Group Title: Independent Florida Alligator
Title: The Independent Florida alligator
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028290/01125
 Material Information
Title: The Independent Florida alligator
Alternate Title: Florida allgator
Alligator
University digest
University of Florida digest
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some col.) ; 36 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Independent Florida Alligator
Publisher: The students of the University of Florida
Campus Communications, Inc.
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: November 5, 2009
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: daily (except saturdays, sundays, holidays and exam periods, aug.-apr.); semiweekly (may-july)
daily
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 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates: 29.665245 x -82.336097 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 65, no. 75 (Feb. 1, 1973)-
General Note: "Not officially associated with the University of Florida."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028290
Volume ID: VID01125
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 13827512
alephbibnum - 000470760
lccn - sn 86010448
issn - 0889-2423
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IOA E 0he E
VOLUME 103 ISSUE 53





VOLUME 103 ISSUE 53


i the independent florida





I of Florida Published by Campus Communications, Inc of Gainesville, Florida
o We Inform. You Decide.


1


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2009


Andrew Stanfill / Alligator Staff
UF student Victoria Reynolds receives a nasal spray vaccine for H1N1 during a mass vaccination of about 700
students Wednesday at the UF Student Health Care Center.


ON CAMPUS

Dancers prep for marathon


By CAROLYN TILLO
Alligator Writer
ctillo@alligator org

The music of Michael Jackson and Beyonce
mingled with the chimes from Century Tower's
bells as about 45 participants from Dance Mara-
thon at UF lined up and danced on Turlington
Plaza Wednesday afternoon.
Members of student and Greek organizations
completed 10-minute performances between
classes from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The dances were
part of the marathon's Dancer Week activities,
which help Dance Marathon at UF participants
show their spirit and raise awareness for the
Children's Miracle Network.
Money from Dance Marathon at UF, a 26.2-
hour event, goes to the Children's Miracle Net-
work at Shands UF to help sick children and
their families. The marathon will take place on
April 10 and 11.
But Kristen Gillis, the overall morale director
for Dance Marathon, said the dances are meant
to remind people of the children who continue
to suffer year-round.
"We can have one event once a year and then
focus on it, but Children's Miracle Network de-


mands 365 days of awareness," Gillis said.
Angela Daly, a Dance Marathon morale cap-
tain, joined Gillis during a dance at 12:35 p.m.
She said the Turlington Plaza dances represented
an opportunity for members of Dance Marathon
teams to earn spirit points that could help them
win awards at the marathon.
"You're doing something beyond
yourself. You realize what a good
cause it is."
Angela Daly
Dance Marathon morale captain

Daly said participants are required to stand
for the entire 26.2 hours to help them understand
the pain suffered by the sick children and their
families.
Participating in last year's event helped her
to realize the impact the marathon has on these
families, she said.
"You're doing something beyond yourself,"
Daly said. "You realize what a good cause it is."
Last year, Dance Marathon at UF had more
than 1,500 participants and raised about $413,000,
Brighton said.


700 students



get vaccine

* ABOUT 100 STUDENTS WITH APPOINTMENTS
DID NOT SHOW UP WEDNESDAY.

UF's first mass swine flu vaccination went off without a ma-
jor hitch on Wednesday, with about 700 students showing up
to receive their doses. The other 100 or so students who made
appointments did not show up, said Kat Lindsey, marketing
coordinator for the Student Health Care Center. The center has
not decided what to do with the extra doses, but director Phil-
lip Barkley said UF could have another vaccination
Student day or maybe hold on to the extras until the next
Life shipment arrives.
Students who kept their appointments reported
no issues with lines and said the entire process took a few min-
utes at most.
"I just thought it was pretty sweet," second-year UF psychol-
ogy student Ari Osteen said.
"You just sniff some drugs, and you're good," Osteen joked.
He said he appreciated how efficient the process was and that
the vaccine was free. He also praised the free plastic back mas-
sagers and lollipops doled out by the staff.
The University of Central Florida joined UF this week in ad-
ministering the vaccine to students. UCF received about 1,500
doses for students and employees, with about 300 doses given
out so far, according to spokesman Chad Binette.
THOMAS STEWART


Applicants up from '08


By TATIANA QUIROGA
Alligator Contributing Writer

Fraternal twins Erin and Martin
Lencki hope to join their two older
siblings at UF next year.
The two 17-year-old Jupiter
High School seniors are among a
pool of 25,098 freshman applicants
this year who applied by Sunday's
deadline despite a diminishing ad-
mission rate.
Students can still apply until
March 1 but will be considered on
a space-available basis, UF spokes-
man Steve Orlando said.
As of Tuesday, 25,190 people ap-
plied, about 1,300 more than at the
same point last year.
Orlando said the football and
basketball national championships
in recent years may have contrib-
uted to UF's increase in popularity.


"We don't know the bottom line,
but it could be a factor," he said.
With in-state tuition now $4,300
a year while the national average for
public universities looms at about
$7,000, the price might also attract
students.
The Bright Fu-
tures scholarship
program and the
short distance to
her hometown
made UF an ap-
pealing option for
Erin Lencki.
Orlando "More and
more people are
realizing that an education at UF is
a stunning value," Orlando said.
Though UF's applicant pool con-
tinues to rise, the number of stu-

SEE APPLY, PAGE 4


Man banned for threatening to throw hot coffee on computer users


Linebacker
Brandon Spikes
(right) has decided
not to play against
Vanderbilt at all in
order to avoid being
a distraction to his
team. Spikes was
originally suspend-
ed for the first half.
See Story, Page 24.


A local man was banned from all UF
libraries Tuesday after Library West em-
ployees told University Police officers
he threatened to throw his hot coffee on
anyone using his favorite computer.
Officers found Roman Schulz, 60, sit-
ting at a computer near the circulation
desk on the ground floor of the Marston
Science Library, according to the report.
Library West employees told police
Schulz had a preferred row of computers


and would pester and threaten others if
those computers were occupied.
Schulz admitted he was frustrated
with students cutting in front of him
to use his favorite computer at Library
West, but he stated that the coffee com-
ment was not directed at anyone.
Schulz is banned from UF libraries for
at least three years, unless he appeals the
warning to UPD's director and chief.
KATIE KLOSS


Today
FORECAST 2
OPINIONS 6


the AVENUE
CLASSIFIED 1
CROSSWORD 1


9 r '
.3 Sunny
"5 78/48


SPORTS 17
visit www.alligator.org


I


cy






2, ALLIGATOR U THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2009

News Today


WHAT'S HAPPENING
Heroic Monumentalism: The
State and Its Architecture in the
1930s
Today, 6 p.m.
Ham Museum of Art Auditorium
This talk by Dietmar Schirmer for
Museum Nights answers the ques-
tion, "Is there a fascist architecture
or has it only to do with mass soci-
ety and culture?"

History and Practice of Ottoman
Miniature Painting and
Illumination
Today, 7:30 p.m.
Ham Museum of Art Auditorium
Come to this talk by Sermin Ciddi
to learn about ancestral painting
styles in Turkey today at Museum
Nights.

Kaleidoscope Month presents
AASU's Got Talent
Today, 6:30 p.m.
Reitz Union Grand Ballroom
Watch and see the many diverse
talents of Asian-American Student
Union members There will be
an array of solo and group acts.
Also, come watch Lydia Paek,
of Boxcutterz, and Victor Kim,
of Quest Crew, from Season 3 of
"America's Best Dance Crew".

African Student Union Pageant
Today, 7 to 10 p.m.
Reitz Union Rion Ballroom
There will be lots of free food so
don't miss out. Penny voting for
each contestant will end today.

Student Investment Club meet-
ing
Today, 7 p.m.
McCarty C 100
The group presents Dr. David
Denslow. He will talk about the
Fed, the future of the dollar and its
implications for investing and the
state of our economy.

Alpha Zeta Fundraiser
Today, 8 to 9 p.m.
TCBY on 34th and Archer
Come to TCBY tonight and support
Alpha Zeta, a coed honors frater-
nity in the College of Agricultural
and Life Sciences.

Shabbat at Hillel
Friday, 7 p.m.
Saturday, 10:30 a.m.
2020 W University Ave.
Rabbi Aaron Alexander, a UF
alumnus and associate dean of the
Ziegler School at American Jewish
University, will join students for
services and dinner, followed by
a discussion of the Jewish soul.
Services will continue on Saturday
morning, followed by lunch and
Alexander's discussion of the
Jewish concepts of heaven and
hell.

Graduate Christian Fellowship
Fall Picnic
Sunday, 1:30 p.m.
Lake Wauburg
Graduate Christian Fellowship
invites all graduate and profes-
sional school students to a fall pic-


FORECAST
TODAY



CLOUDY
78/67


WEDNESDAY



PARTLY
CLOUDY
78/67


THURSDAY


THUNDER
STORMS
78/67


nic at Lake Wauburg. Burgers
and chicken will be provided;
please bring a dish to pass. See
our Facebook group, GCF at
University of Florida, for more
details.

Gator Society for Human
Resource Management
Information Session
Monday, 6 to 8 p.m.
Career Resource Center Library
GatorSHRM is a new student or-
ganization for human resources
offering networking, leadership,
volunteer and resume-building
opportunities. Students from all
majors are encouraged to attend
the information session. Free
refreshments provided. Please
RSVP at GatorSHRM@gmail.
com. Learn more about HR at
shrm.org.

Team Save Something Cute
fundraiser
Wednesday, 6 to 8 p.m.
Gelato Company
The group is raising money for
the Humane Society and would
really appreciate any participa-
tion. There will also be a cook-
book fundraiser, which can be
found at tropicaleats.com.

IDEAL Fall Open House
Nov. 12, 7 to 9 p.m.
Do you have what it takes tobe an
official ambassador for the Reitz
Union and Center for Student
Activities and Involvement?
Come to the IDEAL Fall Open
House in the Arredondo Room
and meet members who love
helping students on campus
find where they belong in in-
volvement. Become a part of the
IDEAL family and become an in-
volved leader on campus. Make
sure to be there for the presenta-
tion at 8 p.m.

Hindu Cultural Society Diwali
Dance Festival
Nov. 13, 7 to 11 p.m.
India Cultural and Education
Center
Showcasing Indian dances such
as Raas, Bollywood, and Bhangra.
Entry fee is $3 for all UF students.
Also selling Indian food, dandiya
sticks, diyas and T-shirts. A por-
tion of the proceeds goes to the
Kamataka flood victims in India.

Got an event?
And want to post it in this space?
Send an e-mail to bkelley@alliga-
tor.org with "What'sHappening"
in the subject line. Please include
a one- to two-sentence synopsis
of the event. Make sure all sub-
missions are formatted properly.


FRIDAY



RAIN
78/67


SATURDAY



SUNNY
78/67


CORRECTION
An article in Wednesday's edi-
tion of the Alligator incorrectly
stated that the College Senate at
Santa Fe College is made up of
SFC faculty. The body is actually
comprised of faculty, administra-
tive and professional staff.



40il 10ftiliiir


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The Alligator strives to
accurate and clear in its n
reports and editorials. If
find an error, please call
newsroom at 352-376-44
or send an e-mail to edit
alligator.org.


S the independent florida

alligator
VOLUME 103 ISSUE 53 ISSN 0889-2423
Not officially associated with the University of Florida
Published by Campus Communications Inc, of Gainesville, Florida
NEWSROOM
352-376-4458 (Voice), 352-376-4467 (Fax)
Editor Kristin Bjornsen,
kbjornsen@alligator.org
Managing Editor/ Print Brian Kelley, bkelley@alligator.org
Managing Editor/ Online Jennifer Jenkins
jjenkins@alligator.org
Assistant Online Editor Andrew Stanfill,
astanfill@alligator.org
Metro Editor Emily Fuggetta,
efuggetta@alligator.org
University Editor Chelsea Keenan
ckeenan@alligator.org
Opinions Editor Will Olsen, wolsen@alligator.org
Sports Editor Phil Kegler, pkegler@alligator.org
Assistant Sports Editor Kyle Maistri, kmaistri@alligator.org
alligatorSports.org Editor Bobby Callovi, bcallovi@alligator.org
Editorial Board Kristin Bjornsen, Brian Kelley,
Jennifer Jenkins
Photo Editor Harrison Diamond,
hdiamond@alligator.org
Assistant Photo Editor Matt Tripp mtripp@alligator.org
Freelance Editor Ashley Ross, aross@alligator.org
the Avenue Editor Lane Nieset, Inieset@alligator.org
Graphics Chief Jessica Warshaver
Copy Desk Chiefs Jack Benge, Adam Berry,
Emily Blake, Joe Holzer,
Rachael Pino
Copy Editors Alex Chachkevitch, Sanika Dange,
Ashley Hemmy, Corey McCall,
Amanda Milligan, Emily Morrow,
George Pappas, Paul Runnestrand,
Jennifer Smith, Erica Zayas


DISPLAY ADVERTISING
352-376-4482, 800-496-0265 (Voice), 352-376-4556 (Fax)
Advertising Director Rose Sierra, rsierra@alligator.org
Advertising Office Manager Victoria Livingston,
vlivingston@alligator.org
Advertising Assistant Melissa Bell
Intern Coordinator Sara Ingebretsen
Display Advertising Clerks Sara Ingebretsen, Shaun O'Connor
Sales Representatives Zoya Avyaeva, Jen Cowie,
Caitlin Dilks, Natasha Dykes,
Brittany Fayne, Joaquin Martinez,
Megan Meckstroth,
Samantha Owen, MelanyValderrama

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
352-373-FIND (Voice), 352-376-3015(Fax)
Classified Advertising Manager Ellen Light, ellight@alligator.org
Classified Clerks Ashley Flattery, Wildivina Rosario

CIRCULATION
Operations Assistant David Carlson

BUSINESS
352-376-4446 (Voice), 352-376-4556 (Fax)
Comptroller Ramona Malloy
Senior Bookkeeper Melissa Bell, mbell@alligator.org
Assistant Bookkeeper Amanda Miller
Accounting Clerks Dyana Sanchez

ADMINISTRATION
352-376-4446 (Voice), 352-376-4556 (Fax)
General Manager Patricia Carey, tcarey@alligator.org
Administrative Manager Judy Moore
Administrative Assistant Lenora McGowan,
Imcgowan@alligator.org
President Emeritus C.E. Barber, cebarber@alligator.org

SYSTEMS
Desktop Support Manager Kevin Hart

PRODUCTION
Production Manager Stephanie Gocklin,
sgocklin@alligator.org
Assistant Production Manager Erica Bales, ebales@alligator.org
Advertising Production Staff Shannon Close, Doug Eastman,
Shaun O'Connor, Briana O'Sullivan
Editorial Production Staff Erica Ervin, Jocelyne Sanchez,
Max Weissler
The Independent Florida Alligator is a student newspaper serving the University of Florida, pub-
lished by a nonprofit 501 (c)(3) educational organization, Campus Communications Inc, PO Box
14257, Gainesville, Florida, 32604-2257 The Alligator is published Monday through Friday morn-
S wings, except during holidays and exam periods During UF summer academic terms The Alligator is
published Tuesdays and Thursdays
TheAlligator is a member of the Newspaper Association of America, National Newspaper Associa-
be tion, Florida Press Association and Southern University Newspapers
ews Subscription Rates: One Semester (Fall or Spring) $18
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you Two Semesters (Fall or Spring) $35
our Full Year (All Semesters) $40
458 The Alligator offices are located at 1105 W University Ave Classified advertising can be placed at
or@ that location from 8 a m to 4 p m Monday through Friday, except for holidays Classifieds also can
be placed at the UF Bookstore Copyright 2005 All rights reserved No portion of The Alligator
may be reproduced in any means without the written consent of an officer of Campus Communica-
tions Inc





THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2009 u ALLIGATOR, 3


Locals react to vote


against gay marriage


* MAINE WOULD HAVE
BEEN SIXTH STATE TO
LEGALIZE UNION.

By JARED MISNER
Alligator Writer

Ricky Carter almost cried when
he heard the news early Wednes-
day morning his fight for equal-
ity just got tougher.
A blow was dealt to Carter, UF
Pride Student Union's promotions
director, and the LGBT commu-
nity Tuesday when Maine voters
approved a referendum that de-
fined marriage as a union between
a man and a woman.
With 87 percent of precincts re-
porting, 53 percent of Maine voters
approved the measure to repeal
same-sex marriage in what would
have been the sixth state to legalize
such unions. So far, supporters of
same-sex marriage have lost every
battle when put to the test at the
ballot box.
"There's a lot of broken hearts
and painfully affected people who
did not expect that could ever hap-
pen," said Mark Sullivan, spokes-
man for No on 1, Protect Maine
Equality campaign.


Reactions to the same-sex mar-
riage defeat resonated in the same
way among many in Gainesville,
more than 1,300 miles away.
"It sounds stupid, but I almost
cried because we just have so few
things going on for us," Carter
said.
He compared the struggles of
the gay rights movement to the civ-
il rights movement of the 1960s.
Other Gainesville residents re-
acted differently to the news.
"A Bible-
National believing Chris-
News tian would never
change their be-
lief that marriage
is ordained by God to be between
a man and a woman and no other
way," said Steve Michaels, campus
minister with Chi Alpha.
Michaels also expressed per-
sonal concern that despite the
rejection of same-sex marriage in
Maine Wednesday, such unions
might eventually be legally rec-
ognized, a move that he said goes
against God's Word.
For more local reactions to Maine
voters' decision, including Pride
Community Center co-President
Terry fi I. ; and UF C.li, I
Republicans chairman Bryan C, i i;,t
visit A i, ....,.org.


