Group Title: Independent Florida Alligator
Title: The Independent Florida alligator
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028290/01070
 Material Information
Title: The Independent Florida alligator
Alternate Title: Florida allgator
Alligator
University digest
University of Florida digest
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some col.) ; 36 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Independent Florida Alligator
Publisher: The students of the University of Florida
Campus Communications, Inc.
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: August 24, 2009
Frequency: daily (except saturdays, sundays, holidays and exam periods, aug.-apr.); semiweekly (may-july)
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Subject: Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates: 29.665245 x -82.336097 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 65, no. 75 (Feb. 1, 1973)-
General Note: "Not officially associated with the University of Florida."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028290
Volume ID: VID01070
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Resource Identifier: oclc - 13827512
alephbibnum - 000470760
lccn - sn 86010448
issn - 0889-2423
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Sof Florida Published by Campus Communications, Inc. of Gainesville, Florida
o We Inform. You Decide.


*


MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009


UF rises two spots in university rankings


Change occurred despite budget cuts


By CAROLYN TILLO
Alligator Staff Writer

UF climbed two spots in both
the national and public school
standings in the U.S. News &
World Report 2010 rankings.
UF moved from 17th to 15th
on the U.S. News & World Re-


port's 2010 Top Public National
Universities ranking and from
49th to 47th in the National Uni-
versities ranking.
UF spokesman Steve Orlando
said UF improved its average
freshmen retention rate, student-
faculty ratio and acceptance rate.
"Given all the budget con-


straints we had, a lot of people
thought we
UF would fall this
Academics year," Orlando
said.
Jordan Johnson, UF's Student
Body president, said UF's rise
was due in part to the UF com-
munity's decision to face the chal-


lenge of budget cuts head-on.
"We really came together, and
we made compromises that were
in the best interest of the univer-
sity in moving forward," Johnson
said. "We have to keep preaching
the idea that, look, we're going
to make it through this, we're
going to make it out better than
we came in, and the education at
UF will not compromise to a bad
economy."


Despite this optimism, UF's
performance slipped in some ar-
eas of the ranking assessment,
including expected graduation
rate, financial resources rank and
the number of freshmen from
the top 10 percent of their high
school classes.
Bob Morse, the director of data
research at U.S. News & World

SEE RANKING, PAGE 10


Help given

Sri on first day
Sprinting n
New Sisters ETHE ASK ME CAMPAIGN KICKED
New sorority OFF SUNDAY AND ENDS TUESDAY.
members race
across Norman By HILARY SHEINBAUM
field to their Alligator Contributing Writer
sorority houses
after receiving If tuition included a personal tour guide,
their bids Sun- navigating a new school would be simple.
day afternoon. Fortunately, new Gators can benefit from the
Spectators next best thing.
The ninth annual UF Ask Me campaign
Crowded the kicked off Sunday and will continue through
Norman Park- Tuesday.
ing Garage The campaign, sponsored by the UF divi-
and the fences sions of Business Affairs, Student Affairs and
around the Human Resources, offers help at residence
field to see halls during check-in and other campus loca-
the newest tions to help make the first days on campus
less confusing for new students.
members of "Navigating the bus schedule and routes
the UF Greek was a daunting task," said journalism fresh-
community. man Sara Solano. "A figure to answer ques-
Harrison Diamond/ Alligator Staff tions like that for new students, such as my-
SEE ASK ME, PAGE 10

ON CAMPUS

New students come together in welcoming ceremony


By EMILY FUGGETTA
Alligator Staff Writer
efuggetta@alligator.org

A pedestrian on UF's Stadium Road Friday
afternoon may have mistaken the swarm of
freshmen for a new military branch.
But instead of Army fatigues, most of them
sported flip-flops and shorts.


About 6,000 new Gators gathered in the
O'Connell Center for New Student Convoca-
tion and Navigating the Swamp, an event that
hasn't been held in years and has never been
held for the entire incoming class, according
to Dean of Students Office spokeswoman Ann
Ho Becks.
The event, which lasted about three hours,
featured speeches from UF President Bernie


Machen and Luis Alberto Urrea, author of
the current Common Reading Program book,
"The Devil's Highway."
The morning kicked off with the convoca-
tion portion, during which students took part
in a pinning ceremony to symbolize their wel-
coming into the university. Freshman business
major Sophie Perez was pinned on stage, and
the rest of the students pinned those around


them.
After the convocation, the mass broke into
groups by college for about two hours, and
faculty led discussions on the Common Read-
ing Program book and on how to succeed in
different programs.
According to Becks, the event received pos-
itive feedback, and UF plans to continue the
event in the future.


Last season's
loss to Ole Miss has
fueled UF quarter-
back Tim Tebow
(right) as he contin-
ues his assault on
the record books.
Another Heisman
or BCS title would
cement his legacy.
See Story, Page 41.


Hurricane Bill blamed in deaths in Maine, Fla.
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) A large wave
fueled by Hurricane Bill swept a group of surf-
watchers into the sea at a Maine park Sunday,
including a 7-year-old girl who died after the
Coast Guard pulled her from the waters.
The girl, her father and a 12-year-old girl
who were all visiting Acadia National Park
were plucked from the water by rescuers. The
man and the 12-year-old were hospitalized.
The three were part of an afternoon crowd
of thousands who lined the national park's


rocky shoreline to watch the high surf and
crashing waves, which were "absolutely the ef-
fects of Hurricane Bill" coupled with the effect
of high tide, park ranger Sonya Berger said.
The hurricane was also blamed for the
death of a 54-year-old swimmer Saturday in
Florida. Volusia County Beach Patrol Capt.
Scott Petersohn said Angel Rosa of Orlando
washed ashore unconscious near rough waves
fueled by Bill at New Smyrna Beach. He was
pronounced dead at a hospital.


FORECAST
OPINIONS
CLASSIFIEDS 3
CROSSWORD 3
SPORTS 4


2 *^
6
14 f
15 Sunny
, 90/72


VOLUME 103 ISSUE 1


Today


visit www.alligator.org


t






2, ALLIGATOR U MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009

News Today


WHAT'S HAPPENING
Reitz Union Art Gallery
presents the Back-to-School
Poster Sale
Reitz Union Colonnade
Today through Friday
9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
The sale features fine art
prints, movie and music post-
ers, photography and more.

Army ROTC Rock Wall
Reitz Union North Lawn
Today, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

"Praharsha'09: The Festival of
Hope and Happiness"
Reitz Union Grand Ball Room
Saturday, 6 to 8 p.m.
An evening of multicultural
performances hosted by Asha
UFlorida. Visit http://www.
ashanet.org/uflorida for more
information. Asha UFlorida is
a group supporting basic edu-
cation initiatives for under-
privileged children in India.

Qualifying to run for a Student
Senate seat
Sept. 3, 4 and 8
284 Reitz Union
9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Visit www.sg.ufl.edu/elec-
tions for more information.

Got an event?
And want to post it in this
space? Send an e-mail to
bkelley@alligator.org with
"What's Happening" in the
subject line. Please include a
one- to two-sentence synopsis
of the event.


TODAY


SUNNY
90/72


TUESDAY


THUNDER
STORMS
89/73


WEDNESDAY


THUNDER
STORMS
89/73


THURSDAY FRIDAY


THUNDER THUNDER
STORMS STORMS
89/73 89/73


"Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


The Alligator strives to be
accurate and clear in its news
reports and editorials. If you
find an error, please call our
newsroom at 352-376-4458
or send an e-mail to editor@
alligator.org.


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alligator
VOLUME 103 ISSUE 1 ISSN 0889-2423
Not officially associated with the University of Florida
Published by Campus Communications Inc., of Gainesville, Florida
NEWSROOM
352-376-4458 (Voice), 352-376-4467 (Fax)
Editor Kristin Bjornsen,
kbjornsen@alligator.org
Managing Editor/ Print Brian Kelley, bkelley@alligator.org
Managing Editor/Online JenniferJenkins
jjenkins@alligator.org
Online Producer Andrew Stanfill, astanfill@alligator.org
University Editor Emily Fuggetta,
efuggetta@alligator.org
Sports Editor Phil Kegler, pkegler@alligator.org
Assistant Sports Editor Kyle Maistri, kmaistri@alligator.org
alligatorSports.org Editor Bobby Callovi, bcallovi@alligator.org
Opinions Editor Allie Conti, aconti@alligator.org
Editorial Board Kristin Bjornsen, Brian Kelley
Jennifer Jenkins
Photo Editor Harrison Diamond,
hdiamond@alligator.org
Freelance Editor Ashley Ross, aross@alligator.org
the Avenue Editor Lane Nieset,
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Copy Desk Chiefs Jack Benge, Rachael Pino
Graphics Chief Jessica Warshaver
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DISPLAY ADVERTISING
352-376-4482, 800-496-0265 (Voice), 352-376-4556 (Fax)
Advertising Director Rose Sierra, rsierra@alligator.org
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Advertising Assistant Melissa Bell
Intern Coordinator Sara Ingebretsen
Display Advertising Clerks Sara Ingebretsen, Shaun O'Connor
Sales Representatives Helen Callis, Jen Cowie, Jen Cowie,
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CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
352-373-FIND (Voice), 352-376-3015(Fax)
Classified Advertising Manager Ellen Light, ellight@alligator.org
Classified Clerks Ashley Flattery, Wildivina Rosario


CIRCULATION
Operations Manager Scott McKearnan,
smckearnan@alligator.org
Operations Assistant David Carlson

BUSINESS
352-376-4446 (Voice), 352-376-4556 (Fax)
Comptroller Ramona Malloy
Senior Bookkeeper Melissa Bell, mbell@alligator.org
Accounting Clerks Andrea Almeida

ADMINISTRATION
352-376-4446 (Voice), 352-376-4556 (Fax)
General Manager Patricia Carey, tcarey@alligator.org
Administrative Manager Judy Moore
Administrative Assistant Lenora McGowan,
Imcgowan@alligator.org
President Emeritus C.E. Barber, cebarber@alligator.org

SYSTEMS
Desktop Support Manager Kevin Hart

PRODUCTION
Production Manager Stephanie Gocklin,
sgocklin@alligator.org
Editorial Production Supervisor Erica Bales
Advertising Production Staff Shannon Close, Doug Eastman
Editorial Production Staff Erica Ervin, Max Weissler
The Independent Florida Alligator is a student newspaper serving the University of Florida, pub-
lished by a nonprofit 501 (c)(3) educational organization, Campus Communications Inc., P.O. Box
14257, Gainesville, Florida, 32604-2257. The Alligator is published Monday through Friday morn-
ings, except during holidays and exam periods. During UF summer academic terms The Alligator is
published Tuesdays and Thursdays.
TheAlligator is a member of the Newspaper Association of America, National Newspaper Associa-
tion, Florida Press Association and Southern University Newspapers.
Subscription Rates: One Semester (Fall or Spring) $18
Summer Semester $10
Two Semesters (Fall or Spring) $35
Full Year (All Semesters) $40
The Alligator offices are located at 1105 W. University Ave. Classified advertising can be placed at
that location from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, except for holidays. Classifieds also can
be placed at the UF Bookstore. Copyright 2005. All rights reserved. No portion of The Alligator
may be reproduced in any means without the written consent of an officer of Campus Communica-
tions Inc.






MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009 U ALLIGATOR, 3


AROUND GAINESVILLE


Students weigh benefits of buying books online


By PATRICK ANNESTY
Alligator Staff Writer
pannesty@alligator.org

Cheap or easy when it comes
to buying textbooks, you usually
can't have both.
Students have to weigh the con-
venience of buying locally against
deals available online.
Scott Laming, public relations
coordinator for abebooks.com, said
buying textbooks online is usually
cheaper because online vendors ca-
ter to a national market. The greater
customer base allows vendors to
purchase their supplies of books in
bulk, often at discount prices.
"Smaller local bookstores just
don't have the same buying power


and can't get the same prices that we
do," Laming said.
In addition, online vendors do
not have to pay to operate a store-
front, keeping prices low.
But Laming said students who
need a book immediately usually
buy it locally rather than waiting or
paying to expedite shipping.
Also, if a professor makes any
last-minute changes to the syllabus,
students who purchased online are
stuck with a book they no longer
need. Buying locally makes returns
and exchanges easier.
Buying from the UF Bookstore
allows students with financial aid to
defer textbook costs until financial
aid is disbursed.
Peter Shekailo, a UF microbiolo-


gy senior, bought his textbooks from
the UF Bookstore because of the con-
venience of the deferment program.
"I'm not supplying the
money I'm using."
Peter Shekailo
UF senior

"Here I can just slide my [Gator 1
Card]," he said.
Even though the books may be
more expensive than buying them
online, Shekailo said he doesn't
mind because he is paying for books
with scholarships.
"I'm not supplying the money
I'm using," he said. If he went else-
where, he would pay out of pocket


and wait to be reimbursed.
The UF Bookstore also offers
digital copies of some textbooks
at a lower price. Director Lynne
Vaughan said a student can pur-
chase a code that, when entered
online, downloads the textbook to
a computer. The copy expires after
180 days and cannot be sold back.
The campus bookstore also hosts
the UF Book Market on its Web site,
allowing students to post classified
ads to sell used books at a price they
set. Buyers can search the listings
and purchase directly from other
students.
While buying used is generally
cheaper, it's not always feasible.
Keith Cox, manager at Orange
and Blue Textbooks, said some stu-


dents have to buy new books if their
courses have an online component.
This coursework is accessed with a
code provided in new copies.
According to Vaughan, early
shoppers tend to buy all the used
books first, forcing others to buy
new.
Brittany Hicks, a materials sci-
ence and engineering freshman,
purchased two calculus books from
the UF Bookstore. She bought her
other books online through amazon.
com, but was unable to find the last
two on the site.
The campus bookstore did not
have used copies of the books she
needed, so she bought them new.
"At that point I just wanted to
have them," she said.


Students room with RAs due to 104 percent capacity


* SO FAR, 105 RAs HAVE BEEN
ASSIGNED A ROOMMATE.

By STEFANIA FERRO
Alligator Contributing Writer

Zumaly Dixon snuggles in her dorm bed
while on her laptop as a Harry Potter movie
plays in the background.
Dixon is a resident assistant, but she isn't
listening to the movie alone freshman Vic-
toria Brathwaite sits across from her RA in a
temporary bed watching, too.
For the first time in at least 25 years, UF


RAs have assigned roommates as part of a
housing overflow procedure, according to
Sharon Blansett, assistant director of housing
for research and organizational development.
Previously, UF housed students in lounges or
made off-campus living arrangements.
But at 104 percent capacity this year the
highest in UF history more residents are be-
ing doubled or tripled to offset demand.
The new living arrangements are tempo-
rary, lasting for two to three weeks until some
residents cancel their leases.
"It affects the [expectations] of the job, but
I don't mind," said Dixon, a marketing sopho-
more.


Out of 183 UF RAs, 105 RAs have been
assigned a roommate. Rawlings Hall RA
Akeelah Ammons is one of the 78 RAs who
continue to enjoy single rooms.
"It must be tough because you're not used
to having a roommate," said
On Ammons, a fifth-year dietetics
Campus major. "I'm using my room as a
refuge for them and the hall."
Prior to move-in, students were notified
via e-mail about temporarily living with a resi-
dent assistant.
"I feel bad because [having your own
room] is one of the perks of being an RA," said
Brathwaite, a biology major.


Some students can only imagine what it
would be like living with their hall RA.
"That's weird because if you go out party-
ing or something your RA is watching your
back," said Ansuya Deosaran, a freshman bi-
ology major. "I would rather have a triple than
living with [an] RA."
Broward Hall RA Nabil Abazaid also has a
freshman roommate in his dorm. He believes
having a roommate may send the wrong mes-
sage to others in his hall.
"It takes away the authority aspect of being
an RA," said Abazaid, a sophomore health sci-
ence major. "You want to be friendly enough
to them but also have respect for the rules."


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4, ALLIGATOR U MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009


UF ADMINISTRATION

UF denies discriminating against former law professor


By THOMAS STEWART
Alligator Staff Writer
tstewart@alligator.org

UF's lawyers have responded to
claims of racial and sexual discrimi-
nation made in a lawsuit earlier this
year by former associate professor
of law Sherrie Russell-Brown.
In documents filed Aug. 7 and
10, UF denies it discriminated
against her and asks the court to
dismiss the case.
In her lawsuit, Russell-Brown,
who is black, alleges UF fostered a
hostile atmosphere that resulted in
harassment by students and faculty
and that the university ultimately
forced her from her job.
In one instance, she alleges she
was talking with a black student
when a male colleague hit her from
behind, pushing her into the class-
room's whiteboard as class was
about to start and students were
taking their seats.
In another, she said a white male
student in one of her classes sent
her a threatening e-mail the day
after the Virginia Tech killings. The
e-mail stated there would be some-
thing waiting for her when she ar-
rived at the classroom, leading her
to cancel the last day of class, ac-
cording to the lawsuit.
She that alleges faculty members


were told to avoid her and that UF
forced her to leave in retaliation for
submitting discrimination com-
plaints.
Her lawsuit was first filed in
Alachua County in February and
then re-filed in New Jersey, where
she lives, in May.
In its response to the lawsuit,
UF states that if students or faculty
avoided or harassed her it was done
without its knowledge or approval.
UF alleges Russell-Brown resigned
willingly after she was told her con-
tract would not be renewed.
In court documents, Bob Jerry,
dean of the law school, stated the
university wanted to let her go be-
cause she could not be relied on to
teach her assigned classes.
Jerry asserted that Russell-
Brown e-mailed him about a week
before the start of classes in the fall
of 2007 informing him that she had
an "unexpected illness" and that she


couldn't teach the first week of class.
Jerry asked her to report back to
him in a few days to let him know
if she would be able to fulfill her
teaching obligations for the semes-
ter, UF's response alleges.
When she didn't report back
and attempts to contact her failed,
the law school reassigned her class,
according to the response.
After a series of e-mails and
phone calls, the law school offered
her another class that would start
in late September. She declined,
stating there wasn't enough time
left to properly teach the class.
However, she offered to teach the
class in the spring and proposed a
class description that included four
essays and no class meetings.
UF alleges that the law school
found this unacceptable and yet
she continued to try to avoid face-
to-face teaching.
"Face-to-face teaching of stu-


dents was an essential function of
Russell-Brown's position," Jerry
stated in court documents.
The lawsuit notes that
Russell-Brown was living in
Plainfield, N.J., at the time.
By the end of September, when
Russell-Brown had still not met
with the dean about her situation
and had not turned in proper medi-
cal documentation to excuse her
from work, Jerry stated the school
decided not to renew her contract,
which resulted in her resignation.
According to court documents,
Russell-Brown put the school in
a similar situation in 2005 when,
a week before fall classes, she in-
formed the law school she couldn't
teach that semester because of a
medical condition.
She was living in England
at the time, working on a de-
gree in public international law
at the University of Oxford.


TIMELINE
OF EVENTS


Jessica Warshaver/ Alligator Staff


A medical form filed with UF in the
fall of 2007 indicates she began ex-
periencing irregular heartbeats and
chest pain in 2005.
Russell-Brown resigned from UF
effective Dec. 31, 2007. She received
almost $121,000 in compensation,
totaling more than a year's worth
of salary and health benefits.
She also agreed not to file any
lawsuits or other complaints against
UF for incidents that occurred be-
fore the contract was signed, which
UF alleges should be grounds for
dismissal of the suit.
Her lawsuit seeks monetary
compensation and reinstatement at
UF.
UF officials declined to com-
ment, citing university policy that
prevents them from talking about
ongoing lawsuits.
On Aug. 11, a statement from the
dean about diversity was posted on
the law school's Web site.
"[T]he measure of an institution
or a community is not the isolated
acts of behavior of one or a few
members of that community...,"
Jerry's statement reads. "Like any
responsible institution, we inves-
tigate any incidents of alleged dis-
crimination brought to our atten-
tion and, while every allegation is
not true, if it is we respond appro-
priately," it said.


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MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009 U ALLIGATOR, 5


UF may spend $10K on repairs for broken bat house


H IT WAS HOME TO ABOUT
200,000 BATS.

By THOMAS STEWART
Alligator Staff Writer
tstewart@alligator.org

After years of housing too
many bats, part of UF's bat house
collapsed Aug. 16.
As a result, UF could end up
spending about $10,000 on re-
pairs, and the campus could see
an influx of homeless bats tak-
ing up residence in the attics and
crevices of its buildings, said Ken
Glover, UF's pest management co-
ordinator.
The house, located on Museum
Road across from Lake Alice, was
home to an estimated 200,000 bats
that weighed in at nearly 1 ton,
Glover said. The structure's roost-
ing fins, a series of plywood boxes
attached to the inside of the roof,
fell to the ground, killing about
100 bats, he said.
"They just overloaded the
roofing structure," he said.
The rest of the bats had already
left the house for the night to seek
food, he said. No people were in-
jured.
Glover recovered about 80 dead
bats on Aug. 17 to be examined by
the Florida Museum of Natural
History at the museum's request.
It's not clear when it collapsed,
but Glover said he was notified
around 8:30 p.m.


Andrew Stanfill / Alligator Staff
Roosting fins from the UF bat house are piled on the ground after they fell from the structure on Aug. 16,
killing nearly 100 bats and forcing another 100,000 to relocate.


He said the structure can
still house about 100,000 bats.
The partial collapse could renew
talks of building a new bat house,
Glover said.


The colony of bats has grown
too large for the house in recent
years, which has led bats to form
small colonies in on-campus
buildings like Larson Hall


A new bat house could cost
about $60,000, he said, and might
take four to six weeks to build.
If UF decides to build a new
bat house, funding will be sought


from various sources, he said. The
UF Foundation, which handles
donations to UF, and the Florida
Bat Conservancy are two potential
sources of funding.
In the meantime, the money for
repairs will likely come from UF's
building maintenance budget, he
said.
The bat house was built in 1991
at a cost of about $20,000 to relieve
the bat infestation at Percy Beard
Track.
The bats began living in the
concrete stands after Johnson Hall,
UF's old cafeteria, burned down
in 1987, he said. Before the fire,
a couple thousand bats had been
living in the attic of the building,
which was located at the site of
the current Academic Advising
Center.
For reasons that are still un-
clear, the bats didn't start living in
the structure until 1995.
With the possibility that more
bats could migrate to campus
buildings, Glover said it is impor-
tant that people don't try to touch
the bats if they see them.
Many bats carry rabies, he said,
which can be deadly.
He urged anyone who finds
a bat on campus from 8 a.m. to 5
p.m. to call UF's pest control at
352-392-1904. For after-hours bat
discoveries, he said, the Universi-
ty Police Department can be noti-
fied by calling 352-392-1111.
Alligator staff writer Andrew
Stanfill contributed to this article.


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6, ALLIGATOR U MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009

Editorial

Still A Future

Tuition increases not the

end of the world
Bright Futures recipients still get a hell of a financial break,
but this year it won't be quite as big.
UF students are being asked to take a little responsibil-
ity in financing their higher education, which isn't as horrible as
every groaning 20-year-old on campus might make it seem.
Although it seems disingenuous to tell kids to do well in
high school and stay in Florida while dangling a later-vanishing
carrot in front of their faces, the fact remains that UF's tuition is
still phenomenally low, and the out-of-pocket cost to attend UF
is practically nil. So taxpayers will now pay 85 percent of what it
costs for you to take "Fruit for Fun and Profit." Cry us a river.
Times are tough, and everyone is all too aware of the budget
issues facing our university. But, for some reason, students be-
moan the fact that they will have to pay $20 for a credit hour.
If paying $60 for a college class is too much of a hassle, you
might need to ask yourself what you're here for in the first
place. A well of knowledge and a possible life-changing experi-
ence might cost about the same as a copy of Call of Duty 5, but
please, get your priorities straight.
Other states do not get Bright Futures. Next time you're feel-
ing bummed about the cost of tuition and books, imagine if you
were born and raised in Wyoming. Not only would you have to
pay for all of your school expenses, you would be in Wyoming.
See? Thought experiments are good for you.
We do wonder if the solution wouldn't be to set higher stan-
dards for the Bright Futures scholarship. Getting a 1270 on the
SAT is hard and all, but we're not sure if it merits a free ride to
college from every old lady with a scratch-off addiction, a poor
understanding of probability and a never-ending supply of op-
timism. Regardless, having to pay for your own books is not the
end of the world. Plus, if scraping together $60 per class each
semester is gonna break you, you're already broke.


Dormitory Disaster


O ne of the worst wel-
omes a UF student
can receive is "perma-
nent triple." The second worst
welcome they could receive
would be telling them they
have to room with a cross be-
tween a peer, a Mother Hen
and an authority figure.
Due to overcrowding, resi-
dent assistants and regular
ol' dorm dwellers are being
paired up in living arrange-
ments that we imagine can
only be described as one half-
step up from Dante's Inferno.
We wonder why UF keeps
ignoring its capacity problem.
The fact that RAs must give
up a major job perk proves the
issue isn't improving.
It's false advertising. When
someone is hired for a job,
they should be aware of what
they will receive as payment
for their duties. Taking away
one of the few perks of an
RA's job is the same as hiring
someone for $10 an hour and
then paying them $7.


