ballroom Please join UF Doctors Without Borders Student Organization and Reitz Union Board Entertainment as we welcome Dr. Keith Stone, an MSF field OB/GYN; Steve Siegel, a UF medical student; and Angie Brice, a Teach for America veteran. They will discuss their life-changing experiences as humanitarians. Meet the speakers, ask questions and gain insight into areas of philanthropy. Reitz Union Entertainment Board presents Groundhog Day Today and Thursday, 8 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. Reitz Union Auditorium Want to know if well be seeDance Marathon hosts 5K, FT5K Sunday, 8 a.m. UF Commuter Lot Dance Marathon at UF is hosting its annual 5K, the FT5K. Early online registration is $20, and same-day registration is $25. A 1-mile fun run is an option for those who like shorter distances for $10. All proceeds benefit Shands Hospital for Children, our local Childrens Miracle Network Hospital. To learn more and register, visit www.floridadm.org/5k. Gainesville Crohns and Colitis support group Feb. 7, 7 p.m. American Cancer Society Hope Lodge, 2121 SW 16th St. If you have inflammatory bowel disease, come find support with others. The group is very welcoming and understands what youve been through. For more information, contact Dennis@UCVlog. com. Got something going on? Want to see it in this space? Send an email with Whats Happening in the subject line to emorrow@alligator. org. To ensure publication in the next days newspaper, please submit the event before 5 p.m. Please model your submissions after above events. Improperly formatted Whats Happening submissions may not appear in the paper. Press releases will not appear in the paper. ing six more weeks of winter? Come watch Groundhog Day to find out. Starring Bill Murray as a weatherman living the same day over and over again. The movie is free and open to the public. Free salsa classes with the Gator Salsa Club Thursday, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Reitz Union Colonnade Come join the Gator Salsa Club to learn some salsa moves for free. The lessons will be held on the Reitz Colonnade every Tuesday and Thursday from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. The club will teach Dance on 2 from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. followed by Casino style from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. No experience or partner is required. All levels of dancers are welcome. UF Libertarians screen Waiting for Superman Thursday, 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Matherly, Room 118 For National School Choice Week, the UF Libertarians will be screening Waiting for Superman, a Sundance award-winning documentary that analyzes the failures of the public education system in America. Those interested in education, public choice, political economy, public policy and liberty are welcome to attend. Refreshments will be provided. Soweto Gospel Choir Friday, 7:30 p.m. Phillips Center for Performing Arts Grammy Award-winning Soweto Gospel Choir pays homage to tribal, traditional and popular African and Western music while uplifting souls with earthy rhythms, dynamic harmonies and a cappella vocals. Student tickets are $12. Visit performingarts.ufl.edu for more infor mation. PARTLY CLOUDY 79/55 RAIN 77/54 PARTLY CLOUDY 76/55 PARTLY CLOUDY 80/53 THUNDER STORMS 80/57 SUNDAY SATURDAY FRIDAY THURSDAY

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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 ALLIGATOR, 3 Haley Stracher / Alligator StaffChas Hackmann, a 19-year-old mechanical engineering sophomore, uses a green to-go box every day at Gator Dining. AN ESTIMATED 1,000 ARE CHECKED OUT EVERY WEEK. MATT BOLESAlligator Contributing WriterGators are taking going green literally with on-campus dining this year. Students have been able to use the reusable, green to-go boxes at Gator Corner Dining Center, Broward Dining and the Reitz Unions Home Zone since Januof Sustainability website. The dining halls started to charge students 40 cents each for disposable boxes in August, and more students are checking out reusable boxes this semester. Felita Sallet, 22, the lead cashier at Gator Corner, estimated that at least 1,000 to-go boxes are checked out every week at Gator Corner. We didnt expect it to catch on like it did, she said. We had to order more boxes to keep up with the demand. She said she didnt know how many were checked out before the charge was implemented on disposable boxes. Students check out a box if they want to take food to go, and as long as they dont keep any boxes, they get their $4 deposit back at the end of the semester, according to Gator Dining Services. The reusable boxes prevent about 14,000 containers from being thrown out, according to a Gator Dining handout. Hanah Eastwood, a 19-yearold linguistics freshman, has used the green boxes about 20 times. Anybody who has a meal she said.Campus to-go boxes growing more popularCRIME SHELBY WEBBAlligator WriterA man was almost robbed walking to his apartment in The Polos early Tuesday morning. Jeremy Christian Barry, 18, of 4330 SE 80th St., was arrested by Gainesville Police on charges for attempted robbery a quarter mile from the incident. According to the arrest report, at 12:13 a.m. Barry ran behind the victim near the 2300 block of Southwest 35th Place and demanded the victims money and phone. As the victim turned around, Barry demanded money again, signaling with his right hand on his pants pocket that he had a weapon. According to the arrest report, he told the victim, Dont make me pull this out. The victim told police a vehicle leaving the complex startled Barry, giving the victim a chance to run away. Police found Barry nearby within minutes. When questioned, Barry said he smoked crack in Phoenix Apartments and was walking to his brothers house. the person who attempted to rob him. After he was arrested, Barry admitted he was looking for drug money. He told police he approached the victim aggressively but denied implying he had a weapon. He was found with a pocketknife in his front right pants pocket. Barry was charged with attempted robbery with a deadly weapon. Bond was set at $30,000.Man arrested, charged with attempted robbery in The Polos

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son said. Dancing was an outlet for her. She started when she was 4 or 5 and never really stopped. Ballet, tap, jazz she did it all. She performed with Dance Alive National Ballet, and she usually took part in the companys annual Nutcracker show at the Phillips Center for the Performing Arts. She played the piano in talent shows at Countryside Christian School, the schools former principal Bill Keith said. Her former teacher Gwen Keith said she loved to draw during class. Christie and Nelson grew up in Gainesville and lived at 11113 W Newberry Road. Mary D. Fletcher, a neighbor, said she sold the Nguyens their house in 1991. She remembered Christie being quiet but thoughtful. She was a brilliant, absolutely brilliant girl, Fletcher said. She never missed a day at Countryside, where she attended from elementary school through high school. She was the class salutatorian in 2001. She was less than a point shy of graduating No. 1, Gwen said. Christie graduated from UF in 2010 with a degree in Asian studies, and she earned a pair of business administration degrees from Santa Fe. She was taking an anatomy and physiology class at Santa Fe this semester and dancing at the college. The dance program is just devastated, in a statement. The dance program was like Christies family. My phone is ringing off the hook with students asking, Is it true? Christie was planning to become a phar macist, Nelson said. Andrew, her father, is a doctor with family practices in Newberry and Trenton. Nelson said. That was one thing that inter ested her. She really wanted to pursue it. My Working at a pharmacy and living with Raikes those were Christies plans for the future, Nelson said. That was her happiness. she had her son the idea of settling and planning becomes exciting, Nelson said. been the happiest Ive seen her. Nelson doesnt know where Christie and Raikes were driving home from Sunday morning. Wherever it was, they left together. 4, ALLIGATOR WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012Olivia Muenter / Alligator slating form Monday afternoon. ALEX CORNILLIE WILL RUN FOR STUDENT BODY PRESIDENT. SAMANTHA SHAVELLAlligator WriterSenior economics major Alex Cor nillie will run as the Students Party candidate for Student Body president with political science and economics junior Jesse Schmitt as his vice president. Party president. Sen. Carly Wilson will run for treasurer. Cornillie has served on the Reitz Union Board of Managers and managed programs for Gator Growl and Homecoming. He was also the press secretary for former Student Body President Ashton Charles. Schmitt has no UF Student Government experience. However, Wilson said he ran and campaigned before with the Student Alliance Party and understands SG. He also brought Humans vs. Zombies to campus in 2010. Schmitt was welcomed to the football team last spring as a walk-on fullback. He said his overall goal is to increase student participation in SG. Last week, the Unite Party announced Tj Villamil as its presidential candidate. Today it will announce its treasur er and vice presidential candidates at the Reitz Union Amphitheater at Each party has also been inter viewing potential senators during qualifying, which ended Tuesday. Supervisor of Elections Toni Megduring all three days. The Students Party had 53 students and the Unite Party had 606 students. No one declared independent, she said.Students Party announces candidates for Spring SG electionsCRIME SHELBY WEBBAlligator Contributing Writer A Gainesville man was arrested Thursday in connection with multiple bike thefts at UF and off-campus apartments. Robert Kenneth Barton, 18, was taken into custody Thursday night by Gainesville Police, according to GPD Detective Tom Mullins. Barton was stealing bikes and trying to sell them to local pawn and sport shops, Mullins said. He added that the arrest was made with help from Univer sity Police Department detective Duffy. During an interrogation, Barton said he stole as many as 10 bikes from UF and popular student apartments, Mullins said. Barton was charged with or ganized stolen property dealing, unarmed burglary of an unoccupied dwelling, fraud and petit theft. Mullins said one of the bikes was returned because it had been registered with UPD. We were able to compare the serial numbers, he said. Its a really good tool for students with bikes on campus. Students are encouraged to register their bikes and report stolen ones to UPD. Decals are available to those who register their bikes, which Mullins said can help deter bur faster.Man charged in connection with series of bicycle thefts CRASH, from page 1Nguyen remembered for her talentsMore voters turned out to polls for this years electioncity elections, when 14.87 percent of registered voters cast ballots. Hinson-Rawls threw her hands in the air and yelled, Thank you! Thank you! as she embraced supporters. Although shell take a short break, she said she has been researching some of the issues from her platform. I want to put them into some real plans for moving forward, HinsonRawls said. I want to be able to step in, day one, and start making results. Ray Washington, a Gainesville lawyer, came in second in the District 1 race and earned 479 votes. He said he plans to support Skop in the runoff. In the meantime, hell go back to work. Armando Grundy, an Army veteran, came in third with 469 votes. Skop and Poe went head-to-head in debates and forums throughout the election cycle. Both said they plan to run a positive runoff campaign. Poe said hes elated he made it this far. wide margin shows that our positive, forward-looking message really resonated with voters, he said. Although he is exhausted, Poe said he and his campaign staff are deter mined to run a strong race. Its like winning the AFC-NFC championship, he said. You get to enjoy it for one night, but then you have to get ready for the Super Bowl. Nathan Skop said hes excited for what the next month will bring. He said he plans to win the runoff election by securing the support of his former opponents who ran on similar government openness. ing change and representative government back to Gainesville, Skop said. The runoff elections will be a referendum on change versus the status quo on the current commission. ELECTION, from page 1Barton Cornillie I want to put them into some real plans for moving forward I want to be able to step in, day one, and start making results.Gainesville city commissioner

