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Title: The Independent Florida alligator
Portion of title: Florida allgator
Alligator
Alternate Title: University digest
University of Florida digest
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some col.) ; 36 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Independent Florida Alligator
Publisher: The students of the University of Florida
Campus Communications, Inc.
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Gainesville, Fla
Publication Date: 09-07-2011
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: daily (except saturdays, sundays, holidays and exam periods, aug.-apr.); semiweekly (may-july)
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Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
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Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
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Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 65, no. 75 (Feb. 1, 1973)-
General Note: "Not officially associated with the University of Florida."
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VOLUME 106 ISSUE 12 WWW.ALLIGATOR.ORG WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2011 Today We Inform. You Decide.Not officially associated with the University of Florida Published by Campus Communications, Inc. of Gainesville, Florida Textbook rental programs gain popularityStudents saved $550,000 at the UF Bookstore in 2010, pg 3. Despite economy, Greek chapter membership is highMore students went through recruitment this year, pg 4. Quarterback John Brantley and the Gators are raving about offensive coordinator Charlie Weis. See story, Page 14. 87 /65Local farmer prepares for seasonHe has sold vegetables at the Union Street Farmers Market for 15 years, pg. 5. HE WAS LYING IN THE MIDDLE OF THE ROAD WHEN HE WAS STRUCK. MORGAN WATKINS Alligator Staff Writer UF student Antonio Milanes Cuesta died Monday after a car ran over him while he was lying in the middle of a road. It was 3:20 a.m. when 22-year-old Adam Rodriguez, of Oviedo, Fla., traveling east on McCulloch Road in Seminole County, did not see Cuesta, 19, lying in the center lane of the road and ran over him, according to a Florida Highway Patrol report. The accident happened near the intersection of McCulloch Road and Orion Boulevard. Cuesta was taken to Florida Hospital East, where he died. A deputy had passed through the area cident but did not see Cuesta or anyone else lying in the road at the time, said Sgt. Kim Montes, FHP public information ofThe FHP doesnt know why Cuesta was lying in the road, Montes said. It will probably take at least two weeks to get the results from the alcohol and drug tests performed during Cuestas autopsy. It is possible that Cuesta could have tripped and fell in the middle of the road, but there were no witnesses in the area to explain how he ended up lying there, Montes said. The investigation is ongoing, but charges are not likely because of the circumstances of the incident, she said. Rodriguez ence of alcohol or drugs at the time of the incident. Cuesta was an electrical engineering sophomore and a member of ROTC at UF, said friend and former roommate Kevin Weschler. He was also a member of the UF FORECAST 2 OPINIONS 6 CLASSIFIEDS 10 CROSSWORD 13 SPORTS 14 JOEY FLECHAS and ERIN JESTER Alligator Staff Writers UFs administration withdrew the proday, postponing a measure that proved unpopular with many students. At a conference call of the UF Board of Trustees, UF Provost Joe Glover said the recent jump in graduation rates gave the administration reason to reconsider the measure. I know of no other place that has undergone a 6 [percentage point] rise in graduation rate, he said. For students who entered UF in 2006, the four-year graduation rate was 64 percent, a jump from 58 percent for students who entered in 2005. Machen said hes never seen an increase so drastic. Ive been in this game for 14 years Ive never seen that kind of jump, he said. He said he felt Student Government handled its opposition to block tuition well, but the statistics are what cemented his stance to postpone the measure. UF Student Body President Ben Meyers said he felt the increased rate is a result of students responding to tough economic times. I want to assure you that the jump in the graduation rate shows a re-dedication of students in this economy, Meyers said. The administration wants to monitor the graduation rate to see if the increase is stable. Glover said UF examines graduation rates every year, and that based on preliminary research, he thinks the current graduation rate will stay steady for the next cycle. Administration postpones Student dies after getting hit by car; investigation pending MINA RADMAN Alligator Writer A family photo project is giving viewers a snapshot of UFs campus in the mid-twentieth century. Pam Marlin, a graduate program assistant for the physics department, created the project, called UF Then and Now. Marlin, 44, got the idea from another online project that showed World War II photos held over their contemporary locations. She decided to expand the concept to UF. A photo from the 1950s shows a boy on the corner of Southwest 13th Street and University Avenue, where an information sign in the background welcomes visitors to the campus. The corner still exists today, but the entrance sign has been removed. The landscaping has changed, and some of the buildings have changed, but the people havent changed, Marlin said. The photographs came from the UF Digital Collections, which hosts more than 300 documents, photographs and maps online. When deciding what UF images to include in her project, Marlin chose photos of locations with personal meaning. Those buildings include Newell Hall, where she once worked, and University Auditorium, where she used to play with the jazz band in college. She also chose popular locaStadium and the Reitz Union. It was a family effort, Marlin said. My children are students here and they had some choices as well. In total, there are 19 photoProject provides peek at UFs past Photo courtesy of Pam Marlin Pam Marlin, a graduate program assistant for the physics department, created the project UF Then and Now. She was inspired by an online project that showed World War II photos over their present-day locations. SEE PROJECT, PAGE 8 SEE ACCIDENT, PAGE 8ON CAMPUS Cuesta I know of no other place that has undergone a 6 [percentage point] rise in graduation rate.Joe GloverUF provost

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News Today Subscription Rates: One Semester (Fall or Spring) $18 Summer Semester $10 Two Semesters (Fall or Spring) $35 Full Year (All Semesters) $40The Independent Florida Alligator is a student newspaper serving the University of Florida, pubThe Alligator The Alligator is The Alligator VOLUME 106 ISSUE 12 ISSN 0889-2423 The Alligator The Alligator 2, ALLIGATOR WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2011 TODAYFORECAST THUNDER STORMS 90/70 THUNDER STORMS 90/69 THUNDER STORMS 88/68 PARTLY CLOUDY 88/67 THUNDER STORMS 87/65 SUNDAY SATURDAY FRIDAY THURSDAY WHATS HAPPENINGWomens Student Association General Body Meeting and Recruitment Today, 7 p.m. CSE Building 220 Want to get involved on campus, join a community of women leaders and gain valuable leadership experience? Come to the Womens Student Associations first general body meeting of the year to meet other students, learn about the organization and eat free food. Everyone is welcome, both males and females, so stop by for more information. WSA has also just released applications for more than 30 leadership positions. Applications can be found online at ufwsa.blogspot. com. Applications are due by Sept. 14. UF Pre-Pharmacy Society First Fall Meeting Today, 7 p.m. Reitz Union 282 If you are interested in major ing in pharmacy, come to the CORRECTIONSAn article in Tuesdays edition of the Alligator incorrectly stated late September at the main campus Student Health Care Center locasatellite SHCC location (SHCC@ A column was also incorrectly presented as a guest column. Sami Main is a regular columnist at the Alligator. first meeting and meet others who share your inter ests.   Students do not need to be a pre-pharmacy major to attend. A social will be held at Lollicup after the meeting at about 8 p.m. Got something going on? Want to see it in this space? Send an email with Whats Happening in the subject line to jflechas@alligator. org. Please model your submissions after above events. Improperly formatted Whats Happening submissions may not appear in the paper. Press releases will not appear in the paper.

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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2011 ALLIGATOR, 3 STUDENT LIFE EMILY MORROWAlligator Writer Textbook rentals on the rise CLARE LENNONAlligator Writer I still think its economically better to buy your books. You can usually sell them back for more than youd save by renting.Marlon Rodriguezpre-med studentOssip

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MEMBERSHIP NUMBERS HAVE INCREASED. MINA RADMANAlligator WriterDespite a bleak economy and ternity Affairs have not seen a decline in the number of students who join Greek organizations. This year, 1,262 women par ticipated in sorority recruitment. Thats about 90 more than last year, said Carey Mays, program The number of men who par ticipated in fraternity recruitment was not available by press time, according to Rajiv Asnani, UF Interfraternity Council president. However, 819 men accepted frater nity bids this year, he said, which is about 40 more than last year. Jack Causseaux, associate director economy had an impact on Greek turnout this year. We feared that, but our numbers have been increasing, he said. The sum of average new member fees and chapter dues for a sorority and fraternity are $2,073 and $3,067, respectively. The fraternities and sororities costs to new members, and most offer scholarships and payment plans, Causseaux said. Brandon Corsentino, a member of Chi Phi Fraternity, is applying for scholarships to help him afford his chapter dues. The fraternitys alumni offer between $500 and $1,000 to nine members each sechosen based on their academic records and involvement within the fraternity. I had to apply for scholarships because my parents told me that if I wanted to be involved, I had to pay out of my own pocket, Corsentino said. I was concerned about the money. The high costs can be justiplan, said Corsentino, an industrial engineering sophomore. Most sororities and fraternities provide their members with 10 to 15 meals per week at their houses. The costs for the meal plans are included in some chapter dues. plans can switch to their chapter houses meal plans. Its better food, Corsentino said. Our chef, Teddy, is pretty awesome. Briana Rittersporn, a telecommunications sophomore, didnt think the expense of joining a sorority was worth it. I would have to go to all the social events, Rittersporn said. There are two other Greek or Panhellenic Council and Interfraternity Council: the Multicultural Greek Council and the National Pan-Hellenic Council. Pan-Hellenic Council was not available to comment. Isamara Berrios, president of the Multicultural Greek Council, said her sorority has been affected by the economy. Everything that the chapter has done now has increased in price, Berrios said. The money has to come from our own pockets. The Multicultural Greek Council has not seen a decline in recent are concerned about the costs, Ber rios said. The sum of average new member fees and chapter dues cost $547. Recruitment for the Multiculabout sororities or fraternities can to Florida Greeks, which is available on the UF Greeks website, People still want to get involved, Berrios said. They just 4, ALLIGATOR Gina Chitko / AlligatorUF student Michael Baumans steel moose sculpture has resided at Jenn Garretts house at 1004 NW 34th St. since May. Dana Burke / Alligator StaffEric Choopani is thrown into the air after he accepts his bid to the fraternity Tau Kappa Epsilon, or TKE, during Fall 2010 recruitment week. Tough economy does not deter students from seeking Greek life ERIN JESTERAlligator WriterPassers-by may have noticed a non-native moose guarding Jenn Garretts front yard near Westside Park and Littlewood Environmentalists shouldnt be concerned, though. The moose, which has reMay, is made of steel. Garrett, 33, a full-time artist, said she usually displays her own work in her yard, but since she loaned out or sold all of her give students an opportunity to showcase their work. Working through a profesment, Garrett found three steel sculptures she liked by three students. and Jon Burns, and the moose by Michael Bauman. All three sculptures are for sale. Weve only gotten good feedback about it, Garrett said. Its common for parents walking their children past the house to the elementary school to stop and comment on the sculptures, Garrett said. The moose gets the most compliments because its the most recognizable. I think its so much fun, she said. Ive enjoyed having [the moose]. And the others, too. Garrett and her husband, Tim, an assistant professor in UFs College of Medicine, moved into the house in 2006 after Garrett received her masters degree in interior design and historic preservation at UF. her own metal sculptures in the yard right away and has had a total of eight or nine sculptures years. from UF to her yard because students dont typically have a way to move the sculptures from campus to their home or storage. moose back to your apartment, she said. One of her pieces rests in the yard of its current owner her neighbor. piece, shell park it on the lawn until someone buys it or it goes to exhibition. The neighbors miss the sculptures between displays. They came by to inquire about the emptiness of the yard before Garrett acquired the moose and its abstract counter parts, she said. They said, Are you all moving? Wheres all the art? Artist displays steel sculptures, student creations in front yard Weve only gotten good feedback about it.Jenn GarrettartistNeighbors favor metal moose