Carnivorous Cookout
Morgan Long, left, serves chicken to Carrington Saddler and Sara Beth Christensen at the "Peo-
ple Eating Tasty Animals" barbecue held by the UF College Republicans on the Plaza of the
Americas. For the story on the barbecue, visit Alligator.org.




SEYE

EXAMS
(by Independent Optometrist)
SNW *, 9Avl Corner of
& 39thAve
| Near Publix
Friday Novm 6 I EYECARE
Q 7 I EXPRESS
vs. Georgia (352)375-6133
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The Alligator has sales intern positions available for
the Spring semesters.You will receive classroom
training, firsthand sales experience, and an
opportunity to improve your communication skills.
This resume builder offers a flexible schedule with
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4, ALLIGATOR U THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2009


STATE

Lake City woman collects post-Halloween pumpkins


By HOLLY FRISOSKY
Alligator Contributing Writer

A barefoot, gray-pigtailed wom-
an marks her home with an orange
cone on a country road. But that's
not all that is orange on her prop-
erty.
Pamela Faith, 60, an artist and
resident of Lake City, has collected
rotten pumpkins for her 130-acre
property for about a decade.
"I've collected a good 1,000
pumpkins this year," she said.
"They cover about an acre of
land."
She took three trips on Saturday
with a 2-ton dump truck to pick up


the last batch.
"It gets pretty orange around
here about this time of year," she
said. "I hate to admit it's not my
most favorite color, but you would
never know it."
Faith uses the pumpkins for
a few reasons. The chickens that
roam her yard like to eat them, as
do opossums, raccoons and foxes,
and she puts them right inside the
chicken coop.
Faith's family even eats them.
"I make bread, soup, cookies,
cake and muffins with the pump-
kins," she said. "Pretty much any-
thing you can make with apples,
you can make with pumpkins, and
I certainly do."


"It's important to me to
live my life as close to the
Earth as I can."
Pamela Faith
Artist

Some pumpkins are put under-
neath plant beds and decorate her
yard. She said they are great mulch
and compost material.
But Faith said she enjoys deco-
rating with them before they rot
away.
"I love to decorate andjust play,"
she said, sitting at her kitchen table,
which is covered with pumpkins.
Faith grew up during the hip-


pie era, when she said people cared
more about the Earth and the envi-
ronment. The mentality has stuck
with her.
"It's important to me to live my
life as close to the Earth as I can,"
she said.
The pumpkins do omit a putrid
odor, but it's worth it.
"I don't mind getting stinky if it
lets me reuse something," she said.
Phillip Faith, 53, said while en-
joying a dinner of baked pumpkin
that he thinks his wife's pumpkin
collecting is a bit extreme.
There was a time when he
worried about their car's tires be-
cause she loaded it with so many
pumpkins that it was barely off the


ground.
However, he does think it adds
a little something extra to their
home.
Anne Gay, who works at the
First United Methodist Church's
pumpkin patch, said that she is
grateful that Faith picks up all of
the pumpkins.
"I'm a person (who) believes in
not wasting anything ," Gay said.
"It's just wonderful to me that she
can do this."
And Pamela Faith is happy, too.
"The art of my life is decorat-
ing, cooking, gardening," she said.
"Pumpkins let me do it all."
To see photos of Pamela Faith's
pumpkins, visit ;lig.;r, .org.


Increase in number of applicants credited in part to sports championships


APPLY, from page 1

dents accepted has been steadily declining.
Two years ago, the target population for
the incoming freshman class was 6,600.
Last year it was 6,400 and this year, it's


6,200, Orlando said.
A year and a half ago, UF set a goal to
cut undergraduate enrollment over the next
four years by 4,000, he said, partially in re-
sponse to a $150 million decrease in the
state-funded portion of UF's budget.
"We had to make choices. We had to re-


duce the number of students we're accept-
ing so we don't reduce the
U F quality of the education,"
Academics he said.
Decreasing enrollment
also might help lower the student-faculty
ratio, which is 20 to 1 at UF, he said.


Roughly 10,000 people will be admitted
this year.
"I'm kind of iffy about it," Martin Lencki
said, adding that UCF is his second choice.
"I know my grades aren't the best, but I
think overall it will be OK."


Butler Plaza Newberry Square
(Next to Archer Road Wal-Mart) (Next to Newberry Road K-Mart)
335-1232 332-3937


UF March of Dimes Collegiate Council
Proudly Presents.
6th Annual h
gators march for babies,
UF community preventing prematunty
In support of the march of dimes


Register, Raise Money and
Join Us to Help Save Babies!
www.gatorsmarchforbabies.org
TURLINGTON PLAZA
REGISTRATION 1:00 PM
KICK-OFF 2:00 PM


march ofdimes


AWARDS 3:00 PM


WITH SUPPORT FROM:
Founding Supporter



The Collier Companies alligator
irsummh uu*rjrfrnIriiiMJ (


THE GIFT GUIDE
WINTER 2009


The Alligator offers great gift ideas to
more than 52,000 readers!

This is the perfect opportunity
to promote your business to UF and SFC
students, faculty and staff looking for
graduation gifts and holiday shopping.

Feature your gift items on our themed pages!

Deadline:
Friday, November 13

Run Date:
Friday. November 20

Call your sales rep today:
352.376.4482 4


the independentorida

alligator


Thursday
College football night
$5 wine tasting, $6 Buckets,

$4 House wines
from 4-close
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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2009 U ALLIGATOR, 5


TOMS creator discusses mission


Blake Mycoskie, the founder of TOMS Shoes, speaks at the Phillips
Center for the Performing Arts on Wednesday night.


* HE SPOKE TO ABOUT
1,000 PEOPLE.

By CAROLYN TILLO
Alligator Writer

Blake Mycoskie went to Ar-
gentina to play polo, take tango
lessons and sip red wine.
He didn't expect to come up
with the idea for a company that
would change his life.
Mycoskie, the founder of
TOMS Shoes, which gives a pair
of shoes to a child in need for
every pair it sells, told his story
and offered advice about start-
ing businesses to an audience
of about 1,000 at the Phillips
Center for the Performing Arts
Wednesday night.
Mycoskie said he came up
with his idea after tagging along
with a group of volunteers do-
ing a shoe drive in Argentina.
He watched the volunteers
get onto their hands and knees
and place used shoes collected
from wealthy families onto the
feet of poor Argentinian chil-
dren.
"I remember just feeling so
touched by the passion and the
compassion they had for these
kids," Mycoskie said.
But Mycoskie realized that
charity alone would not be able


to fund new shoes for these chil-
dren.
He said relying on business
would offer a better long-term
solution.
He eventually returned to Ar-
gentina and spent three weeks
with a friend making 250 pairs
of the original TOMS Shoes.
Mycoskie said TOMS is short
for tomorrow, representing the
company's idea of selling a pair
of shoes today in order to give a
pair away tomorrow.

"I remember just feeling
so touched by the passion
and the compassion they
had for these kids."
Blake Mycoskie
Founder of TOMS Shoes

Coverage in the LA Times,
Vogue, People and TIME helped
boost the profile of TOMS, which
began with Mycoskie and three
interns in his apartment and
now has factories in Argentina,
China and Ethiopia.
Mycoskie said the company
hands out shoes in about 13
countries to children who need
them for school or have foot dis-
eases.
Mycoskie said his experience
with TOMS has shown him the
power an idea can have.


He told the audience about
the benefits of having a business
model focusing on giving back
rather than making a profit.
Mycoskie saw a woman
wearing a pair of TOMS at JFK
International Airport in New
York. When he asked her about
the shoes, she started telling him
the company's story, not realiz-
ing he was its founder.
"Literally she was telling me
my life story word for word,"
Mycoskie said.
He said seeing the passion in
this one customer showed him
that his company did not need
advertising in order to spread
its message and could instead
rely on its customers as its main
marketers.
Mycoskie also said that hav-
ing a service-oriented business
attracts dedicated, experienced
employees looking for jobs.
TOMS offers an experience
that employees can get passion-
ate about and feel as a cause or a
mission, he said.
Mycoskie told students in the
audience that companies look
for employees who have a pas-
sion for volunteering and ser-
vice.
His company's philanthropic
mission has also helped to at-
tract business partners, includ-
ing Ralph Lauren.






6, ALLIGATOR U THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2009

Editorial

No Right

Gay rights activists should

look to federal government

The most notable result of Tuesday's election was not the
Republican wins in New Jersey or Virginia, but the con-
tinued push in voter initiatives rejecting same-sex mar-
riage.
Voters in Maine passed a referendum defining marriage as a
union between a man and a woman, similar to Florida's Propo-
sition 2, which passed last fall. This makes Maine the 31st state
to reject same-sex marriage by voter referendum, according to
the New York Times.
While the margin of victory was significantly smaller in
Maine than in Florida (53 percent in favor, compared to Florida's
62 percent), the fact that any state in the liberal bastion of New
England would pass a measure like this is surprising to some,
and sends a message to gay rights advocates nationwide.
The National Organization for Marriage, a Christian conser-
vative group that successfully campaigned against same-sex
marriage in Maine and elsewhere, argues that the message sent
to activists is: "Americans are not on board with this gay mar-
riage thing."
By overturning a law passed by the Maine Legislature, which
granted same-sex couples the right to wed, conservative groups
hope that the referendum will serve as a warning to politicians
pushing for similar laws in other states.
While it is not difficult to draw a narrow conclusion like this
from such disappointing election results, we believe the mes-
sage sent to gay rights advocates is slightly different: It's time to
escalate your campaign.
In classic tyranny-of-the-majority style, states, one by one,
are restricting the rights of their citizens. Because a slight major-
ity of voters in Maine rejects the idea of same-sex marriage, this
means that gay people in Maine should not be granted the same
rights as others?
Parallels are inevitably drawn between the same-sex mar-
riage debate and the struggle for civil rights of decades past. It
is hard to imagine success for that movement in a state-by-state
effort to secure equal rights.
Some states might still have Jim Crow laws on the books
without federal civil rights legislation. Interracial marriage
might still be illegal in parts of the country, were it not for a
1967 Supreme Court decision granting all citizens the right to
marry (except those seeking same-sex marriages).
Gay rights advocates must look higher than state legislatures
and state supreme courts. The only way to accomplish the goal
of full rights for same-sex couples is to demand action at the
federal level.
The movement to legalize same-sex marriage has the money
behind it. In Maine, it raised $4 million, overshadowing the $2.5
million raised by the opposition, according to the Associated
Press.
They also claim many would-be friends in the federal gov-
ernment, if only these officials were pressed to act. Notable
among them is President Obama, who received overwhelming
support from the gay community in the 2008 elections.
Activists were upset with Obama's reluctance to weigh in on
the issue before Tuesday's referendum, also finding his lack of
action on the promise to end "don't ask, don't tell" troubling.
By allowing this inaction to go unchallenged, gay rights ad-
vocates may be giving up their best chance ever to secure fed-
eral legislation in support of their cause. If civil rights activists
had not kept up the pressure on President Johnson, the country
would likely be a very different place today.


a the independent florida

alligator


Kristin Bjornsen
EDITOR
Brian Kelley
Jennifer Jenkins
MANAGING EDITORS


Will Olsen
OPINIONS EDITOR


The Alligator encourages comments from readers Letters to the editor should not exceed 150
words (about one letter-sized page) They must be typed, double-spaced and must include the
author's name, classification and phone number Names will be withheld if the writer shows
just cause We reserve the right to edit for length, grammar, style and libel Send letters to
letters@alligatororg, bring them to 1105 W University Ave, or send them to PO Box 14257,
Gainesville, FL 32604-2257Columns of about 450 words about original topics and editorial
cartoons are also welcome Questions? Call 376-4458


Opinions


ALLIGATOR
www.alligator.org/opinions


m$INE VOTERS '9&END ?OST\ON RE EaL IYM ITRWhLtSE
Column

Pirates should become sea protectors


As an unabashed supporter of all things pirate, news
about pirates fighting the Mafia has left me noth-
ing short of ecstatic. Additionally, as a shaper of
public opinion and a veritable wellspring of brilliant ideas,
I have an actionable plan that solves a pressing global issue
in one fell swoop.
Somali pirates should be enlisted by the world to save
the oceans.
For years, Somalis have sworn that someone was dump-
ing hospital garbage, chemicals and toxic waste into the
Gulf of Aden and Indian Ocean. This, as well as rampant
overfishing of the ungoverned Somali waters by huge com-
mercial boats from Europe and Asia, was the main impe-
tus behind the formation of a pirate renaissance in Africa.
The United Nations investigated these claims a few years
back and found a bunch of really sick people and radioac-
tive beaches, but nobody had any real proof until last
month.
An Italian mobster dying of terminal cancer flipped in
September, admitting he personally sank at least 10 ships
filled with toxic waste in the waters between Italy and
Africa. Keep in mind: This is only one man in one crime
family. Euro authorities are in a mad scramble to clean up
what could be among the biggest man-made environmen-
tal disasters of modem times and sprint as fast as they can
from legitimate questions about the real cost of European
energy policy.
Mafia-run waste disposal is almost as cliched as smelly
Europeans sipping their iceless water and looking down on
gauche American tendencies, but to see that both concepts
are intrinsically linked gives new and ironic profundity to
the term Eurotrash. Of course nuclear power buttressed by
solar and wind generation is the answer, you fat Yankees


just give all your spent isotopes
to the Mob and fuhgeddaboutit.
Seen in this light, our pirate
friends come off as a ragtag navy
fighting to save the environment
from organized crime and indus-
Tommy Maple trial excess. I smell a Disney movie,
letters@allgator org preferably in CGI, with voice work
by top Hollywood talent. In fact, I
have already had my script for "Small-E: Open Seas-on"
optioned by DreamWorks, and Jamie Foxx is eyeing the
lead role of the gruff yet good-natured captain.
The much-maligned Somali pirates may hijack pass-
ing ships and generally upset Western corporate interests,
but like all scalawags worth their salt, the Somalis live by
a strict code of conduct. Fair to a fault, all ransom money is
shared evenly among the crew, and hostages are protected
to the nth degree. Sexual assault and theft are explicitly
forbidden, and their strict disciplinary structures make the
pirates among the most well-governed and accountable
military forces operating in Africa.
Because only a world governmental authority could
conceivably police all the oceans and everybody is scared
of a global government, let's just make these known crimi-
nals our ocean authorities and allay the fear of the un-
known. Fighting overfishing and waste dumping, the pi-
rates would be too busy to hijack cargo ships with their
expanded role as sea protectors. We need to act quickly on
this because the oceans are a precious and vital part of our
fragile world and I already started writing the script for
the sequel.
Tommy Maple is a graduate student in international com-
munications. His column appears on Thursdays.


The views expressed here are not necessarily those of the Alligator.


Reader response
Today's question: Did Maine mess
up?


Monday's question: Do you think
it is dangerous to cross Archer
Road?


91% YES
9% NO
122 TOTAL VOTES


Vote or post a message at www.alligator.org






THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2009 U ALLIGATOR, 7


Guest column

'Remember the 5th of November'


our hundred and four years ago today the
infamous Gunpowder Plot to blow up the
English Houses of Parliament was foiled,
and co-conspirator Guy Fawkes was conse-
quently executed. Though I do not condone
acts of violence, this event serves as an impor-
tant reminder for us all to stay vigilant in the
face of tyranny. During the pre-revolutionary
era in America, colonists celebrated Nov. 5 to
express their anger toward the authoritarian
government back in England, providing the
foundation for the American Revolution. To-
day it is celebrated to express opposition to
an increasingly belligerent government that
not only puts our liberties at risk but also un-
dermines the very principles this country was
founded on.
Throughout the last century, it has been a
common practice for the federal government
to take power beyond the authority afforded
it by the U.S. Constitution. This usually occurs
during times of crisis and uncertainty when
politicians are more likely to gain public sup-
port. Such was the case during the Great De-
pression and shortly after Sept. 11. We are now
seeing the same grab for power in the wake of
the recent economic collapse. Unfortunately,
the American people are lulled into a sense
of indifference by the snake oil salesmen in
Washington who claim that these actions are
necessary for the "good of the country." I guess
Thomas Jefferson was right when he said, "The
natural progress of things is for liberty to yield
and government to gain ground."
But there is hope yet. Despite being in debt
more than $12 trillion with more than $59 tril-
lion in unfunded liabilities, Washington is
spending money more than ever, and people
are starting to notice. Americans are finally fed
up with politicians who continue to follow the
failedpolicies of interventionism and Keynesian
economics, realizing that government corporat-
ism is the real culprit in our economic troubles.
Americans are realizing that controlling the


Daniel Rood
Speaking Out


markets through central
banking, currency ma-
nipulation, regulation,
subsidies and bailouts is


detrimental to the economy.
Opposition to the government's aggressive
foreign policy is greater now than ever before
because people are starting to see the futility
of maintaining an overseas empire in places
we shouldn't belong. Americans are starting
to believe in the Jeffersonian notions of peace,
commerce and friendship with all nations and
entangling alliances with none.
Apathy toward the two-party system is
starting to take hold as thousands of Ameri-
cans are leaving the Democratic and Repub-
lican parties. People are beginning to look for
candidates who promise to reduce the size of
government and support the basic principles
of freedom our Founding Fathers believed in.
The American people are re-evaluating the role
of government, noting that it does not exist to
take care of them but rather to protect their in-
dividual freedoms. They are rediscovering the
principles of classical liberalism that provided
the foundation for this country. Americans are
starting to understand that individuals, not a
collective society, are the ones who make their
own choices and determine their own fates.
I urge you all to support the cause of free-
dom. But for those of you who continue to sup-
port these detrimental government policies,
I will leave you with this quote from Samuel
Adams: "If ye love wealth greater than liberty,
the tranquility of servitude greater than the ani-
mating contest for freedom, go home from us
in peace. We seek not your counsel, nor your
arms. Crouch down and lick the hand that
feeds you. May your chains set lightly upon
you; may your posterity forget that ye were our
countrymen."
Daniel Rood is a UF student and vice presi-
dent of Students for the Preservation of Freedom.