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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 ALLIGATOR, 5AP PhotoCongregation in mourningInternational Church of the Restoration parishioners mourn the loss of Pastor Jose Carmo Jr., his wife Adriana and their daughter Leticia Carmo on Monday in Marietta, Ga. The family was killed Sunday in an Interstate 75 multi-vehicle crash. TRACK AND FIELD MEET WAS DELAYED 35 MINUTES. BENJAMIN S. BRASCHAlligator WriterGainesville residents and businesses are still feeling the effects of Sundays series of car accidents that left 11 dead. After the wrecks on Inter state 75, businesses temporarily stopped production, athletic competitions were delayed and hotels paid to accommodate those who were The last thing they needed after seeing that mayhem was hotel room was booked, said Tony Trusty, general manager of the Hilton University of Florida Conference Center. The hotel extended reservations overnight for those who of the accidents, he said. In addition to an extra night, the hotel provided a glass of wine to each patron to ease the stress caused by He said he doesnt know if any guests were in the accidents. The hotel covered the expense of the extra night, Trusty said. Technically, there was a loss of revenue, but I dont even look at it that way, he said. We chose the moral route. Some people werent able to get to Gainesville to swordchain mail. About 12,000 people attended the Hoggetowne Medieval Faire on Saturday. That number dropped to 9,500 Sunday, said Linda Piper, events coordinator with the City of Gainesville Division of Cultural Affairs. She said she expects those who couldnt make it over the weekend to be at the fair this weekend. Some businesses have to play catch-up because of accidents. It took some employees of Swamp Head Brewery seven and a half hours to get back from an event in Jupiter when it would normally take them four, said Luke Kemper, founder and owner of Swamp Head Brewery. Because they were so late, they were unable to spend the three hours it takes to clean equipment, Kemper said. With six hours of preparation time needed, the brewery couldnt get a batch ready for fermentation in time. Its not going to be the end of the world, he said. Well just double-up one day. be late to work and tardy to meetings. Sue Burzynski Bullard was late to a weekend of meetings when her two-hour drive half hours. The University of Nebraska-Lincoln associate professor was coming to Gainesville to help decide whether the UF College of Journalism and Communications would be re-accredited. Then, I-75 became a parking lot. As frustrated as I was, I consider myself lucky that I wasnt in the crash the night before, she said. When people arrived in Gainesville, they still had to deal with delays. The Jimmy Carnes Indoor Track and Field Meet brought about 900 youth athletes to day, but some athletes had to wait as others arrived late. The event was scheduled to start at 8:30 a.m., but it started 35 minutes late, said Larry Holsey, director of the meet. The meets organizers had to pay to rent the space from time they didnt use because renters pay by the hour, he said. After waiting 35 minutes, Holsey said, he and others decided to start the meet. He said he had to scramble youth athletes were talking about the accidents among each other, he said. It was on the hearts of a lot hearts go out to the people. It was tragic. Alligator staff writer Meredith Rutland contributed to this report.Businesses, events affected by wrecksI-75 ACCiIDENT ERIN JESTERAlligator Staff WriterAt the request of Gov. Rick Scott, the Florida Department of Law Enforcement has started an investigation into the car crashes that claimed 11 lives on Interstate 75. Scott requested the investigation Monday, FDLE Communications Coordinator Keith Kameg said. why the interstate was reopened a few hours after being closed shortly after midnight Sunday due to poor visibility. During this tragic time, our thoughts and prayers should be with the victims and their families, said a statement on the governors website. General will coordinate the investigation. When the report is complete, FDLE will turn it over to the There is no timeline on the report, Kameg said, and he was unable to provide further information. We got it yesterday and were putting it together today, he said. While there are many things inthe cause of the crashes, some things are already known. The Alachua County Fire Department issued no permits for controlled burns inside Gainesville city limits last week, said Gainesville Fire Rescue District Chief Jeff Lane. northwest of Gainesville, but that Prairie Preserve State Park, he said. The Florida Forest Service authorized a 70-acre pasture burn near Archer, but it was quite far from Paynes Prairie, said FFS spokeswoman Ludie Bond. Bond said controlled burns were Sunday.Gov. launches investigation of FHPScott ALLI LANGLEYAlligator WriterShands at UF went on red alert at about 5 a.m. Sunday, shortly after poor visibility from dense smoke and fog caused crashes involving about 20 vehicles that killed 11 people. The hospitals emergency deBe prepared for mass casualties, they said. Immediately, the Critical Care Center activated its emergency alert system. People mobilized from throughout the hospital, said Dr. Adrian Tyndall, chief of Emergency Services, not just the emergency department. Shands Critical Care Center received 22 patients, said John Pastor, spokesman for UF/Shands Comreleased and eight remained in the hospital as of 5 p.m. Tuesday. Tyndall said four trauma sur geons, emergency physicians, nurses and other staff worked together to handle the emergencies and comfort those involved in the accidents. There was a lot of sadness given said. Despite that, Shands employees handled the situation like the emer gencies they deal with every day. Patients arrived in intervals, he said, and the emergency room atmosphere was calm and orderly. However, he said, workers at the scene played the most important role: They were the ones checking to see who was alive, who could be rescued and who could not. The EMS personnel manning the frontlines were the heroes here, he said. They saw something many never, ever see. Fortunately, Pastor said, the chaos of the crash site didnt translate to chaos at the hospital. The alert lasted less than three hours, but the effects of the crash linger. If needed, doctors and nurses have resources such as counseling to help them. Health care providers arent immune to these situations, said Lisa Merlo, a psychologist and professor at UFs College of Medicine. Like everyone, she said, they need time to rest and process their feelings. Medical personnel are still human beings, she said.Emergency workers heroes in tragedyShands treated 22 patients Its not going to be the end of the world.Luke Kemperfounder and owner of Swamp Head Brewery

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Reader responseVote or post a message at www.alligator.orgThe views expressed here are not necessarily those of the Alligator .The Alligator will be withheld if the writer shows just cause. We reserve the right to edit for length, grammar, style and libel. Send letters to letters@alligator.org, bring them to 1105 W. University Ave., or send them to P.O. Box 14257, Gainesville, FL 32604-2257. Columns of about 450 words about original topics and editorial cartoons are also welcome. Questions? Call 352-376-4458. Column EditorialWEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 WWW.ALLIGATOR.ORG/OPINIONS Joey Flechas EDITOR Emily Morrow MANAGING EDITOR Justin Hayes OPINIONS EDITORTodays question: Would you ever masturbate in public?86 TOTAL VOTES57% YES 43% NOTuesdays question: Are you going to vote today?Rituals still have value in age of reasonThose of us who passed through the Plaza of the Americas last week observed one of the many peculiarities of college life. A cinder-block wall had been erected, each brick painted with negative terms such as Jesus freak useless and terrorist. The project, dubbed Writing on the Wall is an annual exercise meant to raise awareness of hurtful phrases and increase mutual respect. This project serves as a constant reminder of the importance of ritual in the human experience. shoulders and walk on. My time in academia has made me accustomed to feeling like a pilgrim in a strange world. However, when I learned that the wall was meant to be torn down in a ritualized ceremony, it made perfect sense. The university campus is, in a sense, the climax of the modern age. Since the Enlightenment, the Western world has been pining to throw the yoke of old and stodgy traditions off its back. We have embraced reason and logic and rejected the overly pious religiosity of the medieval period. Sure, there are some backward holdovers the rightwing fundamentalists, the street preachers and the Luddites but they represent a small niche on campus, and we all attend class in an environment where Robespierre would feel right at home. However, we still have our rituals. We no longer light incense or pray to the Virgin Mary were much too clever for that. We do something much more sensible (or so we think) we build walls just to tear them down. These rituals are a constant reminder that humans have always had mechanisms to cope with inner depravity. Our ancestors would pray and fast, yet as they moved into the age of reason such things began to appear quaint and illogical. However, the deep need for ritual still overcomes us. The Writing on the Wall project is a perfect example of this. These practices are often meant to raise awareness of a societal blight in this case, intolerance and incivility. One is forced to wonder whether lack of awareness of such things is truly the problem. Do we slander and curse each other because we are unaware that such things are harmful, or do we do so because we have no fear of a deep and binding code of morality? No matter what theory to which one ascribes, both are expressed through the aforementioned custom of ritual. I was fortunate enough to pass through the Plaza of the Americas when the painted wall came crashing down. A large crowd had gathered, and a charismatic Four, he began, and the crowd shouted in unison, three, two, one! The ropes were pulled, the wall creaked and the cinder blocks, marred with their obscenities, came crashing down in a pile of rubble. The crowd shared in a cathartic release in the wake of the spectacle. Is it not odd that in the supposed age of reason, we still put so much value in these ritualized machinations that serve no purpose other than to remind us of what we value? Pulling down a painted wall will not salvage our cultures civility, yet we believe it can, because even the most secular among us are still religious by nature. No matter how many gods are forgotten, all of us still believe in the cleansing power of a communal ritual. Luke Bailey is a history junior at UF. His column appears on Wednesdays.Lack of FocusMedia obsessed with non-issues in GOP raceLast night, the plurality of Florida Republican voters decided that Mitt Romney should be the nominee for the GOP. While yesterdays election might be important to a candidate like Santorum, who has to decide whether he has the resources to remain competitive (his best showing was in Iowa), Floridas 50 delegates do not mean much in the grand scheme of things. So far, only 5 percent of the 2,224 delegates have been allotted to candidates in this race. There still is a long way to go, and the campaign will probably only get worse. As the remaining candidates struggle to take on the Romney machine, the attacks will get dirtier and more personal, although they have been pretty bad already. For the remainder of this campaign, we would like to simply ask the candidates one thing: Why arent you talking about the issues? While the candidates try to prove that their opponents are really liberal wolves in conservative sheeps clothing, a lot of serious issues are being pushed aside for more mundane topics. ly and did not present any new information. And what does releasing the candidates tax returns possibly tell us about how they will perform the duties of commander-in-chief? Part of the blame should be placed on the national media, which focus almost entirely on the latest poll numbers or the latest attack ad. This is not to say that negative campaigning should be prohibited or even discouraged. Negative campaigning brings a lot to elections, giving voters more information about candidates and occasionally mobilizing them to go to the polls. However, the debates have become one negative ad soundbite after another. Rather than asking the candidates serious questions about the issues, the moderators have spent a substantial amount of time discussing the content of negative advertising and disparaging statements. Again, part of this could be the fact that the issues were given serious consideration at the beginning of the race, some been 25 debates so far in this primary, yet nearly none of the previous debates spent much time talking about issues. the candidates plan to do to reduce the debt? We have heard vague generalities about cutting spending and reducing the the candidates about what they want to cut or when. The country is going broke, and the media wants to focus on open marriages and tax returns. Perhaps we should give priority to things that matter. Luke Baileyopinions@alligator.org