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MEREDITH RUTLANDAlligator Staff WriterJoe Durando watched as people mingled around his vegetable stand a girl cradling a white kitten while singing Hound Dog and a young couple holding hands nearby on Farmers Market. His stand holds wares that could purple and green eggplant, starfruit and chestnuts. Durandos romance with vegetables has been a growing relationship. He spent his childhood raised racehorses. He started gardening at 10 and ing magazine in 1975. a bachelors and masters degree in horticulture in the 1980s. Now, he and his wife, Trace near Alachua. I know the vegetables, said Durando, who is in his 50s. Its my passion. He said theyve owned the farm for about 20 years and sold at the farmers market for 15 years. They taurants. Civilization, a downtown co-op restaurant that serves ethnic cuisine, offers lunch and dinner specials that ber who chooses the restaurants produce, said Durandos vegetables nucopia of vegetarian dishes such as pumpkin lasagna. I like the idea of supporting someone who lives here who I here. Theyre raising families here. Theyre spending money here. He said he likes to spread out his business to several local farmers, but he said hell be back to Durando for more ingredients once the salad greens start rolling in. Every year is a learning curve, Durando said. He said he loves coming to the farmers market because of the vibrant atmosphere, great people and, of course, the local beer. Jenn Bennett pushed a stroller up to Durandos stand. Her 18-monthold son, Atticus, looked up with a Hes starting to look like you, Durando said to Bennett as they caught up on old times. Bennett said shes known Durando for 12 years and has been buying vegetables and herbs from his stand Its just such a great way to end the day, said Bennett, who works Academies Magnet at Loften High this season are very nice. I cant wait for fall, though. The vegetables and herbs Durando will start to sell in about a month are a knockout, he said. He has three or four types of arugula and rapini more types than some people know exist. toes, the Cadillac of tomatoes. enced it, theres no way to really talk about it, he said. He makes curry dishes with Asian eggplants and a cold bean salad inspired from a restaurant dish he par ticularly liked. To him, farming is about more than food. Its about sustainability. In this day and age, from the global point of view from global health, how we feed our self is very important, he said. ket is held every Wednesday from 4 to 7 p.m. in the Bo Diddley Commu ALLIGATOR, 5Aundre Larrow / Alligator StaffSenate President Micah Lewis presides over the Student Senate meeting Tuesday. Senators will vote next week to reallocate certain seats. Brett Le Blanc / Alligator StaffJoe Durando, a two-time UF alumnus, runs the Possum Hollow Farm, located 15 miles north of Gainesville. His produce will be for sale at the Union Street Farmers Market on Wednesdays from 4 to 7 p.m. CLARE LENNONAlligator Writer changes the number of senators allotted for different areas. The proposal would cut the number of graduate are currently open. pharmacy school senators from two to one. The six mores from six to eight. Fall elections are based on residence halls and offbased on colleges. the proposal. without approval from the Judiciary Committee. tionment each year, there were not enough committee before voting. Final approval will be voted on at the Were literally running out of time, so it had to be done, he said. in areas usually held by independent senators to give their party members more seats. Michel said he wants graduate students to be involved, but he agreed that some cuts may be necessary. He pointed out that graduate students are already Were not even halfway through the term of people who were elected in the spring, he said.Senators propose seat reallocationsPERsSON OF THE WEEKFarmer prepares for season at Union Street Farmers Market SG Voting District Changes Graduate students could lose half of their Senate spots

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Reader responseVote or post a message at www.alligator.orgThe views expressed here are not necessarily those of the Alligator .The Alligator will be withheld if the writer shows just cause. We reserve the right to edit for length, grammar, style and libel. Send letters to letters@alligator.org, bring them to 1105 W. University Ave., or send them to P.O. Box 14257, Gainesville, FL 32604-2257. Columns of about 450 words about original topics and editorial cartoons are also welcome. Questions? Call 352-376-4458. Column EditorialWEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2011 WWW.ALLIGATOR.ORG/OPINIONS Elizabeth Behrman EDITOR Joey Flechas MANAGING EDITOR Justin Hayes OPINIONS EDITORDo the Right ThingPlagiarism pandemic hurts educationPlagiarism is bad. Thats what we have all been told since high school. Who cares if we copy the works of others? They wouldnt have put it out there if they didnt want other people to use it, right? Its not like Im using all of their work just a few sentences. Im just taking what everyone else has done and making something new, arent I? Many of you might have felt these sentiments while you last research paper. Surely plagiarism is not that big of a deal is it? In a recent Pew Research Center study that polled 1,055 college and university presidents from all over the country, 55 percent said that plagiarism in papers among college students had increased over the past 10 years. Of those presidents, 89 percent believed that computers and the Internet have played a major role in this trend. Copy and paste is not your friend. line into your research paper, but this is a one-way ticket to academic disciplinary action. But moral behavior should never be commanded, and it should never be elicited by threat of punishment. Morality does not exist at the barrel of a gun. Instead, you should not plagiarize because it is the right thing to do. Your research papers might be completed the night before they are due, but the sources you used took years to complete. If you believe that the person or publication that took the time and effort to compile and develop the information and ideas off of which you based your work does not require a citation, then you are essentially implying that the source does not deserve credit for this effort. By that logic, you are implying that you do not deserve credit for your own work. Therefore, you deserve nothing but failure on your project. There is, however, another reason that might hit closer to home. If you do not cite your sources, you will lose all credibility Yes, you are in college and are probably pretty smart. But you will probably not be coming up with the next political, mathematical or psychological theory off of the top of your head. When the words on your page appear to come from far beyond the reach of the average undergraduates intellectual capacity or research capabilities, chances are people will think you made it up or copied it. To put it simply, if you ever want to be taken seriously in the academic or professional world, it is in your best interest not to plagiarize. A mistake like that will stay with you forever. Todays question: Have you ever plagiarized or cheated on an assignment? Tuesdays question: Have you ever gone to a session at TutoringZone? 53 TOTAL VOTES74% YES 26% NO New students should come out of shellsT one to be published. I want to make it good. You only Today, I want to focus on new students. You all are new to college life. It is very different from high school. into the Student Body. In all likelihood, you are either the go-to person who knows where all the good parties are and who advises your friends on the dos and donts, or you are the overachiever who has had things together for years, and youre on to conquer the next frontier. I am speaking to the young adults who may not have it all The next few years are all about you. You are your own sity. Now is the time to dream big. This moment in your life is the best opportunity to be a daydreamer. Be someone who makes their childhood hopes a breathing reality. Do not let the grandiosity of your future overwhelm you into becoming a living nightmare. For all of you outliers on the fringe, daunted by your new environment, the best way to overcome it is simple: You need to get involved. This is the one shot to make someone of yourself and to do better for you, your loved ones and the world around you. You must go out and get away from that small circle in which you felt comfortable. Find new people. Who knows, you could meet your life-long friend, or you could marry that cute girl in your general anthropology class. Do not let fear or lethargy call the shots for you. Be the captain of the ship, and take charge of your fate. I can assure you, no one else is going to do it for you. The Swamp is a community full of zeal. A Student Body composed of contentious understandings is what makes the earth go round. without which you would die if it shot up into space and imploded. Passion is the food of the living dream. Everybody needs it. Do not let anybody a professor, a friend or a parent tell you that you cannot do what you love because it is a lie. Grab on to that love and never let it slip through your join it. If there isnt, make one up. It is a great resource and provides a chance to make a difference in your own life. Because last year was my freshman year, I did not do any of this. This advice comes from personal experience. It is an experience that I hope you can avoid. I lived alone and off-campus. I did not join any clubs. I took classes that I hated. I did not follow where my heart was leading me. Misery plagued me, and I never went out to have fun. Now, gameday changed everything. Until last year, I was never much of a sports fan, let alone a UF football fan. Sitting in the crowd with all the other students was a rush. The games were exciting. Gators chants created a sense of unity with my fellow students that I had not felt before. I am a Gator. Everybody needs to be a part of an organization, whether its a church youth group, an indie band trying to land that sweet gig or joining a comedy club where you can crack jokes. UF is full of opportunities. There are literally people here who are opening the door just for you. It is your choice to walk through or stay put. Nicholas Butler is a journalism sophomore at UF. His column appears on Wednesdays. Nicholas Butlernbutler@alligator.org