Letters to the Editor
Some Republicans 'condone rape'
In response to Wednesday's let-
ter to the editor written by James G.,
you failed to understand an important
point, James. I agree with you that
Paul's claim of racism in regard to Joe
Wilson's remarks is unfounded and
silly. I also agree that Paul's slander
of the Republican Party in reference to
ACORN was unjustified. But when it
comes to the issue of Republicans be-
ing rapists for not passing "some bill,"
you showed a complete lack of knowl-
edge about the subject.
Al Franken did propose a bill that
bans firms like Halliburton from doing
business with the government if they
retain contract stipulations that pre-
vent employees from suing the compa-
ny (even if raped by co-workers). The
only people who voted against the bill
were 30 Republicans. Their reason for
voting no was based on their misguid-
ed idea of what Congress' job is. There
is no debate for this issue, James.
If the Republicans who voted
against that bill aren't rapists, then
they most certainly condone rape. The
Republicans don't need Paul's smear
campaign. They've done a fine job
smearing themselves. So yes, James
- because Republicans didn't vote for
"some bill," they do support rape.
Erik Nyberg
Santa Fe College student


Students should vote to bring
Weezer to UF
Alligator, let's get serious. First, I
complain about your lack of coverage


on Spikes' eye gouge like the trouble-
maker I am. Then, of course, you go
and provide me with coverage on
Spikes' eye gouge as if he's Buddy
Holly or something. Now, I'm faced
with news stories on relevant topics,
opinion columns that are audacious
yet thought-provoking, and yet I have
to ask myself one question: Where, Al-
ligator, is Weezer? The answer is trag-
ic. Right now, Florida State University
is winning a T-Mobile online voting
contest for a free Weezer concert. Say
it ain't so!
And what of UF? We're second -
not the best situation. Second in the na-
tion. All it would take is for a fraction
of the Student Body to do what's right.
Vote for Weezer to come to UF. It's not
my favorite band; I mean, I really, re-
ally hate them. Nevertheless, FSU can-
not win, because FSU is not a winning
school. And although Weezer has not
been a winning band for the last 10
years, it still doesn't deserve to suffer
the tragedy that is Tallahassee. So put
down your hash pipe and vote!
Elliot Morgan
UFstudent


UPD officer responded well to
stolen wallet
I would like to thank University
Police Department Officer R. Howard
for his assistance after my daughter's
wallet was stolen. The most important
item missing from it was her UF-Geor-
gia ticket. He called the ticket office,
and she was able to purchase another
ticket. Many thanks from both of us.
Tina Reddick
Gainesville resident


MASTERIR Q TS4
8th Annual "Got Beethl'oopt,
NOVEMBER 20, 2009 I UNIVERSITY AUDITORIUM OPM
Our annual tribute to the'great Romantic composer." ;
S.?-: .-- -


'1


Live Long & Prosper.
Drive Sober.


Ip



Gerard donated in his
mother's name.











His gift provided shelter for
the Tyler family after a fire.

Support the Red Cross
and save a life, starting
with your own.
Call 1-800-RED CROSS
or visit redcross.org
+ American
Red Cross
")Aeria


11 11111111f e 10 00111101111111r n
Florida Deparnnet ofEnvirmmental Regulation


HEALTH


INSURANCE



"Students need Health Insurance.
Help protect yourself from the
rising cost of medical services.
You deserve quality health
insurance coverage, and it is
available for you. We at Chip
Williams & Associates will help
you acquire that insurance."

Chip Williams


WE FIND ANSWERS.

CHIP WILLIAMS & ASSOCIATES




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theAvenue


thursday, november 5, 2009


Cristiano Migliore,
one of the guitarists in
Lacuna Coil, spoke to the
Avenue about the new
album, "Shallow Life,"
and the band's evolving
music. Lacuna Coil will
play Friday at The
Venue during the Hard
Drive 2009 Tour. Tickets
are $17 in advance,
and the show begins at
7 p.m. All That Remains,
Maylene and the Sons
of Disaster, From Sword
to Sunrise and Taking
Dawn will also be
performing.


braI


PG 9: A column about entertainers
showing American ideology and a
Q&A with the creator of PostSecret
PG 12: An interview with the creator
of a PETA cookbook and a column
on racism


www.alligator.org/avenue





SEX: The effects of hollering, page
12
MUSIC: An overview of the best
shows during The Fest 8, page 1 1





The Avenue interviews Bayside, who
will be performing for free at the
Reitz on Nov. 13 at 8 p.m.




As the weather is getting cooler, now
is the time to grab a coat and scarf
and head outdoors. Take a walk on
the Bolen Bluff trail in Paynes Prairie
or go for a bike ride on the Haw-
thorne trail. The weather is also per-
fect for a romantic picnic, complete
with a tablecloth and basket. Hurry
up before it gets too cold!


Lacuna Coil transforms gothic sound into mainstream


By NICOLE LA HOZ
avenue contributing writer


Lacuna Coil has never been a con-
ventional band.
Singers Cristina Scabbia and An-
drea Ferro have clean voices, yetjux-
tapose each other with hauntingSiren
vocals and grittier male intensity.
Marco Coti Zelati's thick bass, Cris-
tiano Mozzati's battering drums and
the potent guitars of Marco "Maus"
Biazzi and Cristiano Migliore mesh
instead of clash.
The Italian rock band Lacuna Coil
will play Friday at The Venue during
the Hard Drive 2009 Tour presented
by Rock 104 and Glory Days Pres-
ents!. Tickets are $17 in advance,
and the show begins at 7 p.m.
The band will be touring for the
next few months with All That Re-
mains, Maylene and the Sons of Di-
saster, From Sword to Sunrise and
Taking Dawn.


Lacuna Coil is touring with its new
album, "Shallow Life," the fifth re-
lease from the band. It departed from
the gothic metal genre and made it
to No. 16 on the Billboard 200 Chart.
It's an honor that took the band "a
little while to realize," Migliore, one of
the guitarists, wrote in an e-mail.
"We're definitely proud. We love all
these new songs. We wrote in such a
relaxed way and there was no pres-
sure at anytime," he wrote.
Renowned producer Don Gilmore
ensured Lacuna Coil was comfortable
during recording for "Shallow Life."
He flew to Italy after receiving demo
tapes and discussed songs with the
members. Migliore said Gilmore never
pushed and took time to understand
the band's history.
"This music really represents)
what Lacuna Coil is today and we're
glad that people like it," Migliore
wrote.
Even after trotting around the


globe, playing festivals from Germany
to Australia, Migliore had only positive
remarks.

"It's just a matter of following
your heart and write stuff that
you really enjoy playing and
listening to. If that wasn't the
case, we wouldn't be doing this
anymore."
CRISTIANO MIGLIORE
guitarist




"We never did a tour that we didn't
like being on. We always met great
people and tried to make the best out
of every situation."
"I Like It," the second single off of
"Shallow Life," epitomizes that am-
bience. In the music video, Scabbia


tries out as a singer for comical ste-
reotypes, ranging from grill-wearing
rappers to pyro-worshipping metal-
heads. As Scabbia and Ferro sing "I'm
free to be what I like, I'm celebrating
my life" in upliftingtones, tinges of an
Italian accent slip out and Zelati, Moz-
zati, Biazzi and Migliore accompany
them with revitalizing simplicity.
"The music always kinda gives
you a certain feeling... it's all a very
abstract thing, and it's also very per-
sonal. But we always try to make sure
they both (lyrics and music) work to-
gether."
Lacuna Coil does not believe in re-
peatingthe same musical formula in
every album, though. Since their self-
titled extended play in 1998 years
after meeting in a Milan metal pub -
Migliore said each release has been
different.
"Shallow Life," with a grenade per-
fume bottle on the cover, delves into
the superficiality of today's world.


"When we started writing the
music for 'Shallow Life,' the whole
concept about today's superficial-
ity wasn't even there yet," Migliore
wrote. "Andrea and Cristina came up
with the idea at a later time and tried
to adapt the lyrics they wrote to the
music we wrote."
Members adapted to their chang-
ing influences, pairing eerie riffs with
refreshing and catchy rock on some
tracks and gothic beginnings with
mainstream vibes on others. Dark
undertones are present, and as the
album progresses, more harmonies,
cleaner vocals and tighter playing ap-
pear.
"We always try to go further, to go
beyond our limits and try new solu-
tions," Migliore wrote. "It's just a mat-
ter of following your heart and write
stuff that you really enjoy playing and
listening to. If that wasn't the case,
we wouldn't be doing this anymore."






THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2009 *ALLIGATOR, 9


Kanye promotes change


By JON SILMAN
avenue writer

Maybe KanyeWest is a genius after all.
We are in the midst of a large ideological
shift in America. Where the Bush admin-
istration left a lingering sense of disgust
with the condition of American humanity
on the pages of history, our new ideals
are not opposite ones, but realistic ones.
We are realisticallygaugingour misdeeds
and trying to actively combat them.
Carl Jung called it the animus. In "Star
Wars," it's called the dark side. Genesis
8:21 says "the imagination of man's
heart is evil from his youth." With Presi-
dent Obama winning the peace prize
(deservedly or not), it is evident that the
world is taking notice of our ideals once
again. America has done bad things.
We waged a war that was proven to be
based on false information. We let our
greed corrupt us to the point where our
economy exploded, and we have jeop-
ardized the future of our youth with
short-sighted decisions about the en-
vironment. Yes, we have given in to the
dark. But something is happening, and
it is clear that we can't turn back time to
make things right, but we can fight back.
The beauty of our culture is that it can
mirror our ideals, or nudge us in new
directions of action. There are some
current works by popular American en-
tertainers that illustrate our new ideol-
ogy more than any words ever could.

Kanye West, "We Were Once a
Fairytale"
A short film by Spike Jonze

This film features West in a club acting
boorishly. He's the golden child, caught
in drunken wonder over the fact that his
song is playing through the club's speak-
ers. He bumbles around, annoys people
and has anonymous sex with a sexy fe-
male stranger. He ends up laid out on
a tile bathroom floor, spent. He vomits.
Flowers spew out of him. He finds a knife
and cuts himself open. He pulls a demon
puppet out of himself, and hands it a
mini knife that was attached to his bigger
one. The demon commits suicide. West
is America. Full of promise, but selfishly
squandering potential through bad deci-


sions. We want him to succeed, but how
many chances can we really give him?
He's fighting the dark, though. Are we?

Brand New, "Daisy"

Brand New is a rock band from Long Is-
land. Daisy" is a follow-up to "The Devil
and God are Raginglnside Me," a brilliant
album drenched in personal torment.
"Daisy" is darker, moodier and more
ominous. SingerJesse Lacey has tapped
into something so raw and pure and
he's screaming bullets at it. Lacey writes
songs that make gray clouds explode
with thunder storms and then drizzle. In
"Sink," he sings, "How darkly the dark
hand met his end. He was withered and
bony, exposed for a phony. But we heed
the last words that he penned. Haste to
disgrace the traitor. Do not wait til later."

Michael Moore "Capitalism: A Love
Story"

I do not profess to be a Moore fan.
I do not necessarily agree with his poli-
tics, but he does know how to make a
good movie. What he
really brings to light
is the culture of dis-
gusting greed that
has mutilated and
decimated our soci-
ety/economy. While
the rich get richer, the
poor get laid off. Our society was built
on the idea that we could work hard
and get somewhere. Not the idea that
we should refinance our houses and
buy shit. How much money do we re-
ally need? What happened to altruism?
That money isn't goingto fit in a suitcase
when you die. Michael Moore, in his own
special way, is fighting the darkness.
So you see, enough with giving in to self-
ish, dark desires because they seem
natural. Enough of accepting the dark
without question. Fight. I'm not talking
about religion, I'm not talking about spir-
ituality. I'm talking about responsibility.
A responsibility to get our shit together
and be the person we wish to see in the
world. A responsibility to change things.
Thanks, Kanye. You sure get the point
across.


A with Frank Warren, creator of PostSecret


Q&

By JOE DELLOSA


avenue contributing writer

The Avenue speaks with Frank Warren, the
creator of PostSecret, about postcards, reli-
gion and his new compilation, "Confessions on
Life, Death, and God."

AVE: Why do you think PostSecret
resonates with so many people?

FW: I think some people want to read a
funny story or maybe find some voyeuristic
pleasure there's some titillation from a sex-
ual secret. But sometimes the postcards have
artwork that is really painstakingly created
or words that read like a poem; they've been
so carefully chosen to express a secret, and I
think for those people there's something much
more meaningful being expressed on the card.
I think sometimes people can recognize a
secret they might be hiding from themselves
articulated by a stranger on the postcard, and
you make a connection like that.

AVE: Do you think that there is
something about physically creating and
mailing the postcard that adds some-
thing to PostSecret that makes it more
meaningful for the people who are
sending the secrets?

FW: I've always been a bigfan of postcards
my whole life, and I think there's something
magical there about what they do. But I also
think the process, the ritual, of putting a secret
of yours on a postcard using the words to ex-
press it and writing it out is physically letting
go of that postcard in the mailbox to a stranger
who you'll never see, who will never judge you
once they read your secret. I think that process
may be cathartic, or maybe even therapeutic,
or help the person maybe on a longer journey
to deal with that secret in their life in a way
that's appropriate to them.

AVE: The latest PostSecret com-
pilation is called "Confessions on Life,
Death, and God." Looking through the
secrets in the book, there's certainly a
strong spiritual theme among the post-
cards in the book. Why did you choose
this theme?


FW: Well, as the project has continued, the
secrets have, I think, become more philosophi-
cal or spiritual, so the new book has secrets
that are silly and hopeful and painful and
shocking, just like all the others, but it also has
this added dimension of these soulful secrets.

AVE: Do you consider yourself a
religious person?

FW: I think I'm a spiritual person. My faith
is evolving.

AVE: Do you have any strong
beliefs about life, or death, or God?
Anything that, in particular, is important
to you?

FW: I think one of my most important be-
liefs that I think I learned through PostSecret
is the idea that the parts of our lives that in our
past that have caused us the most pain and
suffering and loneliness. If we can face them
and get through them and share them with
others, they can not only heal us but they can
enlighten the whole community.
In my own life, the parts of my life as an
adult now that give me the greatest sense of
purpose and mission, I think, are tied directly
to the parts of my earlier life with the greatest
struggles.

AVE: Many fans of PostSecret say
that the project has helped them feel
less alone. Do you think that we're
more isolated and more alone nowa-
days?

FW: Yeah, I think that's one of the paradox-
es of modern life that there's never been a
greater number of people on the planet, yet at
the same time, there's never been a greater
sense of loneliness.

AVE: How did you get the idea for
PostSecret?

FW: I think I had had secrets in my family
growing up that I knew about but never knew
the details to, and that kind of got me thinking
that other people might have these secrets,
too. And I was curious about them, so I wanted
to try to create a space where we could have a
clearinghouse for those secrets.