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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 ALLIGATOR, 7 The story of the Titanic has captivated the world for nearly a century so much so that the tragedy became a pop culture icon with the release of the 1997 movie, Titanic. The years. The reasons for the widespread interest are clear: The Titanics fate was a terrible disaster with serious human and material costs. maiden voyage. There is more to the story of the Titanic than irony or persistent idolization, however. The Titanic is not an isolated story or a ter rible turn of fate. Rather, its lessons hold credence and value for the be understood and recognized. tanic that led to its destruction. Other ships gave warnings about icebergs in the Titanics path, but the captain made no effort to reduce speed or change course. In fact, a governmental investigation conducted after the tragedy blamed the captain for traveling too cause it was immensely strong so strong that those in charge of commanding the ship felt it could withstand anything. story, and it shows how important human actions and decisions remain in a world of technological and innovative genius. It is a story that has been mirrored most recently in the Costa Concordia disaster. No matter how big, powerful or technologically advanced the ship, human agency remains crucial. When people are trusted with the responsibility of commanding a ship that can, today, effectively command itself, training and human attention to detail should be increased, certainly not decreased. Costa Concordia was a very modern, safe ship built in 2006 and operated by Carnival Corporation, one of the largest cruise compaoperation globally. tion, but rather a greatness of design and construction that instilled in the ships operators the complacency that caused the tragedy. In a 2010 interview with a Czech newspaper, Concordia Captain Francesco Schettino said, These days, everything is much safer. the Internet. al route to pass closer to the Italian island of Giglio. Some speculate this decision stemmed from the captains desire to show off the ship to the islands citizens. It also may have been a nod to the Concordias chief waiter, who comes from the island and hoped to pass close enough to wave to family members. dia were not on his nautical chart, and that when he saw them with captain deviated the ship from the planned route and brought it too close to land. He relied on nautical charts rather than pure common sense, and the ships prowess gave him a false sense of secuThus, if there is anything to be learned from the demise of the Concordia and Titantic it is this: No matter the technology, size or power, human decision matters. It is a lesson that must be apseems so easy to put on autopilot we must always remember that human decisions and behavior are still the most vital factors. Jamie Dailey is a columnist for the Cavalier Daily at the University of Virginia. Nothing is unsinkable: Technological advances demand more attentionLership was led astray when a man had some The man stood up and demanded, What happened with Building 7, Rudolph? The man had a good question, even though he Giulianis speech and probably didnt do much to help his worthy cause. But what needs to be addressed is Giulianis attitude toward the questions themselves. To another audience member, Giuliani respondcould be Times Square. Any more clowns? The man was then harassed by other audience members, and something tells me that it was for more than interrupting Giulianis speech: boos started pouring in as soon as Building 7 came out of the mans mouth. dren. Giulianis response, May I suggest a barber? to a sincere question about 9/11 is the standard misdiFirst, may I suggest Rogaine to you, Mr. Giuliani? (Do you see the pointlessness of ad hominem?) ing a day of such great tragedy as 9/11? Third, to anyone convinced our government is incapable of lying to its constituency, may I suggest an education? woods? Uncertainty regarding the 9/11 Commission Reports veracity is nothing to scoff at. In 2006, Scripps Howard News Service and Ohio University conducted a poll of 1,010 adults and found that 36 percent of respondents thought it go to war in the Middle East. So, you say you want a new investigation opened on 9/11 an investigation not designed to protect the ineptitude of the fed9/11 Commission Report? Well, according to Giuliani, rudeness is appar deny people answers about 9/11. So, dont be rude, or of countless other reasonable Americans, will fall into limbo. or you will be made irrelevant and derided by a As you might have noticed, there is no right way to question the 9/11 Commission Report. Every approach will lead to oblivion or derision dence in the government. And that attitude is shamefully accompanied by the misguided idea that questioning the 9/11 Commission Report is somehow un-American. That is, of course, just another duplicitous, illogical attempt to shift attention from the questions to the questionnaires. Was 9/11 an inside job as asserted by the most Probably not. es preceding and following 9/11 complete? Probably not. But neither of these questions is certain to any reasonable degree. they are left in limbo or snubbed entirely. Americans have doubts about the 9/11 Commission Report. And as long as our troops are in war as a direct result of that day, the questions need to remain alive. Meanwhile, the investigation into 9/11 is not complete. Abdul Zalikha is a biology and English junior at UF. His column appears on Wednesdays. Giuliani should welcome 9/11 questionsColumn Abdul Zalikhaopinions@alligator.org UWireJamie DaileyUWire

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8, ALLIGATOR WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 John McLaughlin / AlligatorLet Them Eat CakeAna Dominguez receives a birthday cake from Aundre Price at the Student Senate meeting Tuesday night. Maureen Miller, a representative from GatorWell, also spoke to the senators at the meeting and thanked them for passing the Resolution Supporting Medical Amnesty Policy. THE FESTIVAL WILL RUN THROUGH SATURDAY. JOLISA CANTYAlligator Contributing WriterComic relief is on the way. The Seventh Annual Gainesville Improv Festival will run today through Saturday in the Squitieri Studio Theatre at the Phillips Center for Performing Arts. Twenty-one improv groups, totaling about 90 performers, will perform improvisational and sketch comedy throughout the festival. Showtimes are 8 p.m. Wednesday through Satur day with additional 10 p.m. shows on Thursday through Saturday. Three improv groups will perform at each show. According to the festivals website, the mission is to share the culture and tradition of the Gainesville improv comedy scene with the national improv community. We like to mix it up a bit, said Tom ODonnell, one of the festivals executive producers. The St. Louis-based group K.A.R.L. is new to the festival this year. K.A.R.L. will perform with Chicago groups 3033 and Stacked on Saturday. Meghan Kenny, president of K.A.R.L., said shes excited about performing and working with such an experienced group as 3033. I think its the most amazing thing thats ever happened, Kenny said. This years festival is presented by Florida Improv, Mod 27 and Take Heed Theatre. Hilton Garden Inn is sponsoring the festival. The host this year is Brian Jaeger, associate producer and event coordinator of the Gainesville Improv Festival. Other groups scheduled to perform are The Third Thought, of Tampa; The Apprentice Group, of Gainesville; Formal Apology, of Chicago; The WHOligans, of Orlando; and Dear Aunt Gertrude, of Tampa. Along with the perfor mances, the festival offers improv workshops for everyone, regardless of experience level. Notable workshop instructors include Bill Arnett, of award-winning sketch comedy group Maximum Party Zone, and Andy St. Clair, formerly of Second City Mainstage and the cur rent host of Treasure Hunters Roadshow. Two rounds of workshops will be offered Feb. 4. a.m. to 1 p.m., and the second round is from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Tickets for the perfor mances are $6 for students and $8 for the general public. Workshop tickets are $30. Tickets are available at the Phillips Center for the at 315 Hull Road, by phone at either (352) 392-ARTS or (800) 905-ARTS and online at Ticketmaster.Gainesville improv festival to feature 21 groups, kicks off today OBITUARY JULIA GLUMAlligator WriterWhen Paul Favini laughed, everyone knew. The loud, infectious sound would open door and echo in the hallways in the Nadine M. McGuire Theatre and Dance Pavilion. You could just hear it, and you just knew that was Pauls laugh, said Tony Mata, head of musical theatre. It was just wonderful to hear. Favini, interim director of the UF School of Theatre and Dance, died Sunday after a nearly three-year battle with cancer. He was 51. Favinis colleagues and students at UF remember him fondly. He was a real gentleman, in the truest sense of the word, Mata said. Favini grew up in Scranton, Pa., and received a bachelors degree in business administration/marketing from the University of Scranton in 1987. He graduated with a Master of Fine Arts degree in costume design from Indiana University in 1997. Favini came to UF in 2000 and became an associate professor of costume design in July 2006. In 2010, he was appointed director. He was a center of calm in the bustling costume workshop, said Stacey Galloway, assistant professor of costume design and technology. Favini had an eye for detail. His bold designs were collaborative and creative, she said. He designed costumes for more than 60 shows, according to his resume. He was phenomenal, said John Reger, Favinis partner of 11 years. He should have been a Broadway designer. He should have a Tony Award. The school was his life. The hardest part of becoming director was that he was no longer in the classroom, Reger said. But Favini never lost his connection with students. He really knew how to listen, said Josh Sallerson, a dance senior. Now, the school feels incomplete without Favinis presence. Its like missing a family member, Sallerson said. He always had a joke for any little situation, and it was always a very funny, sarcastic joke, said his stepson, Britton Reger. Favini and his jokes will remain with his family and friends despite his absence. He will always be here with us in spirit, Mata said. We loved him very, very, very much. There will be a celebration of Favinis life at the Constans Theatre in February. Donations to Paul Favinis memorial fund can be sent to UFs 115800, Gainesville, Fla., 32611.Faculty member remembered for laugh, workFavini

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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 WWW.ALLIGATORSPORTS.ORG Gators Mens Golf Team Wins TourneyJunior T.J. Vogel took home the invidual title, helping UF win the Sea Best Invitational at TPC Sawgrass on Tuesday. See story online at alligatorSports.org.Signing Day CoverageLog on to alligatorSports.org today for quick-hitting coverage of the announcements on National Signing Day. For live updates, follow @WattMatts, @Tomas_Verde, @thekellyprice and @alligatorSports.Florida senior Joanna Mather said the top-ranked womens tennis team is not overlooking a match today with unranked UCF. See story, page 15. BRYAN HOLTAlligator Writer With his entire starting rotation returning from a successful season, few college baseball coaches will be as comfortable as Kevin OSullivan when settling into the dugout for the start of weekend games. But after Hudson Randall, Karsten Whitson and Brian Johnson, the questions begin. Following the 2011 season, the fani, Alex Panteliodis and Tomrounds. Together with senior bined to give the Gators 203.1 innings last season. solve. who our midweek starters are going to be, he said. our middle relief. Im real excited Kish. The trio enter the 2012 cambined to throw just 28.1 innings as freshmen and had mixed results. ing just one earned run over 14.1 innings of work for an ERA of 0.63. The same couldnt be said for Gibson, who saw his ERA balloon to 13.06 in limited action, inruns in a 14-1 loss to Vanderbilt and scrimmages to see who is outshining the others, Randall said. right now. has at the back end of his bulldirected toward freshmen and The midweek question that be coming in the right hand of a Floridas leading candidate for a midweek starter. out there on the mound, Randall said. doing a little bit more. Itd be nice from the fall. Im sure hes going to deliver this With a little more than two game, OSullivan admits that weeks into the season when Flor Even then, he admits that being able to bring one of his closadvantage he will not be afraid to use. nings and then weve got some Alligator File Photo Gators searching for solidity on staff after draft departures JOHN BOOTHEAlligator Staff Writer There were times last season when Will Yeguete felt like a single mistake would land him on the bench. Though he was a freshman and still fensive aggressiveness and a good habit of worst. when he touched the ball, there was a good chance he was going to turn it over, Donovan said. While Yeguete saw the second fewest -Yeguete gaining Donovans trust after turnover-prone seasonStarting rotation set, middle relief still unsettledRandall SEE HOOpPS, paPA GE 15 UF Bask etball