It's also unfair to under-
classmen who are stuck in this
setup. The UF housing Web
site does not mention the pos-
sibility of living with someone
who is essentially in charge of
you. Underclassmen could
move to an off-campus apart-
ment if the situation is truly
awful. However, they would
still have to forfeit their de-
posit, which UF refuses to
return to those who end their
contracts. It's like buying a
TV at Wal-Mart, opening the
box to find a VCR and being
refused a refund.
Our hearts go out to the
RAs who will now watch as
half of their rooms are des-
ecrated with life-size posters
of Tim Tebow, campus maps
and other freshman regalia.
And our hearts go out to the
freshmen who must deal with
never having anyone want to
hang out in their dorms, ever.
But a line of consolation: You
won't have to deal with the
post-party mess.


the independent florida

alligator


Kristin Bjornsen
EDITOR
Brian Kelley
Jennifer Jenkins
MANAGING EDITORS


Allie Conti
OPINIONS EDITOR


The Alligator encourages comments from readers. Letters to the editor should not exceed 150
words (about one letter-sized page) They must be typed, double-spaced and must include the
author's name, classification and phone number. Names will be withheld if the writer shows
just cause. We reserve the right to edit for length, grammar, style and libel. Send letters to
letters@alligator.org, bring them to 1105 W. University Ave., or send them to P.O. Box 14257,
Gainesville, FL 32604-2257.Columns of about 450 words about original topics and editorial
cartoons are also welcome. Questions? Call 376-4458.


Opinions


ALLIGATOR
www.alligator.org/opinions


Guest column

All students welcome to open house


Want to hang at our house? Well, Friday is your
chance. 'Cause it's Friday. You ain't got no job,
and you ain't got shit to do.
But seriously, the Alligator will open its doors to stu-
dents this Friday from 2 to 5 p.m. for the first of many
open houses of the semester. We asked about getting a
keg, but unfortunately we'll only have pizza to offer.
We are (desperately) searching for a metro editor to
assign all city-related stories to our whopping one city
writer. Yeah, we need those too.
Metro attire isn't required for the metro editor, but we
do ask that applicants know or are vaguely familiar
with the difference between the county and city com-
mission. Bonus points to any applicant that can accurate-
ly spell our mayor's name.
Alligator.org will also get a major makeover with-
in the next two weeks we're looking forward to a
snazzier design, more online projects and multimedia.
Our woefully tiny online staff is looking for anyone inter-
ested in making the new site awesome, whether you're
into programming, Web design or video.
In addition to a metro editor and an online staff, we're
on the hunt for multimedia gurus, photographers, writ-
ers, graphic designers, columnists, copy editors... the list
goes on.
So, what is it like to work five days a week at the na-
tion's largest student-run newspaper?
Believe it or not, it's fun.
Sure, we clock more hours in the newsroom than
we do sleeping, in class, sleeping in class or doing our
homework. But fortunately for us, we're all in the same
classes.
Just kidding... sort of.
We give each other back rubs and nurse our poor,


already-suffering-from-carpal-
tunnel forearms and hands. We
watch Jeopardy! religiously ev-
ery Monday through Thursday,
and text message answers (or
Editorial rather, questions) to one another
Notebook during the Friday airing.
editor@alligator.org We eat here, we study here, we
sleep here. If there was a shower,
we'd likely bathe here, too.
We receive voice mails from puzzled readers con-
cerned about missing Sudoku puzzles and word jum-
bles. (Don't worry, we're trying our best to bring back ol'
Crossword Lite.)
Since we spend so much time here, we've even started
decorating. The online office now comes complete with
a throw cover for the couch Alligator staffers have slept
on since 1987.
We also cleaned the newsroom recently, and discov-
ered such gems as an ancient gas mask and a key to the
building's elevator that was missing for two years. We
assume the mask belonged to the sole non-smoker who
worked here back in the good ol' days when we could
smoke inside the windowless newsroom.
During Friday's open house, we will conduct on-the-
spot, smoke-free interviews. We suggest you bring your
resume and portfolio (which will hopefully be smokin').
If we like you, you'll get a call back. If we love you,
you'll likely be writing a story for Monday's edition.
See you Friday!
Kristin Bjornsen is a journalism senior and editor in chief
of the Alligator. Jennifer Jenkins is a journalism senior and
managing editor / online. Brian Kelley is a journalism and
economics senior and managing editor /print.


The views expressed here are not necessarily those of the Alligator.

Reader response
Today's question: Do students Monday's question: The results of Monday's poll
have a right to complain about question are unavailable due to technical error.
Bright Futures changes?
Vote or post a message at www.alligator.org






MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009 U ALLIGATOR, 7


Guest column

Student Body president outlines goa


all students new to UF, welcome to the
next four years of your life. Returning
Gators, cut the freshmen some slack and
welcome back as well.
We have a lot to look forward to in the next
year. Whether you'll be busy cheering on our
defending champion Gators football team or
studying to be a future leader of the world,
I wanted to take this opportunity to update
you on the goals my administration has been
able accomplish, as well as give you an idea of
things you can look forward to this fall. These
goals have included everything from secur-
ing 300 parking spaces for students in the new
parking garage to nearly completing the plan
for an extended-hours study area.
This summer contained a period of tech-
nological expansion on campus in which we


were able to increase the usability of WebMail
by including e-mail forwarding to Gmail and
Yahoo. We also renovated the Student Gov-
ernment Computer Lab to double the number
of computers. This will also double the num-
ber of students able to print at one time when
the lab reopens today.
Another major topic that my administra-
tion has worked tirelessly on is student safety.
Facing a rising rate of muggings and bur-
glaries in and around campus, I personally
worked to shed light on the problem by part-
nering with local law enforcement to create an
awareness program for the fall semester. My
administration worked hand in hand with the
local Fraternal Order of Police, the National
Association for the Advancement of Colored
People and local law enforcement on the "$103


Jordan Johnsoi
Speaking Out

beginning. This ven
will be kicking off th
fore You Party" can
vention campaign i
motion of the newl'
as Later Gator bus
Rides scooter picku
you can call 877-RII


Is for coming semester
to Life" Seat Belt cam- our safe ride dispatch to any of these services
paign. My administra- But we don't plan on stopping there. This
tion was also able to fall we will be tackling sustainability issues
increase the amount like motion sensors, paper recycling, work-
of SNAP vans and ing to increase the number of exercise classes
expand operating available to students and, of course, continu-
Shours to better provide ing to represent students like you on the issues
nighttime security for that concern you most while still providing
students. quality entertainment and services.
But this is only the Since my administration took office, we
y week my administration have been able to get real results for students,
e "Be A Smarty, Think Be- and with your help we can make sure more
npaign. This is a DUI pre- work is done. With the ingenuity of UF stu-
hat will include the pro- dents and the will to do what must be done,
y extended SNAP as well we can make our campus a better place. I look
routes, and the Fabulous forward to an exciting year. Go Gators!
p service. Starting today, Jordan Johnson is the Student Body president
)E-UF1 to be connected to at the University of Florida.


Guest column

At 22, transition to UF just as difficult as freshman year


This summer, while everyone
was in a lazy summer mood,
I was the girl armed with her
class schedule, 50 fliers, a campus
map and the bus schedule. No, I'm
NOT a freshman. I am a transfer
student. And I'm still a new, small
fish in a big, swampy pond.
I've been to college before. Hell,
I've actually graduated from college.
Starting at a school as big as UF,
though, is a totally new experience
for me. I feel like I have to start all
over. It seems like everyone knows


everyone else. People have things to
do after class. People know where
they're going. I do not.
I went to orientation. I listened to
the speeches (no open containers, no
kegs, there is a club that helps you
find other clubs you may want to
join, etc.). However, after we got our
little orientation bag and compli-
mentary pencil, we also got a polite
shove out the door.
UF has all of these cutesy little
handbooks and guides for fresh-
men, but transfer students kind of


Ashley Cruel get the short
end of the
Speaking Out end of the
Speaking stick. We are
new to UF,
but by now, most of us have figured
out how to navigate through college
and all that comes with it. But no one
tells you which bus you need to take
to get home. No one tells you how to
decline the 50 bajillion people hand-
ing out fliers on Turlington Plaza.
I wasn't told about the smoking
policy on campus, although, judg-
ing from how many people gave me


the stank-eye as I practically ate my
cancer sticks out of stress, smoking
is akin to eating small children.
This fall will be my second se-
mester here, and I still feel like a
new kid. I've moved 12 times in
my life, once to another continent.
When you're 6, you make friends
by marching up to someone on the
playground and boom: Before you
know it, you're trading stickers and
planning a sleepover. When you're
22, that doesn't fly.
There is nothing wrong with be-


ing a freshman we've all been one
somewhere. But I have two years
of college under my belt please
don't be condescending when I ask
where the nearest Starbucks is!
With the degrading stigma of be-
ing labeled "freshman," I'm debat-
ing whether or not to carry around
my AA diploma to flash like an ID
card. Or maybe I'll just suck it up
and tell myself that, one day, I'll stop
being the lost little new girl and start
giving directions myself.
Ashley Cruel is a journalism junior.


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8, ALLIGATOR U MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009


Groper promises to leave U.S. after serving jail time


* HE PROMISED TO RETURN TO IN-
DIA AFTER SERVING HIS SENTENCE.

By THOMAS STEWART
Alligator Staff Writer
tstewart@alligator.org

The UF graduate student charged with
groping dozens of women on campus while
pretending to remove bugs from their bodies
was sentenced to 180 days in jail earlier this
month.
Robin Garg, 23, also received three years
of probation and promised to return to India
when he is released. He was ordered to repay
the state about $3,500 in investigation costs


and about $1,600 in court costs.
Garg, who has been in jail since his arrest
on April 14, apologized before being sen-
tenced.
"I want to apologize for University of Flor-
ida and all the victims," he said in his soft-
spoken, emotional statement.
"I'm not a bad person," he said. "I did
something very bad, and I don't know why."
After being arrested earlier this year, Garg
admitted to police that he groped 33 women
on campus. Police later identified 31 women
who said they'd been groped by Garg and five
others who had been approached by him.
According to police, in each case Garg told
the women he wanted to help remove a bug


from their bodies. Garg told police he groped
them because he "liked to scare women."
Not all of the women filed complaints.
Under an agreement with the state, Garg
pleaded no contest to five cases of misde-
meanor battery. The state with-
Local held adjudication on one of
News those cases and agreed not to
file formal charges in the other
20 cases pending against him.
Garg was given credit for 116 days he had
spent in jail since his arrest. In addition, his
attorney, Geoffrey Mason, said the Alachua
County jail would likely shave 30 days off
his sentence for good behavior. If that is the
case, Garg could be released in the first week


of September.
Garg faced a maximum sentence of one
year in prison for each charge against him.
A psychological evaluation determined
Garg is not a threat to society, Mason said.
Though Garg, who is in the country on a
student visa, said he will head back to India
to finish school and be with his family after
his release, the court ordered he is to have no
contact with UF, Santa Fe College or any of
his victims.
After his release, Garg will be handed over
to U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforce-
ment, which could decide to deport him re-
gardless of his intentions to leave the country
on his own.


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MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009 U ALLIGATOR, 9


ON CAMPUS

Parking garage opens today, adds 927 new spaces

Editor's note: this article origi- spaces, only about two-thirds of served for visitor, delivery, ser- Complex includes green, orange, parking spaces, there's a 10 per-
nally appeared in the June 2 the 36,000 drivers who are issued vice and emergency vehicles, blue, carpool and gated zones. cent hike in decal costs.
edition of the Alligator. decals can park on campus at any "We will always have a sup- The complex serves as the According to UF's Transpor-


By LINDSEY DURANT
Alligator Contributing Writer


UF's new $15.5 million park-
ing complex opens its gates today
to UF students, faculty and staff.
While the 927-space garage
is available to all commuting
Gators, it should mostly relieve
parking for those who use the
Health Science Center, the Col-
lege of Veterinary Medicine and
the Office of Information Tech-
nology, which are all nearby.
"I'm not sure if the parking
problem will ever be relieved,"
said Scott Fox, director of Trans-
portation and Parking Services.
"But with the opening of the new
garage, a lot of spaces will be
added."
The Southwest Parking Ga-
rage Complex, located on the cor-
ner of Gale Lemerand Drive and
Mowry Road, has six stories and
contains the widest parking spots
on campus.
Its construction was intended
to bring the number of decals
issued closer to the number of
spaces available.
Because there are only 24,000


given time.
Of these spaces, 19,821 are ac-
cessible to students, faulty and
staff, while the remainder is re-


ply and demand challenge," Fox
said. "But the garage will certain-
ly help."
The Southwest Parking Garage


new home of UF's Transportation
and Parking Services, with 9,000
square feet of office space.
Along with the increase in


tation and Parking Services Web
site, a semester student commut-
er decal currently costs $67. An
annual decal is $134.

"I'm not sure if the park-
ing problem will ever be
relieved."
Scott Fox
director of Transportation and
Parking Services


UF Transportation and Park-
ing Services does not receive
funding from the university or
state and relies solely on decal
sales.
Because the university does
not restrict the number of decals
sold, fall's profit will likely cover
the total price tag of the project.
"We are not in the business of
turning a profit," Fox said. "We
are in the business of breaking
even."
The parking complex called for
a 12-month construction phase,
including six months in design.
"The project has been nothing
but successful," he said. "It is a
true win-win situation, especially
for students."


The new parking garage on Gale Lemerand Drive on Saturday night.





10, ALLIGATOR U MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009


man


Laof Noie At Th Unvrit fFlrd


UNIT


FACULTY


STAFF


Wanted


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UF to lay off 60
UF is laying off 60 employees, 46 as a direct result of bud-
get cuts and 14 as part of the reorganization of WUFT-FM.
UF announced in May that 58 employees would be laid
off as a result of cuts, but that number was reduced by 12
as colleges and other units reworked their plans. The extra
layoffs in the College of Journalism and Communications
four faculty and 10 staff were add-
ed when the college decided to revamp
WUFT-FM, opting to offer more news
programming instead of classical music.
The layoff numbers have changed
and could continue to change as UF finds
private funding to save some positions,
employees find other jobs at UF and oth-
Fussell ers decide to retire before they are laid
off, said Paula Fussell, UF's interim vice
president of Human Resource Services.
UF sent out official notices for most staff and some facul-
ty Wednesday, though they already knew they were being
laid off, Fussell said. UF's contracts call for a notice period
between the notification of the layoff and the employee's
last day of work. The notice period can be up to a year. UF's
2008-2009 budget plan called for 14 faculty and 118 staff lay-
offs. Eight faculty and 66 staff were laid off. Three faculty
were later reinstated, and two were laid off in their place.
THOMAS STEWART


CFO/F&A o 8
CLAS o 1
Journalism -WUFT 4 10
TOTAL ii 49


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Water, bus schedules, maps distributed to students


ASK ME, from page 1


self, is certainly beneficial to UF campus
life."
Campaign volunteers can be found
around various parts of UF, beneath ban-
ners and in orange T-shirts with an Ask Me
logo.
"The primary targets are new students
to campus, which include freshmen, trans-


fer students and new graduate students,"
said Sharon Blansett, assistant director of
housing for research and or-
On ganizational development at
Campus UF.
Not much has changed
since last year's program, Blansett said.
Sunday, staff and student leaders drove
around campus distributing bottled water
and meeting and greeting parents and stu-


dents.
Bottled water, campus maps and RTS
bus schedules will be distributed to stu-
dents as part of the Ask Me campaign to-
day and Tuesday, she said.
The campaign is part of the One Team
initiative a project bringing together
staff from across campus to provide fo-
cused and engaged customer service to all
students.


16,000 UF Students


of students reported no
drinki alcoiTnn^ Tthe
last 30 days.x~


For more information call 392-1 161 or visit us at
www.shcc.ufl.edu/gatorwel I

Produced by: University of Florida GatorWell Health Promotion Sevices


UF's performance slipped in financial
RANKING, from page 1 Regardless of the rankings, moving down the field," he
Orlando said, UF's goal con- said.
Report, said UF's rise in rank tinues to be to provide the best But according to Orlando,
was a very slight increase be- education possible. parents and students still pay
cause the data were compared "Rather than keeping our attention to the rankings.
to information from more than eyes on the scoreboard, we Kate Shoulders, a Ph.D.
250 schools. need to just play ball and keep candidate in agricultural edu-


resources
cation, said UF's high rank
was one of the reasons why
she came to the university.
"They seem like they strive
to keep the best programs and
to keep the best ranking," she
said.


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MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009 0 ALLIGATOR, 11


University of Florida






Student Tickets

are on Sale now for these performances!


Carrie Newcomer
Friday, September 11, 7:30 p.m.
Squitieri Studio Theatre
Sister Hazel
Friday, September 18, 7:30 p.m.
SPONSORED BY BEST WESTERN GATEWAY GRAND AND 98.5 KTK
DANCE
Choreography by Lucinda Childs
Tuesday, September 29, 7:30 p.m.
All performances above are at the Curtis M. Phillips Center
for the Performing Arts unless otherwise noted.


In the Heights Experience**
Sunday, October 25, 2 p.m.
SPONSORED BY WNBW-TV NBC9
Young Concert Artist:
Narek Hakhnazaryan, Cello
Monday, October 26, 7:30 p.m.
Squitieri Studio Theatre
Classic Albums Live:
Pink Floyd The Wall
Wednesday, October 28, 7:30 p.m.
SPONSORED BY THE INDEPENDENT FLORIDA ALLIGATOR AND ROCK 104


More student tickets go on sale October 5. Visit www.performingarts.ufl.edu for more information.


* Plus applicable sales tax (final purchase price $10.50).
**The In The Heights Experience is a special event. Final purchase price with tax for this event is $10.68.
In The Heights Experience tickets must be purchased at the Phillips Center Box Office by October 15.
*$10 student tickets are available at the Phillips Center Box Office and the University Box Office.
Each UF student may buy one student-priced ticket per event. Students must present their valid ID (must be valid at time of purchase
and the time of performance) to be sold a ticket. Tickets are limited and subject to availability.












Carrie Newcomer

Sister Hazel


University of Florida Performing Arts is supported in part by University of Florida Student Government.
Events, dates, times and programs are subject to change.
For more information, call the Phillips Center Box Office at 352-392-2787 or visit

www.performingarts.ufl.edu

UF UNIVERSITY of
UFFLORIDA


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12, ALLIGATOR U MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009


SANTA FE COLLEGE

Santa Fe Zoo adds


two new otter pups


nau ullu uulallullu/ -'lrI. uI oul.Ua
An Asian small-clawed otter pup reaches through its enclosure to touch the hand of otter trainer Emi Wil-
lows at the Santa Fe College Teaching Zoo on July 20. The pup is one of two born April 30 at the zoo.


Editor's note: This story was
originally published in the July
21 edition of the Alligator.
By MONICA VIGO
Alligator Contributing Writer

In a small den on the west side of
the Santa Fe College Teaching Zoo,
there are four Asian small-clawed
otters, two more than before.
First-time parents Jay and Lak-
ena welcomed two otter pups to the
zoo on April 30, but the pups did not
come out of their den until recently,
said Jonathan Miot, assistant direc-
tor of the Teaching Zoo.
The zoo waited until the otter
parents brought their pups out from
the den to publicize their arrival.
In the wild, Asian small-clawed
otters keep their young in a den un-
til they are able to open their eyes,
which can take six to eight weeks.
Miot said the Teaching Zoo


wanted to do the same for Jay and
Lakena.
Since being out of the den, the
parents have been teaching the pups
how to swim by dunking them in a
small pool in their cage.
Miot said the pups did not ap-
preciate the dunking at first but are
now getting used to the water.
The pups have not been named
because their gender isn't deter-
mined yet, said Emi Willows, a SFC
student who works at the zoo.
Miot said the zoo is very pleased
with the way the parents have been
raising the pups and do not want to
interfere to check their sex.
The best time to see the animals
is around 9 a.m. when the zoo opens
or when it is cloudy outside. They
like cooler weather, Miot said.
The Santa Fe College Teaching
Zoo, 3000 NW 83rd St., is open ev-
ery day from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. and
costs $4.


Florida officials buckle down on seat belt regulations


Editor's note: This story was originally
published in the June 30 edition of the
Alligator.
By ROBERTA 0. ROBERTS
Alligator Writer

Not wearing a seat belt has become more
dangerous to motorists or at least to their
wallets.
Police in the state of Florida can now pull


over drivers solely for not wearing their seat
belts, as the infraction has been bumped up to
a primary offense, which carries a $104 fine.
Previously a person could only get a ticket
for not wearing a seat belt if he or she were
already pulled over for another traffic viola-
tion. Now not wearing a seat belt is treated
as a primary offense, and a driver can also get
ticketed if the front-seat passenger is without
a seat belt.
"Now officers can take action then and


there instead of having to pull them over for
speeding or some other traffic violation first,"
said Lt. Tim Frith, Florida Highway Patrol
spokesman.
State "The whole intent of going
News from second to primary [offense]
is to save lives," Frith said.
The law will increase the number of seat
belt wearers, which will in turn increase the
number of crash survivors, he said.
According to the National Highway Traffic


Safety Administration, the law will save 124
lives, prevent 1,733 serious injuries and save
$408 million in associated costs each year.
Frith said death rates are higher in fatal
traffic accidents for people between 16 and 24
years old.
"We could impact that age group just by
changing the behavior of motorists, so they
know they have to buckle their seat belt," Frith
said. "[This law] will make it turn into second
nature."


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MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009 U ALLIGATOR, 13


ON CAMPUS

Thief nabs pricey book


Editor's note: This story was
originally published in the June 2
edition of the Alligator.
By ANDREW STANFILL
Alligator Staff Writer
asta nfill@alligato rorg
Six university police cars sat outside
Marston Science Library and at least six
officers searched the area for a suspected
criminal June 1.
The crime: book theft.
Maria Hicks, a food and resource
economics undergraduate, left her table
on the fourth floor to answer her cell
phone.
When she returned, a man at her ta-
ble was zipping his backpack up, but she
thought nothing of it, she said.
Then she noticed her $200 "Data
Analysis" book was missing.
She searched for the man with the


"I tried to chase him. He dis-
appeared so fast."
Maria Hicks
UF student

backpack, who she described as wearing
an orange UF Gators shirt.
"I tried to chase him," she said. "He
disappeared so fast."
UPD responded by searching the
area for people matching the thief's de-
scription. Officers searched the bags of
several people and questioned them
about the crime.
Hicks had borrowed the textbook
from a friend and will have to pay her
back, she said.
Pam Bonner, a UPD spokeswoman,
offered a moral to the story.
"Don't leave your stuff, take it with
you if you go somewhere," she said.


Officer cleared in shooting


Editor's note: This story was originally
published in the July 23 edition of the
Alligator.

The killing of a Gainesville man by an Ala-
chua County Sheriff's deputy was ruled justi-
fiable by a grand jury on July 21.
Nicholous Vertex Weeks, 18, was shot sev-
eral times by Lt. Mike Hanson on May 15 after
physical force and the use of a Taser gun did
not stop Weeks from attacking the deputy.
Hanson returned to work May 27 after he
was cleared by the ASO Office of Professional
Standards, ASO spokesman Art Forgey said.
Forgey said the Gainesville Police Depart-
ment is conducting the criminal investigation.
Its findings are not complete.
"Were glad it's over with," Forgey said.


"There is no real winner. Now we have to
pick up the pieces and move on."
At around 1 p.m. on May 15, GPD re-
ceived calls about a man and woman fight-
ing in a car at Northwest 34th Street and 39th
Avenue. Before GPD officers arrived, Hanson
pulled up and tried to stop the
Local fight.
News After being Tasered, Weeks
tried to grab the deputy's gun.
Hanson shot Weeks several times, killing
him, GPD spokesman Lt. Keith Kameg said.
From about 9:30 a.m. to about 3 p.m., the jury
listened to personal accounts of Hanson and
the testimonies of multiple witnesses, said
State Attorney Bill Cervone.
Cervone said the grand jury concluded
that Weeks' death was a justifiable homicide.
KATIE EMMETS


Psville


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14, ALLIGATOR 0 MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009


Study: Tanning poses big risk


A woman lies in a tanning booth in Anchorage, Alaska. International cancer
experts have moved tanning beds and other sources of ultraviolet radiation
into the top cancer risk category, deeming them as deadly as arsenic and
mustard gas.