SCommun ityloodCl


Sponsored by:



.l.: a i
Gaine vill (3 or 334-
Nov 12t^fliaBB H | 2009


I


Ith
enters
Clay Gibbons at
@lifesouth org





4-ior
.....
: t~~


CAPTAIN ABU RAED
I P rP A universal story of friendship, set in Jordan.
ci n em a Final night 6:30 & 8:30pm
Tickets and Information 352-375-HIPP I THEHIPRORG


Give Cancer

Patients a Reason

to Smile

Donate new or nearly
new teddy bears to
American Cancer Society's
Bears for Cares







Bring
donations
to the
Gainesville
American Cancer Society Office or
contact Margaret Shaw at 352-
376-6866 ext. 5063 or e-mail at
W margaret.shawcancer.org






10, ALLIGATOR THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2009


The Olam Cafe
Mouthwatering, healthy Kosher
cuisine at affordable prices!
Daily $10 All-You-Can-Eat
Dinner Specials... Mexican, Pan-
Asian, Italian, Mediterranean
& American Deli! SUSHI night
every Wednesday at the low
price of $10! NEW this semester-
Schwarma & Falafel Station!
Fresh Salad Bar daily with over
50 + items! Take-out available.
Lunch Specials starting at $5
11:30-2:30 M-F. Dinner 5:30-8:30
M-Th. Located inside the Hillel
building across from O'Dome.
202 W University Ave. 352-248-
2606 www.theolamcafe.com
For event info:
www.myolamcafe.com



Green Plantains
Happy Hour $2.75
Drink + Appetizer from 3-7pm.
$5 To-Go Dinners. Mon-Sat
from 4pm. Don't miss out $4.95
dinner + soda on Thursday,
student night from 4pm-10pm.
Visit us at 5150 SW 34th Street
at the new Publix Shopping
Center 7 days a week.
We cater. Check us out on
GatorFood.com 352-378-1930
www.greenplantains.com





THE JONES
Gainesville's own indepen-
dently owned community
restaurant dedicated to bringing
sustainable, local, and organic
food to the table. Oh, and it's
really yummy. Herbivores,
carnivores, & omnivores
welcome! *Breakfast & Lunch:
8am to 3pm every day. Dinner:
Friday thru Monday nights
5pm to 10pm.* Check out our
Facebook page for specials and
events. 401 NE 23rd Avenue
352.373.6777

Mildred's Big City Food
Eat Gainesville's Best Food at
Mildred's. We support LOCAL
and SUSTAINABLE agriculture!
Start Living Healthy! LOCAL.
ORGANIC. GOOD. Fresh Dishes
Made From Scratch!
OPEN SUNDAYS!
CONVERTED PATIO-JUST
MINUTES FROM CAMPUS
3445 W. University Ave.
371-1711
MildredsBigCityFood.com

New Deal Cafe
OPEN LATE!
Gainesville's ONLY Local
Beef Burgers! This 12oz.
Goliath is Naturally Aged and
Fresh Ground. MONSTROUS
Desserts. HUGE Martinis.
A Diamond in the Ruff!
Mon-Thurs. llam-10pm
Fri-Sat. llam-llpm
371-4418
Located next door to Mildred's


Ti Amo!
Mediterranean restaurant & bar
Where FOOD & LOVE Meet!
Southern Living Magazine
agrees, "[the chef] adds visual
flair to every dish to make it as
good-looking as it is flavorful."
NEW Happy Hour Specials!
Every day from 4pm-7pm
There's something for everyone!
Small & Large Plates for Tapas
Style Dining. Amazing party
space, affordable prices & terrific
service.
Visit www.tiamogainesville.com
12 SE 2nd Ave. 378-6307



New York Pizza Plus
Bringing experience from New
York & Italy to Gainesville!
Offering a variety of gourmet
pizza, homemade salads,
pasta, & desserts. All you
can eat buffet available!
Outdoor dining. Visit www.
newyorkpizzaplus.com for
coupons. We Deliver!
490 NE 23rd Ave.
376-3444



Book Lover's Cafe
Vegetarian and Vegan cuisine.
Natural, organic, fair trade,
meals, sandwiches, soups,
home-baked desserts. Brunch
Weekends. Specials: Cupcake
Mon., Southern Cooking Tues.,
Greek Wed 6pm, Ethiopian Thurs
6pm.
MO-TH 10am-9pm.
Fri Sun 10am-8pm.
505 NW 13th St. 384-0090



Saigon Legend
Delicious traditional Vietnamese
cuisine with popular Asian
favorites. Pho-Banh Xeo, Banh
Tom Ha-Woi. Enjoy great food
at great prices. Family owned
restaurant. Next to Holiday Inn.
Vietnamese subs-pork, chicken, &
tofu. Dine-in or take out. Catering
available. Mon-Sat 10:30am-
9:30pm, Sun ll:30am-9pm
374-0934
1228 W Univ Ave







Fa e aliao

adv rtiing


376.448


Bands impress,



surprise fans at Fest 8


By J. HUNTER SIZEMORE
alligator staff writer

The Fest8 was like Disney for
punks a dazzling array of attractions
made less enjoyable by long lines and
low-capacity venues.
For a standard Fest pass holder,
seeing a popular act meant arriving at
the venue long before the band played,
a strategy that causes headaches
when the lineup throws several great
bands in a row.
A perfect example was Sunday
night at The Kickstand: The Emotron,
0 Pioneers!, Bomb The Music Industry!
and Defiance, Ohio.
In the statement "If you like X band
then you will like Y band," all of these
acts are X and the venue reached
capacity hours before Defiance, Ohio
took the stage.
But the crowds were there with
good reason. The Fest provided a
whirlwind tour of up-and-coming under-
grounders from every genre with ties
to punk. All three days had incredible
moments of fan dedication and artistic
impressiveness.
On Friday, the metalcore band Co-
alesce was ferocious on the Common
Grounds stage.
At moments, their trance-like states
were hard to watch, appearing more
like intensely personal religious experi-
ences than public performances.
"We're here to f***in' play a punk
rock show and have a good time,"


bassist Nathan Ellis said after the
show. "What's important to us is get-
tingthe soul out."
Folk-punk outfit Andrew Jackson Ji-
had ruled Saturday with their impromp-
tu show following a set inside the Civic
Media Center.
Fans outside, who were held be-
cause of capacity, crowded around the
center's entrance and started chant-
ing, "Play outside! Play outside!"
Not wanting to disappoint, Andrew
Jackson Jihad played several songs
in the parking lot, with the guitar only
barely audible under dozens of fans
singing along
On Sunday, Samiam, a major
headliner of The Fest 8, was without
their bassist, who had missed his flight
to Gainesville.
To make sure the show would still
happen, two local musicians involved
with Fest learned the bass lines to
Samiam's set and played in the show
on Sunday night.
Those who saw the show said it
went off seamlessly.
"That was really awesome to see
Gainesville pulling together to help
this band out," said Tony Weinbender,
founder of The Fest. "Where else can
you see that pulled off?"
For more of Weinbender's take
on the Fest and a wrap-up of Fest
weekend coverage see Alligator.org/
blogs/fest.





Matt Tripp/Alligator
Staff
Sean Ingram (left)
screams Friday
night while on
stage with his
band Coalesce at
Common Grounds
during The Fest
8. Sean Bonnette
(below), singer
and guitarist of
Andrew Jackson
Jihad, plays in an
impromptu show
in a parking lot
outside of the
Civic Media Cen-
ter on Saturday
afternoon


alligthe depedet florid,
I alligator


J


. .......... . .........


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2009 + ALLIGATOR, 111


E






12, ALLIGATOR THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2009


* PETA'S VEGAN COOKBOOK STEMS
OUT TO MEET COLLEGE LIFESTYLE

By ALLISON BANKO
contributing avenue writer

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals
has planted its newest target on college stu-
dents. No worries, there won't be activists on
Turlington Plaza splashing buckets of red paint
on our coats. Instead, the group has made be-
coming vegan easier than ever by tailoring to
students' fast-paced, budget-bearing lifestyles
through a new cookbook, "PETA's Vegan Col-
lege Cookbook: 275 Easy, Cheap, and Deli-
cious Recipes to Keep You Vegan at School."
The book meets every college student's needs,
so excuses for not becoming vegan are as non-
existent as the meat in veggie burgers.
Starza Kolman and Marta Holmberg wrote
the book in a style that's both amusing and
down-to-earth. In a fashion worthy of a few
chuckles, they address the definition of vegan-
ism and collapse the common misconceptions
and stereotypes, such as the berry-picking hip-
pies we so often associate vegans to be. They
acknowledge that college students are not
necessarilythe Betty Crockers of the world and
thus have made all of the recipes microwave-
friendly- no stove needed. Better yet, the bulk
of the dishes take less than five minutes to
prepare with slim ingredients that won't bust
your budget.
Sifting through the 275 recipes is surpris-
ingly intriguing due to the hilarious names
each recipe bears, like the "WTF? Wings" or
the "Booty Shakin' Bagel". The recipes range


Q & A with PETA
on a large scale of mouth-watering delicious-
ness, varying from "F-U Tacos" to the "Fruity
Frat-Tootie Smoothie." There are even special
sections of recipes dedicated to variations on
one food, like the budget-friendly Ramen noo-
dles.
The book stays true to its mission, keeping
sight of veganism facts, and benefits through
little "did you know?" blurbs splattered through-
out the book. Holmberg offered The Avenue
more insight into veganism and the behind-
the-scenes making of "PETA's Vegan College
Cookbook: 275 Easy, Cheap, and Delicious
Recipes to Keep You Vegan at School."
Marta Holmberg is the co-author of the veg-
an cookbook, as well as the street team coordi-
nator for peta2- PETA's youth focused division.

There are many different reasons
why people become vegan, such as en-
vironmentalism, animal rights, nutrition,
etc. What's your reason?
I am definitely a vegan for the animals. At
age 4, I became a vegetarian after I realized
that meat was actually an animal. Then, when I
was in college at San Jose State in California, I
made the switch over to being vegan.

Obviously college students live
on a tight budget and yet eat out a lot.
What advice can you give to college
students on maintaining veganism in
such circumstances?
Beans are a vegan-friendly product that is
a lot cheaper than meat at the grocery store.
In the book, we have a lot of recipes dedicated
to Ramen noodles, which are also fairly inex-


about a vegan cookbook
pensive. As for eating out, you just have to be
specific with your restaurant orders. Request
to have cheese and meat left off. Even at plac-
es like Taco Bell, just substitute beans for your
meat in the taco. There are vegan options ev-
erywhere; you just have to look for them.

All 275 recipes in the book don't
require a stove. There is even the "I'm,
Like, So Easy! Blueberry Pancakes" that
are made to eat in a mug. Won't many
of the dishes look a bit funky when they
come out of the microwave?
I'll admit I was skeptical when we decided
to make only microwavable meals. But there
aren't any stoves in dorms so we made it work.
It was about a year-and-a-half process of col-
lecting and testing vegan-friendly recipes from
PETA staff, interns and supporters. We re-
ceived about 400 recipes and then cut it down
to 275 dishes. There were definitely some
snafus, but we put the dishes in the cookbook
that we liked ourselves and that got the best
responses from.

Most people think that being
vegan doesn't allow many food options.
What advice do you have to those
scared to switch to a vegan lifestyle?
You have to approach veganism with an
open mind. There may be vegan dishes you
don't like, but that doesn't mean you won't
like some other vegan dish out there. It's not
a scary transition. Some people can just jump
into being vegan, but most just have to take
it step by step. Start out small by substituting
soy milk in with your cereal. Use applesauce


instead of eggs. Don't overwhelm yourself.

With dishes ranging from "Choco-
late Dorm Cake" to "Stalker Fruit Salad,"
how nutritious are the recipes in the
book?
We wanted to make sure that we tailored
to every type of college student's eating habits
with the cookbook. We made sure there were
dishes for everyone from the health nuts to the
junk food junkies.


For picking up women,



hollering not effective


By MEAGAN MCGONE
avenue writer

About two weeks ago, I bought a new
bicycle. I can be seen spastically maneu-
vering around campus, making at 10 mph
and periodically falling flat on my unco-
ordinated ass. The whole experience has
been exhilarating, but it became enlight-
ening a few days ago when I took a trip to
Walmart.
On my way there, a truck slowed next
to me and an old man hung out the pas-
senger's side. He released a catcall so
loud that I almost toppled off my seat and
into the bushes. As I kept pedaling with
the wind smacking my red cheeks, I won-
dered what provokes men to make these
ridiculous gestures.
Say I ignored the fact that the man
looked older than my father and that the
truck's bed could easily conceal a dead
body. Did this stranger actually think that
hollering at an unexpected woman would
be an effective way to pick her up?
Although this is America, not every-
thing is as convenient as a Burger King
drive-thru. When it comes to getting wom-
en, you have to at least get out of your car
to have it your way.
A guy once told me that he keeps
crumpled papers with his name and num-
ber scribbled on them on the floor of his
car. When he passes a hot woman on the


street, he throws one at her.
I didn't stay friends with him long
enough to discover if his method was ef-
fective.
Honking, whistling and tossing debris
at female pedestrians will not only alarm
them, but it will make you look like a ba-
boon howling out of a car window. Or even
worse a creeper. Plus, I'd argue that 99
percent of the time
you'll either receive a
dirty look or a middle
finger, and you will
drive away without
any hope of a poten-
tial hookup.
Maybe hollering
Meagan brings men the same
McGone thrill that I get while
Columnist I'm on my bicycle. I'm
not trying to ruin your
fun. I just want you to
know that there are better ways to show
your approval that don't involve me crash-
ing into a tree or you getting sprayed with
Mace in the eyes.
So next time you crack your window
open because you see something you like
on University Avenue, roll it back up, be-
cause Gwen Stefani said it best when she
confirmed that she "ain't no hollaback
girl."
And the girl you are about to whistle at
probably isn't either.


Racism becomes more



subtle, complicated


By ERIK VOSS
avenue writer


Whenever I hear the word "racism," I
think back to a friend I had in second grade
named Christopher. Christopher, it turned
out, wasn't big on black people. One after-
noon, the two of us were playing on a jungle
gym when two black boys asked to join us.
To Christopher, if the jungle gym inte-
grated, it was only a matter of time before
the slide and swing set toppled as well. This
required swift action.
"You can't play with us," he snapped
coldly. "You're different."
Unlike Christopher, I actually paid at-
tention to my teacher's explanation of how
Martin Luther King Jr. and Rosa Parks ef-
fectively ended racism in America. As an
enlightened intellectual, I hoped to dis-
tance myself from the bigoted bumpkin
next to me.
"Come on, Chris," I said. "Martin Luther
King..."
I intended to complete the sentence, but
no more words came out. All I remembered
about Dr. King was that he had a dream
and scored us a day off of school, neither of
which seemed relevant on the jungle gym.
It didn't matter. The two black kids
shrugged and walked away, and the 7-year-
old Jim Crow nodded with the resolve of an
elderly juror.
How could I let this happen? If this were


the real world, I assured myself, Christopher
and I would surely be thrown in jail along
with the child molesters and puppy killers.
Grown-ups just didn't do that kind of thing.
I avoided Christopher after that experi-
ence. I preferred not to be the lieutenant of
the second-grade skinheads.
For me, the jungle gym episode stands
out as an example of racism because of its
simplicity: an oppres-
sor, a victim and an
ignorant bystander.
Today, racism
tis a subtler, more
complicated demonic
surfacing in inappro-
Erik Voss private jokes, hiring
c columnist practices and reality
television casting.
Now that I'm old-
er, I like to think I understand the history of
the Civil Rights Movement and the battles
fought by the African-American community.
But I've never fought those battles.
When I was ostracized on the play-
ground, the reasons cited were lack of ath-
leticism and a tendency to rat out the kids
with cigarettes not my skin color.
I'll never know why Christopher didn't
want to play with those boys or what was
running through their minds as they walked
away.
I'm still just as clueless as I was on that
jungle gym. It's just now I'm aware of it.







BUY IT. SELL IT. FIND IT. 373-FIND








Classifieds
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2009


ALLIGATOR
www.alligator.org/classifieds


$430 per bedroom-All inclusive!
3/3 TH!! Roommate match avail
<1 mi from UF! Huge 24hr gym!
free tanning,freeHBO/showtime
*Oxford Manor*(352) 377-2777
these apts kick other apts in the teeth
12-9-75-1


Live for $339!
All Inclusive 3/3s and 4/4s
Cable Internet Utilities *
Furnished Tanning 24 Hr Gym *
TheLandingsUF.com 336-3838 *
3801 SW 13th St*
12-9-75-1

Save Some Green
2's from $789 3's from $829
FREE Cable*Tanning*Gym
www.greenwichgreen.net
352.372.8100
12-9-09-75-1


1, 2, 3, 4BR Apts.
www.ApartmentslnGainesville.com
12-9-75-1


$369 all inclusive 4/4
$489 all inclusive 2/2
Roommate Match Full Student Suites
New Furn*42" Flat Screen
Now Feline Friendly
352-271-3131*GainesvillePlace.com
12-9-75-1

*MOVE IN TODAY*
Starting @ $349, $0 to sign
All inclusive, fully furnished
2/2's, 3/3's & 4/4's close to UF
3700 SW 27th St. 373.9009
LexingtonCrossingUF.com
12-9-09-75-1


2 BLOCKS TO UF--$350/MO
Everything Incl + Fully Furn!
Call Eric, 352-219-2879 12-9-74-1

SUN ISLAND
FURNISHED 2BR AVAILABLE
352-376-6720
12-9-09-75-1

ALMOST SOLD OUT
2 MONTHS FREE
*Brand New* Gated*Upscale 1br-4br*
3000 SW 35th Place
EnclaveUF.com*352.376.0696
12-9-09-75-1

**LAMANCHA CONDOS**
Walk to Campus 4Br/1.5Ba. Includes elect,
cable tv, & high speed internet. $299/mo
Call 352-278-9347 or
www.lamanchacondos.com 11-6-40-1

2BR/2BA Furnished Apartment in Windsor
Park. $450/ea. room. FREE Internet and
cable! New W/D. On bus route to UF. 305-
788-5681/windsor515@gmail.com. 11-23-
09-45-1

2 bdrm/ 2 bth, fully furnished townhome
in Haile Plantation, SW Gainesville, front
garden, back porch. $950-$1050 for short or
long term. Ideal for visiting scholars, sabbati-
cals. 352-331-3183 11-19-09-30-1

CASABLANCA WEST
Townhouse near UF, Shands, shopping.
Easy access. 2BR/2.5BA; great for student/
family. Only $850/mo; 1st mo rent free & flex
terms. Ready to move in! Ed 305-972-6432
11-17-09-25-1

4 bdr house, tenants needed
$350/month + Util (avg $100/month)
5 mins from SantaFe 15 from UF, free ample
parking, end of cul-de-sac, wooded lot.
Call Zack-813-713-7341 11-17-09-15-1


DUCKPOND BIKE TO UF.
Fully furnished room upstairs. Share all
downstairs Only $80/week + 1/3 utils. Two
rooms avail. 872-8388 11-13-09-10-1