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14, ALLIGATOR WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 National Signing Day 2012National Signing Day is finally here, and Florida will ink its first full class under coach Will Muschamp today. To get you ready, we have compiled a list of UF targets to keep an eye on throughout the day. Several announcements will be shown nationally on ESPNU. Dante Fowler Jr.6-foot-3, 232 pounds Position: Defensive endHigh school: St. Petersburg LakewoodAlso considering: FSU UF or USC.Announcing: 10 a.m. down defender soon into his collegiate career, Leonard Willliams6-foot-5, 254 pounds Position: Defensive endHigh school: Daytona Beach MainlandAlso considering: Auburn, USCAnnouncing: 11 a.m. Williams could be considered another Auburn lean at Tracy Howard5-foot-11, 175 pounds Position: CornerbackHigh school: MiramarAlso considering: FSU, MiamiAnnouncing: 9:50 a.m. on ESPNU he is a force against taller receivers, too. This would Nelson Agholor6-foot-2, 180 pounds Position: Wide receiver High school: Also considering: USC, FSU, Notre DameAnnouncing: on ESPNU Stefon Diggs6-foot. 185 pounds Position: Wide receiverHigh school: Olney, Md., Our Lady of Good Counsel Also considering: Auburn, Cal, Maryland, Ohio StateAnnouncing: Feb. 10 just to generate excitement again. Playing at a school skills and should be ready to contribute immediately. targetsCompiled by Kelly Price All rankings and photos from Rivals.com Oral commitments are nonbinding until a national letter of intent is signed on or after National Signing Day on Feb. 1. Josh HarveyClemons6-foot-5, 208 pounds Position: LinebackerHigh school: Valdosta, Ga., LowndesAlso considering: Georgia, FSUAnnouncing: 9:15 a.m. on ESPNU Avery Young6-foot-6, 273 pounds Position: Offensive linemanHigh school: Palm Beach GardensAlso considering:Auburn, Georgia, MiamiAnnouncing: ESPNU college weight room. With oral commit tackle Young may not be too convinced that he has an Jake Meador6-foot-7, 305 pounds Position: Offensive tackleHigh school: Whiteland, Also considering: Missouri, WisconsinAnnouncing: 10:10 a.m. Meador, an Ole Miss decommit, has seen late Vincent Valentine6-foot-3, 300 pounds Position: Defensive tackleHigh school: Also considering:Announcing: Once considered a solid Nebraska guy, Valentine visit in Gainesville and admitted his decision would be harder. Valentine is an excellent add Schyler Miles6-foot-2, 220 pounds Position: LinebackerHigh school: Also considering: Kansas, West VirginiaAnnouncing: Noon Former UF offensive coordinator Charlie Weis led the charge for Miles has leaned more towards the Jayhawks. last to visit in-home with Miles, and he seems sold. Shawn Janetzke / Alligator Staff

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cent of the possessions he played. If he wanted to become a player Donovan could trust, Yeguete knew he needed to make better decisions. Now a sophomore and seeing starters minutes in four straight games for the Gators, Yeguete is turning the ball over just 13.6 per cent of the time and has limited himself to 13 giveaways over UFs 21 games. I just slowed down, just taking my time on offense, Yeguete said. And sometimes when you see somebodys open but you try to rush the pass, just make sure and take your time passing the ball. Donovan has relied on Yeguete to start nine games this season in place of forward Erik Murphy and, most recently, injured center Patric Young. In the extended minutes, Yeguetes teammates giving him touches on offense. Hes made tremendous progress and coach has continued to work with him, said senior guard Erving Walker. Hes done a great job since hes been here. Last year, we were a little deeper at his position and he worked hard every day in practice. Hes getting the opportunity this year, and I think that hes making the most of it. While Donovan said Yeguete is far from becoming a feared scor ing threat, the drop in turnovers has allowed the Gators to use his defensive skill-set more. Yeguete ranks second on the team with 25 steals and he also has seven blocks on the season. Against Mississippi State last Saturday, Yeguete held the Bulldogs leading scorer Arnett Moultrie below his season average and centage in eight games. Donovan praised Yeguetes ability to keep Moultrie away from the basket and not give up deep entry passes in the post. Once Will gets a guy in an from the basket, hes good enough physically to take on contact and then obviously hes really good with his hands in terms of slapvan said. So hes a really, really good defender. As good of a post defender as Ive had since weve been here. He takes great pride in taking on those challenges. Contact John Boothe at jboothe@ alligator.org. WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 ALLIGATOR, 15Brett Le Blanc / Alligator StaffJunior Ashane Dickerson was named SEC Gymnast of the Week on Tuesday for the third time in her career, following an all-round victory in UFs quad meet last week. SHE WON GYMNAST OF THE WEEK. LANDON WATNICKAlligator Writer this season, Ashane Dickerson fell a little under the radar before last Fridays meet. Then she made a resounding statement in a resounding win. As an all-around competitor, Dickerson title of 2012 and her 11th as a Gator in UFs impressive victory against top-ranked Arkansas, No. 24 Maryland and Bridgeport. cise title (9.95) with freshman Kytra Hunter and tallied a career high on uneven bars (9.925). For her performance last Friday, Dickerson earned Southeastern Conference Gymnast of season and the third of her Florida career. That (all-around win) was really special for Ashane, coach Rhonda Faehn said. She always puts her absolute best into every competition in every event she does. Dickersons total was just one-tenth of a point off her collegiate-best mark of 39.70, which she earned toward the end of her freshman season in the 2010 NCAA North Central Regional. Her 39.60 is also the second-best all-around score this year, behind Arkansas Katherine Grables 39.725 against LSU on Jan. 20. While Dickerson has recently kept a slightly been a powerhouse for the Gators. Dickerson has averaged a 39.325 as an allarounder, which is good for 13th nationally. raised her title total to 50 in her three seasons, placing her seventh on UFs career list. Dickersons performances as an all-around competitor have also helped the Gators average a team total of 196.563 throughout four meets. With Dickerson leading the way last Friday est total in school history. That score, which is also the best in the nation this season, helped rankings to No. 3. It was amazing to show everyone how hard we work in the gym and how much weve bonded, Dickerson said. It showed in our performance. When No. 3 Florida travels to Tuscaloosa, Ala., on Friday night to compete against reigning NCAA champion No. 6 Alabama, big production will now be expected out of Dickerson, although her status as an all-around competitor still remains unknown. Shes becoming more comfortable with the actual performance aspect of competing, Faehn said. Shes really enjoying what shes doing out there. You can see it.Brett Le Blanc / Alligator StaffGators sophomore forward Will Yeguetes 25 steals are the secondmost of any Florida player this season. Yeguete keys defensive stop of MSU HOOPS, from page 13 ELI MARGERAlligator Writer When the Florida womens tennis team hosts UCF on Wednesday, the expectation will be a clean sweep. The No. 1 Gators are simply a different class of team. Every match, no matter who is across the court, will be accompanied by an expectation of victory. Coming off a national championship with a team full of proven winners, there is always the possibility of becoming complacent. Florida has not lost since Feb. 21 last year, and victory has seemingly become a way of life. However, in this new and young season, no one is satisThere will be a lot of great teams this year, a lot of good competition, so I really dont think (complacency) is an issue, Joanna Mather said. As one of two seniors, Mather could be expected to be the leader and chief motivator. But the team returns all of its key members, and each player has taken it upon herself to continue to get better. (The leadership) is spread out, she said. This team is really good at knowing what they need to do and making sure they do it. As far as leadership role, if you consider my spot a leadership role, its very easy. With unranked UCF coming to Gainesville Wednesday, the Gators will face their second straight match in which they are overwhelming favorites. More than anything, the dual match will be another chance to improve heading into a challenging match at No. 5 Baylor. The players maintain that they will not overlook any opponent, regardless of ranking. I dont want us to get complacent, sophomore Olivia Janowicz said. We had a meeting the other day, and we dont want to expect the same things. As long as were not complacent it just as bad or even more. Expectations are going to be high all season, and rightfully so. The Gators have some of the best singles players and doubles teams in the nation, a top-notch coach, and a national championship to defend. The team put together a challenging schedule, including the trips to Baylor this weekend and No. 2 Stanford next weekend. This continual challenge is something that will keep Florida on its toes. When it comes to playing teams like UCF, however, the challenge is avoiding letdowns. Every match is another match for us, Mather said. Were just going to take it as another step towards our goal at the end of the year. Mather

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16, ALLIGATOR WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012



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VOLUME 106 ISSUE 91 WWW.ALLIGATOR.ORG WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 Today We Inform. You Decide.Not officially associated with the University of Florida Published by Campus Communications, Inc. of Gainesville, Florida Man charged with attempted robbery at The PolosHe was arrested a quarter mile away from the apartments, pg 3. Gov. Scott launches investigation of Florida Highway PatrolFlorida Department of Law Enforcement to investigate, pg 5. Despite a No. 1 ranking, UF is still looking for answers out of the bullpen after the departures MEREDITH RUTLAND, ADRIANNA PAIDAS and JULIA GLUM Alligator Staff Writers The votes arrived in bursts of tens, twenties, hundreds. One by one, candidates rolled into the Supervisor of ElecAlmost every eye was on the projection screen until a single red bar slid higher than the rest. Then a future commissioner smiled. Yvonne Hinson-Rawls was elected to the District 1 seat of the Gainesville City Commission on Tuesday with 1,126 votes 54.29 percent of the total District 1 votes. However, two candidates wont be able to relax just yet. The at-large 1 seat will go to a runoff because none of the eight candidates was able to secure a majority of the votes. Lauren Poe, Santa Fe College associate professor and former Gainesville city commissioner, and Nathan Skop, lawyer and former Florida Public Service commissioner, will face off in a Feb. 28 runoff election. They had the highest number of votes, with Poe securing 4,402 votes and Skop earning 2,944 votes. A total of 24,864 people voted about 25 percent of registered voters. This years election turnout was higher than last years Students remember UF faculty member for his laughter and his attention to detail, See story, page 8 79 /55 FORECAST 2 OPINIONS 6 CLASSIFIEDS 9 CROSSWORD 11 SPORTS 13 Alex Catalano / Alligator Staff results came in Tuesday night. Hinson-Rawls wins District 1, at-large 1 seat goes to runoffSEE ELECTION, PAGE 4I-75 ACCIDENT TYLER JETT Alligator Staff Writer The last couple of months contained some of the happiest moments in Christie Nguyens life, a life that came to a tragic end on Interstate 75 on Sunday morning. The 27-year-old lifelong Gainesville resident, whose name was released by the Florida Highway Patrol on Tuesday, was a UF alumna and a Santa Fe College student. Nguyen was headed north in a Toyota Matrix on Sunday. Jason Raikes, her boyfriend and a source of recent joy, died beside her. He was driving. Speaking to his parents and to my parents, its pretty clear they were meant to be with each other, her brother Nelson said. [None of the parents] had seen them happier. They were very much in love. They were talking about settling down. In addition to Nelson, Christie leaves behind her father, Andrew; her mother, Linh; and her 6-year-old son, ball Wiles Elementary School. The Alligator couldnt reach any of Raikes relatives, who, according to WJXT in Jacksonville, live in Richmond, Va. Christie was artistic and talented, NelSanta Fe student and boyfriend die together in I-75 accidentsNguyen SEE CRASH, PAGE 4Runoff election to take place Feb. 28 A THIRD BODY WAS DISCOVERED IN A DODGE PICKUP. JON SILMANAlligator Staff WriterThe death toll is now 11 in the Interstate 75 crashes that also injured at least 22 people early Sunday morning. According to the Orlando Sentinel, the Florida Highway Patrol announced Tuesday night that a third victim was found in a Dodge pickup. In the aftermath of the crash, the pickup was on top of a crushed Pontiac Grand Prix. Another passenger and the driver of the truck were also killed. Their names have not been released. The rise in the death toll is due to the continued investigation by the Medical ExOther names and identities were also released by the FHP in the days following the incident. the remains of 22-year-old Vontavia Robinson of Williston. A family believed to be from a Brazilian Restoration church in Georgia, travelling from a three day conference in the Orlando area, were also victims of the crash. According to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Edson Carmo, 38, was the pastor of the church and driver of a 2012 Dodge Caravan. His passengers included Roselia DeSilva, 41, Jose Carmo Jr., 43, Adrianna nesaw, Ga. They were all killed. Lidiane Carmo, 15, the sole survivor from the van, was still at Shands at UF as of Tuesday night.Death toll in crash rises to 11