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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2011 ALLIGATOR, 7 Tuition increases necessaryI am a graduate student who supports tuition increases to cover the rising operating costs of UF, including my meager salary. There are many reasons for my support, but it primarily has to do with the fact that my tuition and the tuition of other instructors, and teaching and research assistants, has been waived as a result of the hard work of Graduate Assistants United. I would ask all undergraduates who are protesting tuition hikes whether they voted in the midterm elections and for whom they voted. If you didnt vote, you dont have much standing to complain about how the state chooses to fund Floridas institutions of higher learning. If you voted for Republicans, then you essentially voted for policies and systems of taxation that will continue to directly and indirectly gut state support for education at all levels. Ditto your parents. Education is expensive; if the state wont pay for it, then at least part of the cost has to fall back to individual students and families. Certainly, there are cost-saving measures that can be put in place, but you can only whittle away so much before you can no longer claim public Ivy status. UF provides an in-demand and highly expensive service. It just makes good old-fashioned capitalistic sense to raise the price of this service if the state and its citizens refuse to subsidize it at adequate levels. Remember that the next time you walk into a voting booth. Your gripe isnt with UF, its with Tallahassee. C.T. Bland 4th Year Ph.D. Student Graduate Instructor Department of Religion Letter to the EditorLuckily, students around campus dont take the Alligators editorials seriously. Last Friday, in the Darts and Laurels editorial, the Alligator sent a very clear message to students when they threw a wedont-want-to-pay-higher-tuition-either-but-holdingpicket-signs-isnt-going-to-do-anything DART to Students for a Democratic Society. According to the Alligator, students should pack up, give in and roll over for tuition hikes because activism simply doesnt work. It was a truly ridiculous assertion, and students didnt have to look far for evidence to the contrary. In that very same paper there were two articles that highlighted the impact that student activism has had this semester. place over 48 hours on Monday and Tuesday. Students for a Democratic Society collected over 1,200 signatures to put the question of tuition hikes on the Student Government ballot. Now the students will have a chance to formally voice their opposition just like last semester when 90 percent of the Student Body said no to block tuition. Armed with such a huge mandate, students organized rallies and marches to Tigert Hall, culminating in the Board of Trustees decision to postpone the implementation of block tuition by a year. If it wasnt for the awareness of concerned students all over school, block tuition wouldnt have even been up for discussion. It would have passed quietly without the Student Body knowing until it felt the disastrous effects. This is why the UF Student Body should feel immensely proud reading the Alligators second activism related piece, announcing that administrators are abandoning block tuition. The continuing trend of increasing graduation rates left administrators without a leg to stand on. They have no choice but to retreat from a misguided policy that they tried to pass in the face of massive student opposition. The students were right about block tuition, and theyre right again about the 15 percent tuition increase. Why is it that Bernie Machen is licking his lips at the prospect of tuition hikes even before the extent of the budget cuts is known? Why should students have to take out another loan or work more hours while millionaire administrators pay nothing? Putting a stop to these tuition increases is in the interest of every student. If we learned anything from the defeat of block tuition, it should be that if the Student Body stands together, we can overcome these attacks on students. If youre interested in helping us organize against tuition increases, you should come out to SDS on Mondays at 6:30 p.m. in Anderson Hall, Room 34. Conor Munro is a political science and history sophomore at UF. He is an organizer with Students for a Democratic Society.Anti-activism assertion unfoundedGuest columnConor MunroSpeaking Out

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graphs. Over the course of four weekends, Marlin and her husband, Derrius, along with her son, Justin, and daughter, Lizzie, went around campus and lined up each photo to its present-day counterpart. Each photograph took about an hour to complete, Marlin said. You have to hold up the photo with one hand and have the camera in your other hand, Marlin said. My husband and son took the photos because I moved too much. Of all the photos that are part of the project, she said her favorites include one that captured four girls sitting in a car in front of the Smathers Library at its completion in 1926, and another of a young boy selling soda at a Gators football game in 1960. When I was standing there, it was as if the little boy was there, Marlin said. It was weird in a way. Response to the photography project has been overwhelming, Marlin said. As for the future, the UF Foundation will continue to expand the website and may develop the photographs into a calendar. to comment. The then-and-now photos show UFs timeless goal to improve and expand. They did have the goal to expand the university and make it a bigger place, Marlin said. All that is alive and well in the people here today. View the project online at dmarlin.com. Be a part of something BIG GIVE B LOOD.Over 1,000 people gathered to form one of the largest human blood drop 8, ALLIGATOR WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2011 Photo courtesy to the Alligator Tony Milanes Cuesta, an electrical engineering sophomore, was struck by a car Monday while lying in the middle of the road. He was a member of UF ROTC wrestling team. Weschler, a sophomore, was Cuestas roommate in Mallory Hall last year. He was a random roommate. I didnt know who he was, but we ended up getting along really well, Weschler said. He was just a really nice, genuine kid. Cuesta would often pick up Weschler, who didnt have a car, when he needed a ride to the Tau Epsilon Phi fraternity house, where Weschler is a brother, or to another location. He was a really generous kid, he said. He would never say no to go out of his way to do something for someone else. ACCIDENT, from page 1 PROJECT, from page 1Photos could be made into calendar He was just a really nice, genuine kid.Kevin WeschlerCuestas roommate

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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2011 ALLIGATOR, 9 TECHNOLOGY ANNA MARIE SOLTRENAlligator Contributing WriterA study conducted by the Pew Research Centers Internet & American Life Project last month told us this: We are addicted to our cellphones. With 83 percent of American adults today having some type of cellphone, it comes as no surprise that people have an attachment to their phones unlike any other. In a 30-day study conducted by Lisa Merlo, assistant professor of psychiatry at UF, and her team, men and women were found to be equally at risk of cellphone addiction, although younger adults showed more symptoms than older adults. Individuals with fancier phones were also found to exhibit more warning signs than those with more basic models. Fifty-one percent of people with cellphones used their phones at least once to get information they needed right away during the span of the study. Thirteen percent of cellphone users admitted to pretending to use their phones in order to avoid interacting with others around them. I think for the current generation of college students, [cellphones are] a normal thing for them, said Steve Orlando, UF spokesman. Thats what theyve grown up with, and its part of their world. Theyve come to rely on it so much and for so many things. Theyre almost inseparable. Study: People addicted to phones ADMISSION IS FREE. MAGEN WETMOREAlligator Contributing WriterGainesville residents will soon be able to experience Latin America on the big screen. To celebrate Latino/Hispanic Heritage Month, the Latina Womens League is presenting the 7th Gainesville Latino Film Festival, which begins this month. The festival will be held at the Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art from Thursfree and open to the public. About 80 people attended the event last year, and this year they expect between 50 and 100 guests, said Amelia Bell, marketing and public relations coordinator for the Harn Museum. There will also be prints by Armando Morales, a Nicaraguan artist, on display beginning in October. The events kick off with Museum Nights: Destination Latin America on festival is Cinco das sin Nora (Noras Will) and begins at 7 p.m. Veronica troduce the movie. Latino Film Festival begins today at Harn Museum Theyve come to rely on it so much and for so many things. Theyre almost inseparable. Steve OrlandoUF spokesman

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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2011 WWW.ALLIGATORSPORTS.ORG Time change The kickoff of the Gators soccer game on Sunday against Florida Gulf Coast has been changed to 2 p.m. Florida also plays FSU at home Friday at 7 p.m. The MailbagTime is running out to get your submissions in for this weeks mailbag column. Got something on your mind after the opener against FAU? Send us questions to our Twitter account: @alligatorSports. Brett Le Blanc / Alligator StafGators offensive coordinator Charlie Weis is drawing rave reviews from players for his quick play calls and fast-paced tempo. PLAYERS SAID CALLS ARE COMING IN QUICKER. TOM GREENAlligator Staff WriterCharlie Weis doesnt like to waste time. It was evident in Floridas season opener against Florida Atlantic. The Gators came out with a hurry-up offense in their put together a 13-play drive that spanned 6:32 and resulted in the Coach Weis, thats what he likes to do, quarterback John Brantley said. He likes to get the play in quick, and he gets really mad if we have a delay-of-game penalty. Florida put together three more Gators second drive went for 12 plays and 67 yards and took 3:29 off the clock. That was followed by a three-play, 68-yard possession in 1:01, while their last scor plays and 91 yards. Brantley said the quick playcalling made life easier on the offense, and everyone had ample It was real fast, right guard JOHN BOOTHEAlligator Staff WriterAfter two years of former UF goalkeeper Katie Fraine making life easy on the Gators coaching staff, the decision for who will play between the pipes each week has gotten a little tougher in 2011. Through three starts by senior Brooke Chancey and two by freshman Taylor Burke, No. 9 Florida (4-1) has yet to put its We have a person whos seen it all, with Brooke being here for many, many years. We know what we have with her, UF goalies coach Robert Liessem Jr. said. And then you have this kid Taylor who comes in, and we all know her athleticism and her upside and the potential. We have to try and bring that out of her. Just the second true freshman to start a match since 1999, the 6-foot-1 Burke who has begun her career with shutouts on the road at FIU and then against Texas Tech on Friday. Chancey, meanwhile, held Miami goalless in the season opener but conceded four goals in two games against then-No. 18 Texas A&M and thenNo. 15 UCLA. Liessem said coach Becky Burleigh and the rest of the staff were hesitant to throw Burke into either game, as they thought Chancey provided the better matchup against the two ranked teams because of her experience. shes been playing the best to start, he said. The goalkeeper is a very important position, and its so much easier to put her in over a period of time, if thats the eventual goal and if she ends up earning it. for the freshman, with nearly 4,000 on hand in Pressly Stadium and former Gators Abby Wambach and Heather Mitts looking on from the sidelines. Burke again was rarely challenged with just three shots levied GREG LUCAAlligator Staff Writer the offensive line, but that doesnt mean the position remains unsettled. After the units strong performance Saturday against FAU, Will Muschamp and Charlie Weis said they are happy running a seven-man rotation. Early in fall camp, Muschamp emphasized the need gether. But now, with seven players proving they can make one cohesive unit, that desire no longer exists. On the offensive line I feel pretty settled in, Muschamp said Monday. Three players appear to have starting spots locked up: junior Xavier Nixon at left tackle, sophomore Jonotthan Harrison at center and sophomore Jon Halapio at right guard. Snaps at right tackle are split between redshirt freshman Chaz Green and junior Matt Patchan, while time at left guard is divided between senior Dan Wenger, who can also play center, and sophomore Kyle Koehne. Although the group appears jumbled, Muschamp referred to it as the mixture of guys we have a great comfort level with. A major concern with an offensive line platoon is a lack of chemistry, but Weis said he was happy with the groups performance against Florida Atlantic. I liked the fact that there looked to be very good cohesion, he said. To keep your mental mistakes low, especially at the the most part, that was attained. its not surprising that theyre able to work well together Offensive line coming together despite rotation [Weis] likes to get the play in quick and he gets really mad if we have a delayof-game penalty.John BrantleyUF quarterbackFreshman, senior splitting time in goalBurke UF Fo otball sSEE O-lLINE, Pa A GE 16s SEE NONO TEbEBOOK, Pa A GE 16s SEE SOOCCEER, Pa A GE 15QuotableFor [Chris] Rainey to try to give you analysis...thats comical.Charlie Weis, UF offensive coordinator