Editor's note: This story was
originally published in the
Aug. 4 edition of the Alligator.
By SHAY BRODERICK
Alligator Writer

Marla McGill had a lot of plans
when she graduated from UF,
but getting skin cancer wasn't on
her list.
The Jacksonville native said
she loved the sunshine and went
to the tanning salon only a hand-
ful of times when she had free
passes, but when a small mole on
her stomach began to change col-
ors last October, she knew some-
thing was wrong.
A biopsy confirmed her fears
- McGill was diagnosed with
the early stages of skin cancer
at age 23 and the cancer was
safely removed.
She is one of more than 25 mil-
lion Americans that tan in salons.
On July 25, tanning beds were de-
termined tobe carcinogenic the
highest category of cancer risk.
According to the International
Agency for Research on Cancer,
which is part of the World Health
Organization, the risk of skin can-
cer increases by 75 percent if the
person uses a tanning bed before
the age of 30.
Based on older research, scien-
tists could only classify tanning
beds as possibly harmful, but af-
ter analyzing about 20 different
studies, researchers determined
that tanning beds pose a far great-
er risk than previously proven.
The research puts tanning
beds and other sources of ultra-


violet radiation in the same le-
thal group as tobacco, chimney
sweeping and the hepatitis B vi-
rus. International cancer experts
also recently deemed tanning
beds to be as dangerous as arse-
nic gas, according to an article on
MSNBC.com.
As of Aug. 17, nearly 34 per-
cent of the 1,909 people who re-
sponded to an MSNBC.com poll
indicated that they had never
used a tanning bed, and com-
menters called them "cancer
beds" that "should be illegal."
But as the use of tanning beds
has increased among people un-
der the age of 30, doctors have
also seen a rise
National in the number
News of young people
with skin cancer,
according to the article.
"The question is how students
will react to this study, or even if
they will react," said Mel Toran,
executive director for North Cen-
tral Florida's American Cancer
Society. "Our hope is that people
will finally recognize the danger
that tanning beds present and
take caution."
Toran insists there are no ad-
vantages to tanning beds, espe-
cially given the new research.
"The bottom line is simple,"
he said. "If the risk is skin cancer,
there is no benefit."
More than one million cases
of skin cancer, the most common
type of cancer, are diagnosed in
the United States each year, ac-
cording to the American Cancer
Society Web site, and the num-
ber of melanoma cases has risen


steadily in the last few years.
Taylor Tribou, a UF political
science junior, said the free tan-
ning offered by many companies
and apartment complexes makes
it convenient for young people.
Tribou lived at Royal Village
Apartments, which offers a free
tanning salon to residents.
She said that her decision to
live at Royal Village wasn't based
on the free tanning, but it was a
pleasant perk.
"I have fair skin, so I would
have had to pay for a tanning
membership somewhere else
anyway," she said.
"I saved money by signing my
lease there," she said. "I think it
was a smart idea on their part to
attract more residents."
Tribou estimated that she used
the tanning bed at her apartment
about 30 times during the year
and said she plans to continue
moderate use.
"I don't go every day, so I'm
not a tan-a-holic or anything,"
she said. "I just feel more con-
fident when I'm tan. I don't see
what the big deal is."
But McGill said her tanning
bed days are over.
She said she regrets going to
the tanning salon and not wear-
ing enough sunscreen when she
went outdoors. She wishes she
had listened to her parents' warn-
ings to be safe while in the sun.
"The urge to always be tan is
such a vanity thing," she said. "If
there's one thing I learned from
my experience, it's that my health
is more important than the color
of my skin."


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16, ALLIGATOR 0 MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009


RESEARCH

UF study: Brains superior to looks, self-confidence


Editor's note: This story was originally
published in the June 4 edition of the
Alligator.
By JESSICA CHAPMAN
Alligator Contributing Writer

It turns out those Jimmy Choos can't be
considered an investment.
A UF study shows intelligent people have
more economic success over a lifetime than
those who are attractive or self-confident.
"If you were somehow able to choose from
being smart, good-looking or self-confident,
our study shows that while you'd want all
three qualities, brains are the most important
to economic success," said Timothy Judge, the
UF management professor who conducted the


study along with graduate students Charlice
Hurst and Lauren Simon.
"Smart people do better in their careers be-
cause they are more likely to be educated and
are more confident in their abilities," he said.
Results of the study came from 191 men
and women, ages 25 to 75, who participated
in the National Midlife Development in the
United States study.
"You could be the most beautiful teacher,
but if you don't have classroom management
skills, then students aren't going to care," said
Nadene Francis, assistant director of public re-
lations for the UF Career Resource Center.
Intelligence standards for the study were
based on mental exercises and tests, and self-
confidence, which was the second-most im-
portant. Results were based on a 15-question


"Beauty is key because society
is based on looks. Pretty girls get
more [tips]."
Erika Equizi
The Swamp Restaurant manager

survey about a person's ability to handle situ-
ations.
Attractiveness was judged on personal
photos on a scale from one to seven. Although
beauty placed last against intelligence and
self-confidence, beauty's importance in the job
industry is still troubling, Judge said.
According to Judge, studies show that at-
tractive students tend to receive more instruc-
tion and attention from teachers and are pun-


ished less frequently, increasing their chances
of finishing high school and college.
"Beauty is key because society is based on
looks," said The Swamp Restaurant manager
Erika Equizi of the food industry. "Pretty girls
get more [tips]."
The results of the study, which were pub-
lished in the Journal of Applied Psychology,
emphasize the need for employers to be fair
when hiring, Judge said.
However, some employers feel neither
intelligence nor physical attraction matter as
much as personality and job skill.
"[Beauty's] not going to do you any good,"
said Lynne Vaughan, Reitz Union store direc-
tor, of working in retail. "[Intelligence] won't
do you any good either if you don't have the
personality."


'Wayne's World' star booked as Gator Growl comedian


Editor's note: This story was
originally published in the July 7
edition of the Alligator.
* STUDENT TICKETS: $15.

By THOMAS STEWART
Alligator Staff Writer
tstewart@alligator org

Dana Carvey, of "Wayne's
World" fame, will perform at the
Oct. 16 Gator Growl, organizers an-
nounced on July 6.
Carvey was the second most


popular comedian in the student
poll conducted by Gator Growl staff
earlier this year, said show spokes-
man Bryan Griffin. Jimmy Fallon got
the most votes.
Other comedians on the ballot
were Darrell Hammond and Dem-
etri Martin. The poll received about
500 responses.
Griffin said the staff wanted
Fallon, but his schedule didn't allow
for an October performance.
Matt Sloan, the show's producer,
said staff aimed for a bigger name.
He said with the football team's


success and an exceptional senior
class, the staff felt Carvey was worth
the extra money.
"We wanted to up our game be-
cause they upped their game," he
said, adding that he
On wasn't able to release
Campus Carvey's payment for
the show because it
hasn't been finalized yet.
He said in recent years the show
has alienated students.
"I feel like we've really lost a lot
of traction with the students, and
we're trying to get that back."


But it's tricky picking acts, he
said, because of the wide variety
of people who attend the show -
about 40,000 students, 15,000 locals
and 15,000 alumni and football fans
in town for the game the next day.
Carvey, a former "Saturday
Night Live" cast member, portrayed
Garth in the "Wayne's World" mov-
ies. His recent HBO special is called
"Squatting Monkeys Tell No Lies."
Some students surveyed on cam-
pus weren't familiar with Carvey,
but recent UF graduate Rob Castel-
lucci was excited to hear the news.


It's a "massive improvement"
over last year's comedian, he said.
"I think he's really funny com-
pared to a lot of the crap they usu-
ally bring in," he said.
Gator Growl organizers declined
to name the musical act.
The bands on the ballot includ-
ed Sugarland, ZZ Top, O.A.R. and
Third Eye Blind.
Tickets can be purchased by UF
students, faculty and staff for $15 at
gatorzone.com.
The general public can purchase
tickets for $25.


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MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009 U ALLIGATOR, 17


New stem cell procedure could reduce vision loss
Editor's note: This story was common cause of vision loss in the
originally published in the Aug. 4 country.
edition of the Alligator. "Macular degeneration usu-
By JESSICA CHAPMAN ally causes blindness," Grant said.
Alligator Writer "[This research] will someday re-
store vision.


The link between age and vision
loss may be a thing of the past.
New UF research suggests that
bone marrow stem cells can be pro-
grammed to repair damaged retinas
in people with a type of vision loss
called macular degeneration, which
causes worsened vision with age.
According to Maria Grant, se-
nior researcher for the project, the
researchers experimented on mice
and injected adult bone marrow
stem cells into the rodents' circula-
tory systems after modifying them
to act like retinal cells.
"It's a unique way to program
cells," Grant said. "UF's the first to
do it in this way."
The new procedure will target
diseases like macular degeneration,
the damage to a critical area of the
retina, and cardiovascular disor-
ders, such as atherosclerosis and
coronary artery disease.
Macular degeneration affects
almost two million people in the
United States, making it the most


Grant said she thinks the same
effect could be created by injecting
drugs into the cells instead of modi-
fying them in a culture.
The researchers found that they
could activate the stem cells by
mimicking the body's natural sig-
naling channels
U F with chemicals,
Research .
Research using drug ma-
nipulation rather
than genetic manipulation, Grant
explained.
Twenty-eight days after receiv-
ing the modified stem cells, the mice
with damaged retinas showed no
differences from the normal mice.
This suggests the same thing would
happen in humans because mice are
used as a common model for human
disease, Grant said.
Grant and UF have a pending
patent on their research, which was
developed over about four years,
and they hope to start clinical trials
for the procedure within the next
year, Grant said.


Courtesy of UF Health Science Center
Maria B. Grant, M.D., a professor of pharmacology and therapeutics at UF's College of Medicine, has
researched a way for stem cells to help repair damaged retinas.


ON CAMPUS

UF students will now pay cost of lost books, $35 fee


Editor's note: This story was originally
published in the July 23 edition of the
Alligator.
By THOMAS STEWART
Alligator Staff Writer
tstewart@alligator.org

If you've got any lost library books, now's
the time to find them.
After a new policy went into effect Aug. 17,
students may have less time after the due date


to return a book before UF charges them for
the cost of a replacement.
Lost books used to be replaced when li-
brarians get around to buying the new books,
library spokeswoman Barbara Hood said. So
some lost books aren't back on the shelf in a
timely manner, which prompted the change.
Under the new policy, the library will in-
stitute a fixed schedule for book replacement,
and as soon as the new book is ordered, the
one who checked out the book will be respon-
sible for its cost, she said.


Thenewpolicy states that
21 days after the due date,
the library will charge bor-
rowers a $35 processing fee
per item for general loans.
The next day, the replace-
ment item will be ordered,
and the borrower will be re-
sponsible for the cost of the
new item, in addition to the $35 fee.
The other late fees will remain largely the
same. For general loans, it will still cost 25 cents


per day after the due date until the maximum
overdue fine kicks in after 20 days. That fine,
however, will now be $5 as opposed to $10.
From July 1, 2008 to May 13, the library re-
ported 728 lost books at the Smathers Librar-
ies, which at the time didn't include the Health
Science Center or the law school libraries.
Those books had a combined cost of about
$50,000, Hood said.
During the last school year, UF students,
faculty and staff checked out almost 220,000
books, she said.





18, ALLIGATOR U MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009


No charges filed

against student
Editor's note: This story first appeared in the June 4
edition of the Alligator.
By THOMAS STEWART
Alligator Staff Writer
tstewart@alligator org
Charges were not filed against Sergio Castro, 22, the
UF student arrested May 26 for spray-painting a memo-
rial for a local resident outside of The Top restaurant in
downtown Gainesville.
Prosecutors who reviewed the case chose not to file
charges because it wasn't a typical case of graffiti vandal-
ism and because the owners of The Top wanted the felony
charge of criminal mischief dropped, said Spencer Mann,
spokesman for the State Attorney's office.
Castro was arrested after a Gainesville Po-
Local lice Department officer saw him spray-paint
News ing the words "RIP MUCH LOVE" in honor
of Barry Bernard, a Gainesville resident who
drowned in May near the Matanzas Inlet in St. Johns
County.
Castro sprayed "RIP MUCH" before his arrest.
"This is someone who was distraught over the loss of
a friend who wanted to put a memorial up," Mann said.
"Not to excuse it, but it helps us to better understand his
motivation."
Castro said he is relieved that the charges have been
dropped and thanked the owners of The Top for their le-
niency.
Overall, he said, the situation has been a positive one.
"The whole purpose behind me going out and doing
this was to bring attention to the cause," he said. Zachary Bennett/ Alligator
Recently, an unknown artist finished the memorial, Pedestrians walk by a graffiti tag and poster depicting Barry Bernard on the wall of The Top Restaurant on North
which now reads "RIP MUCH LOVE." Main Street. An unknown artists recently finished the memorial, which now reads "RIP MUCH LOVE."


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MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009 U ALLIGATOR, 19


Tebow Turtle auction to benefit charity for children


Jenna Ezell/ Alligator
A turtle statue modeled after UF quarterback Tim Tebow sits at a street corner two blocks from Jack-
sonville Municipal Stadium in Jacksonville, Fla., where the annual UF-Georgia game is played.


Editor's note: This story was
originally published in the July 2
edition of the Alligator.
By JENNA EZELL
Alligator Contributing Writer

Part football legend, part sea tur-
tle and a little bit of alligator, Tebow
Turtle marks territory claimed by
the Gators in last year's UF-Georgia
game.
The roughly 5-foot-tall, fiberglass
statue stands outside the Veterans
Memorial Arena, about two blocks
from Jacksonville Municipal Stadium,
where the Gators and Bulldogs fight
out their heated rivalry each fall.
It features Tim Tebow's signature
"Phil 4:13" under its eyes, which he
wore when the Gators rolled the Bull-
dogs 49-10 in 2008, and an alligator tail
to represent UF's mascot.
"We really just wanted to celebrate
Tim," said Bonnie Upright, the coor-
dinator for Turtle Trails, the organiza-
tion that placed the statue.
However, Tebow Turtle won't be
around to greet Gators fans in Octo-
ber.
"He will be gone before the Flori-
da-Georgia game, but if not, I would
probably move him anyway," Upright
said, fearing vandalism.
The statue is one of 24 turtles placed
around Jacksonville as part of Turtle
Trails, a fundraiser for Jacksonville
organization Child Guidance Center


that provides mental health services
to children and families.
In March 2008, individuals and
companies could sponsor a turtle for
$5,000. The cost paid for production
and artist fees, she said.
This October, Turtle Trails will auc-
tion off the statues. All proceeds will
go to the Child Guidance Center.
Several turtles did not receive spon-
sorships, Tebow Turtle among them.
But Upright decided to have one of
the extra turtles designed like Tebow
because she knew it would do well at
auction, she said.
Around Upright con-
Gainesville tacted the Tebow
family and made
sure that they were OK with the statue
before having it made.
Justin Rose, an artist from Macclen-
ny, Fla., was asked to design the turtle.
He accepted without hesitation.
"I admire Tebow because of the
kind of person that he is and the val-
ues that he has," Rose said.
To prepare for the project, Rose said
he read several versions of Tebow's
biography and referenced pictures of
the quarterback's cleats, alligator tails
and turtle faces.
He worked for 14 hours a day for
the first eight days and finished after
about a month. He estimated the proj-
ect took about 200 hours.
"When it was gone, it was almost
like trying to drop an addiction," he
said.


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20, ALLIGATOR U MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009


With two BCS
national football titles in l I
three years, it's unsurpris-
ing that Gainesville's greatest
sin is pride. But according to a research group, the sin
means the college town exhibits diverse debaucheries.
/a s g Geographers from Kansas State University mapped
the seven biblical sins county-by-county across the U.S., re-
vealing that Alachua is one of the most prideful counties in
Florida.
Pride, the deadliest sin according to some, is mapped by
combining the data from Envy, Wrath, Lust, Gluttony, Sloth
f and Greed, each of which is determined by a separate statistic,
or group of statistics. Researchers split each sin into five levels of
intensity, and when mapped, the darkest is the most sinful, said
Mitchel Stimers, co-author of the project.
In Alachua, Lust registered at the highest level of sinfulness, Envy,
Wrath and Sloth reached the second highest, Greed placed in the mid-
dle level and Gluttony finished at the second lowest level.
Consistently high rates of sin pushed Alachua into the top 14 most
prideful counties in Florida, even though it only ranked at the highest
level in one of the six substantiating sins, Stimers said.
Jacob Larson, associate pastor at Vineyard Church of Gainesville, was
surprised when he found out Alachua was high up on the scale of pride.
"I guess we have the Gator Nation here," Larson said. "And we're very
proud to be Gators."
However, it's worth having the pride that develops a sense of individual-
ism and pushes people to give back to humanity, he said.
"It's giving credit where credit is due," Larson said.
The dangerous part is when pride starts to dehumanize, he said.
"If you choose to love yourself more than anyone else you.... commit atroc-
ities to another person because you love yourself that much," he said. "The
self-love begins to kill you eventually."
Envy was tied to the number of thefts per capita.
Although the crime rate decreased in Alachua by 3.3 percent from 2007 to
2008, larceny has seen a slight increase in the same period, according to Art
Forgey, public information officer for Alachua County Sheriff's Office.
Some of the crime statistics can be blamed on the worsened economy be-
cause people often become desperate under financial stress, he said Alachua's
large student population might also explain some larceny cases, he said.
The start of the school year shows a noticeable increase in robberies. Scoot-
ers, cars and other personal belongings are often stolen from students.
"Many students tend to leave their cars and apartments unlocked," he
said. "For most of them it's their first time on their own."
Wrath was plotted by the number of violent crimes per capita.
Cities tend to have higher crime rates. But demographics and popula-
tion size are very important when comparing data among counties, ac-
cording to Steve Maynard,
1 Alachua County Sheriff's
Office spokesman.


"It's
a very tough
question," he
said. "In compari-
son with huge counties
like Broward our crime rate is
probably relatively low."
He doesn't believe UF con-
tributes to the number of violent
crimes. Common crimes, such as
bike theft and underage alcohol
consumption, are more preva-
lent among students, he said.
The number of violent offens-
es in Alachua, which include
rape, assault, threats and stalk-
ing, increased by 6.2 percent
between 2007 and 2008, accord-
ing to the Uniform Crime Report
Domestic Violence Data for Alachua
County. Stalking and threats made a
large part of the increase.
For Lust, researchers used the number
of sexually transmitted diseases per capita.
One reason for Alachua's high rate of STDs
could be the younger population, according to
George Gibbs, regional program manager for the
Alachua County Health Department.
The most common sexually transmitted diseases
in Alachua are gonorrhea and Chlamydia, which are
largely carried by people between 15 and 24 year old.
Gluttony was determined by fast food restaurants per
capita. Alachua's low score on the Gluttony scale could be be-
cause Gainesville is one of the 25 most educated cities in U.S.,
according to Roland Loog, director of Visit Gainesville, which
provides visitor information. Knowledge generally leads to higher income,
and Loog believes educated populations shop for healthier food, he said.
Greed was measured by comparing the ratio between average income
per capita and the number of individuals below poverty line. A higher
ratio meant there is greater separation between social classes.
Stimers has received some criticism over his team's choice of sta-
tistics, particularly those tied to Gluttony and Sloth.
Originally, as shown in the maps, Sloth was determined by a com-
parison of money spent on arts, entertainment and recreation against
unemployment rates.
Under pressure to have the presentation ready for a geographers'
conference in mid-March, the research team had to choose data that
not only represented the sin but also was available for analysis,
Stimers said.
"You can think of an idea theoretically, but then you have
to get the scientific data for it," he said. "It's art as much
as science."
Stimers said the data is in the process of re-
evaluation with a focus on Gluttony and Sloth
because their distributions didn't show a
clear pattern on the maps. Gluttony will
be re-plotted with child obesity rates
and Sloth will be updated with
more detailed information on
expenditures from the U.S.
Census Bureau's 2007 r
Economic Census.


Maps courtesy of Mitchel Stimers, Department of Geography, Kansas State University


th(v






MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009 U ALLIGATOR, 21


ON CAMPUS


UF allots $5M for construction of business center


Editor's note: This story was
originally published in the July
28 edition of the Alligator.
By SHAY BRODERICK
Alligator Writer

Most of Shands at UF's incu-
bators are occupied by newborns,
but thanks to an $8.2 million
grant, UF is building a different
kind of incubator.
The grant for the Florida In-
novation Hub, a business center
for startup companies, was an-
nounced July 24 along with plans
for building the 45,000-square-
foot facility, according to a UF
press release.
Scheduled for completion in
December 2011, the building will
provide office space, laboratories
and conference rooms for several
budding technological businesses
and companies connected to the
UF community.
Ed Poppell, UF's vice president
of business affairs, said that as
soon as the planning is finished,
workers will begin construction
on the facility, hopefully within
the next six months.
The building will be construct-
ed on what is now a parking lot
on the northeast corner of Shands
at AGH site, Poppell said.
The facility will also house


UF's Office of Technology Licens-
ing and UF Tech Connect, whose
job is to find technology from re-
search that is patentable and then
promote the licensing of these
technologies to the market.
Win Phillips, UF's vice presi-
dent for research, said that UF
developed the idea of a new incu-
bator after seeing the success of


a similar hub in Alachua County,
which opened in 1995.
He said that various business
sectors will use the facility, in-
cluding chemistry, agricultural
and engineering fields.
Phillips said the hub will pro-
vide constant communication
between people who license tech-
nology and the ability to share re-


sources with other companies in
the building to save money.
"There is no question that a
company's ability to succeed is
far greater in an incubator," he
said.
The federal Economic Devel-
opment Administration awarded
the grant, which is one of the
largest of its kind ever awarded


Courtesy of UF
A sketch of the future Florida Innovation Hub at UF, a new incubator that is scheduled to be completed
in December 2011. An incubator provides space and resources for startup businesses.


by the EDA's Atlanta regional
office, said EDA regional repre-
sentative Philip T. Trader in the
press release.
"There is no question that
a company's ability to suc-
ceed is far greater in an
incubator."
Win Phillips
UF's vice president for research

UF will contribute an addi-
tional $5 million in support of the
project and will obtain this mon-
ey mainly through past royalty
incomes, such as from faculty re-
search, Phillips said.
"We expect it to be extremely
successful," he said.
Katie Haney, a health educa-
tion and behavior senior, agrees
with Phillips and said she thinks
the hub is going to continue to
improve the UF business com-
munity.
She is also optimistic about the
new jobs that these future com-
panies will create for Gainesville
residents, she said.
"As a soon-to-be graduate,
I think it's a great idea," Haney
said. "It's something that is going
to make Gainesville an even bet-
ter place to live."


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22, ALLIGATOR 0 MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009


NATIONAL

UF dethroned from No. 1 party school spot


Editor's note: This story was
originally published in the July
28 edition of the Alligator.
By THOMAS STEWART
Alligator Staff Writer
tstewart@alligator org

UF's yearlong reign as the top
party school in the nation ended
abruptly at noon on July 27, when
it was announced that Penn State
University had taken the infamous
title.
UF slipped to No. 2 on the list,
published each year by the Princ-
eton Review in its college guide,
"The Best 371 Colleges."
The ranking means UF has high
levels of drug and alcohol use, a
popular Greek system and students
who don't spend much time study-
ing, according to survey results from
122,000 students at 371 colleges.
If UF had retained its No. 1 po-
sition, it would have been the first
school to do so since 1995, when the
University of Rhode Island com-
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spot, according to Robert Franek,
the author of the college guide.
Steve Orlando, UF's spokesman,
said he was relieved UF had been
dethroned.
"People who do what I do at uni-
versities dread this announcement
coming out," he said.
One reason UF may have slipped
to the second spot this year is that
students weren't treated to as many
championships, he said.
When the last rankings came
out, UF had just won three national
championships two in men's bas-
ketball and one in football.
"We figure people had a lot to
celebrate," Orlando said.
It's also possible UF President
Bernie Machen's attempts to curb
alcohol consumption have had an
effect on UF's reputation, but it's
hard to tell, Orlando said.
"This is anything but a scientific
survey," he said.
Machen, who is in Indonesia
meeting with university leaders,
could not be reached for comment.
In addition to three other No. 2


finishes, UF placed first in one of
the survey's 62 categories: Best Ca-
reer Services. The ranking means
students rated UF's job placement
services highly.
UF was ranked No. 13 in Best
Career Services last year, the first
year the ranking was used.
Wayne Wallace, director of UF's
Career Resource Center, said he
thinks his staff and the center's use
of student surveys have a lot to do
with the level of satisfaction.
"I think that being responsive to
student interests and needs has re-
ally been the key," he said.
And, he said, 99 of the 100 com-
panies Fortune Magazine listed as
the best ones to work for this year
conduct recruitment at UF.
UF's other No. 2 finishes were in
the categories Best Athletic Facili-
ties, Students Pack the Stands and
Jock Schools, which measured pop-
ularity of sports and fraternities.
Last year, UF finished first in
Students Pack the Stadiums and
Students Study the Least.
This year, UF dropped to eighth


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among schools that study the least.
Students had mixed feelings
about UF's drop in the ranking.
Nicole Frankel, a music and pre-
health sophomore, said she was
glad UF was no longer No. 1.
"I think [being No. 1] has kind
of a negative connotation," Frankel
said. "The university is taken a little
less seriously."
But freshman Alex Patel said she
didn't believe Penn State was a big-
ger party school than UF.
"I don't think it's true. I get texts
about parties every night," Patel
said. "They must be partying a lot,
like severely," she said.
Jake Marika, a sociology sopho-
more, said he doesn't think the
ranking means much.
"Whoever says they party the
most parties the most," he said. "It's
bound to change every year."
However, he said, the ranking
might make Machen focus less on
student drinking.
"Maybe it's a good thing," he
said, "because Bernie will be less
likely to get his panties in a bunch."


UF Rankings
Best Career Services #1
Best Athletic Facilities #2
Jock Schools #2
Students Pack Stadiums #2
Lots of Beer #4
Best College Newspaper #8
Students Study the Least #8
Dorms Like Dungeons -#11
Frat and Sorority Scene #12
Lots of Hard Liquor #18
Professors Get Low
Marks #20

Top 10 Party Schools
1. Penn State University
2. University of Florida
3. University of Mississippi
4. University of Georgia
5. Ohio University
6. West Virginia University
7. University of Texas at Austin
8. University of Wisconsin -
Madison
9. Florida State University
10. University of California -
Santa Barbara


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MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009 0 ALLIGATOR, 23


UF student fired for plagiarism at Colo. internship


She stole excerpts from New York Times articles


Editor's note: This is a combination of
stories originally published in the July 9,
14 and 16 editions of the Alligator.
STAFF REPORT

After plagiarizing passages from The
New York Times in four of her news stories,
a UF student was fired July 7 from her in-
ternship at The Colorado Springs Gazette.
Rising junior Hailey Mac Arthur former-
ly wrote for The Independent Florida Alli-
gator and interned at The Gainesville Sun.
Journalism and Communications Dean
John Wright said journalism students are
repeatedly warned against plagiarism.
"For the life of me, I don't see how this
kind of thing could happen in this day and
age," he said. "Even if the person felt com-
pelled to do something so dishonest... I'm
totally baffled."
News of the firing reached blogs and The
Associated Press stories by the evening of
July 7. Some journalism professors received
e-mails about the incident July 8, prompting
them to quickly and firmly announce the


college's stance against plagiarism in class-
es and on Facebook, Twitter and blogs.
That afternoon, Wright's Facebook status
read, "One thing is certain. Plagiarism will
not be tolerated at the College of Journalism
and Communications."
Meredith Cochie, adjunct lecturer at the
journalism college, discussed the issue in
her class and posted it on the class blog so
students could discuss it.
Wright said that all colleges fight student
plagiarism on school work, but this is the
first time since Wright became dean a year
and a half ago that a UF student has been
exposed for something of this magnitude.
Professor and journalism department
chair William McKeen said he takes plagia-
rism as a "personal insult" and that plagia-
rism by a student causes concern over the
value of a degree from the college.
After discovering the plagiarized pas-
sages, The Colorado Springs Gazette issued
a public apology on the paper's Web site,
with links to the plagiarized Times passag-
es. Links to Mac Arthur's offending stories
were removed from the site.