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News Today Subscription Rates: One Semester (Fall or Spring) $18 Summer Semester $10 Two Semesters (Fall or Spring) $35 Full Year (All Semesters) $40The Independent Florida Alligator is a student newspaper serving the University of Florida, pubThe Alligator The Alligator is The Alligator VOLUME 106 ISSUE 91 ISSN 0889-2423 The Alligator The Alligator 2, ALLIGATOR WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 TODAYFORECAST WHATS HAPPENING?Lincoln: The Constitution and the Civil War traveling exhibition Today, 2:30 p.m. Library West, third floor The exhibition opening will be followed by faculty presentations by Patricia Hilliard-Nunn and Sharon Austin at 3 p.m. in Smathers Library, Room 1A. A Q&A session and reception will follow. Radical About Christ Bible study Today, 5 p.m. Little Hall, Room 201 February is the month of love. Radical About Christ presents The Month of Unconditional Love. The first topic to be covered is Understanding Love. CHISPAS General Body Meeting Today, 7 p.m. Reitz Union, Rooms 276-77 Interested in human rights and community service? All students are welcome. Free pizza will be provided, and all who attend will have the chance to win a free T-shirt. UF in Haifa study-abroad dinner Today, 7 p.m. Hillel, 2020 W University Ave. Join Hillel for a free dinner sponsored by the University of Haifa to find out more about study abroad and graduate degree programs in Israel. Action through awareness Today, 7 p.m. Reitz Union Rion Ballroom Please join UF Doctors Without Borders Student Organization and Reitz Union Board Entertainment as we welcome Dr. Keith Stone, an MSF field OB/GYN; Steve Siegel, a UF medical student; and Angie Brice, a Teach for America veteran. They will discuss their life-changing experiences as humanitarians. Meet the speakers, ask questions and gain insight into areas of philanthropy. Reitz Union Entertainment Board presents Groundhog Day Today and Thursday, 8 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. Reitz Union Auditorium Want to know if well be seeDance Marathon hosts 5K, FT5K Sunday, 8 a.m. UF Commuter Lot Dance Marathon at UF is hosting its annual 5K, the FT5K. Early online registration is $20, and same-day registration is $25. A 1-mile fun run is an option for those who like shorter distances for $10. All proceeds benefit Shands Hospital for Children, our local Childrens Miracle Network Hospital. To learn more and register, visit www.floridadm.org/5k. Gainesville Crohns and Colitis support group Feb. 7, 7 p.m. American Cancer Society Hope Lodge, 2121 SW 16th St. If you have inflammatory bowel disease, come find support with others. The group is very welcoming and understands what youve been through. For more information, contact Dennis@UCVlog. com. Got something going on? Want to see it in this space? Send an email with Whats Happening in the subject line to emorrow@alligator. org. To ensure publication in the next days newspaper, please submit the event before 5 p.m. Please model your submissions after above events. Improperly formatted Whats Happening submissions may not appear in the paper. Press releases will not appear in the paper. ing six more weeks of winter? Come watch Groundhog Day to find out. Starring Bill Murray as a weatherman living the same day over and over again. The movie is free and open to the public. Free salsa classes with the Gator Salsa Club Thursday, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Reitz Union Colonnade Come join the Gator Salsa Club to learn some salsa moves for free. The lessons will be held on the Reitz Colonnade every Tuesday and Thursday from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. The club will teach Dance on 2 from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. followed by Casino style from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. No experience or partner is required. All levels of dancers are welcome. UF Libertarians screen Waiting for Superman Thursday, 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Matherly, Room 118 For National School Choice Week, the UF Libertarians will be screening Waiting for Superman, a Sundance award-winning documentary that analyzes the failures of the public education system in America. Those interested in education, public choice, political economy, public policy and liberty are welcome to attend. Refreshments will be provided. Soweto Gospel Choir Friday, 7:30 p.m. Phillips Center for Performing Arts Grammy Award-winning Soweto Gospel Choir pays homage to tribal, traditional and popular African and Western music while uplifting souls with earthy rhythms, dynamic harmonies and a cappella vocals. Student tickets are $12. Visit performingarts.ufl.edu for more infor mation. PARTLY CLOUDY 79/55 RAIN 77/54 PARTLY CLOUDY 76/55 PARTLY CLOUDY 80/53 THUNDER STORMS 80/57 SUNDAY SATURDAY FRIDAY THURSDAY

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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 ALLIGATOR, 3 Haley Stracher / Alligator StaffChas Hackmann, a 19-year-old mechanical engineering sophomore, uses a green to-go box every day at Gator Dining. AN ESTIMATED 1,000 ARE CHECKED OUT EVERY WEEK. MATT BOLESAlligator Contributing WriterGators are taking going green literally with on-campus dining this year. Students have been able to use the reusable, green to-go boxes at Gator Corner Dining Center, Broward Dining and the Reitz Unions Home Zone since Januof Sustainability website. The dining halls started to charge students 40 cents each for disposable boxes in August, and more students are checking out reusable boxes this semester. Felita Sallet, 22, the lead cashier at Gator Corner, estimated that at least 1,000 to-go boxes are checked out every week at Gator Corner. We didnt expect it to catch on like it did, she said. We had to order more boxes to keep up with the demand. She said she didnt know how many were checked out before the charge was implemented on disposable boxes. Students check out a box if they want to take food to go, and as long as they dont keep any boxes, they get their $4 deposit back at the end of the semester, according to Gator Dining Services. The reusable boxes prevent about 14,000 containers from being thrown out, according to a Gator Dining handout. Hanah Eastwood, a 19-yearold linguistics freshman, has used the green boxes about 20 times. Anybody who has a meal she said.Campus to-go boxes growing more popularCRIME SHELBY WEBBAlligator WriterA man was almost robbed walking to his apartment in The Polos early Tuesday morning. Jeremy Christian Barry, 18, of 4330 SE 80th St., was arrested by Gainesville Police on charges for attempted robbery a quarter mile from the incident. According to the arrest report, at 12:13 a.m. Barry ran behind the victim near the 2300 block of Southwest 35th Place and demanded the victims money and phone. As the victim turned around, Barry demanded money again, signaling with his right hand on his pants pocket that he had a weapon. According to the arrest report, he told the victim, Dont make me pull this out. The victim told police a vehicle leaving the complex startled Barry, giving the victim a chance to run away. Police found Barry nearby within minutes. When questioned, Barry said he smoked crack in Phoenix Apartments and was walking to his brothers house. the person who attempted to rob him. After he was arrested, Barry admitted he was looking for drug money. He told police he approached the victim aggressively but denied implying he had a weapon. He was found with a pocketknife in his front right pants pocket. Barry was charged with attempted robbery with a deadly weapon. Bond was set at $30,000.Man arrested, charged with attempted robbery in The Polos

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son said. Dancing was an outlet for her. She started when she was 4 or 5 and never really stopped. Ballet, tap, jazz she did it all. She performed with Dance Alive National Ballet, and she usually took part in the companys annual Nutcracker show at the Phillips Center for the Performing Arts. She played the piano in talent shows at Countryside Christian School, the schools former principal Bill Keith said. Her former teacher Gwen Keith said she loved to draw during class. Christie and Nelson grew up in Gainesville and lived at 11113 W Newberry Road. Mary D. Fletcher, a neighbor, said she sold the Nguyens their house in 1991. She remembered Christie being quiet but thoughtful. She was a brilliant, absolutely brilliant girl, Fletcher said. She never missed a day at Countryside, where she attended from elementary school through high school. She was the class salutatorian in 2001. She was less than a point shy of graduating No. 1, Gwen said. Christie graduated from UF in 2010 with a degree in Asian studies, and she earned a pair of business administration degrees from Santa Fe. She was taking an anatomy and physiology class at Santa Fe this semester and dancing at the college. The dance program is just devastated, in a statement. The dance program was like Christies family. My phone is ringing off the hook with students asking, Is it true? Christie was planning to become a phar macist, Nelson said. Andrew, her father, is a doctor with family practices in Newberry and Trenton. Nelson said. That was one thing that inter ested her. She really wanted to pursue it. My Working at a pharmacy and living with Raikes those were Christies plans for the future, Nelson said. That was her happiness. she had her son the idea of settling and planning becomes exciting, Nelson said. been the happiest Ive seen her. Nelson doesnt know where Christie and Raikes were driving home from Sunday morning. Wherever it was, they left together. 4, ALLIGATOR WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012Olivia Muenter / Alligator slating form Monday afternoon. ALEX CORNILLIE WILL RUN FOR STUDENT BODY PRESIDENT. SAMANTHA SHAVELLAlligator WriterSenior economics major Alex Cor nillie will run as the Students Party candidate for Student Body president with political science and economics junior Jesse Schmitt as his vice president. Party president. Sen. Carly Wilson will run for treasurer. Cornillie has served on the Reitz Union Board of Managers and managed programs for Gator Growl and Homecoming. He was also the press secretary for former Student Body President Ashton Charles. Schmitt has no UF Student Government experience. However, Wilson said he ran and campaigned before with the Student Alliance Party and understands SG. He also brought Humans vs. Zombies to campus in 2010. Schmitt was welcomed to the football team last spring as a walk-on fullback. He said his overall goal is to increase student participation in SG. Last week, the Unite Party announced Tj Villamil as its presidential candidate. Today it will announce its treasur er and vice presidential candidates at the Reitz Union Amphitheater at Each party has also been inter viewing potential senators during qualifying, which ended Tuesday. Supervisor of Elections Toni Megduring all three days. The Students Party had 53 students and the Unite Party had 606 students. No one declared independent, she said.Students Party announces candidates for Spring SG electionsCRIME SHELBY WEBBAlligator Contributing Writer A Gainesville man was arrested Thursday in connection with multiple bike thefts at UF and off-campus apartments. Robert Kenneth Barton, 18, was taken into custody Thursday night by Gainesville Police, according to GPD Detective Tom Mullins. Barton was stealing bikes and trying to sell them to local pawn and sport shops, Mullins said. He added that the arrest was made with help from Univer sity Police Department detective Duffy. During an interrogation, Barton said he stole as many as 10 bikes from UF and popular student apartments, Mullins said. Barton was charged with or ganized stolen property dealing, unarmed burglary of an unoccupied dwelling, fraud and petit theft. Mullins said one of the bikes was returned because it had been registered with UPD. We were able to compare the serial numbers, he said. Its a really good tool for students with bikes on campus. Students are encouraged to register their bikes and report stolen ones to UPD. Decals are available to those who register their bikes, which Mullins said can help deter bur faster.Man charged in connection with series of bicycle thefts CRASH, from page 1Nguyen remembered for her talentsMore voters turned out to polls for this years electioncity elections, when 14.87 percent of registered voters cast ballots. Hinson-Rawls threw her hands in the air and yelled, Thank you! Thank you! as she embraced supporters. Although shell take a short break, she said she has been researching some of the issues from her platform. I want to put them into some real plans for moving forward, HinsonRawls said. I want to be able to step in, day one, and start making results. Ray Washington, a Gainesville lawyer, came in second in the District 1 race and earned 479 votes. He said he plans to support Skop in the runoff. In the meantime, hell go back to work. Armando Grundy, an Army veteran, came in third with 469 votes. Skop and Poe went head-to-head in debates and forums throughout the election cycle. Both said they plan to run a positive runoff campaign. Poe said hes elated he made it this far. wide margin shows that our positive, forward-looking message really resonated with voters, he said. Although he is exhausted, Poe said he and his campaign staff are deter mined to run a strong race. Its like winning the AFC-NFC championship, he said. You get to enjoy it for one night, but then you have to get ready for the Super Bowl. Nathan Skop said hes excited for what the next month will bring. He said he plans to win the runoff election by securing the support of his former opponents who ran on similar government openness. ing change and representative government back to Gainesville, Skop said. The runoff elections will be a referendum on change versus the status quo on the current commission. ELECTION, from page 1Barton Cornillie I want to put them into some real plans for moving forward I want to be able to step in, day one, and start making results.Gainesville city commissioner