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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2011 ALLIGATOR, 15 Starter for Friday game against FSU undeterminedher way on Friday, compared to the 17 shots on goal against Chancey in her three starts. It felt really good to get some experience, especially with that type of crowd and the Florida Gator environment, Burke said. Her lone gaffe occurred in the 37th minute, when she ventured too far in pursuit of an oncoming attacker and left an empty net. The only thing preventing a goal was the heads-up play of defender Kat Williamson, who made it back to the goal line quick enough to clear the incoming shot. Im really impressed with Taylor, especially coming in as a freshman and being commanding in her box and I think theres only better things to come from her, Williamson said. While it will take a week of pracagainst Florida State, Liessem said he would like to see the competition settled before UF hits the meat of Southeastern Conference play, which begins Sept. 23. The ultimate goal is to have someeverything that we need encompassing, and really take it over, he said. As much as its a good thing to have two talented kids that are doing it, for continuity of the team its a lot easier to have that one and thats why we were so ridiculously successful with Katie. Contact John Boothe at  jboothe@alligator.org SOCCER, from page 14 It felt really good to get some experience, especially with that type of crowd and the Florida Gator environment, Taylor BurkeUF freshman goalie BLAZERS RB PAT SHED IS QUESTIONABLE (HERNIA). TYLER JETTAlligator Staff WriterBryan Ellis probably wont leave Florida Field a winner Saturday. He just wont. Hes not supposed to. That wont make it any easier. It didnt feel good settling for second when UAB walked into Neyland Stadium and came close to stunning Tennessee in front of 95,183 fans last September. torched the Volunteers secondary, passing for 373 yards and helping UAB lost 32-29 in double over time, and Vols fans showed appreciation for the opponents efforts. They cheered the underdog quarterback who got his hopes up, who thought maybe, just maybe, he could be a hero. boos, he told The Birmingham News after the game. Ellis, a redshirt senior, will have one last chance to earn some jeers when UAB comes to Gainesville sons, the Blazers have played six games against Southeastern Conference teams. They have lost six times, though they nearly scored an upset twice last year, the other sissippi State in October. Like in those six games, UAB will be the less talented team when Stadium. Over all, the Blazers wont be as fast. They wont be as strong. They wont be as skilled. But they also wont be intimidated. Weve been to some arenas that we can remember experiences from, and hopefully that will help us, said Ellis, who also played in front 74,656 fans at Texas A&M in 2009. We have to let the new guys know that it will be like nothing they have experienced, and it will be fun. If the Blazers are to keep Satur days game tight, they will need a strong effort out of their offense. UAB is coming off its two most productive seasons in school history 5,111 yards in 2009, 5,074 yards last year. To keep things running smoothly, the Blazers will put the offense on Ellis shoulders. Senior running back Pat Shed the teams leading rusher and receiver last season is questionable with a hernia. The receiving corps, meanwhile, is depleted. Three of the teams are gone. Still, the Blazers run a spread system that has consistently remains untested. Last Saturday, Florida had the luxury of opening up against a pass attempts. We have to completely shift gears, coach Will Muschamp said. That is the one thing that is hard about being a defensive player in the NCAA. If Floridas defense isnt ready, maybe Ellis can surprise them like he did against Tennessee. And maybe he can win this time. But probably not. Contact Tyler Jett at tjett@alligator.orgUAB will lean on quarterback Ellis against UF on SaturdayBrett Le Blanc / Alligator Staff UF goalies coach Robert Liessem Jr. (left) said he would like to have one keeper emerge as the best option, similar to former goalie Katie Fraine, who anchored the position the last two years.EEllis

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on game day. Halapio, Koehne and Harrison are roommates, and Green said his roommate Nixon has been very helpful in his development. Wenger said he was welcomed with open arms the moment he transferred from Notre Dame, and many of the linemen have found themselves pulling for Patchan after seeing him battle through numerous injuries in his career. We all connect together, communicate a lot better, Halapio said. We all just play well together. Green mentioned a number of reasons why having a rotation can be positive. If Florida is going to continue to run the up-tempo attack they used against FAU, the ability to for a breather will be critical. Taking off a few plays can also be helpful from a mental standpoint, as the Gators continue to adjust to a new system under offensive line coach Frank Ver ducci. You get a better glimpse of the whole picture when youre on the sideline, Green said. Playing the game, everything is fast. You have to be able to adjust quick. Green added that watching a couple snaps from the bench gives Weis and Verducci an opportunity to offer advice regarding the defensive front or blocking scheme. As is always the case, the decision of who starts Saturday will be made based on performance this week in practice. According to Halapio, even the players didnt know who was going to start against FAU until shortly before the game. Now, they know it doesnt matter. We all trust each other, Halapio said. Whoever starts, its going to be a good offensive line. I Contact Greg Luca at gluca@alligator.org. 16, ALLIGATOR WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2011 Green: Rotation will keep players fresh in fast-paced offense O-LINE, from page 14Driskel, Joyer impress in limited time against Florida AtlanticJon Halapio said. By the time we got to the ball there was already a play there. Freshmen impress: Despite not starting, a pair of freshmen stood out to teammates on the offensive side of the ball in Saturdays season-opening 41-3 win against Florida Atlantic. Quarterback Jeff Driskel and fullback Hunter Joyer saw early playing time against the Owls Driskel as part of coach Will Muschamps plan to get him meaningful snaps, and Joyer in part due to the injury sustained by sophomore Trey Burton. Driskel entered for a series in the second quarter and the dual-threat quarterback didnt let the mistake bring him down. He wasnt pouting around or anything, he just moved on to the next play, Halapio said, adding that for a freshman, Driskel showed action. After Driskel checked back in with the game well in hand, he looked more comfortable running the offense. You couldnt have choreographed it, really, any better, Weis said. He The Swamp; its exciting for a kid at that position. But you saw how much more poised he looked the next time out there. As for Joyer, he garnered praise from Muschamp on Monday for the progress he has made since arriving on campus, as well as his effort Saturday. He also caught the eye of Halapio, who noted Joyers full-speed effort since Hes real physical, a real smart player for a freshman, Halapio said. The thing that stands out to me and my teammates is how physical he is at the fullback position. Gators move up in poll: After entering the season ranked No. 22 in the nation, Florida moved up to No. 18 in the latest AP poll released Tuesday. Florida is one of six Southeastern Conference teams ranked in the Top 25. Contact Tom Green at tgreen@alligator.org. NOTEBOOK, from page 14TTHEE RALLLL YMatt: The day weve all been waiting for came and went Saturday, and for a lot of you it was a joyous occasion. You thought Floridas walloping of FAU at lines made you feel all warm and fuzzy inside. And Dominique Easleys dance moves had you gyrating and smiling in the student section with your friends (and, maybe, family members at the discounted rate of $50). But hold on a minute, OK? Lets not crown these Gators just yet. As good as things looked on Saturday, theres still plenty yet to be tested for example, the secondary. Florida played a Florida Atlantic team thats quarterback entered the game with as many interceptions (1) as completions. The Owls also started a freshman and sophomore at receiver with a total of 12 receptions to their names. Plus, the dominant performance from the defensive line prevented unproven under classmen from being tested at the back end of the Gators new defense. Graham Wilbert looked woefully inept for much of the game Saturday night, but he still managed to complete a 28-yard pass down the seam to tight end Nexon Dorvilus. Whats going to happen when UF plays a real opponent? That should be the concern, not the Gators No. 18 ranking in the new AP Top 25. Tyler: You cant use one play as evidence against the secondary as a whole. Yeah, FAU managed to complete one 28yard pass on one third-and-long. Who cares? The score was 24-0; the game was over. And why are you insulting people for getting excited about Saturdays game? It wasnt a great opponent and probably didnt tell us anything. But how do you want fans to react? You want them to spend their evening not cheering. You are an unpleasant, soulless man. Stay positive. There were plenty of good things to take away from Saturdays win; namely, the running game looked as good as advertised. However, Florida will need to show more balance in the future beginning this weekend. The team doesnt need a more even runpass ratio; the Gators actually threw the ball three more times than they ran it. But the team does need to get the ball to playmakers not named Demps and Rainey. Ignoring incomplete passes, Floridas two burners touched the ball on about 55 percent of plays from scrimmage. Expect defenses to key on Demps and Rainey for the rest of the season. They will stack the box and dare John Brantley to beat them deep. If Floridas offense wants to be good this year, or at least serviceable against Southeastern Conference powers, Brantley needs to show he can burn teams with the long ball. Matt: Thanks for solidifying my point, big guy. The secondary didnt have a chance to be exposed. Thats the point. And on the one play where Wilbert actually had time and threw what happened? It went for a 28-yard gain. While the SEC isnt littered with talent at quarterback as in recent years, the Gators will face much stiffer competition in the weeks to come. Even a guy like Tyler Bray at Tennessee has a legitimate chance to torch UFs inexperienced secondary. connecting with DaRick Rogers and Justin Hunter 11 times for 246 of those yards an average of more than 20 yards for both. Florida started two freshmen and two sophomores and none of them have faced the caliber of player theyre expected to cover week in and week out in the SEC. It doesnt matter how Brantley throws or Demps and Rainey run if the secondary cant hold up against a vertical passing attack. Tyler: That wasnt the only time Wilbert tested the secondary, hater. He threw down Omar Hunter said the Gators defensive line did a poor job of applying pressure. Offensively, Florida clicked way better than it did last season out of the gates, but the passing game still has a lot to prove. The bulk of Brantleys workload came on short passes. yards. He did great on those, completing more than 80 percent of his passes. But while dumping the ball off to Demps FAU, it wont work as well down the road. Also, Muschamp talks about the impor tance of explosive plays runs longer than 10 yards, passes north of 20. Brantley was 0 for 4 on throws of more than 20 yards. He was praised for taking what the defense gave him Saturday. We heard that last year, and it didnt work out so well. otherwise the formula for stopping Florida dare Brantley to throw.Driskel BBrett LLe BBlanc / Alligator StaffFlorida right guard Jon Halapio (67) said the offensive line now trusts each other. He said their off-theTT yler Jetttwitter: @tyler_jett Matt Wattstwitter: @wattsmatt