3 blks from campus!! For rent 4/2. Each
room $400/mo. Includes utilities & Internet.
Beautiful pool & courtyard. A great place to
live in a great location. 813-690-8989. 11-
13-09-10-1







Tradition of Student Living
Fully furnished student suites
Starting @ $399 all inclusive
3700 SW 27th St 373.9009
LexingtonCrossingUF.Com
12-9-09-40-1


QUIET, CLEAN, LOTS of GREEN SPACE.
Rustic 1BR apt. $375/mo.
*1BR cottage $435/mo. Call 213-8798 or
mobile 213-3901. 12-9-09-75-2


*LYONS SPECIAL*
$99 1st month's rent 377-8797
12-9-09-75-2

Amazing Values @ Arbor Park!
1brs from $539 732+ sq ft
2brs from $599 1015+ sq ft
3brs from $750 1223+ sq ft
Water Included Pet-friendly
335-7275 www.arborpark.com
12-9-09-75-2

Tired of Roommates?
Hate Living Far From Everything?
Downtown One Bedrooms Now Leasing!
Move-in TODAY for only $699!
Pool*Free Parking*Blocks to Campus
www.arlingtonsquare.org*338.0002
12-9-09-75-2

1 & 2's SPECIAL RATES!
1BR $459 2BR $539
No Move In Fees! Quiet
Beautiful Pools Pets Loved!
Park Free Across From UF! 372-7555
12-9-09-75-2

Deluxe, Large 3, 4, 5, 6, 7BR apt/house, 60
second walk to UF. Remodeled, Old House
charm. Central AC, washer/dryer included.
Wood floors. With Parking. By Private Owner.
538-2181 Iv message 12-9-09-74-2

Quality & Affordability!
1br $559 / 2br $619--$649
3br $749 / 4br $899
W/D, pool, B-ball/tennis courts!
We love Pets! Call @ 376-4002
www.apartments.com/pinetreegardens
12-9-09-75-2

Deluxe, large one or two bedroom, 60 sec-
ond walk to UF. Wood firs, washer dryer
included, fireplace, patio deck. Can furnish.
Short term available. Private Owner. $595-
up. 352-538-2181. Lv msg 12-9-09-74-2

No deposit, No move-in fees!!!
Huge 1/1's 2/2's 3/3's
<1 mi from UF! Giant 24hr gym
FREE tanning/FREE cable
*Oxford Manor* (352) 377-2777
These apts kick other apts in the teeth
12-9-75-2

** ELLIE'S HOUSES **
Quality single family homes. Walk or bike to
UF. www.ellieshouses.com 352-215-4991 or
352-215-4990 12-9-09-75-2


Live SECONDS from UF!
Studios & 1 Beds from $499 & $575
FREE Parking Near UF
NEVER worry about Game Day Parking!
371.7777 CollegeParkUF.com
12-9-09-75-2


Now you can easily
submit your classified ad
for print andlor web editions
right thru our website!
Just go to
www.alligator.org/classifieds
Visa and Mastercard accepted.

Come see our 1/1, 2/2 & 3/3 townhomes!!
FREE Cable w/HBO and Showtime
All Amenities plus FREE Tanning
Gated*Alarms*Pet Friendly
*Sign Today, Get up to $1800 Cash Back*
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12-9-09-75-2

Best Location & Great Price
Large 2/1's available
One Month Free & $0 Move- In Fees
3500 Windmeadows Blvd
www.spanishtrace.org* 373-1111
12-9-09-75-2


Cobblestone Apartments-NW 23RD BLVD
Move in now or Fall 2010.
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BB Court-Tanning-24 hr fitness-Dog Park
352-377-2801 cobblestoneuf.com
12-9-75-2

A SPECIAL PLACE TO CALL HOME
1 BR from $585
2 BR from $625
3 BR from $755
Tanning*Fitness*Tennis*Pool*Playground
Washer/Dryer*Fireplaces*Pools
Call us for a tour! 376-2507
12-9-09-75-2


***PARKING***
Private, Secure, Guaranteed. 60 sec to UF.
Reserve now! Reasonable rates. 352-538-
2181. Can leave mssg. 12-9-09-74-2

1, 2, 3's! madisonpointe.org
Enormous Screened Patio!
W/D-Walk-in closets-Tanning
Fitness Center-Full size bball court
NW 23rd Blvd*352-372-0400
12-9-75-2






PO LOS
'of Gainesville

Three Pools! Three Bus Routes!
Two Jacuzzis! Business Center!
Billards Room! Fitness Center w/ Free
weights! Sand Volleyball!
Tennis Courts! Basketball Courts!
Close to UF, Shands, 1-75, & Shopping!
1, 2 & 3 Bedrooms for NOW & Fall!!!
GREAT SPECIALS!!!
1/1-$684 2/2-$512w/all util 3/3-$399w/all util
2330 SW Williston Rd.
www.ThePolosUF.com 352-335-7656
12-9-09-75-2


Huge Private Dog Park
1's from $499 Waive all fees
Close to UF, Shands, Butler Plaza
Pet Friendly 376-1248
www.hiddenvillageapt.com
2725 SW 27th Ave
12-9-74-2


l's, 2's and 4's
AS BIG AS A HOUSE!
Great School Districts
Free Personal Training
75 SW 75th Street Call 332-7401 12-
9-75-2


No Move-In Fees
1/1's from $659 3/2's from $799
FREE Tanning*Pool*Gym
www.aspenridgeuf.com
352.367.9910
12-9-09-75-2


HUGE 5 BED HOUSE!
3 baths, enclosed front patio
W/D, Wood Flooors, Fireplace
3 blocks to UF! Pets welcome!
372-7111 106 NW 10 Street
12-9-09-75-2


LAKEWOOD VILLAS
Large 1, 2 & 3 bdrm Floor Plans;
Starting at $830. Corporate units available.
Furniture Packages Include: Washer/Dryer;
Workout Rm, Tennis Court; Swimming Pool;
Sauna etc. Mon-Fri 9-6, Sat 10-3
700 SW 62nd Blvd 877-781-8314
www.lakewoodvilllas.com
text (lakewood)@65586
12-9-09-74-2


SPYGLASS *
Individual Leases: Furniture Packages
Incl Washer/Dryer, FREE Hispeed Internet;
Rates start at $399
Every Unit is an End Unit
Mon-Fri 9-6, Sat 10-3
701 SW 62nd Blvd 888-267-5078
www.spyglassapts.com
text (spyglass)@65586
12-9-09-74-2


ACROSS FROM UF!
Studios $465, includes electric!
Wood floors available. FREE parking.
1225 SW 1 Avenue Pets welcome
372-7111 No move-in fees!
12-9-09-75-2

FREE Scooter! Free 42" TV!
Inclusive 2's & 3's Two Miles to UF
Next Ten 2/2's Discounted to $899
Pet Friendly Roommate Match.
1015 NW 21st Ave
HiddenLakeUF.com 374-3866
12-9-09-75-2


Walk to Class!
1brs from $499 150 ft from UF!
Move-in today. FREE parking!
Pets Welcome! No Move-in Fees.
372-7111 1216 SW 2nd Ave
12-9-09-75-2


$399 FOR EVERYTHING
All Inclusive Student Suites
Roommate Match*Feline Friendly!
42" TV*Astroturf Soccer Field
352-271-3131*GainesvillePlace.com
75-2

Action Real Estate Services
Houses to Condos
1-4 BR, Starting at $450
www.action-realtors.com
352-331-1133
12-9-09-75-2


12-9-


*Fully Furnished*AIl Inclusive*
Roommate Matching
2 MONTHS FREE
*Brand New* Gated*Upscale 1br-4br*
3000 SW 35th Place
EnclaveUF.com*352.376.0696
12-9-09-75-2

Now you can easily
submit your classified ad
for print andlor web editions
right thru our website!


12-9-09-75-2

Wake Up 10 Min Before Class
...AND be on time!
Studios from $499, 1s from $575
$0 M/I Fees, Pet Friendly
371.7777 CollegeParkUF.com
12-9-09-75-2

Apartments off SW 20th Ave. Close to shop-
ping, bus line and a few miles from UF. Price
rage $445 to $665. Includes water, sewer,
garbage and pest control. Sorry no pets al-
lowed. Call 335-7066 Mon-Fri. 12-9-09-75-2

FOX HOLLOW
Gated Entry
Ask about our move-in specials!
7301 W Univ Ave
Mon-Fri 9-6, Sat 10-2
877-288-2921
www.cmcapt.com/foxhollow
12-9-09-74-2

REDUCED 1st Mo 1/2 off! 2/2 off of SW 35th
PI, Close to UF & bus route. Great for grad
students! Building is 3 yrs old w/ only 1 prev
tenant. W/D, D/W, tile & carpet in BDs $800/
mo Avail ASAP, no smokers. (904) 386-6485
11-16-09-76-2

$40 Moves you in. Pine Rush
1 bdr. from $459 2bdr. from $639
1 MONTH FREE! Near UF and Oaks Mall
Ph. 375-1519
www.gremco.com
11-30-09-85-2

$40 Moves you in. Homestead
2/1 from $629 2/2 from $749
1 MONTH FREE! SW Archer Rd. Area
Ph. 376-0828
www.gremco.com
11-30-09-85-2

$40 Moves you in. Gator Village
1 bdr. from $489 1 MONTH FREE!
Near Downtown and 6th Street
Ph. 372-3826
www.gremco.com
11-30-09-85-2

$40 Moves you in. Sunrise
1bdr. from $469 1 MONTH FREE!
Near UF, Schands and VA
Ph.372-4835
www.gremco.com
11-30-09-85-2

$40 Moves you in. Summer Place
1 bdr. from $459 1 MONTH FREE!
Just off SW 34th St.
Ph. 376-0828
www.gremco.com
11-30-09-85-2

1 MONTH FREE RENT
*1BR/1BA walk to UF $460-$475 0 2BR
$525 0 3BR/2BA, fenced yard $1100.
Gore Rabell Real Estate 378-1387
www.Gore-Rabell.com 12-9-09-75-2


Just go to
www.alligator.org/classifieds
MUSEUM WALK Visa and Mastercard accepted.
2/2's $945 CABLE & WATER Included
All Inclusive roommate matching $606 WALK TO CAMPUS
ParknRide Bus Route-Always be on time! 1BRs from $550 2BRs from $600
3500 SW 19th Ave*www.museumwalk.com Sun Bay Sun Key Sun Harbor
379-WALK* 352-376-6720 www.sunisland.info
12-9-09-75-2 Ask about our new pet oolicv & other specials







14, ALLIGATOR U THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2009


ONE MONTH FREE RENT!
1 & 2 bedrooms located near Hilton
Off of SW 34th Str. Close to UF
$350 SD some w/ W/D or hkups.
Water & trash incl. Call Now!
Union Properties 352-373-7578
www.rentgainesville.com
12-9-09-72-2


The Grove Villas
Rental Community
Ask about our Move-in Specials
Gated Community
6400 SW 20th Ave
877-704-2172
12-9-09-50-2

ONE BLOCK TO UF (WALK TO CLASS)
3 bed 1 1/2 bath House- $1725
3 bed 1 bath Apt (incl. utilities)- $1575
1 bed 1 bath Apt (incl. utlities)- $645
Near SW 1st & 2nd Ave and SW 12th St.
No dogs (available now or spring semester)
Negotiable lease terms
call 352.337.9600 for more info 11-30-55-2

LARGE 2BR/1BA
Tile floors, except BRs. Covered patio. Close
to Shands. Only $550/mo. 1 yr lease. Call
352-372-3131 12-9-09-41-2

SERENOLA PINES APTS
Off SW 34th St. near post office. 1BR $560;
2BR $635 Call for daily specials 352-335-
0420 11-30-09-37-2

WOODLAND TERRACE APTS
Off SW 34th St near post office. 2BR $560;
1BR $520. Call for daily specials. 352-335-
0420 11-30-09-37-2

HOUSE avail now. 3BR/2BA, 1.5 miles to
UF, near the Landings Apts. On UF bus rte.
Bike to UF. Fenced backyard, fireplace, cent
H/AC. 3627 SW 15th St. $850/mo. Call 327-
2931 or 376-6183 11-13-09-28-2

1BR/1BA apt, $499/mo. 3320 SW 23rd St.
Each unit has a private gated court yard. On
bus route close to Shands, VA & College of
Vet Med. Pets <501bs arranged. 352-377-
2150 or paloverde3320@yahoo.com 11-
30-09-35-2

HISTORIC APTS Pleasant Street Historic
District. 2BR $850, two 1BRs $625 & $575.
one efficiency $475. Hardwood floors, ceiling
fans, high ceiling & porches. 1st, last, secu-
rity. No dogs. 378-3704 sallygville@aol.com
11-5-09-20-2


PET'S PARADISE
$390 $600. No app or pet fee. 1 & 2BR,
privacy fenced. SW. 352-331-2099 11-9-
09-20-2

www.AndreeRealty.com
We specialize in rentals, sales & property
management. Try us. 352-375-2900 11-30-
09-30-2

HISTORIC DUCKPOND
1BR/1BA apt in vintage house. Hardwood
floors,tile, renovated kitchen, quiet, blocks to
downtown $575 per mo. STUDIO $475/mo.
306 NE 6th St. 379-4952 11-6-09-14-2

Holiday Special/Big Time Savings
NO MOVE-IN COSTS
Free Rent (Don't Pay Anything until 2010)
Please Hurry...Only Few More Units

Rocky Point Apartments Country Gardens
3100 SW 35th Place 2001 SW 16th Ave
352-376-1619 352-373-4500


Regency Oaks
3230 SW Archer Rd.
352-378-5766


South West Villas
3643 SW 20th Ave
352-336-9000


Move in Special: No Security Deposit
2/2 Condo with washer/dryer, screened-
in porch, newer condo, near UF. Shands,
located off 34th & Archer Rd. 2 units
available $750 per month. Call 317-5060
11-5-09-10-2

1/1 in 3/3 in Campus View Condos. 1235
SW 9th Road, 3rd floor unit. Newly built, w/d,
new appliances, Females only please. $515,
from January to July 31st. Can move in early.
Please call 727-776-7098. 11-6-10-2

$550/month Large 2/1 Apt close to UF/
Shands W/D hookup,D/W, balcony No pets
625 SW 11th Ln Call 352-231-3002 or
email hodgeproperties@cox.net 11-16-09-
15-2

FAMILY AREA WITH PETS, OK
Two Bd with Two Full Baths, new carpet, just
painted, new refrigerator. Fenced in back
yard, patio, and large W/D room plus stor-
age. Avail Nov 1st. $660. Only $50 Sec, with
reference. Call Karl 332-5030 11-9-09-10-2

Working at Shands or VA- nice 2/1 @
Summit House across the street. $700/mo +
$200 dep. Call 352-8430-0220 to see. 11-
25-21-2

$550 Roomy 2/1.5 townhalf,Shands
area,laundromat plus wd hookup,adjacent to
Ag campus, city busses,your fenced yard.
quiet, nice, affordable..900 s.f.
386-972-4115. Moritae@yahoo.com
11-18--09-15-2

Baxter Cottage
2 blks to UF campus, 1013 SW 4 Ave
2BR/1BA, Bright, clean, completely remod-
eled, Cent AC/Ht,wood firs, DW, W/D, NS,
NPets. $695+util. ATucker458@aol.com
11-17-14-2

WWW.BIKETOUF.COM
1 BR from $575
2 BR from $625
3 BR from $745
Tanning*Fitness*Tennis*Pool
Washer/Dryer*Pets Welcome!
Call us for a tour! 377-7401
12-9-09-40-2

$40 Moves you in. Sundowne
Studio from $439 1bdr. from $479
1 MONTH FREE! Walk to Butler Plaza
Ph. 377-2596
www.gremco.com
11-30-09-85-2

$40 Moves you in. Courtney Greens
Totally Renovated 1 bdr. from $599
1 MONTH FREE! Near Oaks Mall
Ph. 375-3077
www.gremco.com
11-30-09-85-2

$40 Moves you in. Ashton Square
2/2 from $739 3/2 from $799
1 MONTH FREE! Huge floorplans.
W/D hookup Near Oaks Mall
Ph.333-1120
www.gremco.com
11-30-09-85-2


COTTAGE 1 BR/1BA w/carport
$500/mo Near university in historic district.
Call 352-332-8481 11-18-09-10-2

1/1, Ridgeview, free water, next to park, on
the bus line, cent H/A, courtyard, 2 miles to
UF, convenient to shopping, no smoking, no
pets. $470 SD, $470/mo 562-2824 11-12-
09-5-2


We Speak Spanish
11-20-09-20-2


3BR 2BA 1019 NW 36th Dr. Quiet neighbor-
hood. Beautiful, sanded hardwood floors,
fenced yard, LR, DR, study, $900/mo. $30/
mo ontime discount. 773-407-1774. 11-19-
09-20-2

First Month Free! Beautiful, spacious 3/2
condo, centrally located 1.5 miles from UF.
VERY LOW UTILITIES!Pool, W/D. Quiet; no
pets, please. Reduced to $975. Exit Realty
Producers 352-316-6842. 10-20-09-7-2


$280/mo+util.Sublease nxt spring/sum.Lg 1
br/1 ba in 3br/3ba Stoneridge apt.lnc:wash/
dryer,dshwshr,all essentials!Lg walking clos-
et! Walk to Butler plaza.2 bus rts 12&35.
Gym, pool, bball/tennis crts also.Call 813-
909-6447 11-6-5-3

1/1 apt w/fenced backyard. 2 blocks from
campus near midtown. Pets OK. $625 OBO.
Available spring & summer. Walk every-
where! 813-382-6031 11-6-09-5-3


1/1 in a small, quiet complex off 34th st. Avail.
Jan 2010-end of Jul 2010. W/D and D/W in-
cluded, pets allowed, gated private patio, ce-
ramic tile floors. $739/mo. Negotiable terms.
Jenna 863-860-4834 jennadg@ufl.edu 11-
10-5-3

avail. Dec 1st 2/2 in Treehouse Village with
w/d, gym, pool, on bus line.
Mary Seales: 352-372-3096 or
seales@vanrooy.com ref: L202 11-12-5-3


Roommate Matching HERE
Oxford Manor 377-2777
The Landings 336-3838
The Laurels 335-4455
Greenwich Green 372-8100
Hidden Lake 374-3866
12-9-75-4

Now you can easily
submit your classified ad
for print andlor web editions
right thru our website!
Just go to
www.alligator.org/classifieds
Visa and Mastercard accepted.