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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 ALLIGATOR, 5AP PhotoCongregation in mourningInternational Church of the Restoration parishioners mourn the loss of Pastor Jose Carmo Jr., his wife Adriana and their daughter Leticia Carmo on Monday in Marietta, Ga. The family was killed Sunday in an Interstate 75 multi-vehicle crash. TRACK AND FIELD MEET WAS DELAYED 35 MINUTES. BENJAMIN S. BRASCHAlligator WriterGainesville residents and businesses are still feeling the effects of Sundays series of car accidents that left 11 dead. After the wrecks on Inter state 75, businesses temporarily stopped production, athletic competitions were delayed and hotels paid to accommodate those who were The last thing they needed after seeing that mayhem was hotel room was booked, said Tony Trusty, general manager of the Hilton University of Florida Conference Center. The hotel extended reservations overnight for those who of the accidents, he said. In addition to an extra night, the hotel provided a glass of wine to each patron to ease the stress caused by He said he doesnt know if any guests were in the accidents. The hotel covered the expense of the extra night, Trusty said. Technically, there was a loss of revenue, but I dont even look at it that way, he said. We chose the moral route. Some people werent able to get to Gainesville to swordchain mail. About 12,000 people attended the Hoggetowne Medieval Faire on Saturday. That number dropped to 9,500 Sunday, said Linda Piper, events coordinator with the City of Gainesville Division of Cultural Affairs. She said she expects those who couldnt make it over the weekend to be at the fair this weekend. Some businesses have to play catch-up because of accidents. It took some employees of Swamp Head Brewery seven and a half hours to get back from an event in Jupiter when it would normally take them four, said Luke Kemper, founder and owner of Swamp Head Brewery. Because they were so late, they were unable to spend the three hours it takes to clean equipment, Kemper said. With six hours of preparation time needed, the brewery couldnt get a batch ready for fermentation in time. Its not going to be the end of the world, he said. Well just double-up one day. be late to work and tardy to meetings. Sue Burzynski Bullard was late to a weekend of meetings when her two-hour drive half hours. The University of Nebraska-Lincoln associate professor was coming to Gainesville to help decide whether the UF College of Journalism and Communications would be re-accredited. Then, I-75 became a parking lot. As frustrated as I was, I consider myself lucky that I wasnt in the crash the night before, she said. When people arrived in Gainesville, they still had to deal with delays. The Jimmy Carnes Indoor Track and Field Meet brought about 900 youth athletes to day, but some athletes had to wait as others arrived late. The event was scheduled to start at 8:30 a.m., but it started 35 minutes late, said Larry Holsey, director of the meet. The meets organizers had to pay to rent the space from time they didnt use because renters pay by the hour, he said. After waiting 35 minutes, Holsey said, he and others decided to start the meet. He said he had to scramble youth athletes were talking about the accidents among each other, he said. It was on the hearts of a lot hearts go out to the people. It was tragic. Alligator staff writer Meredith Rutland contributed to this report.Businesses, events affected by wrecksI-75 ACCIDENT ERIN JESTERAlligator Staff WriterAt the request of Gov. Rick Scott, the Florida Department of Law Enforcement has started an investigation into the car crashes that claimed 11 lives on Interstate 75. Scott requested the investigation Monday, FDLE Communications Coordinator Keith Kameg said. why the interstate was reopened a few hours after being closed shortly after midnight Sunday due to poor visibility. During this tragic time, our thoughts and prayers should be with the victims and their families, said a statement on the governors website. General will coordinate the investigation. When the report is complete, FDLE will turn it over to the There is no timeline on the report, Kameg said, and he was unable to provide further information. We got it yesterday and were putting it together today, he said. While there are many things inthe cause of the crashes, some things are already known. The Alachua County Fire Department issued no permits for controlled burns inside Gainesville city limits last week, said Gainesville Fire Rescue District Chief Jeff Lane. northwest of Gainesville, but that Prairie Preserve State Park, he said. The Florida Forest Service authorized a 70-acre pasture burn near Archer, but it was quite far from Paynes Prairie, said FFS spokeswoman Ludie Bond. Bond said controlled burns were Sunday.Gov. launches investigation of FHPScott ALLI LANGLEYAlligator WriterShands at UF went on red alert at about 5 a.m. Sunday, shortly after poor visibility from dense smoke and fog caused crashes involving about 20 vehicles that killed 11 people. The hospitals emergency deBe prepared for mass casualties, they said. Immediately, the Critical Care Center activated its emergency alert system. People mobilized from throughout the hospital, said Dr. Adrian Tyndall, chief of Emergency Services, not just the emergency department. Shands Critical Care Center received 22 patients, said John Pastor, spokesman for UF/Shands Comreleased and eight remained in the hospital as of 5 p.m. Tuesday. Tyndall said four trauma sur geons, emergency physicians, nurses and other staff worked together to handle the emergencies and comfort those involved in the accidents. There was a lot of sadness given said. Despite that, Shands employees handled the situation like the emer gencies they deal with every day. Patients arrived in intervals, he said, and the emergency room atmosphere was calm and orderly. However, he said, workers at the scene played the most important role: They were the ones checking to see who was alive, who could be rescued and who could not. The EMS personnel manning the frontlines were the heroes here, he said. They saw something many never, ever see. Fortunately, Pastor said, the chaos of the crash site didnt translate to chaos at the hospital. The alert lasted less than three hours, but the effects of the crash linger. If needed, doctors and nurses have resources such as counseling to help them. Health care providers arent immune to these situations, said Lisa Merlo, a psychologist and professor at UFs College of Medicine. Like everyone, she said, they need time to rest and process their feelings. Medical personnel are still human beings, she said.Emergency workers heroes in tragedyShands treated 22 patients Its not going to be the end of the world.Luke Kemperfounder and owner of Swamp Head Brewery

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Reader responseVote or post a message at www.alligator.orgThe views expressed here are not necessarily those of the Alligator .The Alligator will be withheld if the writer shows just cause. We reserve the right to edit for length, grammar, style and libel. Send letters to letters@alligator.org, bring them to 1105 W. University Ave., or send them to P.O. Box 14257, Gainesville, FL 32604-2257. Columns of about 450 words about original topics and editorial cartoons are also welcome. Questions? Call 352-376-4458. Column EditorialWEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 WWW.ALLIGATOR.ORG/OPINIONS Joey Flechas EDITOR Emily Morrow MANAGING EDITOR Justin Hayes OPINIONS EDITORTodays question: Would you ever masturbate in public?86 TOTAL VOTES57% YES 43% NOTuesdays question: Are you going to vote today?Rituals still have value in age of reasonThose of us who passed through the Plaza of the Americas last week observed one of the many peculiarities of college life. A cinder-block wall had been erected, each brick painted with negative terms such as Jesus freak useless and terrorist. The project, dubbed Writing on the Wall is an annual exercise meant to raise awareness of hurtful phrases and increase mutual respect. This project serves as a constant reminder of the importance of ritual in the human experience. shoulders and walk on. My time in academia has made me accustomed to feeling like a pilgrim in a strange world. However, when I learned that the wall was meant to be torn down in a ritualized ceremony, it made perfect sense. The university campus is, in a sense, the climax of the modern age. Since the Enlightenment, the Western world has been pining to throw the yoke of old and stodgy traditions off its back. We have embraced reason and logic and rejected the overly pious religiosity of the medieval period. Sure, there are some backward holdovers the rightwing fundamentalists, the street preachers and the Luddites but they represent a small niche on campus, and we all attend class in an environment where Robespierre would feel right at home. However, we still have our rituals. We no longer light incense or pray to the Virgin Mary were much too clever for that. We do something much more sensible (or so we think) we build walls just to tear them down. These rituals are a constant reminder that humans have always had mechanisms to cope with inner depravity. Our ancestors would pray and fast, yet as they moved into the age of reason such things began to appear quaint and illogical. However, the deep need for ritual still overcomes us. The Writing on the Wall project is a perfect example of this. These practices are often meant to raise awareness of a societal blight in this case, intolerance and incivility. One is forced to wonder whether lack of awareness of such things is truly the problem. Do we slander and curse each other because we are unaware that such things are harmful, or do we do so because we have no fear of a deep and binding code of morality? No matter what theory to which one ascribes, both are expressed through the aforementioned custom of ritual. I was fortunate enough to pass through the Plaza of the Americas when the painted wall came crashing down. A large crowd had gathered, and a charismatic Four, he began, and the crowd shouted in unison, three, two, one! The ropes were pulled, the wall creaked and the cinder blocks, marred with their obscenities, came crashing down in a pile of rubble. The crowd shared in a cathartic release in the wake of the spectacle. Is it not odd that in the supposed age of reason, we still put so much value in these ritualized machinations that serve no purpose other than to remind us of what we value? Pulling down a painted wall will not salvage our cultures civility, yet we believe it can, because even the most secular among us are still religious by nature. No matter how many gods are forgotten, all of us still believe in the cleansing power of a communal ritual. Luke Bailey is a history junior at UF. His column appears on Wednesdays.Lack of FocusMedia obsessed with non-issues in GOP raceLast night, the plurality of Florida Republican voters decided that Mitt Romney should be the nominee for the GOP. While yesterdays election might be important to a candidate like Santorum, who has to decide whether he has the resources to remain competitive (his best showing was in Iowa), Floridas 50 delegates do not mean much in the grand scheme of things. So far, only 5 percent of the 2,224 delegates have been allotted to candidates in this race. There still is a long way to go, and the campaign will probably only get worse. As the remaining candidates struggle to take on the Romney machine, the attacks will get dirtier and more personal, although they have been pretty bad already. For the remainder of this campaign, we would like to simply ask the candidates one thing: Why arent you talking about the issues? While the candidates try to prove that their opponents are really liberal wolves in conservative sheeps clothing, a lot of serious issues are being pushed aside for more mundane topics. ly and did not present any new information. And what does releasing the candidates tax returns possibly tell us about how they will perform the duties of commander-in-chief? Part of the blame should be placed on the national media, which focus almost entirely on the latest poll numbers or the latest attack ad. This is not to say that negative campaigning should be prohibited or even discouraged. Negative campaigning brings a lot to elections, giving voters more information about candidates and occasionally mobilizing them to go to the polls. However, the debates have become one negative ad soundbite after another. Rather than asking the candidates serious questions about the issues, the moderators have spent a substantial amount of time discussing the content of negative advertising and disparaging statements. Again, part of this could be the fact that the issues were given serious consideration at the beginning of the race, some been 25 debates so far in this primary, yet nearly none of the previous debates spent much time talking about issues. the candidates plan to do to reduce the debt? We have heard vague generalities about cutting spending and reducing the the candidates about what they want to cut or when. The country is going broke, and the media wants to focus on open marriages and tax returns. Perhaps we should give priority to things that matter. Luke Baileyopinions@alligator.org