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VOLUME 106 ISSUE 12 WWW.ALLIGATOR.ORG WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2011 Today We Inform. You Decide.Not officially associated with the University of Florida Published by Campus Communications, Inc. of Gainesville, Florida Textbook rental programs gain popularityStudents saved $550,000 at the UF Bookstore in 2010, pg 3. Despite economy, Greek chapter membership is highMore students went through recruitment this year, pg 4. Quarterback John Brantley and the Gators are raving about offensive coordinator Charlie Weis. See story, Page 14. 87 /65Local farmer prepares for seasonHe has sold vegetables at the Union Street Farmers Market for 15 years, pg. 5. HE WAS LYING IN THE MIDDLE OF THE ROAD WHEN HE WAS STRUCK. MORGAN WATKINS Alligator Staff Writer UF student Antonio Milanes Cuesta died Monday after a car ran over him while he was lying in the middle of a road. It was 3:20 a.m. when 22-year-old Adam Rodriguez, of Oviedo, Fla., traveling east on McCulloch Road in Seminole County, did not see Cuesta, 19, lying in the center lane of the road and ran over him, according to a Florida Highway Patrol report. The accident happened near the intersection of McCulloch Road and Orion Boulevard. Cuesta was taken to Florida Hospital East, where he died. A deputy had passed through the area cident but did not see Cuesta or anyone else lying in the road at the time, said Sgt. Kim Montes, FHP public information ofThe FHP doesnt know why Cuesta was lying in the road, Montes said. It will probably take at least two weeks to get the results from the alcohol and drug tests performed during Cuestas autopsy. It is possible that Cuesta could have tripped and fell in the middle of the road, but there were no witnesses in the area to explain how he ended up lying there, Montes said. The investigation is ongoing, but charges are not likely because of the circumstances of the incident, she said. Rodriguez ence of alcohol or drugs at the time of the incident. Cuesta was an electrical engineering sophomore and a member of ROTC at UF, said friend and former roommate Kevin Weschler. He was also a member of the UF FORECAST 2 OPINIONS 6 CLASSIFIEDS 10 CROSSWORD 13 SPORTS 14 JOEY FLECHAS and ERIN JESTER Alligator Staff Writers UFs administration withdrew the proday, postponing a measure that proved unpopular with many students. At a conference call of the UF Board of Trustees, UF Provost Joe Glover said the recent jump in graduation rates gave the administration reason to reconsider the measure. I know of no other place that has undergone a 6 [percentage point] rise in graduation rate, he said. For students who entered UF in 2006, the four-year graduation rate was 64 percent, a jump from 58 percent for students who entered in 2005. Machen said hes never seen an increase so drastic. Ive been in this game for 14 years Ive never seen that kind of jump, he said. He said he felt Student Government handled its opposition to block tuition well, but the statistics are what cemented his stance to postpone the measure. UF Student Body President Ben Meyers said he felt the increased rate is a result of students responding to tough economic times. I want to assure you that the jump in the graduation rate shows a re-dedication of students in this economy, Meyers said. The administration wants to monitor the graduation rate to see if the increase is stable. Glover said UF examines graduation rates every year, and that based on preliminary research, he thinks the current graduation rate will stay steady for the next cycle. Administration postpones Student dies after getting hit by car; investigation pending MINA RADMAN Alligator Writer A family photo project is giving viewers a snapshot of UFs campus in the mid-twentieth century. Pam Marlin, a graduate program assistant for the physics department, created the project, called UF Then and Now. Marlin, 44, got the idea from another online project that showed World War II photos held over their contemporary locations. She decided to expand the concept to UF. A photo from the 1950s shows a boy on the corner of Southwest 13th Street and University Avenue, where an information sign in the background welcomes visitors to the campus. The corner still exists today, but the entrance sign has been removed. The landscaping has changed, and some of the buildings have changed, but the people havent changed, Marlin said. The photographs came from the UF Digital Collections, which hosts more than 300 documents, photographs and maps online. When deciding what UF images to include in her project, Marlin chose photos of locations with personal meaning. Those buildings include Newell Hall, where she once worked, and University Auditorium, where she used to play with the jazz band in college. She also chose popular locaStadium and the Reitz Union. It was a family effort, Marlin said. My children are students here and they had some choices as well. In total, there are 19 photoProject provides peek at UFs past Photo courtesy of Pam Marlin Pam Marlin, a graduate program assistant for the physics department, created the project UF Then and Now. She was inspired by an online project that showed World War II photos over their present-day locations. SEE PROJECT, PAGE 8 SEE ACCIDENT, PAGE 8ON CAMPUS Cuesta I know of no other place that has undergone a 6 [percentage point] rise in graduation rate.Joe GloverUF provost

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News Today Subscription Rates: One Semester (Fall or Spring) $18 Summer Semester $10 Two Semesters (Fall or Spring) $35 Full Year (All Semesters) $40The Independent Florida Alligator is a student newspaper serving the University of Florida, pubThe Alligator The Alligator is The Alligator VOLUME 106 ISSUE 12 ISSN 0889-2423 The Alligator The Alligator 2, ALLIGATOR WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2011 TODAYFORECAST THUNDER STORMS 90/70 THUNDER STORMS 90/69 THUNDER STORMS 88/68 PARTLY CLOUDY 88/67 THUNDER STORMS 87/65 SUNDAY SATURDAY FRIDAY THURSDAY WHATS HAPPENINGWomens Student Association General Body Meeting and Recruitment Today, 7 p.m. CSE Building 220 Want to get involved on campus, join a community of women leaders and gain valuable leadership experience? Come to the Womens Student Associations first general body meeting of the year to meet other students, learn about the organization and eat free food. Everyone is welcome, both males and females, so stop by for more information. WSA has also just released applications for more than 30 leadership positions. Applications can be found online at ufwsa.blogspot. com. Applications are due by Sept. 14. UF Pre-Pharmacy Society First Fall Meeting Today, 7 p.m. Reitz Union 282 If you are interested in major ing in pharmacy, come to the CORRECTIONSAn article in Tuesdays edition of the Alligator incorrectly stated late September at the main campus Student Health Care Center locasatellite SHCC location (SHCC@ A column was also incorrectly presented as a guest column. Sami Main is a regular columnist at the Alligator. first meeting and meet others who share your inter ests. Students do not need to be a pre-pharmacy major to attend. A social will be held at Lollicup after the meeting at about 8 p.m. Got something going on? Want to see it in this space? Send an email with Whats Happening in the subject line to jflechas@alligator. org. Please model your submissions after above events. Improperly formatted Whats Happening submissions may not appear in the paper. Press releases will not appear in the paper.

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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2011 ALLIGATOR, 3 STUDENT LIFE EMILY MORROWAlligator Writer Textbook rentals on the rise CLARE LENNONAlligator Writer I still think its economically better to buy your books. You can usually sell them back for more than youd save by renting.Marlon Rodriguezpre-med studentOssip

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MEMBERSHIP NUMBERS HAVE INCREASED. MINA RADMANAlligator WriterDespite a bleak economy and ternity Affairs have not seen a decline in the number of students who join Greek organizations. This year, 1,262 women par ticipated in sorority recruitment. Thats about 90 more than last year, said Carey Mays, program The number of men who par ticipated in fraternity recruitment was not available by press time, according to Rajiv Asnani, UF Interfraternity Council president. However, 819 men accepted frater nity bids this year, he said, which is about 40 more than last year. Jack Causseaux, associate director economy had an impact on Greek turnout this year. We feared that, but our numbers have been increasing, he said. The sum of average new member fees and chapter dues for a sorority and fraternity are $2,073 and $3,067, respectively. The fraternities and sororities costs to new members, and most offer scholarships and payment plans, Causseaux said. Brandon Corsentino, a member of Chi Phi Fraternity, is applying for scholarships to help him afford his chapter dues. The fraternitys alumni offer between $500 and $1,000 to nine members each sechosen based on their academic records and involvement within the fraternity. I had to apply for scholarships because my parents told me that if I wanted to be involved, I had to pay out of my own pocket, Corsentino said. I was concerned about the money. The high costs can be justiplan, said Corsentino, an industrial engineering sophomore. Most sororities and fraternities provide their members with 10 to 15 meals per week at their houses. The costs for the meal plans are included in some chapter dues. plans can switch to their chapter houses meal plans. Its better food, Corsentino said. Our chef, Teddy, is pretty awesome. Briana Rittersporn, a telecommunications sophomore, didnt think the expense of joining a sorority was worth it. I would have to go to all the social events, Rittersporn said. There are two other Greek or Panhellenic Council and Interfraternity Council: the Multicultural Greek Council and the National Pan-Hellenic Council. Pan-Hellenic Council was not available to comment. Isamara Berrios, president of the Multicultural Greek Council, said her sorority has been affected by the economy. Everything that the chapter has done now has increased in price, Berrios said. The money has to come from our own pockets. The Multicultural Greek Council has not seen a decline in recent are concerned about the costs, Ber rios said. The sum of average new member fees and chapter dues cost $547. Recruitment for the Multiculabout sororities or fraternities can to Florida Greeks, which is available on the UF Greeks website, People still want to get involved, Berrios said. They just 4, ALLIGATOR Gina Chitko / AlligatorUF student Michael Baumans steel moose sculpture has resided at Jenn Garretts house at 1004 NW 34th St. since May. Dana Burke / Alligator StaffEric Choopani is thrown into the air after he accepts his bid to the fraternity Tau Kappa Epsilon, or TKE, during Fall 2010 recruitment week. Tough economy does not deter students from seeking Greek life ERIN JESTERAlligator WriterPassers-by may have noticed a non-native moose guarding Jenn Garretts front yard near Westside Park and Littlewood Environmentalists shouldnt be concerned, though. The moose, which has reMay, is made of steel. Garrett, 33, a full-time artist, said she usually displays her own work in her yard, but since she loaned out or sold all of her give students an opportunity to showcase their work. Working through a profesment, Garrett found three steel sculptures she liked by three students. and Jon Burns, and the moose by Michael Bauman. All three sculptures are for sale. Weve only gotten good feedback about it, Garrett said. Its common for parents walking their children past the house to the elementary school to stop and comment on the sculptures, Garrett said. The moose gets the most compliments because its the most recognizable. I think its so much fun, she said. Ive enjoyed having [the moose]. And the others, too. Garrett and her husband, Tim, an assistant professor in UFs College of Medicine, moved into the house in 2006 after Garrett received her masters degree in interior design and historic preservation at UF. her own metal sculptures in the yard right away and has had a total of eight or nine sculptures years. from UF to her yard because students dont typically have a way to move the sculptures from campus to their home or storage. moose back to your apartment, she said. One of her pieces rests in the yard of its current owner her neighbor. piece, shell park it on the lawn until someone buys it or it goes to exhibition. The neighbors miss the sculptures between displays. They came by to inquire about the emptiness of the yard before Garrett acquired the moose and its abstract counter parts, she said. They said, Are you all moving? Wheres all the art? Artist displays steel sculptures, student creations in front yard Weve only gotten good feedback about it.Jenn GarrettartistNeighbors favor metal moose