Editor Jeff Thomas said the newsroom
got a tip Tuesday morning that a passage in
Mac Arthur's story had been published in
the Times only a week before.
"It does not take a lot of sleuthing on
the part of anybody to follow up on a tip
and find out whether something has been
borrowed from The New York Times," he
said.
Mac Arthur was unpaid, but she interned
for college credit, he said.
"I wouldn't presume
Academics to tell the school how to
resolve this one way or
another," he said. "I cer-
tainly have to believe that the university
doesn't tolerate plagiarism. Whether that
same standard applies to an internship set-
ting, I don't know."
One of the stories Mac Arthur plagia-
rized was a man's first-person account of
the death of his daughter.
Overwhelmed with his daughter's death,
George Goens said he took eight months to
write the story of why his grandson Luke
and granddaughter Claire will grow up


without a mother.
Goens said he would like to speak to Mac
Arthur and understands the consequences
she could face.
"I'm not interested in any kind of retri-
bution or punishment," he said. "I just want
the person to own up to the mistake they've
made and make better decisions in the fu-
ture."
Having written two books on the educa-
tion system, Goens has his opinions on how
students are taught to learn.
"I think our whole society has to take a
look at how we rush kids and take shortcuts
to get test scores," he said. "A well-educat-
ed person has a sense of principle and eth-
ics, around which they make decisions so
they can live a good life."
Mac Arthur met with officials from the
College of Journalism and Communications
July 15.
McKeen, along with journalism master
lecturer Mike Foley, attended the meeting
with Mac Arthur, but UF's privacy laws
mean the information about Mac Arthur's
future won't be released.
"I really can't say anything other than
the matter is being resolved," McKeen said.


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Delays to


last into


Fall 2011

Editor's note: This story was
originally published in the July
16 edition of the Alligator.
BY LINDSEY DURANT
Alligator Contributing Writer
Drivers can expect traffic delays
across central Gainesville to end no
earlier than September 2011.
Road and sidewalk resurfacing
that began in June on Northwest
and Southwest 13th Street will start
on Main Street on Sept. 1 and Uni-
versity Avenue on Jan. 1.
According to the Florida De-
partment of Transportation spokes-
woman Laurie Windham, Main
Street will be permanently reduced
from four lanes to two in the one-
mile stretch between North Eighth
Avenue and North 23rd Avenue, in-
creasing downtown public parking.
The construction will cost at least
$13 million and will be funded by
state taxes, requiring an estimated
8,640 hours of labor, she said.
During resurfacing, asphalt on
the roadway is replaced and dam-
aged sidewalks are repaired, she
said. While sidewalk repairs require
minimal lane closures and can be
completed during the day, road re-
paving can cause major delays.
Nighttime paving for the 13th
Street phase, which spans four miles
from Southwest Ar-
cher Road to North-
Local west Sixth Avenue,
News began Aug. 1 and
could continue for up
to three months, according to an
FDOT press release.
While 13th Street and University
Avenue will each take six months to
complete, the Main Street renewal is
a two-year project, Windham said.
Windham said despite weather
delays, work on 13th Street is still
expected to end in December.
State standards call for routine
road resurfacing, said Regina Hawk-
ins, a public education specialist for
the city of Gainesville.
New criteria call for the instal-
lation of detector devices on curbs
for the visually impaired and wider
ramps for those in wheelchairs. Bi-
cycle lanes will be added to all three
roads.
"It has been on the drawing board
for a long time," Windham said. "It
was definitely [the roads'] turn."
Businesses with driveways lead-
ing onto 13th Street said they have
not been affected by the road work.
"I can't really say that we have
been hurt at all by it," said Ryan
Levine, guest service manager of the
Holiday Inn University Center.
The pockets of those caught
speeding in the areas, however, will
be take a hit state law allows for
a 200 percent fine increase in active
construction zones.
V.E. Whitehurst & Sons Inc., of
Williston, was contracted for the
13th Street resurfacing for $3.9 mil-
lion.
The other two projects are still
being bid on by independent con-
tractors, Windham said.


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MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009 U ALLIGATOR, 25


LOCAL

Shands CEO discusses closure


UF cashier stops


accepting cash

Editor's note: This story was originally published in the
June 11 edition of the Alligator.
By THOMAS STEWART
Alligator Staff Writer

UF students are no longer able to pay for classes and other
university expenses with cash or debit cards or make over-the-
counter payments to the University Cashier at Criser Hall. The
change was enacted on June 12.
However, the change won't affect most students, as about
73 percent of payments are handled electronically, UF spokes-
man Steve Orlando wrote in an e-mail.
UF expects to save $85,000 a year by eliminating the over-
the-counter option, Orlando said.
Other payment options, like online credit card transactions
and e-checks, will remain available.
On Payments can also be made by dropping
Campus checks in a 24-hour drop box outside the Univer-
sity Cashier's office or by mailing checks to UF.
The most popular payment method is the online e-check,
which is free, he said.
UF will still charge a fee for online credit card transactions,
and Visa cards will still not be accepted because the company
charges a flat rate for transactions, as opposed to a percentage,
he said.
UF prefers to pay a percentage fee because of the wide vari-
ety in payment sizes, Orlando said.
Most of the remaining 27 percent of students who pay
through the University Cashier pay with checks.
University departments that send their deposits to the ca-
shier will not be affected by the new policy, according to a
memo sent to administrators on June 9.


Editor's note: This story was originally published in
the July 16 edition of the Alligator.
By LAUREN BAKER
Alligator Writer
Ibaker@alligator.org

After a marked absence from a May meeting to
address the closure of Shands at AGH, Shands CEO
Timothy Goldfarb announced a number of effects
of the closing on Shands at UF at a public meeting
July 15.
Goldfarb, who oversaw the closing, said Shands
at UF will be equipped to take on extra patients
when it opens a new emergency department and
Shands Cancer Center on Nov. 1.
Goldfarb said none of programs or employees
from Shands AGH would be cut by the closure,
adding that only 52 of the 1150 AGH employees
have not yet been placed.
Still, Goldfarb was unsure what presence AGH's
programs for heart rehabilitation and wound-care
would have at Shands at UF, but parts of the pro-
gram would likely appear, he said.
Starting Nov. 1, Shands will offer 92 more pa-
tient beds than they have currently, though a less-
ened obstetric capacity may mean delivering moth-
ers will be two to a room.
"It will fit. It doesn't mean it will be comfort-
able," Goldfarb said.
North Florida Regional Medical Center mean-
while is also prepared for more patients, while the
Alachua County Public Health Department plans to
extend its hours and services.
Jean Munden, Alachua County Health Depart-
ment administrator, said increasing the depart-
ment's operations would depend on whether or not
it receives the $750,000 from low-income pool state


funding, for which it has qualified and expects to
receive next week.
The department expects to take on many of the
low-income patients without health care, who can
no longer depend on Shands at AGH.
Shands at UF has also taken steps to provide for
patients without health insurance by partnering
with Solantic to open an urgent care center, Gold-
farb said.
The center is scheduled to open in September.
Still, some doubted Shands at UF's ability to
treat veterans and those lacking
heath care.
"Solantic is not a cheap, afford-
able option to health care," said
one Gainesville resident at the
meeting, a veteran, who stressed
the need for a plan that serves the
majority of the community.
DonovaOthers said the cultural transi-
tion would be huge for AGH patients.
"We already know that services to the low-in-
come are very poor," said Commissioner Jack Don-
ovan, who spoke of a "population left behind."
Goldfarb said tough economic times and finan-
cial losses made closing AGH the best solution,
estimating the shut down would save about $79.2
million during the next seven years.
"As a last resort when we looked at those storm
clouds, we said, you know, we have to close AGH,"
he said. "The decision, obviously, was a difficult
one."
Vice President of University Relations Jane Ad-
ams said after the institution is dismantled, UF
plans to convert the property into a tech-transfer
development complex, a facility used to bring UF's
research to the marketplace.






26, ALLIGATOR U MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009


Group protests St. Francis House 130-meal limit


narrlson ulamona / ailgaior aar
Gainesville resident Corey Williams speaks at a protest outside City Hall. Protesters marched from the
St. Francis House homeless shelter to voice their opposition to an ordnance that limits the number of
meals a shelter can serve to the homeless.


Editor's note: This story was
originally published in the July
30 edition of the Alligator.
By ROBERTA 0. ROBERTS
Alligator Writer

James Chamberlain decided to
protest the 130-meal limit at St.
Francis House when he heard the
story of a pregnant woman who
was turned away from a meal. She
was the 131st person of the day, he
said.
"Based on moral, ethical stan-
dards alone, if she's pregnant and
hungry, let her eat," said Cham-
berlain, from Catholic Action Re-
source Exchange, the organization
that put the march together.
About 30 to 50 people marched
from St. Francis House and ended
at the steps of City Hall, where
protesters spoke out against the
limits July 28.
The 130-meal limit is enforced
by the city because St. Francis
House set a 130 limit when they
initially applied to obtain a spe-
cial-use permit allowing them
to serve more than 20 meals a
day, said Bob Woods, Gainesville
spokesman.
Religious organizations such
as St. Francis House can serve no


more than 20 meals without a spe-
cial-use permit.
County Commissioner Rodney
Long has spoken against the re-
striction, and Mayor Pegeen Han-
rahan has advocated a temporary
lifting of the limits, Chamberlain
said.
Long and Hanrahan did not
return phone calls in time for pub-
lication.
Kent Vant, executive direc-
tor of St. Francis House, said the
special-use permit
Local is renewed every
News five years by the city
planning board.
When renewing the permit ear-
lier this year, Vant asked about
removing the limit or increasing
the limit.
The planning board told him
that only City Commission has the
authority to change the permit's
limit, he said.
The city planning board can
only renew it.
Chamberlain is confident that
his cause will succeed.
"It's not a matter of if it's lift-
ed," he said.
"It's a matter of when, and we
believe that with our collective
voice it will be sooner rather than
later."


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28, ALLIGATOR U MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009

UF ACADEMICS

First female


engineering


dean selected

Editor's note: This story was originally published
in the July 7 edition of the Alligator.
By THOMAS STEWART
Alligator Staff Writer
tstewart@a Iligator org

The College of Engineering announced a new
dean on July 6 the first female dean in the college's
history.
And it's just in time as the 2009-2010 academic
year marks the college's 100-year anniversary.
Cammy Abernathy, who has been at UF since
1993, took over on July 17, replacing Pramod Khar-
gonekar, who just finished his eighth year as dean.
Khargonekar announced his resignation in late
2007. However, due to budget uncertainties, the
search process was cut short in
March of 2008 and resumed in Jan-
uary.
"It's not really about me," Ab-
ernathy said of her selection as
the first female dean in a UF news
release. "It's a sign of where engi-
neering has to go in the future."
Abernathy "We have to change the way
engineering is perceived, and we
have to change the way it is introduced to potential
students. This is especially important because engi-
neering and educating the next generation of engi-
neers is so critical to our country today."
Abernathy attended Massachusetts Institute of
Technology as an undergraduate and earned her
master's and doctorate degrees at Stanford Univer-
sity.
She has also worked for AT&T Bell Laboratories,
according to a memo sent to administrators on July
6.
She is currently the associate dean for the Office
of Academic Affairs and a professor of materials sci-
ence in the engineering college.
Her husband, Steve Pearton, is a UF distinguished
professor of materials science and engineering.
Abernathy could not be reached for salary infor-
mation, but Khargonekar's salary is listed as about
$302,000. Abernathy currently earns about $233,000,
according to UF's Web site.
Khargonekar said he plans to continue teaching
and researching in the electrical and computer engi-
neering department after he resigns.


Heavy Lifting
A crane lifts the final section of the new high-resolution Daktronics LED video board into position in the South
end zone board in Ben Hill Griffin Stadium on July 3. The board bookends the smaller one put in place in the
North end zone during the first half of the summer.




Booting begins in Midtown bar area


Editor's note: This story was originally
published in the May 26 edition of
the Alligator.
By ABBIE PARKER
Alligator Contributing Writer

Tow truck drivers in Midtown now
have the option to boot or tow illegally
parked cars.
Changes in the towing policy at the
UF Plaza, 1702 W University Ave., have
frustrated some merchants in the area, but
others said that booting is better for driv-
ers.
Parking Solutions, the company that
patrols the lot, began booting in April.
Kevin Witesides, owner of Parking
Solutions, said booting is less expensive
than towing but still acts as deterrent. The
booting fine is $60 versus the $76 towing


fine.
Booting also reduces the chances of
damaging the vehicle, a problem that can
happen while towing, Witesides said.
Drivers with towed cars can receive up
to $300 in fines. Beyond the initial charge,
a towing bill can include a storage fee,
lean fee and administration fees and taxes.
Booting incurs no extra
Around fees, he said.
Gainesville "Nine out of 10
people would rather
be booted than towed," he said. "In the
beginning no one wants either, but when
they think about not having to get a ride to
the towing company to get their car, and it
saves them time and money, they always
agree booting is the better option."
Mike Cook, manager of I Love N.Y.
Pizza, feels that booting will do a better
job of getting the message across, he said.


However, some employees in the area
see downsides to the policy.
Geyzer Salgado, manager of Fritanga
Latin Grill, opposes booting. Parking So-
lutions takes business away when booted
cars are left in the lot, he said.
The company doesn't notify people
when they are illegally parked. The car
can sit there for two to four hours and pos-
sibly turn away customers, Salgado said.
Filup Molina, manager of How I Got
An A, thinks people don't know where to
park when visiting Midtown businesses.
"It's a bad way to treat customers who
do want to come to our business," he
said.
Ultimately, Witesides feels that he is
doing college students a favor, he said.
"If you can get away with a cheaper
deterrent then why not help the kids out
a little bit," Witesides said.






MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009 U ALLIGATOR, 29


SPECIAL REPORT

UF researcher studies growth rates of alligators


Editor's note: This story was originally
published in the July 7 edition of the Al-
ligator.
By ALEXANDRA LAYOS
Alligator Writer

Growing up in Tampa, Ph.D. candidate
Ashley Boggs enjoyed Florida's wildlife and
often played with lizards and turtles.
However, graduating to alligators didn't
cross her mind until later, she said.
"I never thought about the bigger animals
like alligators," Boggs said. "Other than ca-
noeing down the Hillsborough River as a kid,
I never really ran into them."
Boggs now studies alligator growth at the
Guillette Lab at UF to assess the effect of toxins
on the animals in the wild.
As an undergraduate zoology student,
Boggs volunteered in the lab where she was
paired with a graduate mentor, a position she
now holds.
The eggs used in her study were collected
from Lake Woodruff, a relatively clean site,
Lake Apopka, which is considered a contami-
nated area, and their test site, near Kennedy
Space Center in Cape Canaveral.
"Everything that the embryo needs to de-
velop is packed into the egg by the mother,"
Boggs said. "We wanted to see if the mother
was putting anything into the egg that might
be harmful."
Boggs is curious to see what effects the
space center may have on the alligators.
"[Cape Canaveral] is still fairly wild, and
there's a decent sized alligator population out
there. We've been looking at chemicals like
flame retardants, heavy metals and perchlo-
rate, which makes up a large part of rocket
fuel," Boggs said.
Boggs said some of these chemicals can
reduce the production of thyroid hormone,
which alters metabolism and development.


High levels of perchlorate have not been
detected in the area. It has a very hot, intense
bum, and most of it may bum up during
launches, with little escaping into the environ-
ment when the shuttle takes off, Boggs said.
However, perchlorate may enter nearby
waterways at other points on the space center.
"We're very interested in the areas where
they're washing the shuttles down afterwards
or maybe where they're loading or unloading
the fuel and there might be some sort of spill-
age there," Boggs said.
Once the eggs were collected, Boggs' job
was to make sure that all of the eggs, and the
alligators hatching from them, experienced the
exact same conditions.
The more than 250 alligators being studied
live in greenhouses on the rooftops of Bartram
and Carr halls. All reptiles are packed in about
six tubs, which resemble the natural crowding
behavior of young alligators in the wild.
Boggs records each alligator's length every
two weeks, first measuring from snout to tail
and again without the tail.
"This is more indicative of their actual
length because tail size can vary," Boggs said.
Finally Boggs takes the weight and mea-
sures the tail girth; the size of the tail girth is
generally an indication of health.
"There is a wide difference in the growth
rates of these animals. Whether or not it's sig-
nificant from lake to lake, we don't know yet.
But just visually we know that some animals
aren't doing as well as others," Boggs said.
The alligators are almost 1 year old, and the
largest are around two feet. The smallest are
less than half that size.
To prevent bias in the study, Boggs is in-
tentionally unaware of the origins of any par-
ticular alligator. However, each alligator was
fitted with an electronic chip so that data can
be stored on a computer system.
When the study is complete, she will look at
the computer and be able to match the groups


Andrew Stanfill / Alligator Staff
An almost year-old alligator looks up from a pen on the roof Bartram Hall where UF biologists
are studying whether alligators' differing growth rates are due to their home environments.


of alligators with their original home.
Alligators were chosen as the subject of this
study because they are a "sentinel species."
"They can tell us things about the environ-
ment. They're kind of like our watchdogs,"
Boggs said.
Because alligators are aquatic, any toxins in
the water will end up in them. Additionally,
alligators eat a lot of fish, which increases their
exposure to contaminants.
The irony of a UF Gator working with al-
ligators has not been lost on Boggs.
"It's a joke that I have to deal with a lot,"
she said. Two of the most important things
that Boggs has learned while studying alliga-


tors are confidence and respect.
"You can't hesitate and be scared when
you're out there trying to catch an alligator,"
she said.
On the other hand, they command respect.
"You just have to understand that this is
a powerful animal and even though you get
used to handling them, they're still wild,"
Boggs said.
But Boggs sees her work extending beyond
alligators.
"What we do to the environment, we're
doing to ourselves as well. There's not a sepa-
ration between the two; we are a part of our
environment," Boggs said.


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30, ALLIGATOR U MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009


ON CAMPUS


'Water Sculpture' scrapped after $40K in vandalism


Editor's note: This story was originally
published in the June 30 edition of the
Alligator.
By STEVE JOHNSON
Alligator Writer

There will no longer be a quiet oasis
outside the University Galleries on the
east side of UF's campus.
After a 34-year stint, "Water Sculpture"
has been removed due to vandalism, and
the sounds of water trickling down the
massive metal sculpture will be replaced
with a planter.
"We're all very sad it was vandalized to
the extent that required us to remove it,"
said Denise Krigbaum, UF College of Fine
Arts Communications Coordinator. "I do
feel the sculpture was a symbol of the col-
lege and the university."
The sculpture was removed after van-
dals damaged the piping inside the foun-
tain that allowed water to flow over the
sculpture.
"It wasn't the university's fault for tak-
ing it down," she said. "It was the person
who vandalized it."
Commissioned in 1975 and created by
Jeoffrey Naylor, a former UF sculpture
professor, the stainless steel structure ini-
tially cost $20,000.
It was paid for by grants from art en-
dowments, UF student government and
the University Budget Commission, Krig-
baum said.
Thirty-four years later, more than three


times its expected lifespan, the Physical
Plant Department was asked by the Col-
lege of Fine Arts to remove the fountain.
"It was expensive to maintain because
there were a lot of pranks done involv-


ing the sculpture," Krigbaum said. It's
understood that its lifetime is made to be
limited."
Over the years, UF fine arts students
have been known to contribute to the


Harrison Diamond/ Alligator Staff
The fountain "Water Sculpture" near the University Galleries was removed over the
summer pranks and vandalism made the costs of repairs too high. One incident caus-
ing damage to the fountain was when participants in the Sept. 13, 2008 Underwear
Run jumped into the fountain and beat on the metal with their hands (pictured).


sculpture by adding soap or Jello as a right
of passage.
"I think that it has been well loved over
the years," she said. "Some of that love
took its toll."
Two main obstacles stood in the way of
repairing the sculpture: cost and artistic
integrity.
It would cost an estimated $40,000 to re-
pair the fountain, according to Krigbaum,
a number which upset some students at
UF.
"Dumping money into fixing the foun-
tain is not worth it," said Ashley Neu-
kamm, a senior fine arts major. "I'd rather
have my faculty be there on call when I
need them instead of pouring money into
the maintenance for the fountain."
The 24-foot-wide, 8-foot-tall sculpture
is now in storage and will be recycled by
the Physical Plant Department.
"Even if we could repair it, there are
ethics involved when an artist creates a
piece," Krigbaum said.
"It has been damaged beyond repair
and couldn't meet the artist's initial in-
tent."
As students walk by the empty plaza
outside of the University Gallery, the
sights and sounds of 13th Street are for-
ever changed.
"I feel like it's something the art depart-
ment is known for," Neukamm said.
"It's like the equivalent of taking down
the french fries or the potato in Turling-
ton."


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MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009 U ALLIGATOR, 31


NATIONAL

Women outnumber men in Florida universities


Editor's note: This story was
originally published in the June
30 edition of the Alligator.
By SARA WATSON
Alligator Writer

Perhaps men really are from
Mars.
Male students at UF are becom-
ing increasingly alien as female
enrollment grows.
Data show that the female stu-
dent population at UF has out-
numbered the male population
over the past 10 years and has
continued to rise. This fall, women
will comprise 60 percent of incom-
ing freshmen.
The increasing number is not
about innate ability, but rather
women's organizational abili-
ties and tendency to reach goals,
said Mary Ann Clark, an associate
professor in the College of Educa-
tion who researches male under-
achievement in public education.


"I don't think colleges and uni-
versities seek to admit more fe-
male students, but in general, the
applicant pool of women is stron-
ger as a group," Clark said.
"They are showing higher
GPAs, more advanced course
work in high school and are in-
volved in more extracurricular
and leadership activities than men
as a group."
The increasing female popula-
tion is not restricted to UF.
Female enrollment tops 60 per-
cent in five of Florida's 11 state
universities. Nationally, women
comprise 57 percent of college
enrollment, and this trend is pro-
jected to increase through 2015,
according to the National Center
for Educational Statistics.
In addition, flagship universi-
ties like University of North Car-
olina at Chapel Hill "have been
60 percent female for quite a few
years," Clark said.


In the past, people assumed
men did not need help in school
and would "land on their feet,"
Clark said. Recent data show that,
in big cities, women in their 20s
earn more than men in the same
age group. Admissions offices
across the country are encourag-
ing more males to apply, she said.
"I don't think colleges and
universities seek to admit
more female students, but
in general, the applicant
pool of women is stronger
as a group."
Mary Ann Clark
Associate professor in the UF
College of Education

The gender gap at the college
level can affect marriage and fam-
ily patterns as well as economic
patterns, Clark said.


"Numbers in enrollment mat-
ter," said Milagros Pena, director
of the Center for Women's Studies
and Gender Research.
Pena said that gender diversity
enriches the college experience
and helps students prepare for a
globalized world.
"I think this is significant and
welcomed, and of course we want
to encourage young men to seek
higher education," Pena said.
"But we are also still challenged
by inequities in pay and access to
opportunities, even as educated
women."
Pena said it is also important
to see if the increase in numbers
translates significantly for women
in less traditional professions like
engineering.
While the majority of UF's col-
leges are dominated by women
in terms of population, engineer-
ing is one of two colleges where
women are outnumbered, Clark


said. The second is business ad-
ministration.
Women are entering the engi-
neering field and taking advan-
tage of UF's status as the top-
ranked engineering program in
Florida, said Andrea Eckstrom, a
senior majoring in mechanical en-
gineering.
"I didn't initially choose engi-
neering because there are fewer
women involved in the field. It
was just something I had always
wanted to do," Eckstrom said.
However, Eckstrom said peo-
ple questioned her ability to suc-
ceed in engineering during high
school and her freshman year of
college.
"Not being taken seriously can
be a huge motivator. I felt like
I had something to prove," she
said.
Despite more women in tech-
nical electives, Eckstrom said she
notices the gender disparity.