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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 ALLIGATOR, 7 The story of the Titanic has captivated the world for nearly a century so much so that the tragedy became a pop culture icon with the release of the 1997 movie, Titanic. The years. The reasons for the widespread interest are clear: The Titanics fate was a terrible disaster with serious human and material costs. maiden voyage. There is more to the story of the Titanic than irony or persistent idolization, however. The Titanic is not an isolated story or a ter rible turn of fate. Rather, its lessons hold credence and value for the be understood and recognized. tanic that led to its destruction. Other ships gave warnings about icebergs in the Titanics path, but the captain made no effort to reduce speed or change course. In fact, a governmental investigation conducted after the tragedy blamed the captain for traveling too cause it was immensely strong so strong that those in charge of commanding the ship felt it could withstand anything. story, and it shows how important human actions and decisions remain in a world of technological and innovative genius. It is a story that has been mirrored most recently in the Costa Concordia disaster. No matter how big, powerful or technologically advanced the ship, human agency remains crucial. When people are trusted with the responsibility of commanding a ship that can, today, effectively command itself, training and human attention to detail should be increased, certainly not decreased. Costa Concordia was a very modern, safe ship built in 2006 and operated by Carnival Corporation, one of the largest cruise compaoperation globally. tion, but rather a greatness of design and construction that instilled in the ships operators the complacency that caused the tragedy. In a 2010 interview with a Czech newspaper, Concordia Captain Francesco Schettino said, These days, everything is much safer. the Internet. al route to pass closer to the Italian island of Giglio. Some speculate this decision stemmed from the captains desire to show off the ship to the islands citizens. It also may have been a nod to the Concordias chief waiter, who comes from the island and hoped to pass close enough to wave to family members. dia were not on his nautical chart, and that when he saw them with captain deviated the ship from the planned route and brought it too close to land. He relied on nautical charts rather than pure common sense, and the ships prowess gave him a false sense of secuThus, if there is anything to be learned from the demise of the Concordia and Titantic it is this: No matter the technology, size or power, human decision matters. It is a lesson that must be apseems so easy to put on autopilot we must always remember that human decisions and behavior are still the most vital factors. Jamie Dailey is a columnist for the Cavalier Daily at the University of Virginia. Nothing is unsinkable: Technological advances demand more attentionLership was led astray when a man had some The man stood up and demanded, What happened with Building 7, Rudolph? The man had a good question, even though he Giulianis speech and probably didnt do much to help his worthy cause. But what needs to be addressed is Giulianis attitude toward the questions themselves. To another audience member, Giuliani respondcould be Times Square. Any more clowns? The man was then harassed by other audience members, and something tells me that it was for more than interrupting Giulianis speech: boos started pouring in as soon as Building 7 came out of the mans mouth. dren. Giulianis response, May I suggest a barber? to a sincere question about 9/11 is the standard misdiFirst, may I suggest Rogaine to you, Mr. Giuliani? (Do you see the pointlessness of ad hominem?) ing a day of such great tragedy as 9/11? Third, to anyone convinced our government is incapable of lying to its constituency, may I suggest an education? woods? Uncertainty regarding the 9/11 Commission Reports veracity is nothing to scoff at. In 2006, Scripps Howard News Service and Ohio University conducted a poll of 1,010 adults and found that 36 percent of respondents thought it go to war in the Middle East. So, you say you want a new investigation opened on 9/11 an investigation not designed to protect the ineptitude of the fed9/11 Commission Report? Well, according to Giuliani, rudeness is appar deny people answers about 9/11. So, dont be rude, or of countless other reasonable Americans, will fall into limbo. or you will be made irrelevant and derided by a As you might have noticed, there is no right way to question the 9/11 Commission Report. Every approach will lead to oblivion or derision dence in the government. And that attitude is shamefully accompanied by the misguided idea that questioning the 9/11 Commission Report is somehow un-American. That is, of course, just another duplicitous, illogical attempt to shift attention from the questions to the questionnaires. Was 9/11 an inside job as asserted by the most Probably not. es preceding and following 9/11 complete? Probably not. But neither of these questions is certain to any reasonable degree. they are left in limbo or snubbed entirely. Americans have doubts about the 9/11 Commission Report. And as long as our troops are in war as a direct result of that day, the questions need to remain alive. Meanwhile, the investigation into 9/11 is not complete. Abdul Zalikha is a biology and English junior at UF. His column appears on Wednesdays. Giuliani should welcome 9/11 questionsColumn Abdul Zalikhaopinions@alligator.org UWireJamie DaileyUWire

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8, ALLIGATOR WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 John McLaughlin / AlligatorLet Them Eat CakeAna Dominguez receives a birthday cake from Aundre Price at the Student Senate meeting Tuesday night. Maureen Miller, a representative from GatorWell, also spoke to the senators at the meeting and thanked them for passing the Resolution Supporting Medical Amnesty Policy. THE FESTIVAL WILL RUN THROUGH SATURDAY. JOLISA CANTYAlligator Contributing WriterComic relief is on the way. The Seventh Annual Gainesville Improv Festival will run today through Saturday in the Squitieri Studio Theatre at the Phillips Center for Performing Arts. Twenty-one improv groups, totaling about 90 performers, will perform improvisational and sketch comedy throughout the festival. Showtimes are 8 p.m. Wednesday through Satur day with additional 10 p.m. shows on Thursday through Saturday. Three improv groups will perform at each show. According to the festivals website, the mission is to share the culture and tradition of the Gainesville improv comedy scene with the national improv community. We like to mix it up a bit, said Tom ODonnell, one of the festivals executive producers. The St. Louis-based group K.A.R.L. is new to the festival this year. K.A.R.L. will perform with Chicago groups 3033 and Stacked on Saturday. Meghan Kenny, president of K.A.R.L., said shes excited about performing and working with such an experienced group as 3033. I think its the most amazing thing thats ever happened, Kenny said. This years festival is presented by Florida Improv, Mod 27 and Take Heed Theatre. Hilton Garden Inn is sponsoring the festival. The host this year is Brian Jaeger, associate producer and event coordinator of the Gainesville Improv Festival. Other groups scheduled to perform are The Third Thought, of Tampa; The Apprentice Group, of Gainesville; Formal Apology, of Chicago; The WHOligans, of Orlando; and Dear Aunt Gertrude, of Tampa. Along with the perfor mances, the festival offers improv workshops for everyone, regardless of experience level. Notable workshop instructors include Bill Arnett, of award-winning sketch comedy group Maximum Party Zone, and Andy St. Clair, formerly of Second City Mainstage and the cur rent host of Treasure Hunters Roadshow. Two rounds of workshops will be offered Feb. 4. a.m. to 1 p.m., and the second round is from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Tickets for the perfor mances are $6 for students and $8 for the general public. Workshop tickets are $30. Tickets are available at the Phillips Center for the at 315 Hull Road, by phone at either (352) 392-ARTS or (800) 905-ARTS and online at Ticketmaster.Gainesville improv festival to feature 21 groups, kicks off today OBITUARY JULIA GLUMAlligator WriterWhen Paul Favini laughed, everyone knew. The loud, infectious sound would open door and echo in the hallways in the Nadine M. McGuire Theatre and Dance Pavilion. You could just hear it, and you just knew that was Pauls laugh, said Tony Mata, head of musical theatre. It was just wonderful to hear. Favini, interim director of the UF School of Theatre and Dance, died Sunday after a nearly three-year battle with cancer. He was 51. Favinis colleagues and students at UF remember him fondly. He was a real gentleman, in the truest sense of the word, Mata said. Favini grew up in Scranton, Pa., and received a bachelors degree in business administration/marketing from the University of Scranton in 1987. He graduated with a Master of Fine Arts degree in costume design from Indiana University in 1997. Favini came to UF in 2000 and became an associate professor of costume design in July 2006. In 2010, he was appointed director. He was a center of calm in the bustling costume workshop, said Stacey Galloway, assistant professor of costume design and technology. Favini had an eye for detail. His bold designs were collaborative and creative, she said. He designed costumes for more than 60 shows, according to his resume. He was phenomenal, said John Reger, Favinis partner of 11 years. He should have been a Broadway designer. He should have a Tony Award. The school was his life. The hardest part of becoming director was that he was no longer in the classroom, Reger said. But Favini never lost his connection with students. He really knew how to listen, said Josh Sallerson, a dance senior. Now, the school feels incomplete without Favinis presence. Its like missing a family member, Sallerson said. He always had a joke for any little situation, and it was always a very funny, sarcastic joke, said his stepson, Britton Reger. Favini and his jokes will remain with his family and friends despite his absence. He will always be here with us in spirit, Mata said. We loved him very, very, very much. There will be a celebration of Favinis life at the Constans Theatre in February. Donations to Paul Favinis memorial fund can be sent to UFs 115800, Gainesville, Fla., 32611.Faculty member remembered for laugh, workFavini