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MEREDITH RUTLANDAlligator Staff WriterJoe Durando watched as people mingled around his vegetable stand a girl cradling a white kitten while singing Hound Dog and a young couple holding hands nearby on Farmers Market. His stand holds wares that could purple and green eggplant, starfruit and chestnuts. Durandos romance with vegetables has been a growing relationship. He spent his childhood raised racehorses. He started gardening at 10 and ing magazine in 1975. a bachelors and masters degree in horticulture in the 1980s. Now, he and his wife, Trace near Alachua. I know the vegetables, said Durando, who is in his 50s. Its my passion. He said theyve owned the farm for about 20 years and sold at the farmers market for 15 years. They taurants. Civilization, a downtown co-op restaurant that serves ethnic cuisine, offers lunch and dinner specials that ber who chooses the restaurants produce, said Durandos vegetables nucopia of vegetarian dishes such as pumpkin lasagna. I like the idea of supporting someone who lives here who I here. Theyre raising families here. Theyre spending money here. He said he likes to spread out his business to several local farmers, but he said hell be back to Durando for more ingredients once the salad greens start rolling in. Every year is a learning curve, Durando said. He said he loves coming to the farmers market because of the vibrant atmosphere, great people and, of course, the local beer. Jenn Bennett pushed a stroller up to Durandos stand. Her 18-monthold son, Atticus, looked up with a Hes starting to look like you, Durando said to Bennett as they caught up on old times. Bennett said shes known Durando for 12 years and has been buying vegetables and herbs from his stand Its just such a great way to end the day, said Bennett, who works Academies Magnet at Loften High this season are very nice. I cant wait for fall, though. The vegetables and herbs Durando will start to sell in about a month are a knockout, he said. He has three or four types of arugula and rapini more types than some people know exist. toes, the Cadillac of tomatoes. enced it, theres no way to really talk about it, he said. He makes curry dishes with Asian eggplants and a cold bean salad inspired from a restaurant dish he par ticularly liked. To him, farming is about more than food. Its about sustainability. In this day and age, from the global point of view from global health, how we feed our self is very important, he said. ket is held every Wednesday from 4 to 7 p.m. in the Bo Diddley CommuALLIGATOR, 5Aundre Larrow / Alligator StaffSenate President Micah Lewis presides over the Student Senate meeting Tuesday. Senators will vote next week to reallocate certain seats. Brett Le Blanc / Alligator StaffJoe Durando, a two-time UF alumnus, runs the Possum Hollow Farm, located 15 miles north of Gainesville. His produce will be for sale at the Union Street Farmers Market on Wednesdays from 4 to 7 p.m. CLARE LENNONAlligator Writer changes the number of senators allotted for different areas. The proposal would cut the number of graduate are currently open. pharmacy school senators from two to one. The six mores from six to eight. Fall elections are based on residence halls and offbased on colleges. the proposal. without approval from the Judiciary Committee. tionment each year, there were not enough committee before voting. Final approval will be voted on at the Were literally running out of time, so it had to be done, he said. in areas usually held by independent senators to give their party members more seats. Michel said he wants graduate students to be involved, but he agreed that some cuts may be necessary. He pointed out that graduate students are already Were not even halfway through the term of people who were elected in the spring, he said.Senators propose seat reallocationsPERSON OF THE WEEKFarmer prepares for season at Union Street Farmers Market SG Voting District Changes Graduate students could lose half of their Senate spots

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Reader responseVote or post a message at www.alligator.orgThe views expressed here are not necessarily those of the Alligator .The Alligator will be withheld if the writer shows just cause. We reserve the right to edit for length, grammar, style and libel. Send letters to letters@alligator.org, bring them to 1105 W. University Ave., or send them to P.O. Box 14257, Gainesville, FL 32604-2257. Columns of about 450 words about original topics and editorial cartoons are also welcome. Questions? Call 352-376-4458. Column EditorialWEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2011 WWW.ALLIGATOR.ORG/OPINIONS Elizabeth Behrman EDITOR Joey Flechas MANAGING EDITOR Justin Hayes OPINIONS EDITORDo the Right ThingPlagiarism pandemic hurts educationPlagiarism is bad. Thats what we have all been told since high school. Who cares if we copy the works of others? They wouldnt have put it out there if they didnt want other people to use it, right? Its not like Im using all of their work just a few sentences. Im just taking what everyone else has done and making something new, arent I? Many of you might have felt these sentiments while you last research paper. Surely plagiarism is not that big of a deal is it? In a recent Pew Research Center study that polled 1,055 college and university presidents from all over the country, 55 percent said that plagiarism in papers among college students had increased over the past 10 years. Of those presidents, 89 percent believed that computers and the Internet have played a major role in this trend. Copy and paste is not your friend. line into your research paper, but this is a one-way ticket to academic disciplinary action. But moral behavior should never be commanded, and it should never be elicited by threat of punishment. Morality does not exist at the barrel of a gun. Instead, you should not plagiarize because it is the right thing to do. Your research papers might be completed the night before they are due, but the sources you used took years to complete. If you believe that the person or publication that took the time and effort to compile and develop the information and ideas off of which you based your work does not require a citation, then you are essentially implying that the source does not deserve credit for this effort. By that logic, you are implying that you do not deserve credit for your own work. Therefore, you deserve nothing but failure on your project. There is, however, another reason that might hit closer to home. If you do not cite your sources, you will lose all credibility Yes, you are in college and are probably pretty smart. But you will probably not be coming up with the next political, mathematical or psychological theory off of the top of your head. When the words on your page appear to come from far beyond the reach of the average undergraduates intellectual capacity or research capabilities, chances are people will think you made it up or copied it. To put it simply, if you ever want to be taken seriously in the academic or professional world, it is in your best interest not to plagiarize. A mistake like that will stay with you forever. Todays question: Have you ever plagiarized or cheated on an assignment? Tuesdays question: Have you ever gone to a session at TutoringZone? 53 TOTAL VOTES74% YES 26% NO New students should come out of shellsT one to be published. I want to make it good. You only Today, I want to focus on new students. You all are new to college life. It is very different from high school. into the Student Body. In all likelihood, you are either the go-to person who knows where all the good parties are and who advises your friends on the dos and donts, or you are the overachiever who has had things together for years, and youre on to conquer the next frontier. I am speaking to the young adults who may not have it all The next few years are all about you. You are your own sity. Now is the time to dream big. This moment in your life is the best opportunity to be a daydreamer. Be someone who makes their childhood hopes a breathing reality. Do not let the grandiosity of your future overwhelm you into becoming a living nightmare. For all of you outliers on the fringe, daunted by your new environment, the best way to overcome it is simple: You need to get involved. This is the one shot to make someone of yourself and to do better for you, your loved ones and the world around you. You must go out and get away from that small circle in which you felt comfortable. Find new people. Who knows, you could meet your life-long friend, or you could marry that cute girl in your general anthropology class. Do not let fear or lethargy call the shots for you. Be the captain of the ship, and take charge of your fate. I can assure you, no one else is going to do it for you. The Swamp is a community full of zeal. A Student Body composed of contentious understandings is what makes the earth go round. without which you would die if it shot up into space and imploded. Passion is the food of the living dream. Everybody needs it. Do not let anybody a professor, a friend or a parent tell you that you cannot do what you love because it is a lie. Grab on to that love and never let it slip through your join it. If there isnt, make one up. It is a great resource and provides a chance to make a difference in your own life. Because last year was my freshman year, I did not do any of this. This advice comes from personal experience. It is an experience that I hope you can avoid. I lived alone and off-campus. I did not join any clubs. I took classes that I hated. I did not follow where my heart was leading me. Misery plagued me, and I never went out to have fun. Now, gameday changed everything. Until last year, I was never much of a sports fan, let alone a UF football fan. Sitting in the crowd with all the other students was a rush. The games were exciting. Gators chants created a sense of unity with my fellow students that I had not felt before. I am a Gator. Everybody needs to be a part of an organization, whether its a church youth group, an indie band trying to land that sweet gig or joining a comedy club where you can crack jokes. UF is full of opportunities. There are literally people here who are opening the door just for you. It is your choice to walk through or stay put. Nicholas Butler is a journalism sophomore at UF. His column appears on Wednesdays. Nicholas Butlernbutler@alligator.org