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near 34th & Archer. Close to UF on bus stop,
pool, hot tub, tennis, gym, $420, inc. utili-
ties. Prefer clean & studious. 407-361-1154
8-28-09-46-1

350/mo Countryside @ the University 4/4
with W/D Newly remodeled. Furnished. Call
352-274-3089 or email
redfox8979@gmail.com
8-28-30-1

Three bedroom out of four are available for
rent, furnished with utilities included. Near
UF and Shands, $400.00 a month. Call 352-
795-1870 or 352-266-4114. 9-3-09-30-1

Rooms for Rent- UF students pref
$325/mo + 1/3 of the bills/room/tenant
3BR/3BA, $300 sec dep. 1 Yr lease Aug 1st,
09 July 31st '10 Call for info 386-445-0043
8-28-09-27-1

ROOM FOR RENT
Lg master suite in new home; 15 min to VA,
Shands & UF. NS, professional only. All util,
cable TV, & wireless internet incl. $500/mo.
219-3410 8-25-09-20-1

$295/Rm Univ Commons 4BR/2BA Privately
owned = rent below mgmt company's rate !
Fully furnished, full size washer and dryer,
quiet 3rd floor with balcony. Free cable TV w/
HBO. Also on 5 bus routes. $50/month utili-
ties. No Pets. Brad @ 813-854-5628 or
bkseshep@tampabay.rr.com 8-31-09-16-1

SUN ISLAND
FURNISHED 2BR AVAILABLE
352-376-6720
12-9-09-75-1

COLLEGE ROOMS STARTING AT
$395.00 MONTH, UTILITIES INCLUDED
NO MOVE IN COST
Call Frances 352-375-8787
Rent Florida Realty
10-28-09-60-1

5 MONTH LEASE: Aug Dec !! Looking
for one male roommate to share 3 bedroom
condo in Creeks Edge. Quiet upstairs. W/D,
Free Cable & Internet. Min.'s to campus on
direct bus route. $375/mo 727-463-0560
8-24-09-13-1


*$350 for a room, meals & convenience*
One block N of UF campus. Includes utilities,
laundry room, computer lab and parking.
Fall/Spring leases for a shared dormitory.
352.377.4269 www.cloliving.org 117 nw 15 st
8-28-09-17-1

WWW.TheFloridaRenterslnsurance.COM

Renters Insurance from $9 per month

Online Quotes 9-16-09-31-1

Univ. Terr. Gainesville, 3921 SW 34th st., 1st
fir., 4 bdrm., 4 bath, cent A/C, cable, wash.,
dry., full kitch., $300/mo.ea., $25/person
finders fee, owner/manager/gainesville 352-
472-9778 9-4-09-27-1

CLOSE TO CAMPUS. Beautiful 3/3 condo
Windsor Park, dir on bus route, new furn.,
beaut. remod. bathrooms and hardwood
floors, upstairs, front bldg, 1300/mo, 772-
349-3221, bdduf86@comcast.net 9-23-
09-30-1


ALMOST SOLD OUTt
2 MONTHS FREE
*Brand New* Gated*Upscale 1br-4br*
3000 SW 35th Place
EnclaveUF.com*352.376.0696
12-9-09-75-1

BEAUTIFUL 7TH STREET STATION
TOWNHOUSE. Close to UF. 2BR/2pvt BA +
1/2 BA. New floor & carpet. Secure parking.
$815/mo. Please call 407-227-7223 8-28-
09-10-1

Fully furnished 2BR/2BA available in
3BR/3BA. #1117 Windsor Park Condos.
3705 SW 27th St. Vast amenities. Bus comes
every 10 min. $550/mo ea. For info call 386-
597-1167 8-24-09-5-1

$350/mo Univ Commons 4BR/2BA. Fully
furnished and comes with washer and dryer.
Rent includes free cable TV w/HBO, water,
electric and wireless internet. 5 Minutes from
campus. 5 bus routes. Complex has swim-
ming pool, fitness center and basketball
court. No pets. Please contact Ashok at 321-
948-6327 or e-mail at americana@cfl.rr.com
8-24-09-5-1

Oxford Terrace-Private bed/bath in big 4/4.
Rent includes: wi-fi,cable, utilities & w/d in
unit. No sm or pets, M or F welcome.
407-774-7176 or beweiss59@hotmail.com
Clean / Ready to move-in! 8-28-09-9-1


UF DORMS STINK! Furnished single room
for rent in Luxury Ivy House ON SORORITY
ROW! Hi speed internet, cable, utilities in-
cluded! $599/mth Available Aug '09-'10,Kim
4077413223 8-24-09-5-1

2BR/2B newly renovated condo@ CREEKS
EDGE min's from UF on direct bus route.
Ideal for professional or grad Students.
Ammenities W/D in unit $850 +utilities 305-
780-2015. 8-24-09-5-1

2 RM for Rent in 4BR Spacious House across
from UF Track. Wi-Fi, HBO, DW, W/D, hard-
wood floors in room. 2min walk to bus route.
Utilities included in rent. $500-$550. 352-
653-0397 or hpeta@ufl.edu 8-27-7-1

PROF/GRAD STUDENT. All Amenities.
Studious & quiet. Safe & secure. $350/mo.
Leave message 333-8300. 8-24-09-5-1

lbr/lba in 4/4 luxury condo $410/mth,
all inclusive (utilities, internet, tv, phone,
washer/dryer), fully furnitured. very close to
campus. contact 352-235-4762 or
toxapheneufl@yahoo.com 9-16-20-1

*** University Terrace West ***
4BR/4BA. Individual leases. Fully furnished,
utils included, W/D. $399/mo Call 352-278-
9347 www.bogartproperties.com or rent the
whole place for $1600. 8-28-5-1

Room for rent, Countryside in 4/4 condo.
$395/mo all included. 1 mile from UF/shop-
ping. Bus/bike rte. Call Nalini 352-514-3398.
W/D, pool, fitness, security. Only 3 rooms
left. 8-24-09-3-1

1 bdrm,private bath,all ultilities,assess to
W/D and pool,fenced yd for parking, evening
meal included, no pets, 30 min from UF
450/ mo. 250 dep.first and last 352-481-0569
8-26-5-1

NEED FEMALE ROOMMATE FOR 2B/2BA
Nantucket Walk Condo. Fully furnished.$600/
month. Luxury style condo with parking
balcony,w/d in unit, granite counters,etc.Call
2566981203.carab@ufl.edu 8-28-09-7-1

2BR / 1.5BA FURNISHED TOWNHOME
Shellrock 6210 SW 8TH LANE,near UF&
Mall,Washer/Dryer, Screened Patio,$750/
MO 850-264-0780 or z.investments@yahoo.
com 8-24-09-3-1

2 girls need 1 more for BEAUTIFUL 3BR/3BA
condo. Close to UF min to SF. Near RTS bus-
stop. Lrg-priv BR/BA & walk-in closet. Tall
ceil, outside lanai, pool. $550 ALL UTILITIES
INC! No pets, yr lease reqd. 305-304-1703


**LAMANCHA CONDOS**
Walk to Campus 4Br/1.5Ba. Includes elect,
cable tv, & high speed internet. $350/mo
Call 352-278-9347 or
www.lamanchacondos.com 8-28-6-1

LIVE IN LUXURY @ Windsor Park! A MUST
SEE APT! 3Bd/3Private BTH All Inclusive:
water,light,cable, and h-s internet plus more!
ONLY $470 no security deposit! Call for more
details 305-984-4245 9-1-09-7-1

3 ROOMS FOR RENT
$525-$650/mo All utils incl. Near SFC, Oaks
Mall & UF 786-325-7941 9-21-09-20-1

Looking for 2 female UF Grad student
roommates for a townhouse in Marchwood.
$399 plus utilities. 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom,
fully furnished, complete kitchen, and
fireplace. Located on SW 43rd st near SW
20th av. Contact Sarah at sonofrio@ufl.edu
8-28-09-5-1

Two furnished 1/1's available in 2/2 at
Capstone Quarters. One room available im-
mediately other room available in Dec. All
inclusive for $550. $550 S.D. + 1st months.
rent. Call Valerie Rivera @ 904-910-7506
8-28-09-5-1

FIRST MONTH FREE!!! Apt for rent. 4bd/2ba.
$400/mo/room. Three blks from campus.
Newly remodeled. Pool, Internet. 813-690-
3781. 9-11-09-14-1

DUCKPOND
Prof/grad student. fully furn large room in qui-
et house. Bike to campus. $350/mo. Leave
message 872-8388 9-4-09-10-1

$350 MOVES YOU IN! Need 1 roommate to
rent rm in a 3/2 FULLY FURNISHED house.
5 mins to UF. 10 mins to Santa Fe. No sec or
util deposit. Split utils, maid & yard man, W/D,
Irg yard, family & living rm 813-362-7729
8-28-09-5-1

$700/month, 2BR/2BA Furnished Apt with
washer/dryer, walk-in closets, 2905 SW
Archer Rd, minutes from UF and Shands,
on bus route. 954-452-3600 or diwool@aol.
com. 8-28-09-5-1


QUIET, CLEAN, LOTS of GREEN SPACE.
Rustic 1BR apt. $375/mo.
01BR cottage $435/mo. Call 213-8798 or
mobile 213-3901. 12-9-09-75-2


How To Place A Classified Ad:


In Person:
Cash, Check, MC, or Visa
The Alligator Office
1105 W. University Ave.
M-F, 8am 4pm
Online: w/ Visa or Mastercard
www.alligator.org/classified
By Email: classifieds@alligator.org


By Mail:
Use forms appearing weekly in The
Alligator. Sorry, no cash by mail. MC,
Visa or checks only.
By Phone: (352) 373-FIND
Payment by Visa or MasterCard ONLY.
M-F, 8am 4pm
By Fax: (352) 376-4556


When Will Your Ad Run?
Ads placed by 4 pm will appear two publica-
tion days later. Ads may run for any length
of time and be cancelled at any time. Sorry,
but there can be no refunds or credits for
cancelled ads.


Corrections and Cancellations:
Cancellations: Call 373-FIND M-F, 8am 4pm. No refunds or credits can be given.
Alligator errors: Check your ad the FIRST day it runs. Call 373-FIND with any
corrections before noon. THE ALLIGATOR IS ONLY RESPONSIBLE FOR THE
FIRST DAY THE AD RUNS INCORRECTLY. Corrected ads will be extended one
day. No refunds or credits can be given after placing the ad. Changes called in after
the first day will not be further compensated.
Customer error or changes: Changes must be made BEFORE NOON for the next
day's paper. There will be a $2.00 charge for minor changes.


All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make limitation, or discrimination." We will
not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. All employment opportunities advertised herein are subject to the laws which prohibit discrimina-
tion in employment (barring legal exceptions) because of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, handicap, familial status, age, or any other covered status. This newspaper assumes no responsibility for injury or loss arising from contacts made through the type of advertising that
is know as "personal" or "connections" whether or not they actually appear under those classifications. We suggest that any reader who responds to that type of advertising use caution and investigate the sincerity of the advertiser before giving out personal information. Although this
newspaper uses great care in accepting or rejecting advertising according to its suitability, we cannot verify that all advertising claims or offers are completely valid in every case and, therefore, cannot assume any responsibility for any injury or loss arising from offers and acceptance of
offers of goods and/or services through any advertising contained herein.







MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009 U ALLIGATOR, 35


*LYONS SPECIAL*
$99 1st month's rent 377-8797
12-9-09-75-2



1, 2, 3's SUPER RENT DISCOUNTS!
1BR $509 2BR $579* 3BR $775
HUGE FLOORPLANS! Pets Loved!
Bus Stop Pools Green Courtyards!
Park Free Across From UF! 335-7275
12-9-09-75-2



The ONLY Apartments Downtown
Studios-$645*1/1 from $699
2/2 from $900* 3/3 $500/bed
Washers & Dryers*Alarms*We Love Pets
207 SE 2nd Place-Next to Starbucks
352.338.0002-arlingtonsquare.org
12-9-09-75-2



1 & 2's SPECIAL RATES!
1BR $459 2BR $539
No Move In Fees! Quiet
Beautiful Pools Pets Loved!
Park Free Across From UF! 372-7555
12-9-09-75-2



Deluxe, Large 3, 4, 5, 6, 7BR apt/house, 60
second walk to UF. Remodeled, Old House
charm. Central AC, washer/dryer included.
Wood floors. With Parking. By Private Owner.
538-2181 Iv message 12-9-09-74-2


Rule #76: No excuses!
Live w/quality & affordability!
1br $549/2br $659
3br$855/4br$1100
Pet friendly, pook B-ball/tennis courts!
Crash @ Pinetree Gardens!
pinetreegardens.com*376-4002
12-9-09-75-2


Deluxe, large one or two bedroom, 60 sec-
ond walk to UF. Wood firs, washer dryer
included, fireplace, patio deck. Can furnish.
Short term available. Private Owner. $595-
up. 352-538-2181. Lv msg 12-9-09-74-2


No deposit, No move-in fees!!!
Huge 1/1's 2/2's 3/3's
<1 mi from UF! Giant 24hr gym
FREE tanning/FREE cable
*Oxford Manor* (352) 377-2777
These apts kick other apts in the teeth
12-9-75-2



** ELLIE'S HOUSES **
Quality single family homes. Walk or bike to
UF. www.ellieshouses.com 352-215-4991 or
352-215-4990 12-9-09-75-2


HOUSES FOR FALL!
2-4 bds from $420/person
Pets Welcome, Free Parking near UF
303 NW 17th Street, Ste.A
371-7777 CollegeParkUF.com
12-9-09-75-2


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Now you can easily
submit your classified ad
for print and/or web editions
right thru our website!
Just go to
www.alligator.org/classifieds
Visa and Mastercard accepted.

Come see our 1/1, 2/2 & 3/3 townhomes!!
FREE Cable w/HBO and Showtime
All Amenities plus FREE Tanning
Gated*Alarms*Pet Friendly
*Sign Today, Get up to $1800 Cash Back*
www.thelaurelsuf.com 352-335-4455
12-9-09-75-2

Affordable & Great Location
1 & 2's available
One Month Free & No Move- In Fees
3500 Windmeadows Blvd
www.spanishtrace.org* 373-1111
12-9-09-75-2

Cobblestone Apartments
3/3 for only $1007. $0 moves you in!!
Free Cable-Unlimited Tanning-Fitness Ctr
2801 NW 23rd Blvd 352-377-2801
Cobblestoneuf.com
12-9-75-2

BIVENS COVE
1/1 From $649 2/2 From $699
3/2 From $824 4/3 From $1099
Close to UF/Shands Pet Friendly
(352) 376-2507 3301 SW 13th Street
12-9-09-75-2

***PARKING@@@
Private, Secure, Guaranteed. 60 sec to UF.
Reserve now! Reasonable rates. 352-538-
2181. Can leave mssg. 12-9-09-74-2

2/2 & 3/3 with GARAGE!
W/D, Alarm, Huge patio!
We love pets! $875-$1012
372-0400*MadisonPointe.org
12-9-75-2





PO LOS
of Gainesville
Three Pools! Three Bus Routes!
Two Jacuzzis! Business Center!
Billards Room! Fitness Center w/ Free
weights! Sand Volleyball!
Tennis Courts! Basketball Courts!
Close to UF, Shands, 1-75, & Shopping!
1, 2 & 3 Bedrooms for NOW & Fall!!!
GREAT SPECIALS!!!
1/1-$684 2/2-$512w/all util 3/3-$399w/all util
2330 SW Williston Rd.
www.ThePolosUF.com 352-335-7656
12-9-09-75-2

Huge Private Dog Park
1's from $499 Waive all fees
Close to UF, Shands, Butler Plaza
Pet Friendly 376-1248
www.hiddenvillageapt.com
2725 SW 27th Ave
12-9-74-2


OWNER

FINANCING

ON 19.99 ACRES

IN NEWBERRY, FL.


Fenced and cross
fenced, high and dry.
Oak trees, zoned AG
and low taxes.

S269K



Call Gigi Tajalli
@ 352-281-0001
Watson Realty Corp.


l's, 2's and 4's
AS BIG AS A HOUSE!
Great School Districts
Free Personal Training
75 SW 75th Street Call 332-7401 12-
9-75-2


Get it while it's HOT!
Starting at $299
FREE Tanning*Pool*Gym
3813 SW 34th st
Call NOW! 372-8100
12-9-09-75-2


MUSEUM WALK
2/2's $945 CABLE & WATER Included
All Inclusive roommate matching $606
ParknRide Bus Route-Always be on time!
3500 SW 19th Ave*www.museumwalk.com
379-WALK*
12-9-09-75-2


SORORITY ROW 2BDs!
2br/2.5ba from $899
W/D included. No Move-in Fees!
Pets welcome! FREE Parking!
372-7111 CollegeManor.org
12-9-09-75-2


LAKEWOOD VILLAS
Large 1, 2 & 3 bdrm Floor Plans;
Starting at $695
Furniture Packages Inc. Washer/Dryer;
Workout Rm, Tennis Court; Swimming Pool;
Sauna etc. Mon-Fri 9-6, Sat 10-3
700 SW 62nd Blvd 877-781-8314
www.lakewoodvilllas.com
text (lakewood)@65586
12-9-09-74-2


SPYGLASS *
Individual Leases: Furniture Packages
Incl Washer/Dryer, FREE Hispeed Internet;
Rates start at $399
Every Unit is an End Unit
Mon-Fri 9-6, Sat 10-5, Sun 12-4
701 SW 62nd Blvd 888-267-5078
www.spyglassapts.com
text (spyglass)@65586
12-9-09-74-2


ACROSS FROM UF!
Studios $459, includes electric!
Wood floors available. FREE parking.
1225 SW 1 Avenue Pets welcome
372-7111 No move-in fees!
12-9-09-75-2

FREE Scooter! Free 42" TV!
Inclusive 2's & 3's Two Miles to UF
Next Ten 2/2's Discounted to $899
Pet Friendly Roommate Match.
1015 NW 21st Ave
HiddenLakeUF.com 374-3866
12-9-09-75-2


Walk to Class!
1brs from $499 -150 ft from UF!
Move-in today. FREE parking!
Pets Welcome! No Move-in Fees.
372-7111 1216 SW 2nd Ave
12-9-09-75-2


$399 FOR EVERYTHING
All Inclusive Student Suites
Roommate Match*Feline Friendly!
42" TV*Astroturf Soccer Field
352-271-3131*GainesvillePlace.com
75-2


Action Real Estate Services
Houses to Condos
1-4 BR, Starting at $450
www.action-realtors.com
352-331-1133
12-9-09-75-2

*Fully Furnished*AII Inclusive*
Roommate Matching
2 MONTHS FREE
*Brand New* Gated*Upscale 1br-4br*
3000 SW 35th Place
EnclaveUF.com*352.376.0696
12-9-09-75-2


Now you can easily
submit your classified ad
for print and/or web editions
right thru our website!
Just go to
www.alligator.org/classifieds
Visa and Mastercard accepted.

WALK TO CAMPUS
1BRs from $550 2BRs from $600
Sun Bay Sun Key Sun Harbor
352-376-6720 www.sunisland.info
Ask about our new pet policy & other specials
12-9-09-75-2


ACROSS FROM UF!
0 4 bds from $555 For Fall
1 MONTH FREE! $0 TO MOVE IN!
Pets Welcome, Free Parking near UF
303 NW 17th Street, Ste. A
371-7777 CollegeParkUF.com
12-9-09-75-2

SPACIOUS & PEACEFUL!
1-2 bds from $350/person
1 MONTH FREE! $0 TO MOVE IN!
Pets Welcome, Free Parking near UF
303 NW 17th Street, Ste. A
371-7777 CollegeParkUF.com
12-9-09-75-2


**LUXURIOUS 1800 SQ FT HOME**
SECLUDED, UPSCALE NEAR UF. 3/2, SUN
ROOM, COVERED PATIO W/D. $1400/MO
PERFECT FOR GRAD. AVAIL AUG. 1607
NW 12 RD 352-466-4171 LV MSG 8-28-
09-58-2

1 & 2BR/1BA
W/D. Tile throughout, front gated patio. Pet
friendly. From $635/mo. Call 352-377-1633.
www.lenoxcorner.com 8-31-09-56-2


PET'S PARADISE
$500 $600. No app or pet fee. 2BR, privacy
fenced. SW. 352-331-2099 9-4-09-59-2

We have REAL 1/1s
Dump your roommate & save on gas!
3 blocks to UF GATORNEST
575 sq ft, $575 PLUS one month FREE!
300 NW 18 Street
4 blocks to UF GATORSIDE
400 sq ft, only $450 Only 4 left!
1600 NW 4 Avenue
BIKE to UF CENTERPOINT
530 sq ft big, only $475 Just a few left!
1220 NW 12 Street
No application fee, most pets ok.Call
E.F.N. Properties, 352/371-3636 or email:
Rentals@EFNProperties.com
8-28-09-45-2

NANTUCKET WALK *
UPPER WEST SIDE *
Brand new luxury apartments! Walk to class!
All-inclusive! nantucketwalk@cmcapt.com
352-240-6961
12-9-09-74-2

large 4 bed 3 bath house for rent. near uni-
versity and 34th, pets ok, washer& dryer, first
and security 1500/mo. Available June 1st.
yearly. Call 727-430-3094 7-19-09-21-2


BIKE TO UF! 1st mont free!
5BR 3BA, lawn service incl,
Fireplace, carport, w/d hkups, $1800/rent
3920 SW 20th Street
12-9- Carl Turlington Real Estate, Inc. 372-9525
www.TurlingtonRealEstate.com 8-28-09-
34-2


NW 39 Av fancy 3br/2ba w/loft Ig open bright
Costly laminated wd-looking fir. $750-775 XL
3/2 loft apt, new ceramic firs carpet $850.
Nice 2br/2ba gated patio, trees $600-630 2/2
fancy firs $670 373-8310, 219-3937 8-25-
24-2

VICTORIA STATION! 1st MONTH FREE!
2 BR 2.5 BA TH, washer/dryer, high ceilings,
separate Dining room, pool,
$800/rent, 3552 SW 30th Way #146
Carl Turlington Real Estate, Inc. 372-9525
www.TurlingtonRealEstate.com 8-28-09-
25-2


ft =, -n


o


bm ON** % a







36, ALLIGATOR U MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009


WALK TO UF! 1ST MONTH FREE!
2 BR duplex, CH/AC, will consider small pet,
$695/rent 120-A NW 10th Street
Carl Turlington Real Estate, Inc. 372-9525
www.TurlingtonRealEstate.com 8-28-09-
30-2

GREAT MOVE-IN SPECIALS!
1, 2, 3, 4 & 5 BR Houses & apartments!
Contact us for pricing & availability!
Carl Turlington Real Estate, Inc. 372-9525
www.TurlingtonRealEstate.com 8-28-09-
30-2

3BR $99 Move you in! $750/mo
Walk to UF, cent AC, WID, fenced yards,
pet friendly, wd firs, 352-505-9264 or 352-
870-0904
8-28-09-30-2

4/2 $99 Moves you in! $1000/mo
Super Special, Walk to UF, cent AC, WID
hkup, carpet & wd firs, extra room, large
fenced yard, pet friendly 352-505-9264
8-28-09-30-2

2/1 Apt. $99 Move-in $500 total.
Historic downtown, cent AC, WID hkup,
10min bike to UF, front porch, pets ok,
great size. Yes $500 whole apt! 505-9264
8-28-09-30-2

Room $299. $99 first month.
has everything, walk-in closet, pvt BA,
WID, DW, built-in micro, tile & carpet, pool
on site, 505-9264 or 870-0904
8-28-09-30-2

$499, 1BR apt, spacious,very quiet, energy
efficient, private gated patio, Trees w/lots of
greenspace, 1824 NW 9th St. prefer grad/
mature person.(352)376 0080; (352) 284
3873; postj@bellsouth.net. 8-31-09-22-2

SOUTHFORK OAKS! 1st MONTH FREE!
2 BR 1.5 BA TH, Pool, w/d hkups, close to
everything! $675/rent,
2300 SW 43rd St #1-3
Carl Turlington Real Estate, Inc. 372-9525
www.TurlingtonRealEstate.com 8-28-09-
28-2

POOL HOUSE! 1st MONTH FREE!
2 BR with bonus room or 3rd BR,
Large screen porch & deck, wood floors,
fireplace, Living & dining rooms, $995/rent
includes pool svc, 738 NW 24th Avenue
Carl Turlington Real Estate, Inc. 372-9525
www.TurlingtonRealEstate.com 8-28-09-
28-2

STEPS TO CLASS! 4 BR 2.5 BA house,
Living, dining & sunrooms, w/d hkups,
CH/AC, $1800/rent, 1107 SW 1st Avenue
Carl Turlington Real Estate, Inc. 372-9525
www.TurlingtonRealEstate.com 8-28-09-
28-2

Apartments off SW 20th Ave. Close to shop-
ping, bus line and a few miles from UF. Price
rage $445 to $665. Includes water, sewer,
garbage and pest control. Sorry no pets al-
lowed. Call 335-7066 Mon-Fri. 12-9-09-75-2

ARBOR
Ask about our move-in specials!
Close to UF & Shands
2411 SW 35th PL
866-604-7097
M-F 9-6, Sat 10-2
www.arborgainesville.com
12-9-09-74-2

FOX HOLLOW
Gated Entry
Ask about our move-in specials!
7301 W Univ Ave
Mon-Fri 9-6, Sat 10-2, Sun 1-5
877-288-2921
www.cmcapt.com/foxhollow
12-9-09-74-2

2/2 Close to UF & bus route. Great for grad
students! Builiding is 3 yrs old w/ only 1 prev
tenant. W/D, D/W, tile & carpet in BDs $800
for the whole place Avail ASAP, no smokers.
(904) 386-6485 8-25-09-19-2

1 MONTH FREE RENT! 2 br/1ba;$599, near
UF & downtown; 1830 NW 10th St. quiet;
greenspace; spacious, tile floors, balcony;
upstairs; prefer quiet mature person;postj@
bellsouth.net application reqd.352 376 0080
8-31-09-22-2