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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 WWW.ALLIGATORSPORTS.ORG Gators Mens Golf Team Wins TourneyJunior T.J. Vogel took home the invidual title, helping UF win the Sea Best Invitational at TPC Sawgrass on Tuesday. See story online at alligatorSports.org.Signing Day CoverageLog on to alligatorSports.org today for quick-hitting coverage of the announcements on National Signing Day. For live updates, follow @WattMatts, @Tomas_Verde, @thekellyprice and @alligatorSports.Florida senior Joanna Mather said the top-ranked womens tennis team is not overlooking a match today with unranked UCF. See story, page 15. BRYAN HOLTAlligator Writer With his entire starting rotation returning from a successful season, few college baseball coaches will be as comfortable as Kevin OSullivan when settling into the dugout for the start of weekend games. But after Hudson Randall, Karsten Whitson and Brian Johnson, the questions begin. Following the 2011 season, the fani, Alex Panteliodis and Tomrounds. Together with senior bined to give the Gators 203.1 innings last season. solve. who our midweek starters are going to be, he said. our middle relief. Im real excited Kish. The trio enter the 2012 cambined to throw just 28.1 innings as freshmen and had mixed results. ing just one earned run over 14.1 innings of work for an ERA of 0.63. The same couldnt be said for Gibson, who saw his ERA balloon to 13.06 in limited action, inruns in a 14-1 loss to Vanderbilt and scrimmages to see who is outshining the others, Randall said. right now. has at the back end of his bulldirected toward freshmen and The midweek question that be coming in the right hand of a Floridas leading candidate for a midweek starter. out there on the mound, Randall said. doing a little bit more. Itd be nice from the fall. Im sure hes going to deliver this With a little more than two game, OSullivan admits that weeks into the season when Flor Even then, he admits that being able to bring one of his closadvantage he will not be afraid to use. nings and then weve got some Alligator File Photo Gators searching for solidity on staff after draft departures JOHN BOOTHEAlligator Staff Writer There were times last season when Will Yeguete felt like a single mistake would land him on the bench. Though he was a freshman and still fensive aggressiveness and a good habit of worst. when he touched the ball, there was a good chance he was going to turn it over, Donovan said. While Yeguete saw the second fewest -Yeguete gaining Donovans trust after turnover-prone seasonStarting rotation set, middle relief still unsettledRandall SEE HOOPS, PA GE 15 UF Bask etball

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14, ALLIGATOR WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 National Signing Day 2012National Signing Day is finally here, and Florida will ink its first full class under coach Will Muschamp today. To get you ready, we have compiled a list of UF targets to keep an eye on throughout the day. Several announcements will be shown nationally on ESPNU. Dante Fowler Jr.6-foot-3, 232 pounds Position: Defensive endHigh school: St. Petersburg LakewoodAlso considering: FSU UF or USC.Announcing: 10 a.m. down defender soon into his collegiate career, Leonard Willliams6-foot-5, 254 pounds Position: Defensive endHigh school: Daytona Beach MainlandAlso considering: Auburn, USCAnnouncing: 11 a.m. Williams could be considered another Auburn lean at Tracy Howard5-foot-11, 175 pounds Position: CornerbackHigh school: MiramarAlso considering: FSU, MiamiAnnouncing: 9:50 a.m. on ESPNU he is a force against taller receivers, too. This would Nelson Agholor6-foot-2, 180 pounds Position: Wide receiver High school: Also considering: USC, FSU, Notre DameAnnouncing: on ESPNU Stefon Diggs6-foot. 185 pounds Position: Wide receiverHigh school: Olney, Md., Our Lady of Good Counsel Also considering: Auburn, Cal, Maryland, Ohio StateAnnouncing: Feb. 10 just to generate excitement again. Playing at a school skills and should be ready to contribute immediately. targetsCompiled by Kelly Price All rankings and photos from Rivals.com Oral commitments are nonbinding until a national letter of intent is signed on or after National Signing Day on Feb. 1. Josh HarveyClemons6-foot-5, 208 pounds Position: LinebackerHigh school: Valdosta, Ga., LowndesAlso considering: Georgia, FSUAnnouncing: 9:15 a.m. on ESPNU Avery Young6-foot-6, 273 pounds Position: Offensive linemanHigh school: Palm Beach GardensAlso considering:Auburn, Georgia, MiamiAnnouncing: ESPNU college weight room. With oral commit tackle Young may not be too convinced that he has an Jake Meador6-foot-7, 305 pounds Position: Offensive tackleHigh school: Whiteland, Also considering: Missouri, WisconsinAnnouncing: 10:10 a.m. Meador, an Ole Miss decommit, has seen late Vincent Valentine6-foot-3, 300 pounds Position: Defensive tackleHigh school: Also considering:Announcing: Once considered a solid Nebraska guy, Valentine visit in Gainesville and admitted his decision would be harder. Valentine is an excellent add Schyler Miles6-foot-2, 220 pounds Position: LinebackerHigh school: Also considering: Kansas, West VirginiaAnnouncing: Noon Former UF offensive coordinator Charlie Weis led the charge for Miles has leaned more towards the Jayhawks. last to visit in-home with Miles, and he seems sold. Shawn Janetzke / Alligator Staff

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cent of the possessions he played. If he wanted to become a player Donovan could trust, Yeguete knew he needed to make better decisions. Now a sophomore and seeing starters minutes in four straight games for the Gators, Yeguete is turning the ball over just 13.6 per cent of the time and has limited himself to 13 giveaways over UFs 21 games. I just slowed down, just taking my time on offense, Yeguete said. And sometimes when you see somebodys open but you try to rush the pass, just make sure and take your time passing the ball. Donovan has relied on Yeguete to start nine games this season in place of forward Erik Murphy and, most recently, injured center Patric Young. In the extended minutes, Yeguetes teammates giving him touches on offense. Hes made tremendous progress and coach has continued to work with him, said senior guard Erving Walker. Hes done a great job since hes been here. Last year, we were a little deeper at his position and he worked hard every day in practice. Hes getting the opportunity this year, and I think that hes making the most of it. While Donovan said Yeguete is far from becoming a feared scor ing threat, the drop in turnovers has allowed the Gators to use his defensive skill-set more. Yeguete ranks second on the team with 25 steals and he also has seven blocks on the season. Against Mississippi State last Saturday, Yeguete held the Bulldogs leading scorer Arnett Moultrie below his season average and centage in eight games. Donovan praised Yeguetes ability to keep Moultrie away from the basket and not give up deep entry passes in the post. Once Will gets a guy in an from the basket, hes good enough physically to take on contact and then obviously hes really good with his hands in terms of slapvan said. So hes a really, really good defender. As good of a post defender as Ive had since weve been here. He takes great pride in taking on those challenges. Contact John Boothe at jboothe@ alligator.org. WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012 ALLIGATOR, 15Brett Le Blanc / Alligator StaffJunior Ashane Dickerson was named SEC Gymnast of the Week on Tuesday for the third time in her career, following an all-round victory in UFs quad meet last week. SHE WON GYMNAST OF THE WEEK. LANDON WATNICKAlligator Writer this season, Ashane Dickerson fell a little under the radar before last Fridays meet. Then she made a resounding statement in a resounding win. As an all-around competitor, Dickerson title of 2012 and her 11th as a Gator in UFs impressive victory against top-ranked Arkansas, No. 24 Maryland and Bridgeport. cise title (9.95) with freshman Kytra Hunter and tallied a career high on uneven bars (9.925). For her performance last Friday, Dickerson earned Southeastern Conference Gymnast of season and the third of her Florida career. That (all-around win) was really special for Ashane, coach Rhonda Faehn said. She always puts her absolute best into every competition in every event she does. Dickersons total was just one-tenth of a point off her collegiate-best mark of 39.70, which she earned toward the end of her freshman season in the 2010 NCAA North Central Regional. Her 39.60 is also the second-best all-around score this year, behind Arkansas Katherine Grables 39.725 against LSU on Jan. 20. While Dickerson has recently kept a slightly been a powerhouse for the Gators. Dickerson has averaged a 39.325 as an allarounder, which is good for 13th nationally. raised her title total to 50 in her three seasons, placing her seventh on UFs career list. Dickersons performances as an all-around competitor have also helped the Gators average a team total of 196.563 throughout four meets. With Dickerson leading the way last Friday est total in school history. That score, which is also the best in the nation this season, helped rankings to No. 3. It was amazing to show everyone how hard we work in the gym and how much weve bonded, Dickerson said. It showed in our performance. When No. 3 Florida travels to Tuscaloosa, Ala., on Friday night to compete against reigning NCAA champion No. 6 Alabama, big production will now be expected out of Dickerson, although her status as an all-around competitor still remains unknown. Shes becoming more comfortable with the actual performance aspect of competing, Faehn said. Shes really enjoying what shes doing out there. You can see it.Brett Le Blanc / Alligator StaffGators sophomore forward Will Yeguetes 25 steals are the secondmost of any Florida player this season. Yeguete keys defensive stop of MSU HOOPS, from page 13 ELI MARGERAlligator Writer When the Florida womens tennis team hosts UCF on Wednesday, the expectation will be a clean sweep. The No. 1 Gators are simply a different class of team. Every match, no matter who is across the court, will be accompanied by an expectation of victory. Coming off a national championship with a team full of proven winners, there is always the possibility of becoming complacent. Florida has not lost since Feb. 21 last year, and victory has seemingly become a way of life. However, in this new and young season, no one is satisThere will be a lot of great teams this year, a lot of good competition, so I really dont think (complacency) is an issue, Joanna Mather said. As one of two seniors, Mather could be expected to be the leader and chief motivator. But the team returns all of its key members, and each player has taken it upon herself to continue to get better. (The leadership) is spread out, she said. This team is really good at knowing what they need to do and making sure they do it. As far as leadership role, if you consider my spot a leadership role, its very easy. With unranked UCF coming to Gainesville Wednesday, the Gators will face their second straight match in which they are overwhelming favorites. More than anything, the dual match will be another chance to improve heading into a challenging match at No. 5 Baylor. The players maintain that they will not overlook any opponent, regardless of ranking. I dont want us to get complacent, sophomore Olivia Janowicz said. We had a meeting the other day, and we dont want to expect the same things. As long as were not complacent it just as bad or even more. Expectations are going to be high all season, and rightfully so. The Gators have some of the best singles players and doubles teams in the nation, a top-notch coach, and a national championship to defend. The team put together a challenging schedule, including the trips to Baylor this weekend and No. 2 Stanford next weekend. This continual challenge is something that will keep Florida on its toes. When it comes to playing teams like UCF, however, the challenge is avoiding letdowns. Every match is another match for us, Mather said. Were just going to take it as another step towards our goal at the end of the year. Mather

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16, ALLIGATOR WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2012