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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2011 ALLIGATOR, 7 Tuition increases necessaryI am a graduate student who supports tuition increases to cover the rising operating costs of UF, including my meager salary. There are many reasons for my support, but it primarily has to do with the fact that my tuition and the tuition of other instructors, and teaching and research assistants, has been waived as a result of the hard work of Graduate Assistants United. I would ask all undergraduates who are protesting tuition hikes whether they voted in the midterm elections and for whom they voted. If you didnt vote, you dont have much standing to complain about how the state chooses to fund Floridas institutions of higher learning. If you voted for Republicans, then you essentially voted for policies and systems of taxation that will continue to directly and indirectly gut state support for education at all levels. Ditto your parents. Education is expensive; if the state wont pay for it, then at least part of the cost has to fall back to individual students and families. Certainly, there are cost-saving measures that can be put in place, but you can only whittle away so much before you can no longer claim public Ivy status. UF provides an in-demand and highly expensive service. It just makes good old-fashioned capitalistic sense to raise the price of this service if the state and its citizens refuse to subsidize it at adequate levels. Remember that the next time you walk into a voting booth. Your gripe isnt with UF, its with Tallahassee. C.T. Bland 4th Year Ph.D. Student Graduate Instructor Department of Religion Letter to the EditorLuckily, students around campus dont take the Alligators editorials seriously. Last Friday, in the Darts and Laurels editorial, the Alligator sent a very clear message to students when they threw a wedont-want-to-pay-higher-tuition-either-but-holdingpicket-signs-isnt-going-to-do-anything DART to Students for a Democratic Society. According to the Alligator, students should pack up, give in and roll over for tuition hikes because activism simply doesnt work. It was a truly ridiculous assertion, and students didnt have to look far for evidence to the contrary. In that very same paper there were two articles that highlighted the impact that student activism has had this semester. place over 48 hours on Monday and Tuesday. Students for a Democratic Society collected over 1,200 signatures to put the question of tuition hikes on the Student Government ballot. Now the students will have a chance to formally voice their opposition just like last semester when 90 percent of the Student Body said no to block tuition. Armed with such a huge mandate, students organized rallies and marches to Tigert Hall, culminating in the Board of Trustees decision to postpone the implementation of block tuition by a year. If it wasnt for the awareness of concerned students all over school, block tuition wouldnt have even been up for discussion. It would have passed quietly without the Student Body knowing until it felt the disastrous effects. This is why the UF Student Body should feel immensely proud reading the Alligators second activism related piece, announcing that administrators are abandoning block tuition. The continuing trend of increasing graduation rates left administrators without a leg to stand on. They have no choice but to retreat from a misguided policy that they tried to pass in the face of massive student opposition. The students were right about block tuition, and theyre right again about the 15 percent tuition increase. Why is it that Bernie Machen is licking his lips at the prospect of tuition hikes even before the extent of the budget cuts is known? Why should students have to take out another loan or work more hours while millionaire administrators pay nothing? Putting a stop to these tuition increases is in the interest of every student. If we learned anything from the defeat of block tuition, it should be that if the Student Body stands together, we can overcome these attacks on students. If youre interested in helping us organize against tuition increases, you should come out to SDS on Mondays at 6:30 p.m. in Anderson Hall, Room 34. Conor Munro is a political science and history sophomore at UF. He is an organizer with Students for a Democratic Society.Anti-activism assertion unfoundedGuest columnConor MunroSpeaking Out

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graphs. Over the course of four weekends, Marlin and her husband, Derrius, along with her son, Justin, and daughter, Lizzie, went around campus and lined up each photo to its present-day counterpart. Each photograph took about an hour to complete, Marlin said. You have to hold up the photo with one hand and have the camera in your other hand, Marlin said. My husband and son took the photos because I moved too much. Of all the photos that are part of the project, she said her favorites include one that captured four girls sitting in a car in front of the Smathers Library at its completion in 1926, and another of a young boy selling soda at a Gators football game in 1960. When I was standing there, it was as if the little boy was there, Marlin said. It was weird in a way. Response to the photography project has been overwhelming, Marlin said. As for the future, the UF Foundation will continue to expand the website and may develop the photographs into a calendar. to comment. The then-and-now photos show UFs timeless goal to improve and expand. They did have the goal to expand the university and make it a bigger place, Marlin said. All that is alive and well in the people here today. View the project online at dmarlin.com. Be a part of something BIG GIVE B LOOD.Over 1,000 people gathered to form one of the largest human blood drop 8, ALLIGATOR WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2011 Photo courtesy to the Alligator Tony Milanes Cuesta, an electrical engineering sophomore, was struck by a car Monday while lying in the middle of the road. He was a member of UF ROTC wrestling team. Weschler, a sophomore, was Cuestas roommate in Mallory Hall last year. He was a random roommate. I didnt know who he was, but we ended up getting along really well, Weschler said. He was just a really nice, genuine kid. Cuesta would often pick up Weschler, who didnt have a car, when he needed a ride to the Tau Epsilon Phi fraternity house, where Weschler is a brother, or to another location. He was a really generous kid, he said. He would never say no to go out of his way to do something for someone else. ACCIDENT, from page 1 PROJECT, from page 1Photos could be made into calendar He was just a really nice, genuine kid.Kevin WeschlerCuestas roommate

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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2011 ALLIGATOR, 9 TECHNOLOGY ANNA MARIE SOLTRENAlligator Contributing WriterA study conducted by the Pew Research Centers Internet & American Life Project last month told us this: We are addicted to our cellphones. With 83 percent of American adults today having some type of cellphone, it comes as no surprise that people have an attachment to their phones unlike any other. In a 30-day study conducted by Lisa Merlo, assistant professor of psychiatry at UF, and her team, men and women were found to be equally at risk of cellphone addiction, although younger adults showed more symptoms than older adults. Individuals with fancier phones were also found to exhibit more warning signs than those with more basic models. Fifty-one percent of people with cellphones used their phones at least once to get information they needed right away during the span of the study. Thirteen percent of cellphone users admitted to pretending to use their phones in order to avoid interacting with others around them. I think for the current generation of college students, [cellphones are] a normal thing for them, said Steve Orlando, UF spokesman. Thats what theyve grown up with, and its part of their world. Theyve come to rely on it so much and for so many things. Theyre almost inseparable. Study: People addicted to phones ADMISSION IS FREE. MAGEN WETMOREAlligator Contributing WriterGainesville residents will soon be able to experience Latin America on the big screen. To celebrate Latino/Hispanic Heritage Month, the Latina Womens League is presenting the 7th Gainesville Latino Film Festival, which begins this month. The festival will be held at the Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art from Thursfree and open to the public. About 80 people attended the event last year, and this year they expect between 50 and 100 guests, said Amelia Bell, marketing and public relations coordinator for the Harn Museum. There will also be prints by Armando Morales, a Nicaraguan artist, on display beginning in October. The events kick off with Museum Nights: Destination Latin America on festival is Cinco das sin Nora (Noras Will) and begins at 7 p.m. Veronica troduce the movie. Latino Film Festival begins today at Harn Museum Theyve come to rely on it so much and for so many things. Theyre almost inseparable. Steve OrlandoUF spokesman

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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2011 WWW.ALLIGATORSPORTS.ORG Time change The kickoff of the Gators soccer game on Sunday against Florida Gulf Coast has been changed to 2 p.m. Florida also plays FSU at home Friday at 7 p.m. The MailbagTime is running out to get your submissions in for this weeks mailbag column. Got something on your mind after the opener against FAU? Send us questions to our Twitter account: @alligatorSports. Brett Le Blanc / Alligator StafGators offensive coordinator Charlie Weis is drawing rave reviews from players for his quick play calls and fast-paced tempo. PLAYERS SAID CALLS ARE COMING IN QUICKER. TOM GREENAlligator Staff WriterCharlie Weis doesnt like to waste time. It was evident in Floridas season opener against Florida Atlantic. The Gators came out with a hurry-up offense in their put together a 13-play drive that spanned 6:32 and resulted in the Coach Weis, thats what he likes to do, quarterback John Brantley said. He likes to get the play in quick, and he gets really mad if we have a delay-of-game penalty. Florida put together three more Gators second drive went for 12 plays and 67 yards and took 3:29 off the clock. That was followed by a three-play, 68-yard possession in 1:01, while their last scor plays and 91 yards. Brantley said the quick playcalling made life easier on the offense, and everyone had ample It was real fast, right guard JOHN BOOTHEAlligator Staff WriterAfter two years of former UF goalkeeper Katie Fraine making life easy on the Gators coaching staff, the decision for who will play between the pipes each week has gotten a little tougher in 2011. Through three starts by senior Brooke Chancey and two by freshman Taylor Burke, No. 9 Florida (4-1) has yet to put its We have a person whos seen it all, with Brooke being here for many, many years. We know what we have with her, UF goalies coach Robert Liessem Jr. said. And then you have this kid Taylor who comes in, and we all know her athleticism and her upside and the potential. We have to try and bring that out of her. Just the second true freshman to start a match since 1999, the 6-foot-1 Burke who has begun her career with shutouts on the road at FIU and then against Texas Tech on Friday. Chancey, meanwhile, held Miami goalless in the season opener but conceded four goals in two games against then-No. 18 Texas A&M and thenNo. 15 UCLA. Liessem said coach Becky Burleigh and the rest of the staff were hesitant to throw Burke into either game, as they thought Chancey provided the better matchup against the two ranked teams because of her experience. shes been playing the best to start, he said. The goalkeeper is a very important position, and its so much easier to put her in over a period of time, if thats the eventual goal and if she ends up earning it. for the freshman, with nearly 4,000 on hand in Pressly Stadium and former Gators Abby Wambach and Heather Mitts looking on from the sidelines. Burke again was rarely challenged with just three shots levied GREG LUCAAlligator Staff Writer the offensive line, but that doesnt mean the position remains unsettled. After the units strong performance Saturday against FAU, Will Muschamp and Charlie Weis said they are happy running a seven-man rotation. Early in fall camp, Muschamp emphasized the need gether. But now, with seven players proving they can make one cohesive unit, that desire no longer exists. On the offensive line I feel pretty settled in, Muschamp said Monday. Three players appear to have starting spots locked up: junior Xavier Nixon at left tackle, sophomore Jonotthan Harrison at center and sophomore Jon Halapio at right guard. Snaps at right tackle are split between redshirt freshman Chaz Green and junior Matt Patchan, while time at left guard is divided between senior Dan Wenger, who can also play center, and sophomore Kyle Koehne. Although the group appears jumbled, Muschamp referred to it as the mixture of guys we have a great comfort level with. A major concern with an offensive line platoon is a lack of chemistry, but Weis said he was happy with the groups performance against Florida Atlantic. I liked the fact that there looked to be very good cohesion, he said. To keep your mental mistakes low, especially at the the most part, that was attained. its not surprising that theyre able to work well together Offensive line coming together despite rotation [Weis] likes to get the play in quick and he gets really mad if we have a delayof-game penalty.John BrantleyUF quarterbackFreshman, senior splitting time in goalBurke UF Fo otball SEE O-LINE, P A GE 16 SEE NO TEBOOK, P A GE 16 SEE SOCCER, P A GE 15QuotableFor [Chris] Rainey to try to give you analysis...thats comical.Charlie Weis, UF offensive coordinator