2/1.5 Town home $679
Includes full size WID, dw, disposal
A pet-friendly, quiet community
pinetreegardens.com*376-4002
12-9-09-75-2

GREAT LOCATION! 1ST MONTH FREE!
2 BR 2BA in Concordia, w/d, pool, quiet loca-
tion! $750/rent, 405-B NW 39th Road
Carl Turlington Real Estate, Inc. 372-9525
www.TurlingtonRealEstate.com 8-28-09-
20-2

Nantucket Walk Luxury 1 BR/1 BA Condo
1460 NW 3rd Place, 640 sq ft, stainless ap-
pliances, black granite countertops, tiled,
covered balcony, reserved parking, H/AC,
DW, W/D $1000/mo 813-766-4003 9-1-09-
21-2

3BR/1BA House Available August 1st. Cent
H/AC, ceiling fans, carport. $925/mo. 217
NW 36th Terrace. Call 372-4903 or 917-416-
6968 8-27-09-18-2

611 NW 34th Dr. Available August 1st.
3BR/2BA house. Cent H/AC, ceiling fans.
$950/mo. Call 372-4903 or 917-416-6968
8-27-09-18-2

Historic Duckpond
2bd/1.5ba renovated 1200sq ft townhouse.
Hardwd firs, ceiling fans, new appliances,
Beautiful! Blocks to downtown shops &
restaurants. Avail now 508 NE 4th ave
$950mo, or unrenovated $750 379-4952
8-24-09-13-2

* BIKE TO UF PETS CONSIDERED-
AVAIL AUG 0 ATTRACTIVE 3 or 4 BR
Home near UF. 2BA, cent h/a, Family rm,
fireplace, smooth top stove, W/D, DW, newer
carpet, fenced backyard w/covered patio.
Great location. $1195/mo 352-665-9547
8-25-09-12-2

Downtown House 110 SE 4th PI 3BD/1.5BA
Central heat/air. On street parking, fenced
yard, w/d hookups. Walk downtown & bike/
bus to campus! $760/mo + 1st, last $500 dep
Call 373-6551 8-24-13-2

WWW.TheFloridaRenterslnsurance.COM

Renters Insurance from $9 per month

Online Quotes 9-16-09-31-2

LOFTS OASIS 3BR/3.5BA
Luxury condo w/ upgraded kitchen, W/D,
DW, cent H/AC. 1400 sq ft. $1300/mo cable
incl. + utils. Close to bust stop. No smoking/
no pets. 727-458-8189 8-25-09-14-2

LAS PAMPAS! 2 BR 2 BA townhouse,
Wood laminate floors, screen porch, pool,
loft $800/rent, 3482 NW 37th Avenue
Carl Turlington Real Estate, Inc. 372-9525
www.TurlingtonRealEstate.com 8-28-09-
16-2

2BR/2BA The Gables Gated Townhome,
Garage, washer/dryer, pool, gym, tennis.
Cable, HBO,Showtime and some furnishings
included. $975 mo. by owner call 321-698-
7579. 8-24-09-11-2

1BR 1BA apt. in quiet area
close to UF wirelss-int/cable
WID & dishwshr in unit cent ac
club amenities. $550/mo pls call
786/262-8310 (cel) 305/887-2213.
8-26-09-13-2

3Bd/Ba house $1000/mo or $333 split with
2 additional roommates. Large fenced yard
with deck. W/D hookups, central HA. $500
sec deposit. 352-213-1567. 8-25-11-2

August free! Beautiful extra large 2BR/1BA
avail 8/1. M-21 Summit House 1700 SW
16th Ave. Near UFNANet/Shands. $600/
mo. Pool, parking. Private lease. 480-390-
4528. Deposit. Leave name & number 8-28-
09-14-2

Near Royal Park, Mall, UF, bus. 4BR/2BA
home. Oversized garage, POOL, private
yard, W/D. $1450/mo. Includes pool & yard
care. Irene Larsson, Owner/Realtor. 352-
373-2605, 352-538-1218 8-24-09-10-2

NW Appletree, contemporary home.
3BR/2BA, 2 car garage, sunroom, cul-de-
sac St. 1700 sq ft. NICE! $1250/mo. Irene
Larsson Owner/Realtor 352-373-2605, 352-
538-1218 8-24-09-10-2


LOTS OF SPACE! 1ST MONTH FREE!
3 BR 2 BA w/ living, family & dining rooms,
2 car carport, fenced yard, w/d, lawn svc,
$1000/rent, 126 SW 40th St.
Carl Turlington Real Estate, Inc. 372-9525
www.TurlingtonRealEstate.com 8-28-
09-14-2

LIVE BY THE GOLF COURSE!
1st month free! 3 BR 2 BA TH, garage, vault-
ed ceilings, living & family rooms,
$895/rent, 1627 NE 40th PI
Carl Turlington Real Estate, Inc. 372-9525
www.TurlingtonRealEstate.com 8-28-
09-14-2

CLOSE TO EVERYTHING! 1st month free!
3/2 house, carport, living & family rooms,
newer carpet,
$825/rent, 1901 NW 38th Terr
Carl Turlington Real Estate, Inc. 372-9525
www.TurlingtonRealEstate.com 8-28-
09-14-2

Unique L shaped POOL 4/2 Home
1 ml UF Huge Deck easy parking
W/D DishW Car port 3/4 ac lot
Yard serv includ 352 214 4559
$1825.00
8-24-09-10-2

MOVE IN SPECIAL
One month free rent on top of our already
low prices. Apartments, townhouses and
homes available. Great S.W. locations
near UF, Shands and shopping. M-F 8:30
to 5 & Saturday 11-4. Contact University
Management Inc., licensed Real Estate
Broker, at 352-375-1111
8-24-09-10-2

1/1 HALF A BLOCK TO UF--Behind book-
store Rent $770 includes: Cable, Internet,
Water SW 12th St & 1st Ave. Built 2006
Covered Parking,W/D in unit,tiled, AC/Heat
(305)389-8638 or delcastill@aol.com 8-25-
09-10-2

Tumbling Creek Condos. Creekfront Condo
within walking distance of UF 1BR/1BA
CHNA W/D Water Sewer Garbage provided
$550 rent $550 deposit 352-493-3487 352-
493-515 8-31-09-14-2

930 N.E. 6th Ave, 2 br 1 ba duplex near
duckpond available now. Convenient to
downtown and UF.carport, laundry room,
large bedrooms, Ch/a. Pets under 25 Ibs
may be arranged. $625 month 1st, last and
$400 security with approved credit.Drive by,
then call 352-281-4528 or 352-450-0939.
8-25-09-10-2

ONLY ONE LEFT
2 BLKS TO STADIUM. LUXURY
TOWNHOME, 2BR.2.5BA. W/D, DW, 2
PARKING SPACES. NO PETS. $525/EA.
352-335-4790, 352-214-3369 8-24-09-8-2

1/1 HALF A BLOCK TO UF--Behind book-
store Rent $770 includes: Cable, Internet,
Water SW 12th St & 1st Ave. Built 2006
Covered Parking,W/D in unit,tiled, AC/Heat
(305)389-8638 or delcastill@aol.com 8-25-
09-10-2

SERENOLA PINES APTS
Off SW 34th St. near post office. 1BR $560;
2BR $635 Call for daily specials 352-335-
0420 9-16-09-25-2

WOODLAND TERRACE APTS
Off SW 34th St near post office. 2BR $560;
1BR $520. Call for daily specials. 352-335-
0420 9-16-09-25-2

Spacious 1 2 & 3BR $550 & up
C/HA, veritcals, Italian Tile, private patio,
some w/d hookup Some walk to UF. Much
Much more Call 352-332-7700. 11-4-60-2

1 MONTH FREE in Spacious 4br/3ba Home.
Near Campus across from Best Buy and on
Bus Rt. Fenced backyard, w/d hookups, d/w,
brand new c/ac. $1250/mth Call 786-999-
8440 8-28-09-12-2

1525 nw 34 pl. 5 min to UF/10 min to
Santa fe. This Beautiful house has been
Completely updated. Fenced-in yard,
Hardwood floors, wooden deck, cul-de-
sac, covered carport, w/d. Available Aug.
1st. $1000. monthly. 786-797-9783 8-25-
09-9-2


1BR EFFICIENCY $375/MO
No pets. Year lease. Shady lot. 1022.5 NW
4th Ave. 352-359-1508 8-24-09-7-2


GRANTWOOD 2 MONTHS FREE!
2 BR 2 BA Townhouse, loft, wood laminate
floors, Washer/Dryer, pool, courtyard,
$750/rent, 2508 SW 35th PI #47
Carl Turlington Real Estate, Inc. 372-9525
www.TurlingtonRealEstate.com 8-28-
09-14-2


ROCKWOOD VILLAS 2 MONTHS FREE!
3 BR 3 BA Townhouse, wood laminate floors
& ceramic tile, porch, Washer/Dryer,
$895/rent, 858 SW 58th Terr
Carl Turlington Real Estate, Inc. 372-9525
www.TurlingtonRealEstate.com 8-28-
09-14-2


CUTE 3 BR HOUSE! 1st month free! Garage,
Newer flooring, w/d hkups, $775/rent
1730 NW 31st Place
Carl Turlington Real Estate, Inc. 372-9525
www.TurlingtonRealEstate.com 8-28-09-
14-2


FIRST MONTH FREE MILLRUN CONDO
Close to UF, cute & clean 2BD/2BA
1000sq ft, storage/laundry room with W/D hk-
ups, pool. Pets considered. Rent $695/mo
Phone (352) 359-8311 9-30-09-34-2


1st TWO MONTHS FREE*+ $100 Gift Card
$39 Moves You In! No Pet Fees!
1/1s from $416* (Rate includes specials)
Close to UF & Oaks Mall.
Pine Rush Villas 375-1519
www.gremco.com
8-28-09-25-2


1st TWO MONTHS FREE*+ $100 Gift Card
$39 Moves You In! No Pet Fees!
2 BRs from $532* (Rate includes specials)
SW Archer Rd
Homestead Apts. 376-0828
www.gremco.com
8-28-09-25-2


1st TWO MONTHS FREE* +$200 Gift Card
$39 Moves You In! No Pet Fees!
2BRs from $616* & 3BRs from $707*
(Rate includes specials)
Close to Oaks Mall & Newberry Rd.
Ashton Square Villas 333-1120
www.gremco.com
8-28-09-25-2


1st MONTH FREE*!
$39 Moves You In! No Pet Fees!
Quiet, Private Patios
1BRs from $485* (Rate includes specials)
Gator Village 372-3826
www.gremco.com
8-28-09-25-2


1st TWO MONTHS FREE*!
$39 Moves You In! No Pet Fees!
Studios from $391* (Rate includes specials)
Walk to Butler Plaza
Sundowne 352-377-2596
www.gremco.com
8-28-09-25-2


1st TWO MONTHS FREE* + $100 Gift Card
$39 Moves You In! No Pet Fees!!
1 BR from $424* (Rate includes specials)
1/2 mile to UF
Sunrise 352-372-4835
www.gremco.com
8-28-09-25-2


*** Totally Renovated 1 Bdrs ***
$39 Moves You In! No Pet Fees
*$535 Month*lncludes Specials*
2 MONTHS FREE + $300 Gift Card
Free Tanning/Cyber Cafe
Great Location!
Courtney Greens 375-3077
www.gremco.com
8-28-09-11-2


1st TWO MONTHS FREE* + $100 Gift Cert
$39 Moves You In! No Pet Fees
Newly Renovated!
W/D hookup/Central A/C
2/2s from $607 (Rate includes specials)
Close to UF
Savannah Place 372-4835
www.gremco.com
8-28-09-11-2


1st TWO MONTHS FREE*!
$39 Moves You In! No Pet Fees!
Quiet, Great Location
1 Bdr from $441 (Rate includes specials)
Summer Place 372-2818
3316 SW 41st Place Just off SW 34th Street
www.gremco.com
8-28-09-11-2


3 Blocks from UF lbd in a 4/2 apt 295/mth
Individual lease. No pets. 1740 NW 3rd PL.
Only 1 left. 352-231-3002
Large 2/1 apt 600/mth w/d hook up
615 SW 11th lane 8-27-09-10-2


stu headquaster


FUTONsnuev aV Sa
experience the NEW futon. 15 %/
Coupon must be presented at
time of purchase or abso utely
void. Not valid with ANY other
discount, coupon, sale or offer.
SAdditional restrictions may
apply. Expires 09/30/09.


THE
FUTON
CORNER


On the corner of 16th Avenue & Main Street in Gainesville sharing a building with Wood You Furniture


www.futoncorner.com
1601 north main street







MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009 U ALLIGATOR, 37


4/2 HOME PLUS STUDY
Corner lot, H/D 2385 sqft Rent reduced to
$1400 + $1500 dep. Motivated to rent! Avail
after 6/25/09. 3608 NW 22nd PI. Call 352-
214-1956 8-24-09-7-2

Cute & Clean! Studio apt. in quiet NW area
near Ward's & Publix. Close to shopping &
busline, bike to UF. $450/mo. Other places
avail, visit www.cozygator.com, call 352-
338-7670, or email shepley@cozygator.com
8-24-09-7-2

Available Aug: Cute & Clean Vintage 4bd/
2.5ba behind Applebee's. Bike to UF! Wd
firs, CH/AC, W/D, fans, blinds. Huge rooms!
907 NW 11th Ave. $1500/mo. Others avail-
able! www.cozygator.com 352-338-7670
8-24-09-7-2

HOUSE avail 1st wk of Aug. 4BR/2BA, 1.5
mis to UF, near the Landings Apts. On UF
bus rte. Bike to UF. Fenced backyard, fire-
place, cent H/AC. 3627 SW 15th St. $1300/
mo. Call 376-6183 or 327-2931 9-3-09-5-2


Beautiful Historic Home
Walking Distance To UF. 4BD/2BA w/ Irg
fenced yard, W/D hook-up, Heat/AC & More.
$1495. Avail Aug 1, Call Tom @ 2626423
8-31-09-12-2

2 bedroom/2 bath for rent in Looking Glass,
2 parking spaces, great location right across
from Stadium & Library West! $960/month.
e-mail d.villoch@gmail.com 8-28-10-2

Cute & Clean!! Charming 3 BR vintage home
near UF & downtown for August. Wood
floors, high ceilings, CH/AC, laundry, large
front porch. $1185. Others available. Visit
www.CozyGator.com or call 352-338-7670
8-24-09-6-2

4BR/2 1/2BA Town home in gated com-
munity Cricket Club on Tower Rd. Newly
remodeled with hardwood floors through-
out. Washer/dryer in unit. Pool, club house,
fitness room, tennis courts and duck pond
on premesis. $1100 352-665-9838 Robert
Stawicki 8-28-10-2


Wendy Gayle

Hart
White Female
(DOB 02/12/69); 5'07",
135 Ibs, Brown Hair,
Brown Eyes
Wanted for:
Traffic Offense: DUI Alcohol
or Drugs 3rd Violation
ALACIA 4 oUNtY


CRIME

STOPPERS

Call (352) 372-STOP


4 Bedroom/4 bath Condo Overlooking pool
from screened in porch. All bedrooms have
bath en suite. Commom Living area, washer,
dryer inside unit. 8-25-09-7-2


DI I I. I, A M A Y

c. It A N [1



$99 Moves You In!
1, 2, 3 Bedroom


$0 RENT

UNTIL OCTOBER
Rents start at $750.00
Open 'til 8:00pm
Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday
Call Today 352-331-2966
2625 SW 75th St, Gainesville, FL 32608
Equal Housing Opportunity.
Rath/Harper and Associates.
8-28-09-10-2

Cute vintage 1-BR behind Applebee's. Wood
floors,large yard,quiet area, great for grads!
Bike to UF & downtown. $585/mo Contact:
shepley@CozyGator.com or 352-338-7670.
Others available at www.CozyGator.com
8-24-09-5-2

3/2/2 in desirable Haile Plantation. Right off
of biking and walking paths. Washer and
dryer included. Pets OK. Graduate student
or professional preferred. Available imme-
diately. $1,100 per month. 352-375-4050.
8-24-09-5-2

PRIVATE VIEWS FENCED YARD -
DOGGIE DOOR. Cabin & 20 acres, 7 mi
south of Newberry Paddocks, riding trails.
$575 Pets welcome. 330-329-8834,
writer777@att.net 8-31-10-2

120 NW 9th Street, 3b/1bath cool two story
house $900 no security deposit. Walk to
class close to UF call Mitchell Realty Services
352-374-8579 or Bob Mitchell 352-538-9951
8-24-09-5-2

2929 West University Avenue; 4bed/2bath
Close to UF, Super location, $1494 no se-
curity deposit. Call Mitchell Realty Services
352-374-8579 or call Bob Mitchell 352-538-
9951. 8-24-09-5-2

110 NW 9TH Terrace (Nicks Place)$850
2bed/2bath with washer/dryer included.
Great location close to UF, walk to class,
Call Mitchell Realty Services 352-374-8579
or Bob Mitchell 352-538-9951 8-24-09-5-2

2361 SW 31st Place 2bed/1bath with washer
dryer hookup, $550 per month no security
deposit. The unit is located close to the en-
trance of the complex. Call Mitchell Realty
Service 352-374-8579 or call Bob Mitchell
352-538-9951 to see apartment. 8-24-09-
5-2

2361 SW 31st Place 2bed/1bath with washer
dryer hookup, $550 per month. The unit is
located close to the entrance of the complex.
Call Mitchell Realty Service 352-374-8579 or
call Bob Mitchell 352-538-9951 to see apart-
ment. 8-24-09-5-2

FOXMOOR remodeled, 2 bdr/1.5 ba, condo
w/W&D,DSL,cable. 1 blkfrom UF (by Hilton@
UF) Near SW Rec & UF/City buslines. Avail.
8/14. No pets. Non-smokers. Perfect for grad
students. $675/mo + Util. 352-359-6292
8-25-09-6-2

NEXT TO UF CAMPUS
1BR/1BA, W/D in unit.
Pets ok with deposit. $500/mo 378-5801
8-31-09-10-2

HOUSES/CONDOS
2 houses, 2/1 fenced NW & SW.
2 nice condos 2/2 & 2/1 SW
Move in today. $600-$800. 352-374-4216
8-24-09-5-2

3 bed / 1 bath house $850 month
Available for rent immediately. Big yard 1st/
Last mth rent + $500 security. Wsh/Dry, large
screened porch, cen AC. 1006 NE 22nd Ave.
Ask about pets. Call 352-317-2246 8-24-
09-4-2


TAILGATE WALK TO SWAMP!
3/2 + SUNROOM BR, 2-CAR GARAGE.
COVERED PATIO, LRG FENCED YRD,
PETS OK, $1400 1ST MO. FREE. AVAIL
8/18. 5 NW 28TH TRC. (305) 725-0119
8-24-4-2

GET A FREE BEACH VACATION!
Large 2 BR 1.5 BA Townhomes
Close to UF & On 2 Bus Routes
Open House Everyday 359-6386
www.gopinnaclepoint.com
9-4-09-13-2

2 bed/1 bath house
5 blocks to campus
$520/month
116 NW 9th St
813-786-8152 8-25-09-5-2

ROCKWOOD VILLAS 3 bed/3 bath $1,100.
Each room has a private bath. End unit in
quiet neighborhood. 2 pools, sand vball court,
tennis courts. Close to the mall, UF, and
SFCC. On bus route. Call 352.514.3424.
9-9-09-15-2

1 MONTH RENT FREE! 4 Bed 4 Bath Condo
at Univ Terrace. W/d, walk in closets, new
carpet, Right near pool. Less than 2 mi to UF
w/bus stop out front. (386)747-8672 $350/
mo per pers. or $1300/mo forwhole unit. +util
8-28-09-8-2

Walk to UF. (2bd/2.5bth $850, 2 story, cen-
tral ac/heat, full kitchen, w/d, and private
parking). (2bd/lbth $800, tile floors, central
ac/heat, full kitchen, laundry access, water
included, and private parking). (Studio $450,
tile floors, wall ac, elec heat, full kitchen,
laundry access, and water included. Contact
352-870-7256 of gv1132601 @gmail.com.
8-25-09-5-2

2 BR 1.5 BA Townhouse.
Tile floors downstairs & carpet upstairs, new
appliances, master bedroom overlooks a
large pond. Mill Run subdivision- $775/mo.
Call 871-7801 8-25-09-5-2

1BR/ 1BA House.
Pets ok. Perfect!
$600/mo 372-2525 8-25-09-5-2

3/2 House.Close to UF AND Santa
Fe.Fenced yard.Deck. Pets allowed with
dep. wash/Dryer incl.$1,000 a month. 2032
sw 43rd ave.private drive.CallTODAY 501-
253-8021 8-25-09-5-2

BIKE TO CAMPUS!
Studio apartment $450 including utils.
Large living space, kitchen & bath.
Very quiet and private. (352) 337-2723
8-24-09-4-2

* 2/1 house $600/mo. Shed and carport.
Near Noonan's Lake. 653 SE 73rd Terr.
* 1/1 Vintage apt $425/mo. 3 blocks to UF.
$300 security.
Call Annette 514-6281 8-24-09-3-2

REDUCED PRICE Immediate occupancy
House Duckpond area 4BR/2.5BA. W/D,
storage bldg, fireplace, wd firs, glassed-in
porch. 1st, last + $200 dep. $375/mo/rm or
$1500/mo for all + utils. George 466-0165
8-31-09-9-2

1 BR/1 BA available now. Near Shands. Large
screened-in porch. W/D hook-ups. Pets ok.
$525/mo, $575 sec dep. 3300 SW 23rd St.
Apt #2. Call 352-371-3473, please leave
message. 9-4-09-12-2

2BR + small bonus room/1BA. Near Shands.
Availalbe now. Large screened-in porch. W/D
hook-ups. $685/mo, $700 sec dep. 3300 SW
23rd St. Apt #1. Call 352-371-3473 please
leave message. 9-4-09-12-2

Home 3BR/2BTH Close SF/UF
Lg Shady Fenced Lot, All Aplncs. NW Gville.
$1000. 772-631-1448, 305-401-6817
8-28-09-7-2

Loft apt off Tower Rd, 1/1, spacious, quiet,
lots of amenities, pool, exercise room, sauna,
on bus route, mature setting, $700/mo, $500
deposit, 352-682-6257. 8-26-09-5-2

1Bdrm in 4/2 home, Fall sublease, close to
UF and SFC, quiet neighborhood,3 male
grad student roomates, $425/mo call Dan
954-551-9846 8-28-09-7-2


Single family 3/2 home in Gville. fireplace,
screened patio, living/dining room with vault-
ed ceiling, two car garage w/ work bench.
Northwood Oaks. $985/mth. 377-8078
8-26-09-5-2

Looking for a place to live
before school starts?
Homes available for immediate occupancy
Low payments!
Call for details: 352-378-4411 8-31-09-8-2

Historic 3 Br 1 ba House for Rent. Walk to
downtown, behind Melting Pot. C/H Air, New
carpet & paint. Front porch, fenced back yrd.
$900 mo, 1st, last $500 Dep. Small pets ok
with approval. Call (352) 258-6582
or e-mail tamorcutt@yahoo.com 8-31-09-
7-2

Move in Special: No Security Deposit
2/2 Condo/w/washer/dryer, screened-in
porch/newer condo/near UF/Shands/located
off 34th & Archer Rd./$750 per month-
call 317-5060 8-27-09-5-2

1 MONTH FREE RENT
*1BR/1BA walk to UF $460-$475 0 2BR
$525 0 3BR/2BA, fenced yard $1100.
Gore Rabell Real Estate 378-1387
www.Gore-Rabell.com 12-9-09-75-2

400$ +1/3 utils 1BR in 4/2 Big House, com-
mon area furnished, wireless internet, W/D, 2
living rooms, kitchen, garage, porch. Contact
Mark at 386-566-4440 or
ripthesea@yahoo.com 8-24-09-2-2

Houses
Close to Campus

2/1 713 NW 30th Ave 650
3/1 503 NW 6th Ave remodeled $950
3/1 1607 NW 8th Ave wood firs $975
4/2 541 NW 34th St new appl. $995
4/2 3737 SW4th PI 1918 sq ft $1350
4/2.5 212 NW 21st St 1 mo. free $2000
4/2.5 16 NW 29th St brand new $2000
Edbaurmanagement.com
1731 NW 6th St-375-7104
8-31-09-7-2

AVAILABLE NOW!
Nice 1BR/1BA apt. Close to campus and
convenient to everything. $395. Call Richard
371-4367 8-27-09-5-2

GREAT DEAL ON 2/2.5 TOWNHOME.
Kensington North, quiet neighborhood close
to campus, on busline, with pool and gym.
Washer and dryer in unit. $700 or best offer.
Call Amy at 813-205-3533. 8-27-09-5-2

Great Apartments Immediate Occupancy
* 1BD/1BA-1 Block to UF, Conv. and
Comfortable. $550/month and Utilities
* Great Townhouse on Bus Lines
2BD/2.5BA in Pool Community $800/month
Century 21 Classic Properties ext 107
352-331-2100 1-800-466-3429
8-24-09-2-2

2 Bedroom-2 Full Bath Modern Condo. One
Car Garage plus reserved parking. Tiffany
Condos -NW 23rd Blvd. $850 mo + $500 dep
tiffany@NFMLLC.com, 352-514-1800. Pics
at tinyurl.com/tiffany4 9-8-09-12-2

Non-Smoking Female. 2 miles east of UF.
On bus route. One bedroom for rent. Share
full bath. CLEAN cat OK. $240/month. Incl.
Util. Call Jane 871-6065 8-28-09-5-2