1BR INDIVIDUAL LEASES IN FURNISHED
4BR CONDOS. 2 blocks to UF. $345/mo incl
elec, cable tv, internet, pool, laundry facility.
914 SW 8th Ave. 378-4626 11-30-09-55-4

Enjoy A Romatic Old House
Near library downtown. $295-375/rm + utils.
Short term. No pets. No smoking. 378-1304
11-6-09-15-4

1 month free-Share 2B/2B MH in Cornerstone.
Furn rm avail now. $200 N/R dep. $400/mo
or $100/wk util incl. Laundry/cook/clean svc
avail. Near bus/shops. 30 day notice to va-
cate. Some pets ok. Call 331-0762 11-6-
15-4

1BR/1BA or 2BR/2BA avail Jan 1st.
for responsible mature individual. $400-$800/
mo OBO + utils. Brandywine on Archer Rd.
yttek@hotmail.com or305-332-6566 11-13-
09-16-4

WALK TO UF 1 or 2 rooms in a 4/2 apt.
Ind. leases end 7/31/10. $295/month/room.
No pets. 1740 NW 3rd PL Call 352-231-3002
or email hodgeproperties@cox.net 11-16-
09-15-4

SWEET 2/1 HOUSE
Prive location, 708 NW 10th Ave. includes;
all Utl's, W/D, and Swimming pool. Avail Now
$440. Plus sec. Call Karl 332-5030 11-9-
09-10-4

Walk or bike to UF, Shands orVA. Roommate
needed for nice 2/1, $350/mo + half utilities
at Summit House on SW 16th Ave. Recently
renovated. $200 dep. Call 352-843-0220 to
see. 11-25-21-4

Beautifully renovated, furnished
condo,1 mile from UF, $399/MO
includes cable, internet, utilities,
pool + fitness room and on bus route,
Female roommate needed, 352 262-2871
11-12-09-10-4


$350 FEMALE ONLY
1/2 of utilities, FREE WATER! 786-797-2778
mad05@ufl.edu 11-9-8-4

Female wanted to share new 3BR/3BA home
near campus(SW area)2400sf. On bus route.
Washer & dryer included. Furnished, except
your bedroom. $425 plus utilities. Serious,
non-smoking students only. 813-610-1698
11-20-15-4

Female preferred. Share 2BR/2BA $445/mo.
Free cable/internet. Archer Rd &
1-75. Master suite, walk-in closet, W/D. Quiet,
private, wooded view.
Pool, gym, Common area furn. 1 cat. Lease
thru Aug '10. 352-339-0502 11-6-09-5-4

Female roommates needed. Live in a big new
house w/ bus stop to UF, quiet/relax area,
fenced yard,private pool. 520/month all inclu-
sive. Joyce 941-724-0961. Must see House
Pics: tinyurl.com/mbs77r 11-25-15-4


Sell your house, condo, acreage, mobile
home and much more in the ALLIGATOR
CLASSIFIEDS! Reach thousands of possible
buyers! Mastercard and Visa accepted over
the phone, by fax, email or CHECK OUT
PLACING YOUR AD THRU OUR ONLINE
AT www.alligator.org. or please call 373-
Find (373-3463)


SEE ALL CONDOS
WWW.UFCONDOS.COM
Matt Price Campus Realty, 352-281-3551
12-9-74-5


NEW CONDOS -WALK to UF
3 Blks to UF. For Info on ALL 1, 2, 3, 4
Bedrooms for Sale, Call Eric Leightman,
Campus Realty at 352-219-2879. 12-9-74-5

AFFORDABLE LUXURY NEW CONSTRUC-
TION NEAR UF, SHANDS, LAW SCHOOL
2Bed/3 Full Baths + Office. Granite
Counters, 2 Direct Bus Stops to UF.
Matt Price, Campus Realty 352-281-3551
12-9-74-5


WALK TO UF & DOWNTOWN!
THE PALMS New Ultra-Luxury Condos.
Granite, Huge Closets, Pool, Call Eric
Leightman, Campus Realty, 352-219-2879
12-9-74-5

Gator Getaway -Exp old Florida. 20 acre lot 4
miles south of Archer. Century old live oaks,
high & dry, beer & turkey. 15 mins from Gville.
Investment priced $6500/acre. Certified ap-
praisal as of 9/8/09. 352-528-2406 Ten
11-30-09-30-5

I'VE HAD IT WITH YOUR LOUD MUSIC!
Is your roommate driving you crazy? Find a
replacement in the Alligator Classifieds!


1 br/1 ba by Regal Cinemas & UF
507 NW 39th Rd #126- Hawthorne Reserve
Condos. $60,000 short sale. Call Stacy at
Trevor Waters Realty 352-682-8530 11-9-
09-5-5


4bed/3Bath home in Savanna Pointe, just off
the Prairie. $479,500. Rural setting yet
urban proximity. MLS#308127. Dawn Realty
Visit VernonClouser.com for all the Details.
Off Williston Rd, just West of Country Club
11-17-8-5


BED QUEEN $120 ORTHOPEDIC
Pillow-top, mattress & box. Name brand,
new, still in plastic. Call 352-372-7490 will
deliver. 12-9-09-74-6

BED FULL SIZE $100 ORTHOPEDIC
Pillow-top mattress & box. New, unused, still
in plastic w/warranty. Can deliver. Call 352-
377-9846 12-9-09-74-6

MICROFIBER SOFA & LOVESEAT $400
Brand new still packaged w/warranty. Must
sell. Can deliver. Retail $1600. 352-372-
7490 12-9-09-74-6

BED KING $170 PILLOWTOP
mattress & box springs. Orthopedic rated.
Name brand, new, never been used, in plas-
tic with warranty. Call 352-372-8588. Can
deliver. 12-9-09-74-6

CHERRY SLEIGH BED solid with Pillowtop
Mattress & Box. All new still boxed. Cost
$1500, sacrifice $450 352-333-7516

Sofa $175 Brand new in pkg 333-7516
12-9-74-6

BEDROOM SET. 7pc Cherry, Queen/ king
bed, dresser w/mirror, 2 nightstands, chests
avail. Dovetail const. New, in boxes. Can de-
liver. Retail $6500, must sell, sacrifice $1100
(352) 372-7490 12-9-09-74-6

SOFA & LOVESEAT 100% Italian leather.
Brand new in plastic w/warranty. Retail
$2650. Sacrifice $750. Call 352-377-9846
12-9-09-74-6


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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2009 U ALLIGATOR, 15


DINING ROOM Beautiful cherry set w/table,
6 Chippendale chairs, hutch & buffet. New,
still in boxes. Retail $5200, sacrifice $1100.
Must sell. Can deliver. 352-372-8588 12-
9-74-6

FUTON Solid oak mission-style frame w/
mattress. New, in box. $160 332-9899

DINETTE SET 5pc $120 Brand new in box.
Never used. 352-377-9846 12-9-09-74-6

**BEDS ALL BRAND NEW**
**Full $100 Queen $125 King $200**
Orthopedic pillow-top sets. Brand name
matching sets not used or refurbished. Still
in plastic, direct from factory! 352-333-7516.
12-9-74-6

BED- QUEEN New orthopedic pillowtop mat-
tress and boxspring set. Brand name, brand
new, still in plastic with warranty. Can deliver.
$130 352-377-9846.12-9-74-6

Bed- All New King! 3pc Orthopedic pillowtop
mattress set. Brand NEW, still in plastic with
warranty. Can deliver. $200 352-333-7516.
12-9-74-6

BEDROOM SET- $300 BRAND NEW
Still in boxes! 6 pieces include: Headboard,
2 Nightstands, Dresser, Mirror, Chest. Must
sell, can deliver. 352-377-9846. 12-9-09-
74-6

FUTON $60 Solid Oak Mission Style. With
plush mattress $160. All brand NEW still in
box. Can deliver. 352-333-7516 12-9-74-6


Bed-FULL size pillowtop mattress & box. New
in plastic, warr. Can del. $100 317-4031

SOFA $185 Brand new! Love seat $150 still
in pkg. Can del 352-333-7516 12-9-74-6


CASH PAID: Laptops & Cameras
Parts & Repair Mac & PC laptops
AC adapters Joel 336-0075
www.pcrecycle.biz 12-9-09-74-7








C OmPUTER
12-9-74-7


Computer Help Fast Gatorland Computers
House/Dorm Fast response. No waiting/
unplugging/hassels. $30 Gator discount w/
ID. Certified MCSE Technicians. 338-8041.
www.GatorlandComputers.com 12-9-74-7


COMPUTER & LAPTOP REPAIRS
Network specialists
We buy computers and laptops
Working and Non-working
378-4009, 607 NW 13th Street
12-9-09-71-7


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In the market for a new set of wheels or just
looking to add a second to that collection?
Want personalized handlebars or a fitted
seat? Check in the Alligator Classifieds

NEW & USED BIKES FOR SALE
WE REPAIR ALL BRANDS
Best Prices in Town *
SPIN CYCLE 373-3355
424 W UNIV AVE (DOWNTOWN)
12-9-74-9

Did you know that with as little as $40 down
you can be riding a new quality bike today?
Schwinn Shop has the best selection of new
and used bikes. 1225 W University 2 doors
down from Leonardo's 374-2064 11-6-15-9




***PARKING***
Private, Secure, Guaranteed. 60 sec to UF.
Reserve now! Reasonable rates. 352-538-
2181. Can leave mssg. 12-9-09-74-10

UF SURPLUS EQUIPMENT AUCTIONS
are underway...
bikes, computers, printers, vehicles & more.
All individuals interested in bidding go to:
surplus.ufl.edu 392-0370
12-9-09-75-10

THE ORIGINAL RALLY TOWEL. YOU'VE
SEEN THEM IN THE STADIUM, NOW
GET YOUR OWN. THE ORIGINAL RALLY
TOWEL. JUST HOW BIG OF A FAN ARE
YOU? www.therallytowel.com 11-24-09-
14-10





***WWW.RPMMOTORCYCLES.COM**
FULL SERVICE REPAIR SHOP 11TH YEAR
OEM + AFTERMARKET PARTS + ACCY'S
HUGE TIRE SELECTION IN STOCK, CALL
FOR PRICES + DISCOUNTS 352-377-6974
12-9-75-11

*****New Scooters 4 Less*****
Motor Scooter Sales and Service!
Great Scooters, Service & Prices!
118 NW 14th Ave, Ste D, 336-1271
www.NS4L.com
12-9-09-75-11

***GatorMoto***
Largest Scooter Store in Town! Run by Gator
Grads! New scooters starting at$999. No legit
shop can beat these prices! lyr Warranties
included. 376-6275GatorMoto.com 12-9-09-
75-11

SCOOTER SERVICE
New Scooters 4 Less has LOW service rates!
Will service any make/model. Close to UF!
Pick-ups avail cheap oil changes!! 336-1271
12-9-09-75-11

***www. BuyMyScooter.com***
Buy A New Scooter, Buy A Used Scooter
All on one site! Check the website or call
336-1271 for more info! 12-9-09-75-11

GATORMOTO Gville's #1 service facility. We
repair ALL brands of scooters. Pickups avail-
able. Lowest labor rates around. Quickest
turnaround time. Run by Gator Grads so we
know how to treat our customers! 376-6275
12-9-09-75-11

*00000 SCOOTERS 000000
RPM MOTORCYCLES INC
SALES, SERVICE, PARTS
Many Brands Available 518 SE 2nd St.
www.RPMmotorcycles.com 377-6974
12-9-75-11

**SCOOTER RENTALS**
Rent for a day, week, semester, or rent to
own! Reserve now for Game Day Weekends!
NS4L.com 352-336-1271 12-9-09-75-11


FAST CASH FOR ALMOST ANY CARS *
ORunning or not!*
*NEED HONDA, TOYOTA, PICKUPS
*Over 15 yr svc to UF students
OCall Don @ 215-7987 12-9-75-12


CARS CARS BuyOSellOTrade
Clean BMW, Volvo, Mercedes
Toyota, Honda, Nissan cars
3432 N Main St. www.carrsmith.com
CARRSMITH AUTO SALES 373-1150
12-9-75-12

$500! POLICE IMPOUNDS!
HONDAS, CHEVYS, TOYOTAS, ETC.
For listings 800-366-9813 ext 4622
12-9-75-12


**HEADLINERS SAGGING?**
POWER WINDOWS DON'T WORK?
On site avail. Steve's Headliners 352-226-1973
12-9-74-12


WE BUY JUNK CARS
Titles Only. Call K.T. (352) 281-9980
12-9-75-12


I BUY CARS & TRUCKS
Call Anytime 352-339-5158
11-16-09-42-12

SUN CITY AUTO SALES
All vehicles $0 down
No credit check
Cash vehicles $1000 and up.
352-338-1999 12-9-49-12


SUN RISE AUTO SALES
No credit check
Cars, SUVs, Trucks & Vans
30 day warranty
352-375-9090 12-9-49-12


92 Nissan Stanza $999 cash
98 Grand Am $999 cash
96 Kia Sephia $1299 cash
96 Chevy Cavalier $1499 cash
352-338-1999 12-9-40-12

92 Honda Accord $1499 cash
96 Lincoln Mark 8 $1999 cash
97 Mazda Millenia $1999 cash
95 Pontiac Bonnville $1999 cash
352-338-1999 12-9-40-12

92 Chevy Camero $1999 cash
96 Mits Galant $1999 cash
98 Chrysler Cirrus $1999 cash
96 Plymouth Minivan $1999 cash
352-338-1999 12-9-40-12

97 Jeep Cherokee $1900
96 Chevy Astro Van $1900
96 Chevy Blazer $1999
98 Ford Expolorer $2500
352-338-1999 12-9-48-12

95 Dodge Ram PK $2900
98 Dodge Ram PK $2900
98 Pontiac Transport $2900
94 Toyota Camry $2900
352-338-1999 12-9-48-12

97 Mercury Grand Marquis $2900
00 Hyundai Elantra $2900
94 Toyota Station Wagon $2900 SOLD
97 Mits Diamonte $2900
352-338-1999 12-9-48-12

94 Honda Accord $2900
94 Toyota Camry $2900
96 Cadillac Deville $2900
01 Hyundai Sonata $2900
352-338-1999 12-9-48-12


Sun City Auto Sales
60 Day pay off
On cash vehicles
Pay off time negotiable
352-338-1999 12-9-48-12


2003 Honda Civic, 79k $8999 CASH
2003 Honda Civic, 115k $8499 CASH
2003 Honda Civic, 69k $8999 CASH
2002 Honda Odysee, 117k $6999 CASH
352-375-9090 12-9-40-12

2003 Nissan Sentra, 80k $6999 CASH
2005 Nissan Altima, 94k $9999 CASH
2006 Suzuki Aerio, 54k $8999 CASH
2001 Nissan Altima, 99k $5999 CASH
352-375-9090 12-9-40-12

2002 Toyota Camry, 76k $8999 CASH
2004 Toyota Corolla, 111k $7999 CASH
1999 Toyota Sienna, 135k $5999 CASH
2002 Toyota Corolla, 68k $6999 CASH
352-375-9090 12-9-40-12


07 CHEVY LS
5-speed, CD, airbag, new cond. 43k miles.
Leaving for Europe must sell. $6950/OBO.
Call 352-486-2812 11-10-09-5-12


Students Guaranteed Financing!
Do you have a valid drivers license?
Do you have a part time job?
Ride today for $750 down!
Call Angie @ 352-672-5048 11-19-10-12


LOCAL ARTIST NEEDS:
* Gold Diamonds Gems Class Rings
* ETC Top Cash $$$ or Trade *
OZZIE'S FINE JEWELRY 373-9243. 2-10-
74-13


UF GRAD PAYS MORE
forgold jewelry, scrap gold, Rolex, diamonds,
guitars, etc. Top $$$. Get my offer before you
sell! Call Jim 376-8090 or 222-8090
12-9-75-13



BE AN INSPIRATION!
Take a blind lady to Mass on Sundays and
for walks and shopping as needed. We'll
have lots of fun! And you will make a new
friend! Contact 219-6948 11-6-09-74-13


The American Cancer Society
Road to Recovery Volunteers Needed!
VOLUNTEER DRIVERS NEEDED
to transport cancer patients to treatment.
Flexible schedule.
Training and liability insurance provided.
Please call
352-376-6866 ext. 5079 if interested.