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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2011 ALLIGATOR, 15 Starter for Friday game against FSU undeterminedher way on Friday, compared to the 17 shots on goal against Chancey in her three starts. It felt really good to get some experience, especially with that type of crowd and the Florida Gator environment, Burke said. Her lone gaffe occurred in the 37th minute, when she ventured too far in pursuit of an oncoming attacker and left an empty net. The only thing preventing a goal was the heads-up play of defender Kat Williamson, who made it back to the goal line quick enough to clear the incoming shot. Im really impressed with Taylor, especially coming in as a freshman and being commanding in her box and I think theres only better things to come from her, Williamson said. While it will take a week of pracagainst Florida State, Liessem said he would like to see the competition settled before UF hits the meat of Southeastern Conference play, which begins Sept. 23. The ultimate goal is to have someeverything that we need encompassing, and really take it over, he said. As much as its a good thing to have two talented kids that are doing it, for continuity of the team its a lot easier to have that one and thats why we were so ridiculously successful with Katie. Contact John Boothe at jboothe@alligator.org SOCCER, from page 14 It felt really good to get some experience, especially with that type of crowd and the Florida Gator environment, Taylor BurkeUF freshman goalie BLAZERS RB PAT SHED IS QUESTIONABLE (HERNIA). TYLER JETTAlligator Staff WriterBryan Ellis probably wont leave Florida Field a winner Saturday. He just wont. Hes not supposed to. That wont make it any easier. It didnt feel good settling for second when UAB walked into Neyland Stadium and came close to stunning Tennessee in front of 95,183 fans last September. torched the Volunteers secondary, passing for 373 yards and helping UAB lost 32-29 in double over time, and Vols fans showed appreciation for the opponents efforts. They cheered the underdog quarterback who got his hopes up, who thought maybe, just maybe, he could be a hero. boos, he told The Birmingham News after the game. Ellis, a redshirt senior, will have one last chance to earn some jeers when UAB comes to Gainesville sons, the Blazers have played six games against Southeastern Conference teams. They have lost six times, though they nearly scored an upset twice last year, the other sissippi State in October. Like in those six games, UAB will be the less talented team when Stadium. Over all, the Blazers wont be as fast. They wont be as strong. They wont be as skilled. But they also wont be intimidated. Weve been to some arenas that we can remember experiences from, and hopefully that will help us, said Ellis, who also played in front 74,656 fans at Texas A&M in 2009. We have to let the new guys know that it will be like nothing they have experienced, and it will be fun. If the Blazers are to keep Satur days game tight, they will need a strong effort out of their offense. UAB is coming off its two most productive seasons in school history 5,111 yards in 2009, 5,074 yards last year. To keep things running smoothly, the Blazers will put the offense on Ellis shoulders. Senior running back Pat Shed the teams leading rusher and receiver last season is questionable with a hernia. The receiving corps, meanwhile, is depleted. Three of the teams are gone. Still, the Blazers run a spread system that has consistently remains untested. Last Saturday, Florida had the luxury of opening up against a pass attempts. We have to completely shift gears, coach Will Muschamp said. That is the one thing that is hard about being a defensive player in the NCAA. If Floridas defense isnt ready, maybe Ellis can surprise them like he did against Tennessee. And maybe he can win this time. But probably not. Contact Tyler Jett at tjett@alligator.orgUAB will lean on quarterback Ellis against UF on SaturdayBrett Le Blanc / Alligator Staff UF goalies coach Robert Liessem Jr. (left) said he would like to have one keeper emerge as the best option, similar to former goalie Katie Fraine, who anchored the position the last two years.Ellis

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on game day. Halapio, Koehne and Harrison are roommates, and Green said his roommate Nixon has been very helpful in his development. Wenger said he was welcomed with open arms the moment he transferred from Notre Dame, and many of the linemen have found themselves pulling for Patchan after seeing him battle through numerous injuries in his career. We all connect together, communicate a lot better, Halapio said. We all just play well together. Green mentioned a number of reasons why having a rotation can be positive. If Florida is going to continue to run the up-tempo attack they used against FAU, the ability to for a breather will be critical. Taking off a few plays can also be helpful from a mental standpoint, as the Gators continue to adjust to a new system under offensive line coach Frank Ver ducci. You get a better glimpse of the whole picture when youre on the sideline, Green said. Playing the game, everything is fast. You have to be able to adjust quick. Green added that watching a couple snaps from the bench gives Weis and Verducci an opportunity to offer advice regarding the defensive front or blocking scheme. As is always the case, the decision of who starts Saturday will be made based on performance this week in practice. According to Halapio, even the players didnt know who was going to start against FAU until shortly before the game. Now, they know it doesnt matter. We all trust each other, Halapio said. Whoever starts, its going to be a good offensive line. I Contact Greg Luca at gluca@alligator.org. 16, ALLIGATOR WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2011 Green: Rotation will keep players fresh in fast-paced offense O-LINE, from page 14Driskel, Joyer impress in limited time against Florida AtlanticJon Halapio said. By the time we got to the ball there was already a play there. Freshmen impress: Despite not starting, a pair of freshmen stood out to teammates on the offensive side of the ball in Saturdays season-opening 41-3 win against Florida Atlantic. Quarterback Jeff Driskel and fullback Hunter Joyer saw early playing time against the Owls Driskel as part of coach Will Muschamps plan to get him meaningful snaps, and Joyer in part due to the injury sustained by sophomore Trey Burton. Driskel entered for a series in the second quarter and the dual-threat quarterback didnt let the mistake bring him down. He wasnt pouting around or anything, he just moved on to the next play, Halapio said, adding that for a freshman, Driskel showed action. After Driskel checked back in with the game well in hand, he looked more comfortable running the offense. You couldnt have choreographed it, really, any better, Weis said. He The Swamp; its exciting for a kid at that position. But you saw how much more poised he looked the next time out there. As for Joyer, he garnered praise from Muschamp on Monday for the progress he has made since arriving on campus, as well as his effort Saturday. He also caught the eye of Halapio, who noted Joyers full-speed effort since Hes real physical, a real smart player for a freshman, Halapio said. The thing that stands out to me and my teammates is how physical he is at the fullback position. Gators move up in poll: After entering the season ranked No. 22 in the nation, Florida moved up to No. 18 in the latest AP poll released Tuesday. Florida is one of six Southeastern Conference teams ranked in the Top 25. Contact Tom Green at tgreen@alligator.org. NOTEBOOK, from page 14THE RALL YMatt: The day weve all been waiting for came and went Saturday, and for a lot of you it was a joyous occasion. You thought Floridas walloping of FAU at lines made you feel all warm and fuzzy inside. And Dominique Easleys dance moves had you gyrating and smiling in the student section with your friends (and, maybe, family members at the discounted rate of $50). But hold on a minute, OK? Lets not crown these Gators just yet. As good as things looked on Saturday, theres still plenty yet to be tested for example, the secondary. Florida played a Florida Atlantic team thats quarterback entered the game with as many interceptions (1) as completions. The Owls also started a freshman and sophomore at receiver with a total of 12 receptions to their names. Plus, the dominant performance from the defensive line prevented unproven under classmen from being tested at the back end of the Gators new defense. Graham Wilbert looked woefully inept for much of the game Saturday night, but he still managed to complete a 28-yard pass down the seam to tight end Nexon Dorvilus. Whats going to happen when UF plays a real opponent? That should be the concern, not the Gators No. 18 ranking in the new AP Top 25. Tyler: You cant use one play as evidence against the secondary as a whole. Yeah, FAU managed to complete one 28yard pass on one third-and-long. Who cares? The score was 24-0; the game was over. And why are you insulting people for getting excited about Saturdays game? It wasnt a great opponent and probably didnt tell us anything. But how do you want fans to react? You want them to spend their evening not cheering. You are an unpleasant, soulless man. Stay positive. There were plenty of good things to take away from Saturdays win; namely, the running game looked as good as advertised. However, Florida will need to show more balance in the future beginning this weekend. The team doesnt need a more even runpass ratio; the Gators actually threw the ball three more times than they ran it. But the team does need to get the ball to playmakers not named Demps and Rainey. Ignoring incomplete passes, Floridas two burners touched the ball on about 55 percent of plays from scrimmage. Expect defenses to key on Demps and Rainey for the rest of the season. They will stack the box and dare John Brantley to beat them deep. If Floridas offense wants to be good this year, or at least serviceable against Southeastern Conference powers, Brantley needs to show he can burn teams with the long ball. Matt: Thanks for solidifying my point, big guy. The secondary didnt have a chance to be exposed. Thats the point. And on the one play where Wilbert actually had time and threw what happened? It went for a 28-yard gain. While the SEC isnt littered with talent at quarterback as in recent years, the Gators will face much stiffer competition in the weeks to come. Even a guy like Tyler Bray at Tennessee has a legitimate chance to torch UFs inexperienced secondary. connecting with DaRick Rogers and Justin Hunter 11 times for 246 of those yards an average of more than 20 yards for both. Florida started two freshmen and two sophomores and none of them have faced the caliber of player theyre expected to cover week in and week out in the SEC. It doesnt matter how Brantley throws or Demps and Rainey run if the secondary cant hold up against a vertical passing attack. Tyler: That wasnt the only time Wilbert tested the secondary, hater. He threw down Omar Hunter said the Gators defensive line did a poor job of applying pressure. Offensively, Florida clicked way better than it did last season out of the gates, but the passing game still has a lot to prove. The bulk of Brantleys workload came on short passes. yards. He did great on those, completing more than 80 percent of his passes. But while dumping the ball off to Demps FAU, it wont work as well down the road. Also, Muschamp talks about the impor tance of explosive plays runs longer than 10 yards, passes north of 20. Brantley was 0 for 4 on throws of more than 20 yards. He was praised for taking what the defense gave him Saturday. We heard that last year, and it didnt work out so well. otherwise the formula for stopping Florida dare Brantley to throw.Driskel Brett Le Blanc / Alligator StaffFlorida right guard Jon Halapio (67) said the offensive line now trusts each other. He said their off-theT yler Jetttwitter: @tyler_jett Matt Wattstwitter: @wattsmatt