2 BR/2 pvt Bath available in Rockwood Villas
3 BR unit $400 per room plus 1/3 of utilities.
Internet and Cable included in rent. W/D in
unit. None smokers preferred.Close to Oaks
Mall. 321-626-2352 8-24-1-2

Beautiful 3/2 house nice NW area.
Options:washer,dryer,cable tv. Includes:dish
washer,central AC,garage,nice above ground
pool,1500 sq/ft, sun room,great yard. $1100
month Call:352-283-8366. 9-2-8-2

* 2/1 House Stephen Foster
* 2/1 House Hippy-style SW
* 2/2 Condo Large, clean
* 2/1 Condo Cute
$550-$750. 352-374-4216
8-28-09-5-2

GRAD STUDENT NEEDS 1 ROOMMATE:
$450 rent plus utilities for 1 Room in 2bed
2bath, 1190SQ.FT. apt. in Bellamay Grand.
Call Abby @ 484-951-5736, email:
abbyc@ufl.edu 8-28-09-5-2


2BR/1.5BA TOWNHOUSE FOR RENT
Completely Remodeled, New Appliances,
W/D Inc, Alarm, On bus route, 5 min from UF
$725/month, 561-236-0714 8-24-09-2-2


HUGE 5 BED HOUSE!
3 baths, enclosed front patio
W/D, Wood floors, Fireplace
3 blocks from UF! Pets loved!
372-7111 106 NW 10th Street
12-9-09-75-2


1 BLOCK TO SHANDS
2BR/1BA units. $765, $825, $875.
Furnished/unfurnished.
Summit House. 359-6785 8-28-09-5-2

DUCK POND 1ST MONTH FREE!
$1085 MO 3 OR 4 BR/2BA.
LR/DR. LGE YARD. QUIET.
CLOSE TO UF. NEW PAINT.
904/415-0370 kbskiis@yahoo.com 9-1-09-
7-2

2 br/1.5 bath Townhouse in SW Gainesville
Convienient to Mall, Parks, Schools and UF
Pets OK! Washer and Dryer included!
700 month + security
Call 407-433-1443 8-25-09-2-2

WALK TO UF 1 OR 2 bedrooms in 4/2 APT
Ind. lease 295/month 1/4 utilities no pets
1740 NW 3rd PL Call 352-231-3002 or email
hodgeproperties@cox.net for more info
8-28-09-5-2

2 bd 2.5 bath townhouse SW 43rd St. Near
Archer Rd & 1-75. Community pool & 2 park-
ing places. Water and trash included. $800
941-773-8887 941-301-7577 8-28-09-5-2

DUPLEX EFFICIENCY Private entrance
1BR/1BA, full kitchen, double stainless sink,
garbage disposal, microwave, ref/freezer,
Dish TV, covered patio, shed. Utils incl $495/
mo. Tower & Archer Rd. 352-372-6466
8-28-09-5-2

*3BR/1 BA House
819 NW 10th Ave $850/mo
*2BR/1.5BA Townhouse
7130 SW 45th PI $600/mo.
No pets. Call Geri 352-538-1114 9-4-09-
10-2

Quiet, Green, 1/2 mile to UF, Reduced Rent
and must see! 2BR/2.5BA Townhouse, 1200
s.ft, 4112 SW 15th PI., fenced yard, A/C,
W/D hook-up, DW, Pets OK, SW 20th Ave.
busline,$786/mo. Call Lalit 352-378-6817,
871-8205 8-28-09-5-2

CUSTOM UPGRADED 2BDRM 1BATH
TILE IN LR KIT HALL BATH NEW CARPET
IN BDRMS W CEILING FANS LIKE NEW
STAINLESS APPL IN KIT NEW TUB TOILET
VANITY IN BATH FULL SIZE W/D AVAIL
CABLE/INTERNET CENT H/A 1 1/2 MI TO
UF SHANDS BUTLER PL ON BUS RTE NO
PETS $685/MO 7272423-9463 JOE 8-28-
09-5-2

Great deal 3/2 home @ 4139 NW 19th
Drive. New study w/ ceiling fan, carport,
W/D hookup, screened porch, fenced yard.
Quiet neighborhood, Norton Elem. district.
Pets negotiable $895/month. Call 371-2118.
8-28-09-5-2

Upscale 2/2 Condo in Haile Plantation $1175
Fireplace,balcony,washer dryer,cathedral
ceilings,split floor plan,two master suites and
computer station.Community pool, workout
center,walking trails 3523753677 8-28-09-
5-2

Clean, spacious 3/2 condo. Quiet, yet cen-
trally located just 1.5 mi. from law school.
Very low utilities, W/D, pool. Sorry, no pets.
Just $1000. Call 352-262-9119 9-11-09-
14-2

2BR1BA HOUSE Only $575/mo
Near Newnan's Lake.
653 NE 73rd Terr. 514-6281 8-28-09-5-2


1BR/1BA apt. $400/mo
3 Blocks to UF.
Water incl. 115 NW 9th Terr. 514-6281
8-28-09-5-2







38, ALLIGATOR U MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009


1104 SW 7th Ave #A Gainesville, FL 32605.
For rent. 3 bedrooms. 2 bathrooms.
1 bedroom available. 2 other rooms occupied.
Rent $500. Walking distance to campus.
Call Frank at (850)519-2180. Available now.
8-26-09-15-3

2/2 Condo at The Links at Haile Plantation
for sublease beginning September 4, 2009
(flexible). No Security deposit. Call Debbie at
305-794-9734. 8-26-09-5-3

one bedroom sublease in a 4/4 apt of girls.
private room and bath.$565 mth.
941-914-5255 8-27-09-5-3

WALK TO SFC
The Crossings at Santa Fe, Apt #2114. $519/
mo for 1BR/1BA in 3BR/3BA. Share with 2
other girls. Availalbe Sept '09 thru Aug '10.
Pool. Call 328-5101 8-27-09-5-3

Desperate. Must rent daughter's
apartment. 2bd2bath large with male UF
graduate. Rent $352 until August 2010. Will
subside to make rent $200 for whole year.
Cindi 352 331-3793
8-27-09-4-3


Roommate Matching HERE
Oxford Manor 377-2777
The Landings 336-3838
The Laurels 335-4455
Greenwich Green 372-8100
Hidden Lake 374-3866
12-9-75-4


Now you can easily
submit your classified ad
for print and/or web editions
right thru our website!
Just go to
www.alligator.org/classifieds
Visa and Mastercard accepted.


Renovated, beautiful condo.'Close to
Shands, VA, campus. Prefer female. $525/
mo includes utils. Call (386)871-7184 8-28-
09-30-4

1st MO FREE RENT. Countryside Share
4BR/4BA upgraded furn condo w/ 2 other
students. 1.5 miles to UF on bus rte, pool,
W/D, cable & utils incl. $425/mo. Call 386-
672-6969 or 386-295-7929. Avail Aug 1st.
9-4-09-26-4

1BR INDIVIDUAL LEASES IN FURNISHED
4BR CONDOS. 2 blocks to UF. $345/mo incl
Pool, laundry facility. 914 SW 8th Ave. 378-
4626 8-24-09-12-4

COLLEGE ROOMS STARTING AT
$395.00 MONTH, UTILITIES INCLUDED
NO MOVE IN COST
Call Frances 352-375-8787
Rent Florida Realty
10-28-09-60-4

Roommate wanted for furnished BD in
Creeks Edge Condos. Close to UF & Santa
Fe. Incl pool, tennis courts, workout room,
clubhouse, outdoor grills & picnic tables.
Very wooded & quiet. (407) 276-5702
8-27-09-14-4


Male, grad student, small furnished apt on
side of private home close to UF. One per-
son only. No pets. Cable, patio, clean, quiet.
$500 pm, utilities included. 336-5808 8-31-
09-16-4

Seeking students for 3/2 home w/ 2 rooms
for rent. 1600 sq. ft, 1 acre lot in Meadows
on the Prairie. Facebook Mike Rollins for
pict. 727-224-5852. $550/mo everything incl
8-24-09-10-4

Young professional seeking grad/law stu-
dent house roomate. Quiet neighborhood,
short drive/bike ride to campus, walking dis-
tance to Starbucks! Must love dogs. $450 per
month.
E-mail Chris: trinitytennis@gmail.com 8-31-
09-13-4


Female roommate pref for furn/unfurn
lbr/lba in a 2br/2.5ba townhouse in quiet
SW neighborhood near UF & Shands. AVAIL
NOW, M-to-M lease, $450/month & $250
refundable deposit. Call Ann 352-870-7414
8-23-10-4

$350 MOVES YOU IN! Need 1 roommate to
rent rm in a 3/2 FULLY FURNISHED house.
5 mins to UF. 10 mins to Santa Fe. No sec or
util deposit. Split utils, maid & yard man, W/D,
Irg yard, family & living rm 813-362-7729
8-28-09-4-4

Southfork Oaks; 2 Bd/2.5 Ba;
Clean, studious, female rmmate needed.
$415/mo + utilities. Water incld.
Call cell 954-579-9368. Leave message
8-28-11-4

Room $299. $99 first month
has everything, walk-in closet, pvt BA,
WID, DW, built-in micro, tile & carpet, pool
on site. 505-9264 or 870-0904 8-28-09-
9-4

Female for upstairs 4/bed 4/bath Countryside
@ UF Condo fullyfurnished, $435 incl utilities
cable/internet W/D pool work-out fac. semes-
ter renter ok, great bus route. 904-612-3944
9-8-09-15-4

AVAILABLE NOW 1 BD in 4BD/2BA house
with 3 females. Rent is $400/mo + 1/4 utili-
ties. Pets welcome. Cable hook ups and
wireless internet. weelo25@ufl.edu 8-31-
09-10-4

Roommate wanted to share 3br/2ba house
w/pool near UF campus. No pets, No smok-
ing.
$395/month +1/3 utilities.
Call 321-537-6212 for more info 9-8-09-15-
4

Female Student Wanted! Gorgeous room
available in spacious new 2BR/2BA at
Royale Palms. 18 steps from UF campus on
sorority row. $760 rent per month includes
utlities,cable, and internet. Available Aug 8,
first month free! Contact Kathy at 954-604-
0570 or email at kryzoc@gmail.com. 8-24-
09-5-4

GREAT PRICE!
$350 & all utils incl. 1/1 avail in fully furn 4/4
apts. New carpet & paint, cable, wireless in-
ternet, pool, W/D in unit. SW area on 2 bus
rts. Bus stop on site. 954-593-3063 8-28-
09-8-4

Hate long bus rides? Be in class/Shands/
VA in 5 mins. Share 2/1 at Summit House
Condos, $375/mo + 1/2 util.$200 sec. dep.
No pets per complex, Available immed. Call
Tim 352-843-0220 8-31-9-4

Male college student preferred. 4BR/4BA
Countryside condo. Own bathroom, W/D,
hi-speed internet, on bus rte. Utils included.
$450/mo. 863-634-1893. Available immedi-
ately. 8-26-09-5-4

1BR in 3BR/2BA GREENLEAF
Furnished condo. W/D, free TV cable. $350/
mo + 1/3 utils. Call 352-260-3359 8-26-09-
5-4

$250 or $325 MOVES YOU IN.2 roommates
share 3BR/2.5BA furn townhome w/UF
UG.CasaBlanca West.pool, patio.No dogs.
Near bus to campus.M-M.786.299.8626 or
786.514.5319. 8-26-09-5-4

1 female roommate needed. Move in now.
Poolside 1/1 in 4/4 at Countryside. $425/mo.
Internet, W/D, great deal and location. Call
386-676-9703 or nukkenl@aol.com 8-27-
09-5-4

Walk to UF 1# and deposit cost $350 a
month plus utilities and satellite furnished
with kingsize bd, desk and TV. Call Jim at
375-9411 or 215-1164 for the right person.
8-24-09-2-4

Roommate Wanted in Rockwood Villas 1
bedroom private bath available in a 3/3. Room
available immediatley,August rent free. On
bus route to UF and Santa Fe College. Call
Jeff at 352-538-7521 8-28-09-6-4

Need roommate pref. male for 2 bed 2 1/2
bath townhouse style apt on sw 10th st and
sw 7th ave behind Norman Hall (Taylor
Square) $650/month flat rate, everything in-
cluded. call 772-370-5006 8-27-5-4


3BR/3BA avail now in 4BR/4BA Country-side
condo. $435/mo/room, + utils incl. Direct
bus to UF 3 mi. Bball, pool, exercise room,
nicely furn. 3rd Fir. W/D, wireless. Flo 352-
357-9656, Sebastian 352-874-8905 8-31-
09-7-4

CLEAN+QUIET STUDENT/PROF WANTED
Private bed/bath in 2/2 1300sf pvt condo
15m toUF,2m toMall-Quiet,Nice Nghbrhood
common areas frnshd,w/d,pool.NO smk/pets
$425+1/2 util. call alex 352-514-0405 8-28-
09-6-4


Enjoy A Romantic Old House
Near library downtown. $295-$375/rm + utils.
Short term. No pets. No smoking. 378-1304
8-28-6-4

Serious but fun medical student needs 2
roommates for 3BR condo. 1BR furn, the
other not. Moderate drinking okay but no
drunks or drugs. $375/mo + 1/3 utils. Call
(386) 397-6775 8-27-09-5-4

Male roommate needed. Share furn 3BR/2BA
house w/yng prof $400/mo +1/2 util Directv,
ph, wireless, Vonage, elec. W/D, ofc space
pvt BA (morn) Ig yd fenced, pets ok, trees,
wooddeck, hottub, pond. UF-15 min drive,
near bus, Lakeview Ests 352-682-6297
7-31-7-4

******YOU FOUND IT******
NW Gainesville Cozy home. 3 furn BDs on
bus rt 8. 3 mi to UF, 5 to SFC. Female seek-
ing same. W/D. Wireless inet Bonus! School
parking paid $425 all incl. (239) 220-3771
8-27-09-5-4

Handyman spec Disc 4 wk share 2/2-furn
rm avail now $200/NR dep $300/mo $75/
wk +1/2 GRU 2 wk adv Laund/cook svc avail
NS/NA/ND Car a+ 30day vacate notice. Near
bus/shops. Some pet ok. Donna 331-0762
8-31-6-4

Female roommate needed, beautifully
renovated, furnished condo,1 mile
from UF, $399/MO includes cable,
internet, utilities, pool + fitness room
and on bus routes, 352 262-2871
9-4-09-10-4

Roommates wanted to share nice 4/2.5 fur-
nished NW home in quiet neighborhood 1.5
miles to UF. Large yard. $450-$500 includes
utilities, cable in all BR's, hi speed internet,
W/D. NS & no pets. 352-284-0771. 8-28-
09-5-4


Sell your house, condo, acreage, mobile
home and much more in the ALLIGATOR
CLASSIFIEDS! Reach thousands of possible
buyers! Mastercard and Visa accepted over
the phone, by fax, email or CHECK OUT
PLACING YOUR AD THRU OUR ONLINE
AT www.alligator.org. or please call 373-
Find (373-3463)


SEE ALL CONDOS
WWW.UFCONDOS.COM
Matt Price Campus Realty, 352-281-3551
12-9-74-5

NEW CONDOS -WALK to UF
3 Blks to UF. For Info on ALL 1, 2, 3, 4
Bedrooms for Sale, Call Eric Leightman,
Campus Realty at 352-219-2879. 12-9-74-5

AFFORDABLE LUXURY NEW CONSTRUC-
TION NEAR UF, SHANDS, LAW SCHOOL
2Bed/3 Full Baths + Office. Granite
Counters, 2 Direct Bus Stops to UF
Matt Price, Campus Realty 352-281-3551
12-9-74-5


WALK TO UF & DOWNTOWN!
THE PALMS New Ultra-Luxury Condos.
Granite, Huge Closets, Pool, Call Eric
Leightman, Campus Realty, 352-219-2879
12-9-74-5

RENT TO BUY OR
SELL W/OWNER FINANCING.
Lovely 3BR/2BA near UF. 378-4626 or 262-
4290 See at chesnutlending.com/properties.
8-24-09-12-5


2001 2BR/2BA Mobile Home
in Oak Park Village. Includes appliances,
10x10 shed, awning. $12,000. 352-424-0687
8-31-09-15-5

Tumbling Creek Condo. Creek Front
1BR/1BA Wood flooring $59900
352-493-3487 8-31-14-5

2006 Homes of Merrit 3/2 excellent condi-
tion 28x56 double wide in Westgage Mobile
Manor.Storage shed all appliances included.
Great home for students. Only $39,999
352-214-8310 or email
dblochkell@yahoo.com 8-31-09-9-5


BED QUEEN $120 ORTHOPEDIC
Extra thick, pillow-top, mattress & box. Name
brand, new, still in plastic. Call 352-372-7490
will deliver. 12-9-09-74-6

BED FULL SIZE $100 ORTHOPEDIC
Pillow-top mattress & box. New, unused, still
in plastic w/warranty. Can deliver. Call 352-
377-9846 12-9-09-74-6

MICROFIBER SOFA & LOVESEAT $400
Brand new still packaged w/warranty. Must
sell. Can deliver. Retail $1600. 352-372-
7490 12-9-09-74-6

BED KING $170 PILLOWTOP
mattress & box springs. Orthopedic rated.
Name brand, new, never been used, in plas-
tic with warranty. Call 352-372-8588. Can
deliver. 12-9-09-74-6

CHERRY SLEIGH BED solid with Pillowtop
Mattress & Box. All new still boxed. Cost
$1500, sacrifice $450 352-333-7516

Sofa $175 Brand new in pkg 333-7516
12-9-74-6

BEDROOM SET. 7pc Cherry, Queen/ king
bed, dresser w/mirror, 2 nightstands, chests
avail. Dovetail const. New, in boxes. Can de-
liver. Retail $6500, must sell, sacrifice $1100
(352) 372-7490 12-9-09-74-6

SOFA & LOVESEAT 100% Italian leather.
Brand new in plastic w/warranty. Retail
$2650. Sacrifice $750. Call 352-377-9846
12-9-09-74-6

DINING ROOM Beautiful cherry set w/table,
6 Chippendale chairs, hutch & buffet. New,
still in boxes. Retail $5200, sacrifice $1100.
Must sell. Can deliver. 352-372-8588 12-
9-74-6

FUTON Solid oak mission-style frame w/
mattress. New, in box. $160 332-9899

DINETTE SET 5pc $120 Brand new in box.
Never used. 352-377-9846 12-9-09-74-6

**BEDS ALL BRAND NEW**
**Full $100 Queen $125 King $200**
Orthopedic pillow-top sets. Brand name
matching sets not used or refurbished. Still
in plastic, direct from factory! 352-333-7516.
12-9-74-6

BED- QUEEN New orthopedic pillowtop mat-
tress and boxspring set. Brand name, brand
new, still in plastic with warranty. Can deliver.
$130 352-377-9846. 12-9-74-6

Bed- All New King! 3pc Orthopedic pillowtop
mattress set. Brand NEW, still in plastic with
warranty. Can deliver. $200 352-333-7516.
12-9-74-6

BEDROOM SET- $300 BRAND NEW
Still in boxes! 6 pieces include: Headboard,
2 Nightstands, Dresser, Mirror, Chest. Must
sell, can deliver. 352-377-9846. 12-9-09-
74-6

FUTON $60 Solid Oak Mission Style. With
plush mattress $160. All brand NEW still in
box. Can deliver. 352-333-7516 12-9-74-6

Bed-FULL size pillowtop mattress & box. New
in plastic, warr. Can del. $100 317-4031

SOFA $185 Brand new! Love seat $150 still
in pkg. Can del 352-333-7516 12-9-74-6


000000* BEDS *O***00
TWIN set $49, FULL set $69; QUEEN set
$89; KING set $99. CALL-A-MATTRESS
2 locations: 4390 SW 20th Ave 352-376-0953
& downtown 203 SW 16th Ave 352-378-6005
8-25-09-8-6

Mattress Set Purchased new for guest bed-
room never used. Paid over $350 Sell for
$250 like new. Close to UF. Call James
373-6078 8-28-09-7-6

05 PC Bedroom set $275
*Dining table w/ four chairs $125
OQueen & Full mattress sets $90/set
Call Billy 215-3403 9-9-09-14-6

Sofa Chair Ottoman Denim washable covers
comfortable no tears $150 or b/o. Kitchen ta-
ble w/4 swivel chairs 3'x5' off whilte w/ maple
accents good condition $150 or b/o, call 214-
4677. 8-26-09-3-6


CASH PAID FOR LAPTOP'S
Buy Sell Trade Any Condition
336-0075 www.pcrecycle.biz Joel 12-9-
09-74-7








CD PUTERS
12-9-74-7

Computer Help Fast Gatorland Computers
House/Dorm Fast response. No waiting/
unplugging/hassels. $30 Gator discount w/
ID. Certified MCSE Technicians. 338-8041.
www.GatorlandComputers.com 12-9-74-7


In the market for a new set of wheels or just
looking to add a second to that collection?
Want personalized handlebars or a fitted
seat? Check in the Alligator Classifieds


NEW & USED BIKES FOR SALE
WE REPAIR ALL BRANDS
Best Prices in Town *
SPIN CYCLE 373-3355
424 W UNIV AVE (DOWNTOWN)
12-9-74-9

Triathlon?
Learn more about triathlons at one of our
FREE clinics! All experience levels welcome!
352-573-9481
www.pointyhelmetcoaching.com
8-28-09-6-9





***PARKING@@@
Private, Secure, Guaranteed. 60 sec to UF.
Reserve now! Reasonable rates. 352-538-
2181. Can leave mssg. 12-9-09-74-10


UF SURPLUS EQUIPMENT AUCTIONS
are underway...
bikes, computers, printers, vehicles & more.
All individuals interested in bidding go to:
surplus.ufl.edu 392-0370
12-9-09-75-10


PARKING SPACES
FOR RENT $60/mo.
Call 372-4903 or 917-416-6968 8-27-09-9-
10

PARKING 60 SECONDS TO UF
Next to McDonalds NW 13th St. Call for se-
mester rates: 352-538-2454. 8-24-09-5-10

GLASS TOP 4-SEAT KITCHEN
TABLE Like new. $550.
Call 491-2930 8-24-09-3-10

PLAY & BUY DRUMS, GUITARS, MORE
@ STUDIO PERCUSSION
www.STUDIOPERCUSSION.org
(352) 338-8302 9-18-20-10







MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009 U ALLIGATOR, 39


OOO*JET BOATOOOO
'97 14' SeaDoo, 4-5 seater, perfect for lakes,
rivers, intercoastal. Runs great, looks great!
Must sell, moving. Comes w/ wakeboard, ski
rope & skis. $6500/OBO Call 352-316-1637
9-4-09-10-10


***WWW.RPMMOTORCYCLES.COM**
FULL SERVICE REPAIR SHOP 11TH YEAR
OEM + AFTERMARKET PARTS + ACCY'S
HUGE TIRE SELECTION IN STOCK, CALL
FOR PRICES + DISCOUNTS 352-377-6974
12-9-09-75-11

*****New Scooters 4 Less*****
Motor Scooter Sales and Service!
Great Scooters, Service & Prices!
118 NW 14th Ave, Ste D, 336-1271
www.NS4L.com
12-9-09-75-11


***GatorMoto***
Largest Scooter Store in Town! Run by Gator
Grads! New scooters starting at$999. No legit
shop can beat these prices! lyr Warranties
included. 376-6275GatorMoto.com 12-9-09-
75-11


SCOOTER SERVICE
New Scooters 4 Less has LOW service rates!
Will service any make/model. Close to UF!
Pick-ups avail cheap oil changes!! 336-1271
12-9-09-75-11

***www.BuyMyScooter.com***
Buy A New Scooter, Buy A Used Scooter
All on one site! Check the website or call
336-1271 for more info! 12-9-09-75-11

GATORMOTO Gville's #1 service facility. We
repair ALL brands of scooters. Pickups avail-
able. Lowest labor rates around. Quickest
turnaround time. Run by Gator Grads so we
know how to treat our customers! 376-6275
12-9-09-75-11


*00000 SCOOTERS 000000
RPM MOTORCYCLES INC
SALES, SERVICE, PARTS
Many Brands Available 518 SE 2nd St.
www.RPMmotorcycles.com 377-6974
12-9-09-75-11


**SCOOTER RENTALS**
Rent for a day, week, semester, or rent to
own! Reserve now for Game Day Weekends!
NS4L.com 352-336-1271 12-9-09-75-11


FAST CASH FOR ALMOST ANY CARS *
*Running or not!*
*NEED HONDA, TOYOTA, PICKUPS
SOver 15 yr svc to UF students
OCall Don @ 215-7987 12-9-75-12

CARS CARS BuyOSellOTrade
Clean BMW, Volvo, Mercedes
Toyota, Honda, Nissan cars
3432 N Main St. www.carrsmith.com
CARRSMITH AUTO SALES 373-1150
12-9-75-12


$500! POLICE IMPOUNDS!
HONDAS, CHEVYS, TOYOTAS, ETC.
For listings 800-366-9813 ext 4622
12-9-75-12


**HEADLINERS SAGGING?**
POWER WINDOWS DON'T WORK?
On site avail. Steve's Headliners 352-226-1973
12-9-74-12


CARS FROM $29/MO!
Hondas, Chevys, Jeeps and More!
$0 Down, 36 Months @ 8.5% apr.
For listings call 800-366-9813 ext 9765
10-30-09-50-12


WE BUY JUNK CARS
Titles Only. Call K.T. (352) 281-9980
12-9-75-12


Add a strong rJesume builder...