LOOKING FOR SOMEONE TO HELP ME
LEARN TO RAKE KNIT A HAT, second and
fourth wednesdays of each month. These
hats are made for people in Haiti. Come and
have fun with Lenora. Call 219-6948. 11-
6-09-74-13


Help Needed
OVolunteers: to drive adult cats to Gville to
neuter/spay & return
OWorking Computer needed desperately.
Old Town, FL 352-542-0706,
C Carroll, priest 11-6-09-5-13


This newspaper assumes no responsibility
for injury or loss arising from contacts made
through advertising. We suggest that any
reader who responds to advertising use cau-
tion and investigate the sincerity of the ad-
vertiser before giving out personal informa-
tion or arranging meetings



0 the independent florida


alligator

RETAIL ADVERTISING MANAGER
FULL TIME POSITION
Sales driven person to train student sales
staff in outside newspaper advertising sales.
Motivator needed who works well with a
constantly changing staff.
Duties include training university students
in outside newspaper sales, layout and
copy writing. Must work well within and
meet daily deadlines. Good organizational
skills a must. Newspaper ad sales back-
ground an advantage. Modest salary, good
benefits and excellent working environment.
With resume, send cover letter that must
include salary requirements, to: General
Manager, The Independent Florida Alligator,
PO 14257,Gainesville,FI 32604 or
email to tcarey@alligator.org.
No phone calls please. EOE







16, ALLIGATOR U THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2009


1 the independent florida


alligator


ACCOUNTING CLERK
The Business Office at The Alligator has
an open position for an Accounting Clerk.
Applicant must be a currently enrolled stu-
dent, preferably in Accounting or Business
Administration. Duties include operating
Quickbooks accounting system to work with
accounts receivables and accounts payables.
Other duties consist of manipulating Excel
spreadsheets, answering phones, and gen-
eral office duties. Organization and a great
attitude is a necessity. Candidate should be
able to work 10-15 hrs per week and commit
to a 1 year term. Please send resume, along
with a cover letter to: Business Office, The
Independent Florida Alligator PO Box 14257,
Gainesville, FL 32604-2257. Email: mbell@
alligator.org AND tcarey@alligator.org, or
Fax: 352-376-4556. No phone calls please.

LIKE TO WORK WITH LUXURY CARS?
Bright? Enthusiastic? Like people? Must be
over 22, stable work history, clean driving re-
cord, drug-free, personal references.
www.carrsmith.com for details. 12-9-75-14


$STUDENTS GET CASH ON THE SPOT$
For gently used clothing/accessories & fur-
niture. No appt.necessary! Sandy's Savvy
Chic Resale Boutique 2906 NW 13th St. 372-
1226 12-9-09-74-14


Now you can easily
submit your classified ad
for print andlor web editions
right thru our website!
Just go to
www.alligator.org/classifieds
Visa and Mastercard accepted.

BARTENDING
$250 A DAY POTENTIAL
No experience necessary, training provided.
800-965-6520 ext 138 12-9-09-75-14


FUTURE GMs
Now hiring assistant managers
GatorDominos.com/jobs
12-9-75-14

PHONE AGENTS NEEDED
Must have Excellent Vocabulary and
Communication skills. PC skills needed.
Apply Now! 6020 NW 4th Place, Suite G.
352-371-5888 x 111 12-9-74-14

DOMINO'S
Now hiring Delivery Drivers $12-$16/hr.
You need a great attitude & dependable car.
Hiring lunch, dinner & late night shifts. Our
closing drivers earn $100 per night. Apply
@ any of our 8 location or @ gatordominos.
comrn/jobs. 12-9-09-75-14

Students in Accounting, Aviation, Business/
Sales and computer science needed for
various positions. Flexible schedules and
competitive pay. Join our team! Learn more
at www.gleim.com/employment 12-9-09-
82-14

STUDENTPAYOUTS.COM
Paid survey takers needed. Gainesville.
100% FREE to join. Click on Surveys 12-
9-09-73-14

Graduate debt-free. Earn cash while attend-
ing college. For a confidential interview call
1-800-577-2021 & please leave your name &
number TWICE 12-9-68-14

Breakthrough product, everyone wants it,
everyone needs it. 50% commissions paid
bi-monthly. For an interview, call 1-800-577-
2021 12-9-68-14

PT Sales /Leasing Agents Needed
Help students find their new apartment!
Great pay plus bonuses. Sales experience &
outgoing personality required. No real estate
exp req (training provided). Send resume,
cover letter & avail schedule to
hr@trimarkproperties.com
12-9-65-14


We need people to post ads
online. Social networking
knowledge a plus. Get paid
every Friday. For details see
paycheckonfriday.com 11-12-45-14

Earn Extra Money. Students needed ASAP.
Earn up to $150 per day being a Mystery
Shopper. No Experience Required. Call
1-800-722-4791 11-20-41-14

Quality child caring center is looking for dedi-
cated people who love working with children.
FT/PT, exp. required and a CDA, AA or BA
in education. Benefits available with FT. Call
377-2290 or 373-1481 11-13-09-27-14

STUDENT WORK
GREAT PAY
Customer Sales/Service
Flex Sched, PT/FT Avail,
Work around classes,
conditions apply,
352-371-9675
11-12-09-20-14

Telecommunications--Software Engineers/
Programmers C/C++ programmers for
Embedded digital TV software (Cable,
Satellite, Video over IP). Nagravision has
openings in our Atlanta and Gainesville, FL
offices. 2-7 years experience. Competitive
salaries, benefits, relocation. Send resume
or questions to: resumes.atlanta@lw.net
11-25-09-28-14

Full time NANNIES needed for Jan
one toddler $10/hr M-F OR 2 elem age $12/
hr M-F + E & wkds; grad students welcome;
exp req; Noah's Ark Nanny; send resume,
photo, short bio to gnv@nanoneone.com
11-6-09-10-14

NANNY for 1.5 children ages 1 & 2.5
20 hrs/wk; 4hrs/day, variable am/pm
Noah's Ark Nanny: resume, photo,
class sched, bio to gnv@nanoneone.com
11-6-09-10-14

Transcription/Office Asst
Must be pleasant, enjoy people & have expe-
rience; also admin. & grading psych tests.
Email res. info@villagecounselingcenter.net
11-12-09-10-14

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Join Our Team!
Unique long term opportunity. Full time
position with 100% employee owned Co.
Extensive training/benefits-health, 401K, etc.
Indesign, photoshop, MAC/PC experience
a must. Apply now, Renaissance Printing,
4130 NW 16th Blvd. Drug Test. 11-6-7-14

YARD WORK Mowing. Car detailing. Pool
maintenance. Back up shipping. Errands.
Miscellaneous duties. Must have a valid driv-
ers license and good driving record. Own ve-
hicle. Truck preferred. Please apply on line at
http://www.gleim.com 11-13-09-10-14

Veterinary Asst. Exper. Preferred.
P/T or F/T hours. Must be avail, to work Mon.
& Fri. 7:30-6:00,& Sat 8:15-12:30. Fax or e-
mail resume to 352-373-7211 or
timberviewpetclinic@yahoo.com 11-5-09-
5-14

Hair models wanted for long hair in motion
studies. Hip-length or longer only. No experi-
ence necessary. $70 to $120 and hour. Call
352 792-1824 modelslh@yahoo.com
11-19-09-12-14

Barn help needed 1 day per week
Exchange for boarding or lessons
EXPERIENCE NECESSARY!
Call 359-4149 11-17-09-10-14

Opus Cafe Coffee Bar
We are searching for fun and active
students to work 12 to 30 hours per week at
a fast paced coffee bar near campus.
Starting pay is $7.75/hour + tips.
To apply, go to our website, www.opus-cafe.
com, click on the employment tab, and
follow the directions.
11-16-09-8-14

Mommy's helper for energetic 2yr old
Fun, smart, creative female student
to help in AM; 4hrs/day; 2-5 days/wk
email bio, availability, references
and more to UFmommy@gmail.com 11-10-
09-5-14


Medical Office Manager for mid-sized
Dermatology practice. Duties include perform-
ing or supervising ICD-9/CPT coding, billing
and collections; A/R; payroll management;
employee supervision and maintenance of
employee records and benefits; insurance
evaluation and contracting; interfacing with
clinical staff and physicians; preparing finan-
cial reports and interfacing with accountant.
Seeking a mature, energetic individual with
experience but will train motivated candi-
date. Salary, benefits and possible incentive
commensurate with experience. Bachelor's
degree desired. Email resume ofmgrbeers@
AOL.com or fax to 352-332-2966.
11-12-09-5-14

Spring Design Internship!
352 Media Group is seeking young artists
with experience in
Fireworks or Photoshop to learn from our
Web design
team. Interested? Email
Internship@352media.com for details! 11-
19-09-10-14

Spring Programming Internship!
352 Media Group is seeking talented stu-
dents with experience in Web programming
and development.
Interested? Email
Internship@352media.com for details! 11-
19-10-14


IMPORT AUTO REPAIR. BMW, Mercedes,
Porsche, Volvo, VW, Honda, Toyota, Nissan,
Mazda. Quality craftsmanship, reasonable
prices, near UF, AAA approved 378-7830
www.carrsmith.com 12-9-75-15

EVERGLADE EQUESTRIAN CENTER
The countryclub for horses & owners.
Customer lounge w/full kitchen & bath. 250' x
160' riding ring, round pen &jump paddock.
Lessons. 30 acres, 40 matted stalls, 19 sepa-
rate paddocks. 24-hr security, 352-591-3175
everglade-equestrian.com 12-9-74-15

Want to be a CNA, phlebotomist or pharm
tech? Express Training offers courses, days,
eve, weekend. All classes live, no videos.
Call 352-338-1193 or
expresstrainingservices.com 12-9-09-74-15

PERSONAL TRAINING 300
Personal and Group Training
Flexible Scheduling Exclusive Facility
Call for a free workout
339-2199
12-9-74-15

TLC HORSEBOARD
All facilities & amenities, quality instruc-
tion; 15 minutes from UF. Jan at 376-7762.
Greathouse Equestrian Ctr. 12-9-75-15


HORSE BOARDING
Hourly work available. 12 x 12 stall cement
block barn. Good grass turnout with room to
run! Limited # of stalls available. $350/mo.
352-472-2627 for info & directions. 12-9-
09-74-15

HYPNOTIST Stop smoking. Improve mem-
ory & concentration. Eliminate bad habits.
Past life regression. Learn self hypnosis.
Low Student Rates. Leonard Umans AAPH,
NGH certified 379-1079 12-9-75-15


T-SHIRT SCREEN PRINTING
Greeks-Sports-Clubs-Bands
*Call or Stop by for a QUOTE*
MONSTER PRESS 373-3355
424 W UNIV AVE (in Spin Cycle)
12-9-74-15

Mini Maxi Warehouses; corner Waldo Rd &
NE 31st Ave; 12 acres, student/staff rentals;
UHaul warehouse complex, trucks, trailers. 6
x 10 rentals $39/mo! 352-373-6294 or 1-800-
559-2449 Also 100 sheds for sale. 12-9-09-
68-15

Gator Slide Farm: Horse boarding.
Owner housing. Dressage, stadium jumping,
X-country. Lessons/schooling opportunities.
Feeding/mucking mitigate monthly charges.
Visitors always welcome. Contact Dibbie
352.466.3538 or gtrslfrm@aol.com 1-7-09-
120-15


GUTTER & ROOF CLEANING
Free Estimates. Super Service! Lic & Ins.
Steve "The School Teacher" 352-377-7086
12-9-09-74-15

HORSE BOARDING Premier facility next
to Canterbury. Stall or pasture board from
$250. Two sand/clay arenas, round pen,
jumps, lessons. Work avail to defray costs.
352-472-9977 weecfl@gmail.com 1-19-09-
95-15

* GREAT BANNERS & SIGNS *
Full-color DecalsOExhibitsOVehicle Wraps
Top QualityOFast ServiceOLow Prices
www.signpower.com
SignMasters 335-7000
1-29-83-15

** PLAQUES AWARDS TROPHIES **
Name BadgesOButtonsOADA Signs
Top QualityOFast ServiceOLow Prices
www.signpower.com
SignMasters 335-7000
1-29-83-15

BEGINNER GUITAR & PIANO LESSONS
For ALL ages.
My EXPERIENCE: 10 yrs-guitar & a lifetime-
piano. If interested call 352-256-3800 or
email gidonherman00@gmail.com 11-19-
45-15

Writing a paper? Send it to:
GETABETTERGRADE@gmail.com.
We'll check grammar-syntax.
Quick turnaround. Inexpensive. 11-10-09-
10-15


HIV ANTIBODY TESTING
Alachua County Health Dept. Call
334-7960 for app't (optional $20 fee)

All Women's Health Center
ABORTION
Free Pregnancy Test
RU-486 Available
378-9191
www.abortiongainesville.com
12-9-75-16

THE TRUE YOU!
Lose 8-15 pounds in 4 weeks
Only $119!
Gain muscle while you lose fat
Groups forming now. 339-2199
12-9-74-16


Think you're pregnant?
Free pregnancy tests & referrals
Free, confidential advising
For appt., call 352-367-2716
A Woman's Answer Medical Center
38-16


12-8-


HIV ANTIBODY TESTING
Alachua County Health Dept. Call
334-7960 for app't (optional $20 fee)


*Family Chiropractic*
Since 1977. Two blocks from U.F.
373-7070
12-9-74-18

SAVE ON RAYBAN/SUNGLASSES

University Opticians
300 SW 4th Ave. 378-4480
12-9-09-75-18

Blastoff Network. It's free! Fun and easy!
Get paid when you shop onine. Make money
when you spread the word! Register online.
http://my.blastoffnetwork.com/singleton51.
Questions (352) 208-9582 11-6-09-5-18


WALDO FARMERS & FLEA MARKET
Every Sat & Sun Hwy 301
15 min from Gainesville 468-2255
12-9-09-99-21


SHOTGUN SHOOTING SPORTS
Open To Public We-Fr-Sa-Su, Noon-Dusk
Skeet Trap Olympic Trap -5 Stand
gatorskeetandtrap.com 352-372-1044
12-9-09-75-21


Rocky Creek Paintball
In Gainesville Better Prices
Better Fields Better Call 371-2092
12-9-09-99-21


OO*BAHAMAS SPRING BREAKOO*
Complete 5-Day packages from $189.
All packages include round-trip cruise and
hotel. www.BahamaSun.com 800-867-5018
FL Seller of Travel Reg No 35585
3-1-09-85-21


GMG TRANSPORT
FREE WiFi on buses New Departures
Thur 1 & 4:30 / Fri 1 & 4:30
Ret Sun 2 & 4 pm Mon 2 pm -Also
Reverse trips Credit card payments, no xtra
charge pay by phone or online- $35 O/W
- $45 R/T www.gmgtrans.com 352-215-8196
12-9-74-23


Furry, feathery, scaly...no, not your room-
mate...pets. Find or advertise your pets or
pet products here in the Pets section of the
Alligator.



Help Needed Rescue/Rehome
OKittens: toms, wormed. litter trained
OSmall Dog: neutered, shots, housebroken
Old Town, FL 352-542-0706,
C Carroll, priest 11-6-09-5-24







Finders Keepers? If you find something, you
can place a FREE FOUND AD in our lost &
found section. Be kind to someone who's lost
what you've found. Call 373-FIND.


LOST: RING Worn about 40 years. Bent with
2 rubies. Size 7 or so. Lost on Oct 24th at
park on 400 NE 16th Ave during the Breast
Cancer Walk. REWARD OFFERED. Call
Jessie at 352-283-9178 11-6-09-5-25








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Sports
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2009


ALLIGATOR
www.alligatorSports.org


Spikes decides to sit out entire Vanderbilt game


By PHIL KEGLER
Alligator Staff Writer
pkegler@allgator org


Florida linebacker Brandon
Spikes will sit out the entire Van-
derbilt game Saturday, coach Ur-
ban Meyer and Spikes jointly an-
nounced Wednesday.
Meyer and Spikes spoke to
the media for roughly 30 seconds
each.
Neither took any questions.
The senior All-American was
originally suspended Monday
for only the first half by Meyer.
The penalty came in regards to an
incident Saturday where Spikes
put his hand in the facemask of
Georgia running back Washaun
Ealey.
"Brandon came to see us last
night. Coach Strong and myself
and a lot of the negative things
out there are really weighing
heavy on his heart right now,"
Meyer said. "And so we thought,
as a group, we decided it would
be best interest just for the team
to not play him Saturday, but it's
a group decision and we're doing
it out of respect to our team so we
can try to focus on trying to win


our ninth game. We think it's the
right thing to do.
"We support Brandon fully.
We look forward to him getting
back and finishing the season the
right way."
Spikes led the Gators in tack-
les Saturday after sitting out the
previous seven quarters with a
groin injury.
"I really don't want to be
a distraction to the team.
I want the guys to pre-
pare without any negative
things going on, and I feel
like if I would play it would
be a big thing going on."
Brandon Spikes
UF senior linebacker

"I really don't want to be a dis-
traction to the team," Spikes said.
"I want the guys to prepare with-
out any negative things going on,
and I feel like if I would play it
would be a big thing going on.
"I'm just trying to stay out of
the way, just motivate the guys.
I'm pretty sure the (coaching)
staff's got my back, and my team-
mates really support me in this
decision."


Harrison Diamond/ Alligator Staff
UF linebacker Brandon Spikes will not play Saturday after the senior All-American decided he did not
want to be a distraction to his team.


Gators slip by Vols in double OT


* LINDSAY THOMPSON SCORED THE GAME-
WINNING GOAL IN THE 1-0 MATCH.

By TYLER JETT
Alligator Writer
tjett@alligator org

The No. 1 seed cleared its first test, albeit in a heart-
stopping fashion.
No. 10 Florida (15-4-2), the regular-season Southeast-
ern Conference champion, needed a golden goal in dou-
ble overtime to sneak past Tennessee (8-9-3) 1-0 in the
first round of the conference tournament Wednesday.
The goal came after midfielder Erika Tymrak recov-
ered a Tennessee clearance at the top of the Volunteers
penalty box. Tymrak carried the ball to the right wing
then, with three defenders marking her, the freshman
crossed it to Lindsay Thompson on the left side of the
penalty box.
From there, Thompson was able to put the ball in the
upper-right corner of the goal in the 102nd minute.


"We'd been so close the whole game," Thompson
said. "We were really taking it to them. To finally end
the game felt amazing."
Thompson has been the go-to scorer for the Gators all
year, and Wednesday marked the fifth time this season
that she scored a goal to put UF ahead for good.
Coach Becky Burleigh said she thought the team had
plenty of good opportunities, something the scoreboard
did not reflect.
= "(Tennessee) plays really hard, and
they put a lot of pressure on you," Burleigh
said. "We did a pretty good job of keeping
Soccer our composure in that circumstance."
The Gators could have ended the game
in the 81st minute, when Volunteers goal-
keeper Molly Baird was caught out of position. After a
Thompson pass, forward McKenzie Barney had a wide-
open net to shoot at, but defender Ali Hall put her body
in front of Barney and deflected the shot.
UF recorded its fifth-straight shutout, although UT
had a few opportunities to score midway through the
SEE SOCCER, PAGE 18


Nelson reaches out

with scholarship fund
A year and a half ago, I had the pleasure of inter-
viewing Stacey Nelson for a feature story, and
he told me about her love for Africa and help-
ing people.
"I don't know why I'm so interested in Africa, but
I am," Nelson said in 2008. "I took Swahili. I was hop-
ing to go over there in the Peace
ECorps, but they don't send
people to East Africa anymore
because it's too dangerous. I just
wanted to get involved because
of all the people struggling over
there."
Kyle Maistri Nelson finished her last sea-
son as a Gator as the school's
Kyle Points leader in every meaningful
kmaistr@allgatororg pitching category and the best
player on UF's first-ever trips to
the Women's College World Series, including a heart-
breaking loss to Washington in last season's finals.
Wednesday, I had the pleasure of sitting down with
Stacey Nelson again, and the subject matter of our con-
versation didn't change a whole lot.
Except she's no longer speculating about her future
SEE KYLE, PAGE 20


* Here's to hoping Tim Tebow can outperform Tyler Hansbrough in commercial 0 Redshirt sophomore Rebecca Lowe Tim Tebow (Maxwell Award, top overall
acting after his college career ends. First, Pyscho T was tracking down a lost was named SEC Female Cross Country player), Brandon Spikes (Bednarik Award,
dog. Now, he's in a super-awkward Acura commercial. You can do it, Tim! ... Athlete of the Year, and coach Todd top defensive player), Joe Haden (Thorpe
Be afraid, Florida fans. ECU defensive coordinator Greg Hudson is a possible Morgan was named Women's Coach Award, top defensive back) are all semifi-
replacement for Mickey Andrews at FSU. If his swashbuckling defense makes it of the Year. nalists for their respective honors.
to Tallahassee, it'll mean big trouble fo UF.





18, ALLIGATOR U THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2009


Trio of Gators face


challenge of indoors


By GREG LUCA
Alligator Writer

Allie Will, Alex Lacroix and
Antoine Benneteau will have to
compete not only with 32 of the
nation's best players but also with
an unfamiliar set of elements at
the ITA National Intercollegiate
Indoor Championships this week-
end.
The second leg of the collegiate
tennis grand slam, which will
be held at Yale in New Haven,
Conn., is the first tournament of
the season that will be held en-
tirely indoors.
Making the necessary adjust-
ments can be tricky for some, but
nothing a little extra practice time
can't remedy.
"I have some issues with my
eyesight," Will said. "I see the
ball a little differently indoors. It's
something I have to adjust to."
Will's coaches suggested she
take a couple days off after her
win in the ITA Southeast Regional
finals Oct. 26, but Will, the tour-
nament's No. 6 seed, chose to
limit her rest to just a day to get
as much indoor practice time as
possible.
Typically, indoor courts play a
great deal faster than outdoor, as
players have an easier time lining
up their shots without any wind
interference.
"The biggest difference is you
don't have to factor in any out-
door elements like wind, the sun,
cold, or heat. It's more neutral
than outdoor," men's assistant


coach Jeremy Bayon said.
The change in arena has forced
the players and coaches to make
slight alterations to their original
strategies.
"Indoor tennis is a lot faster
and more powerful, so (Lacroix
and Benneteau) just need to be
aware and take the first strike
often and be aggressive," men's
coach Andy Jackson said.
In addition to a change in prac-
tice venue, the UF players took
the trip up to New Haven a day
early to get used to the unfamiliar
environment.
"Indoor tennis is a lot faster
and more powerful, so (La-
croix and Benneteau) just
need to be aware and take
the first strike often and be
aggressive,"
Andy Jackson
UF men's tennis coach

"Alex and Antoine went up
a little early and got to practice
(Tuesday) night and practice
(Wednesday) so they'll be perfect-
ly acclimated," Bayon said.
Women's head coach Roland
Thornqvist is equally confident in
Will's ability to make the transi-
tion seamlessly.
"The lighting is great, and
she hit the ball very, very well
(Wednesday), so we're not wor-
ried at all about her getting accli-
mated," Thornqvist said.


UF to face South Carolina in next round


SOCCER, from page 17

second half.
After Florida goalkeeper Katie Fraine tried
to boot the ball deep, a UF player mishit a
header, and Tennessee forward Emily Dowd
carried the ball unmarked into the Gators' de-
fensive third.
Fraine approached Dowd to cut off her an-
gle at the goal, but Dowd was able to sneak
the ball past Fraine. The shot slowly rolled to-
ward the net but ultimately ended up wide to
the left.
"That was the scariest situation of the
night," Fraine said.


Dowd, a Gainesville native, terrorized UF's
back line again 10 minutes later, outhustling a
Gators defender for the ball in the left corner
and crossing it to forward Jayden Barrett.
Barrett had an open look at the left side of
the goal but hit the ball awkwardly on the side
of her foot, sending it wide left.
UF has one day off before playing South
Carolina (16-3-1) Friday night. After such a
long game Wednesday, Burleigh said the team
will do pool workouts to rejuvenate before get-
ting back on the pitch.
"That's the nature of this tournament,"
Burleigh said. "You're going to have to play
hopefully three games that are really hard in
a row."


UF midfielder Lindsay Thompson (18) scored the game-winning goal in Florida's 1-0, double-
overtime victory over Tennessee in the first round of the SEC Tournament.


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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2009 U ALLIGATOR, 19


SOUTHEASTERN CONFERENCE

Alabama-LSU matchup will play key role in SEC West


By PHIL KEGLER
Alligator Staff Writer
pkegler@alllgator org
One of the teams in the Dec. 5 South-
eastern Conference Championship
Game has been set. The other could be
decided Saturday.
Florida clinched the SEC East with
its 41-17 win over Georgia on Saturday
combined with South Carolina's 31-13
loss at Tennessee.
Now, No. 3 Alabama (8-0, 5-0 SEC)
and No. 9 LSU (7-1, 4-1 SEC) will face
off in Tuscaloosa at 3:30 p.m. on Satur-
day, with control of the SEC West up for
grabs. A Crimson Tide victory would
give them the division title and a ticket to
Atlanta. If the Tigers prevail, they would
control their own destiny win out, and
LSU would play in the SEC title game.
LSU has won five of the last six games
in the series, although Alabama won 27-
21 in Baton Rouge last season.
The Crimson Tide and the Tigers
enter the game ranked No. 2 and No. 3,
respectively, in the conference in scoring
defense.
"It's hard to figure out exactly scores,
but I suspect both offenses will move
more slowly than they'd like," LSU
coach Les Miles said.
Another crucial matchup will be Ala-
bama receiver Julio Jones against LSU's


secondary. The sophomore has been
plagued by injuries this season after a
freshman campaign in which he ranked
third in the SEC in receiving yards per
game.
"I think he's 100 percent healthy,
playing faster, more confident," Ala-
bama coach Nick Saban said. "He's a
guy that needs to make plays for us. He's
got a lot of talent and a lot of ability. He's
got great size and speed, and he's a great
competitor. He's gotta become a part of
the offense for us."
FATHER-SON CLICKING: Through eight
games, Tennessee is only 4-4, but the
Volunteers' defense has come together
quite nicely under coordinator Monte
Kiffin, father of coach Lane Kiffin.
"He's done such a phenomenal job,"
Lane Kiffin said of his father. "To be in
the first year of a system and to have so
many injuries to work through (the
play) has been great.
"I had not thought about the recruit-
ing as much, but it's been unbelievable.
When kids come here and meet him and
he sits down with them and shows them
how he can coach them and how he can
get them to the next level, the reaction
has been unbelievable by high school
kids. We've even started putting our of-
fensive recruits with him because they're
just so blown away by him."


HnIIurew atd1iiii / HniiiluUr atl I
Alabama coach Nick Saban will be facing his former LSU team for the third time this Saturday.
A win would clinch the SEC West for the Crimson Tide.


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20, ALLIGATOR U THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2009


Adams takes over as Vandy's QB after injury to Smith


* SMITH TORE HIS
HAMSTRING AGAINST
GEORGIA TECH.

By KYLE MAISTRI
Alligator Staff Writer
kmalstrl@alllgator org

Redshirt senior Mackenzi
Adams led Vanderbilt to a road
victory over then-No. 6 South
Carolina in his first career start
in 2007.
He peaked early.
Since then, Adams struggled
to hold off Chris Nickson as
the team's starting quarterback
while passing for 1,925 yards,
14 touchdowns and 14 intercep-
tions in his sophomore and ju-
nior seasons combined.
Sophomore Larry Smith
usurped him as the Commo-
dores' starting signal caller this
year and showed signs of prom-
ise as a passer and runner.
But Smith tore his hamstring
last week against Georgia Tech,
and Adams will once again be
Vanderbilt's starting quarterback
this weekend against Florida.
"Somebody has to step up


and take the place of those play-
ers you were counting on," Van-
derbilt coach Bobby Johnson
said. "You have to prepare them
the best you can when that hap-
pens and try to dig deep down
in your depth, or lack of depth
whatever you want to call it, and
try to get some players ready to
go."
The Gators boast the South-
eastern Conference's toughest
passing defense, as they have
surrendered 138.8 yards per
game through the air.
In two career games against
UF, Adams has completed 21 of
his 40 passes for 206 yards and
three interceptions, though he
did rush for two touchdowns in
Ben Hill Griffin Stadium in 2007.
Florida coach Urban Meyer
said Adams brings some famil-
iarity to the game, but his team
won't have to make any last-
minute adjustments.
"(Smith) was a tremendous
athlete, a big athlete," Meyer
said. "(Adams) is a very good
athlete. We've played against
him before. We're not chang-
ing our game plan. I don't think
they'll change their offense."


Andrew Stanfill / Alligator Staff
Vanderbilt quarterback Mackenzi Adams will make his first start of the year against UF, which has the SEC's
best pass defense. In two games against Florida, Adams is 21 of 40 for 206 yards and three interceptions.


Murphy's recent success aided by tear

The sophomore has seven triple-doubles in '09


By ANTHONY CHIANG
Alligator Writer
achlang@alllgator org


More times than not, there is someone else
to thank for one's success.
In sophomore setter Kelly Murphy's case
there are 14 women to thank her team-
mates.
It is easy to notice all of the things she does
to help No. 9 Florida (18-3, 12-2 Southeastern
Conference) win, but the impact the other
members of the team have on her performance
often goes overlooked.
Murphy is asked to do a lot for the Gators,
as she leads the NCAA in triple-doubles with
seven and also plays two positions, opposite
hitter and setter.
But UF coach Mary Wise made it clear that


most of her accomplishments are due to the
play of her teammates.
Her setting and hitting stats are helped by
the excellent libero play of senior Elyse Cu-
sack because of the importance of first contact,
while the middle blockers are to thank for
Murphy's high dig numbers, Wise said.
During the recent six-match win streak,
Murphy has excelled. In that short stretch, she
has tallied three triple-doubles while posting a
.463 hitting efficiency.
"A lot of it has to do with our passing,"
Murphy said. "We've been passing really well
lately and that just makes everything else easi-
er. I have to credit my teammates a lot."
However, it goes both ways. Her versa-
tility has helped take some of the load off of
her teammates. In just her sophomore year,


Murphy has broken all kinds of records while
helping the Gators rebound from losing two
starters last season.
Not even Cusack, who has played with six
All-Americans, can remember playing with
such an all-around talent.
"Anytime you have a
player like Kelly who can set
and hit, it is kind of unique,"
Volleyball Cusack said. "I've never
played with a player as dom-
inant as she is."
Playing two drastically different positions,
it is essential that Murphy has different mind-
sets while playing at different spots on the
floor.
"You know when you rotate to the front
row it's different, you have to score points and


Inmates' play
kill balls," Murphy said. "In the back row, it's
more about digging balls and setting up the
other teammates."
The numbers that really stick out to Wise
are the sophomore's kill and dig statistics be-
cause the amount of attempts she has at each
is restricted due to her constant rotation from
the front row to the back row.
If that has affected her game, it hasn't
shown. She is still knocking down three kills
per set while also having the second most digs
on the team this season.
But if something is going to limit her game,
it will be the play of her teammates, Wise said.
So far, though, they have only helped take her
to new heights.
"You can make the argument that Kelly is
most talented player in this league based on
all that she does for our team," Wise said. "But
she is only as good as her teammates allow her
to be."


KYLE, from page 17


in humanitarianism she's acting.
Nelson, who is still living in Gainesville while she finishes
up her undergraduate degree, has started Stacey Nelson's Get
Educated, Get Rewarded! Scholarship Program.
"My plan is to give out scholarships to high school Juniors
who respond to a challenge following a presentation on the
current humanitarian crisis in Northern Uganda," reads a
statement on Nelson's Web site.
She gave her first presentation Wednesday and will be
focusing on four Gainesville-area high schools: Buchholz,
Gainesville, Eastside and Oak Hall.
Any high school student may apply and write an essay
demonstrating his or her understanding of the current crisis in
Uganda.
Needless to say, I doubt very much I would be able to qual-
ify for her scholarship.
Nelson has already raised enough money through private
donations to award one $500 first-place scholarship, and de-
pending on how much money she is able to raise, there will be
multiple second- and third-place scholarships worth $250 and
$100, respectively.


Her work to both develop and put into effect a scholar-
ship in her name is incredibly impressive in its own right, but
it doesn't stop there. Nelson, who hopes to earn a law degree
in international humanitarian law, has made a habit of giving
back.
Last spring, the softball team hosted Swing for Cancer, and
Nelson mowed down Florida athletes and coaches from inside
the circle in the name of charity.
On Oct. 23, she decided athletes and coaches weren't enough
and teamed up with former Gators pitcher and current UF med
student Stacey Stevens in striking out students to raise money
for Project Heal, a group that takes a medical outreach trip to
Ecuador each spring break.
Later this month, Nelson will travel back to Japan one of
the stops she made as a member of Team USA over the sum-
mer to strike out Japanese athletes and celebrities for a cause
yet to be determined (last year, it was physical disabilities).
Evidently, mowing down overmatched batters in the name
of helping others in the Western Hemisphere wasn't enough.
"It's kind of a snowball effect," Nelson said of her constant
involvement. "It feels good to do good."
She plans to use her spring semester the one she would
be taking "off" between undergrad and law school to finally
make her trip to Africa for a few weeks as a teaching volunteer
for children.


Giving back to the community be it local, national or
global is just as much a part of who Nelson is as softball. In
fact, more so.
"I never wanted to be looked at as just a softball player," she
said. "I wanted to be looked at as a girl who played softball."
Perhaps the perfect attitude for a public figure to have.
Athletes don't ask to be thought of us as role models, but
they are just the same. Luckily for Nelson, and everyone her
hard work touches, she happens to be a role model first and a
dominant pitcher second.
It's incredibly easy for an athlete, or any college-age person,
to sit in an interview room and talk about giving back to the
community later in life. Too often, we are all guilty of starting
ideas we never have the wherewithal to close.
Nelson will forever be remembered in Gainesville as one of
the greatest starting pitchers UF has ever seen.
And she's making one helluva a push to be remembered as
one of the greatest closer, as well.
Off the field, of course.

If you would like to donate money to or get more information
about Stacey Nelson's scholarship program, you can contact her at
sn.geteducated@gmail.com or visit her Web site at plaza.ufl.edu/
staceyn. Or join her Facebook group: Stacey Nelson's Get Educated,
Get Rewarded! Scholarship Program.




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