Begin to 4tdidypor



., busines' 'experience



To compete in today's job market, you need

experience. The Alligator offers students just

like you that opportunity. As a sales intern

or representative, you will gain valuable sales

experience through personal contact w'Itt clients.

You will learn the media business from a nds-

on perspecnve. d



ou can work fall and sring semesters, co e

what makes us a reflction of your colleg

m et. You must be e lled in classes. Let th

S tor be your fi t ep toward a successful

,L Jiuture.



S*Appa s are available at The Alligator
y', ti Application deadline:
.'t EMonday, August 31st


$$ CASH TODAY! $$
For Your Unwanted Cars
Junk!! Trucks, RVs, & Wrecks!!!
TOP DOLLAR PAID!
386-365-1855 & 386-234-0075
8-24-09-10-12

Saturn 2001 Wagon, 119,000 miles $3900
WILL NEGOTIATE FOR BEST OFFER!
MUST SELL SOON!
EXCELLENT CONDITION! Totally
well-maintained!
E-mail: jcmcguire@bellsouth.net Home
phone: 352-481-4421 Cell phone: 352-284-
6010 8-24-09-1-12


LOCAL ARTIST NEEDS:
* Gold Diamonds Gems Class Rings
* ETC Top Cash $$$ or Trade *
OZZIE'S FINE JEWELRY 373-9243. 2-10-
74-13

UF GRAD PAYS MORE
forgold jewelry, scrap gold, Rolex, diamonds,
guitars, etc. Top $$$. Get my offer before you
sell! Call Jim 376-8090 or 222-8090
12-9-75-13


BE AN INSPIRATION!
Take a blind lady to Mass on Sundays and
for walks and shopping as needed. We'll
have lots of fun! And you will make a new
friend! Contact219-6948 8-28-09-74-13

The American Cancer Society
Road to Recovery Volunteers Needed!
VOLUNTEER DRIVERS NEEDED
to transport cancer patients to treatment.
Flexible schedule.
Training and liability insurance provided.
Please call
352-376-6866 ext. 5079 if interested.

Looking for someone to help me learn to rake
knit a hat, second and fourth wednesdays of
each month. These hats are made for peo-
ple in Haiti. Come and have fun with Lenora.
Call 219-6948. 8-28-09-74-13

Unlimited Music & Video Downloads
Music, videos, movies, TV shows, games,
ringtones, audio books, etc. to your iPhone,
iPod, or cellphone. No per download fee.
www.fastappsdownloader.com/91288
8-28-09-5-13

$ WANTED
GRAPHIC CALCULATORS
Will pay cash. Call 352-284-8140 8-28-09-
5-13


This newspaper assumes no responsibility
for injury or loss arising from contacts made
through advertising. We suggest that any
reader who responds to advertising use cau-
tion and investigate the sincerity of the ad-
vertiser before giving out personal informa-
tion or arranging meetings


LIKE TO WORK WITH LUXURY CARS?
Bright? Enthusiastic? Like people? Must be
over 22, stable work history, clean driving re-
cord, drug-free, personal references.
www.carrsmith.com for details. 12-9-75-14


$STUDENTS GET CASH ON THE SPOT$
For gently used clothing/accessories & fur-
niture. No appt.necessary! Sandy's Savvy
Chic Resale Boutique 2906 NW 13th St. 372-
1226 12-9-09-74-14

Now you can easily
submit your classified ad
for print and/or web editions
right thru our website!
Just go to
www.alligator.org/classifieds
Visa and Mastercard accepted.


BARTENDING
$250 A DAY POTENTIAL
No experience necessary, training provided.
800-965-6520 ext 138 12-9-09-75-14



FUTURE GMs
Now hiring assistant managers
GatorDominos.com/jobs
12-9-75-14


PHONE AGENTS NEEDED
Must have Excellent Vocabulary and
Communication skills. PC skills needed.
Apply Now! 6020 NW 4th Place, Suite G.
352-371-5888 x 111 12-9-74-14


DOMINO'S
Now hiring Delivery Drivers $12-$16/hr.
You need a great attitude & dependable car.
Hiring lunch, dinner & late night shifts. Our
closing drivers earn $100 per night. Apply
@ any of our 8 location or @ gatordominos.
com/jobs. 12-9-09-75-14


Students in Accounting, Aviation, Business/
Sales and computer science needed for
various positions. Flexible schedules and
competitive pay. Join our team! Learn more
at www.gleim.com/employment 12-9-09-
82-14


Part Time Laboratory Assistant wanted
Must have experience in ElectroChemistry,
flexible work hours -10 hours per week.
Fax or e-mail resume/experience to
joy@geno-mechanix.com fax: 332-4515
8-24-09-7-14


Planting, mulching, trimming shrubs. Person
needed for lawn & garden care. Flex hrs, but
must be avail to work Wed. mornings. House
located 2 miles north of Highway Patrol sta-
tion. $12/hr. Fax resume to 386-462-7935
8-24-09-5-14


SANDY'S SAWYCHIC RESALE BOUTIQUE
NOW HIRING. Great working environment.
PT/FT positions available. $7.25-$7.50/hr +
incentives. 352-372-1226 2906 NW 13th St
8-24-09-5-14


SORORITY NEEDS
A FEW GOOD BUSPERSONS
Call 378-9032 for appointment 8-24-09-5-
14


Speech Language Therapist,
BA required, Supervision provided, 35 hr/
week, Call Einstein Montessori School
(352)335-4321 8-25-09-5-14


FARM MANAGER NEEDED:
Horses Helping People is seeking a dedi-
cated farm manager to work in exchange for
housing. Please call (352) 495-0533 or visit
www.horseshelpingpeople.org for more info.
8-24-4-14


Knowledge of Illustrator CS3 or Corel Draw
X3,P/T employee to create logos for T-shirts,
decals, jackets etc. create vinyl & embroidery
files. We have a retail store and website in
Gainesville.Call 352-871-2017 8-25-09-5-14


Do you have a passion for the Obamas, fit-
ness, and activism? Volunteers needed,
could lead to paid position.
J_r_rothstein@yahoo.com 8-25-09-5-14


Kennel Assistant needed for busy veterinary
practice. Mornings and weekends. Please
fax resume to 352-466-4267 or email to mi-
canopytech@gmail.com 8-25-09-5-14


Experienced FT NANNY needed
for ADORABLE lyr old M-F
$10/hr; exp req.; Aug to Aug min.
Noah's Ark Nanny e-mail resume,pic,
schedule to gnv@nanoneone.com
8-26-09-6-14


STAY IN GAINESVILLE

CAREER POSITIONS
(with benefits)

Software Developer
Linux Admin
Admin Asst
Aviation Editor
Accounting Editor

Send resume to hr@gleim.com
GLEIM PUBLICATIONS
http://www.gleim.com
8-26-09-1-14


BARBERS WANTED
Hawthorne, Melrose, Keystone area. Call
256-2590 8-24-09-3-14

Clerical/Technician Position
FT/PT
Please apply in person
Institute of Veterinary Spec.
3603 NW 98th St. Suite A. 8-26-5-14

Executive Assistant- Crime Prevention
Security experiencing huge growth, great
career opportunity! Experience preferred.
Background check, drug test & valid FL
Drivers License required. Great benefits! Fax
resume to Jessica @ 376-9236
9-9-09-14-14

CATERING or RESTAURANT EXP
Catering Staff for special events.
Call Omi 352-215-1363 8-28-5-14

NOW HIRING
QUALIFIED MANAGERS
for busy restaurant. Email resumes to
adamsribco@gmail.com 8-26-5-14

Nanny for 3mon twins 20-25hr/wk
recent exp req / great refs
Noah's Ark Nanny e-mail resume,
pix, sched. gnv@nanoneone.com 8-26-09-
5-14





NOW HIRING
Experienced Notetakers and Editors
FALL 2009
Apply online at www.SmokinNotes.com
9-4-09-11-14

EVENT SUPERVISORS!!
PT Supervisors needed. days, nights week-
ends. Flexible hours. Great 2nd Job! Apply
at Concessions Office, South End Zone Ben
Hill Griffin Stadium, next to the Gator Sport
Shop (352) 375-4683 x6500 8-28-09-6-14

WAREHOUSE STAFF!!
FT/PT inventory control, flexible hours. Great
job for students! Will work around Class
schedule. Apply at Concessions Office,
South End Zone Ben Hill Griffin Stadium,
next To the Gator Sport Shop (352) 375-
4683 x6500 8-28-09-6-14

Tutors needed grad students pref. Writing,
English Composition & Literature, & geogra-
phy for local non-profit serving learning dis-
abled students. We'll work with your sched-
ule. Please call 352-335-8966 for more info
8-31-09-7-14

Brand new start-up company is looking
for Reps in ALL areas. We train & support
at no cost. Be your own boss. Make the
fortune you've dreamed of. No $ to start.
http://stokton.org/vacancies.html 9-10-
09-14-14

P/T Animal Keeper
Responsible for basic husbandry needs
of a collection of fruit bats at Lubee Bat
Conservancy. 20hrs/wk, mornings only. $9/
hr. Prior paid animal experience or zoologi-
cal degree preferred. FAX resume to 352-
485-2656, or email to bpope@lubee.org.
8-27-09-5-14

P/T Bookkeeper
Permanent part-time position at a conserva-
tion center. Requires full-charge bookkeep-
ing experience, proficiency with MS Office
and Quickbooks 2009, and excellent orga-
nizational skills. 12hrs/month, $25/hr. FAX
resume to 352-485-2656, or email to
awalsh@lubee.org. 8-27-09-5-14







40, ALLIGATOR U MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009


HowiGotAnA
Have a 3.6 GPA & want to earn some extra
cash? We are hiring notetakers for fall '09.
Go to www.HowlGotanA.com
8-31-09-7-14

Office Assistant FIT Passion Numbers/
language/organization/fitness. Eye for detail.
1 year + commitment. Resume to: 625 NE
1st St. 32601 or paulsrothstein@yahoo.com
8-28-09-5-14

BABYSITTER needed for a boy and a girl
ages 14 & 10. Daily pick up at 4pm at bus
drop and escort to home, prepare dinner
and help with homework. Daily 4-7pm. West
G'ville. Call 352-514-4339 8-28-09-5-14


PARK PLACE CARWASH
is looking for highly motivated employees,
morning & afternoon shifts available Apply in
person 7404 NW 4th Blvd. No calls please.
9-14-09-15-14

STUDENTS ONLY: 20 hour per week IT help
desk position with local government. Flexible
hours, great environment. Please submit re-
sume to resume.submit@actcfl.org. 8-28-
09-5-14


OFFICE ASSISTANT
15 hrs/wk. $7.25/hr. Proficiency typing,
Word, Excel, internet surfing. Indicate avail-
able hours, critical. sival950@yahoo.com
8-28-09-5-14

NANNY for 3 month old needed
Infant experience and references required
Email resume and availability to
stephmarchman@aol.com 8-26-09-3-14

MOSES MEDIA INC. has 18 immedi-
ate openings for National Internet Sales
Reps for our downtown office. Will train.
Commission based. Applicants must have
great communication skills, be self motivated
and computer literate. Telemarketing exp. a
plus. Please call Mr. Williams 352-337-2800
9-4-09-10-14


Part time home and office. $9.00/hr. start.
Weekends and weekdays. Mowing experi-
ence preferred. 591-3000 8-28-09-5-14

Movie Extras, Actors, Models Wanted Up
to $300/day! All Looks Needed! Call NOW
1-800-458-9303 9-21-20-14

Long hair models needed Work in a easy
going beautiful outdoor setting. Hip length
and longer only. No exp. ness. earn $80-300
while enjoying the day. 352 792-1824
9-4-09-10-14

Consultants wanted at the Center for
Instructional Technology and Training at the
University of Florida to assist in Faculty lab.
Applicants must be familiar with Windows
and MS Office, Photoshop, & Dreamweaver.
A friendly and cheerful attitude is essential
for this customer service position. Pay
starts at $8.00/hour. Contact Jennifer Smith
jksmith@ufl.edu, online application at:
http://www.citt.ufl.edu/employment.php.
9-4-10-14

WEB GRAPHIC ARTISTS wanted at the
UF Center for Instructional Technology and
Training. Develop your portfolio! Please visit
our website for more information. Schedule
is flexible; pay starts at $10.00 per hour. Call
392-7249 ext 230, online application at http://
www.citt.ufl.edu/employment.php
9-4-10-14


MOTHERS HELPER
2:30-6 weekdays for 13 and 11 y/o kids.
References and reliable car
required. 352-379-1017.
9-4-09-10-14

Administrative Assistant/ open position-
flexible hours. Need proficiency with MS
Office, Internet/email, organizational skills.
General clerical work, handling phone calls,
files & agenda. 9$/ hour. To schedule inter-
view, please email resume to
cleantouch@cleantouchcompany.com
8-26-09-3-14

PCA and CMA needed immediately to work
in Gainesville and Starke area. Male staff are
encouraged to apply. Call 352-284-2336 or
fax C.V. to 352-373-2254 8-28-09-5-14


IVEY'S GRILL
has openings for servers & dishwasher/
cooks. Apply in person before 11am or after
2pm. Closed Mondays. 8-28-09-5-14

Micanopy Animal Hospital is looking for an
experienced veterinary technician for a part-
time position. Must be able to work week-
ends. Fax resume to 352-466-4267 or email
to micanopytech@gmail.com. 8-28-09-5-14

PT Nanny for 3.5 yr old boy. Mon/Wed/Thurs
7-8:30 am & Tues 5-6:30 pm. Minimum 1 yr
commitment. Background check & referenc-
es required; CPR & experience preferred.
Must be nonsmoker with car & cell phone.
Excellent salary. 225-3349. 8-24-09-1-14

EARN SERIOUS CASH!
INDEPENDENT SALES REPS WANTED TO
INTRODUCE HEALTHY ALL NATURAL
ENERGY DRINK TO CAMPUS MARKET.
SELF-MOTIVATED, ENTREPRENEUR
TYPES ONLY.
CALL 1-800-342-3083
www.theactiondrink.com/zilli
8-28-09-5-14

Dermatology Practice has an opportunity
for FT/PT employment. Excellent Benefits,
Competitive Salary. Retirees, Second Career
and Shared Shift welcome to apply. Excellent
opportunity for PA applicants too. Please
send resume to fscds2009@yahoo.com
8-28-09-4-14

SUPERNANNY NEEDED
Busy professional couple with 5 children
Need nanny/housekeeper/assistant
20+ hours per week. Email resume and ref-
erences to: Tony@mcknight.ws 8-28-09-
5-15

Nanny for afterschool 3 days a week.
352-335-7835 (day)
kathywalsh61@yahoo.com 8-26-3-14


PT Nanny for 3.5 yr old boy. Mon/Wed/Thurs
7-8:30 am & Tues 5-6:30 pm. Minimum 1 yr
commitment. Background check & referenc-
es required; CPR & experience preferred.
Must be nonsmoker with car & cell phone.
Excellent salary. 225-3349. 8-24-09-1-14

MWFSat. NANNY for 3: 15 hr/wk
MWF nanny for 1: 25 hrs/wk
newborn to 3yrs; in-home prior exp;
must be avail for 1 year min;
Noah's Ark Nanny email resume,
pic, sched. to gnv@nanoneone.com 8-28-
09-5-14


IMPORT AUTO REPAIR. BMW, Mercedes,
Porsche, Volvo, VW, Honda, Toyota, Nissan,
Mazda. Quality craftsmanship, reasonable
prices, near UF, AAA approved 378-7830
www.carrsmith.com 12-9-75-15

EVERGLADE EQUESTRIAN CENTER
The countryclub for horses & owners.
Customer lounge w/full kitchen & bath. 250' x
160' riding ring, round pen &jump paddock.
Lessons. 30 acres, 40 matted stalls, 19 sepa-
rate paddocks. 24-hr security, 352-591-3175
everglade-equestrian.com 12-9-74-15

Want to be a CNA, phlebotomist or pharm
tech? Express Training offers courses, days,
eve, weekend. All classes live, no videos.
Call 352-338-1193 or
expresstrainingservices.com 12-9-09-74-15

PERSONAL TRAINING 300
Personal and Group Training
Flexible Scheduling Exclusive Facility
Call for a free workout
339-2199
12-9-74-15

TLC HORSEBOARD
All facilities & amenities, quality instruc-
tion; 15 minutes from UF. Jan at 376-7762.
Greathouse Equestrian Ctr. 12-9-75-15

HORSE BOARDING
Hourly work available. 12 x 12 stall cement
block barn. Good grass turnout with room to
run! Limited # of stalls available. $350/mo.
352-472-2627 for info & directions. 12-9-
09-74-15

HYPNOTIST Stop smoking. Improve mem-
ory & concentration. Eliminate bad habits.
Past life regression. Learn self hypnosis.
Low Student Rates. Leonard Umans AAPH,
NGH certified 379-1079 12-9-75-15


T-SHIRT SCREEN PRINTING
Greeks-Sports-Clubs-Bands
*Call or Stop by for a QUOTE*
MONSTER PRESS 373-3355
424 W UNIV AVE (in Spin Cycle)
12-9-74-15

Mini Maxi Warehouses; corner Waldo Rd &
NE 31st Ave; 12 acres, student/staff rentals;
UHaul warehouse complex, trucks, trailers. 6
x 10 rentals $39/mo! 352-373-6294 or 1-800-
559-2449 Also 100 sheds for sale. 12-9-09-
68-15

Gator Slide Farm: Horse boarding.
Owner housing. Dressage, stadium jumping,
X-country. Lessons/schooling opportunities.
Feeding/mucking mitigate monthly charges.
Visitors always welcome. Contact Dibbie
352.466.3538 or gtrslfrm@aol.com 9-16-
09-60-15


GUTTER & ROOF CLEANING
Free Estimates. Super Service! Lic & Ins.
Steve "The School Teacher" 352-377-7086
12-9-09-74-15

STUDIO TIME
Professional recordings for any purpose
Session Rate- $25/hr
352-450-1933
studiotime@afreshconcept.com
8-25-15-15

HORSE BOARDING Premier facility next
to Canterbury. Stall or pasture board from
$250. Two sand/clay arenas, round pen,
jumps, lessons. Work avail to defray costs.
352-472-9977 weecfl@gmail.com 1-19-09-
95-15


Laser Hair Removal, Electrolysis, & Skin
Care @ Advanced Hair Removal & Skin
Institute- 352.331.6797- Ask about student
discounts & sorority specials. Check out our
website @ www.hairskininstitute.com
9-30-09-27-15

Private home office experienced childcare.
Close to UF. 3 months to 3 years old. $17.50/
day & pay only for the day(s) you need.
Please call 352-372-1769 9-11-09-14-15


HIV ANTIBODY TESTING
Alachua County Health Dept. Call
334-7960 for app't (optional $20 fee)


All Women's Health Center
ABORTION
Free Pregnancy Test
RU-486 Available
378-9191
www.abortiongainesville.com
12-9-75-16


THE TRUE YOU!
Lose 8-15 pounds in 4 weeks
Only $119!
Gain muscle while you lose fat
Groups forming now. 339-2199
12-9-74-16


Affordable Therapy at Stillpoint
This months Specials:
1 Hour Massage Therapy or.....
1 Hour Acupuncture/Acupressure/Herbal
Consult.. or Chiropractic Treatment Session
$ 40.00!!! Licensed, Experienced
Professionals 10 minutes from campus on
39th ave. schedule today. 376 1320 9-17-
20-16


HIV ANTIBODY TESTING
Alachua County Health Dept. Call
334-7960 for app't (optional $20 fee)


SAVE ON RAYBAN/SUNGLASSES

University Opticians
300 SW 4th Ave. 378-4480
12-9-09-75-18

LAPTOP BACKPACKS!
All Jansport backpacks on sale. Many styles
with padded laptop compartments. All have
lifetime warranties. 1 mile N. of UF on 13th
St. Lloyd Clarke Sports 352-372-7836 9-3-
10-18

SHOE SALE
Over 200 styles are on sale 10-50% off.
Great selection of running shoes, sandals
and cleats too! Let us help you find the right
shoe. Lloyd Clarke Sports 1504 NW 13th St.
9-3-10-18

NEED A RUNNING BUDDY?
Come join our running group Sunday nights
at 6:00pm. Meet at Lloyd Clarke Sports 1504
NW 13th St (1 mile N. of UF) 3-6 mile loops -
Great company. www.lloydclarkesports.com
9-3-10-18

NEED TEAM UNIFORMS?
From super-technical to ultra-basic, we make
any type of jerseys you may need. Our team
department is fast, competitive and profes-
sional. Call Palmer @ 372-7836 for all of
your team needs. Lloyd Clarke Sports 1504
NW 13th St. 9-3-10-18

CHACOS
Great sandal for walking all over campus.
Adjustable straps for a custom fit & they last a
long time. Flip flops too! Lloyd Clarke Sports
1504 NW 13th St. 352-372-7836 9-4-10-18

BOARDSHORT SALE!
Awesome colors & prints all on sale.
Billabong, Quiksilver, Element, Fox, Hurley &
Oakley. Check it out. Lloyd Clarke Sports, 1
mile N. on 13th St. 9-4-10-18


Want to make a connection?
Place your ad here to look for someone to
share a common interest with or for your true
love

Handsome, romantic, mature artist, who
looks and acts younger, is looking for an at-
tractive female with a sense of humor. Object:
companionship and who knows? Please call
352-226-8449. I use a taxi. 8-27-09-5-19


IS YOUR BUSINESS, CLUB OR
ORGANIZATION HAVING AN EVENT?
DO YOU HAVE A SPECIAL
ANNOUNCEMENT? PLACE YOUR AD
HERE AND GET IT NOTICED!


THE BIGGEST POSTER SALE.
Biggest and Best Selection. Choose from
over 2000 different images. FINE ART,
MUSIC, MODELS, HUMOR, ANIMALS,
PERSONALITIES, LANDSCAPES,
MOTIVATIONALS, PHOTOGRAPHY.
MOST IMAGES ONLY $7, $8, AND $9
SEE US AT Reitz Union Colonnade ON
Monday August 24th thru Friday August
28th, 2009. THE HOURS ARE 9 AM 6 PM
THIS SALE IS SPONSORED BY
Reitz Union Arts and Crafts Center. 8-28-
09-5-20

ZUMBA Fitness classes every Monday and
Thursday at 5:30pm. 601 S. Main St. Parking
in rear. $7 walk-in or 10/$50. Great Latin
music, fun steps and lots of smiles. www.
ZumbaGypsy.com 904-742-0188 8-24-09-
1-20


WALDO FARMERS & FLEA MARKET
Every Sat & Sun Hwy 301
15 min from Gainesville 468-2255
12-9-09-99-21


SHOTGUN SHOOTING SPORTS
Open To Public Wed-Sat-Sun 1pm-6pm
Skeet Trap Olympic Trap -5 Stand
gatorskeetandtrap.com 352-372-1044
12-9-09-75-21


Rocky Creek Paintball
In Gainesville Better Prices
Better Fields Better Call 371-2092
12-9-09-99-21


GMG TRANSPORT
FREE WiFi on buses New Departures
Thur 1 & 4:30 / Fri 1 & 4:30
Ret Sun 2 & 4 pm Mon 2 pm -Also
Reverse trips Credit card payments, no xtra
charge pay by phone or online- $35 O/W
- $45 R/T www.gmgtrans.com 352-215-8196
12-9-74-23


Furry, feathery, scaly...no, not your room-
mate...pets. Find or advertise your pets or
pet products here in the Pets section of the
Alligator.


Tri-County Bird Hospital
Recept/Tech PT for more info call 352-318-
1247. Apply in person between 12 noon &
2:30 pm. Mon thru Fri. 9-4-09-10-24


Finders Keepers? If you find something, you
can place a FREE FOUND AD in our lost &
found section. Be kind to someone who's
lost what you've found. Call 373-FIND.











Sports
MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009


ALLIGATOR
www.alligatorSports.org


Doubters make Tebow motivated to outdo himself

U A SECOND HEISMAN OR THIRD BCS TITLE
WOULD PUT THE SENIOR QB IN RARE AIR.

By MIKE McCALL
Alligator Staff Writer
Smmccall@alligator.org

Tim Tebow can't go a day without seeing himself or his
team mentioned on TV, but he's not tuning in for the talk
of Florida winning a third title in four years or his bid for a
second Heisman Trophy and college football immortality.
Spare him the glowing tributes to his character, leader-
ship or athletic ability.
He's not interested in any of that. He'll only tune in to
see the doubters.
"I usually don't watch anything just NFL stuff but
sometimes I'll watch it as motivation if it's sort of a nega-
tive thing," Tebow said. "I'm not a big reader of myself or
watching it, but some things I will because I know it moti-
vates me and it will irritate me."
So go ahead and doubt Tebow. He'll work that much
harder to prove you wrong.
He showed he could run through defenders as a fresh-
man, throw over them as a sophomore and win the big
games as a junior. There are only two things left for his se-
nior season: displaying his NFL potential and leading the
Gators to an undefeated season.

One of the Greats?
The only problem with Tebow's motivational formula is
that he isn't leaving much room for criticism.
In three years, Tebow has completed a school-record 65.8
percent of his passes for 6,390 yards and 67 touchdowns.
He's the Southeastern Conference's all-time leader in pass-
ing efficiency (173.8) and has rushed for 2,037 yards and 43
touchdowns, also a UF record.
In all likelihood, he will break SEC career marks in yards
gained, touchdowns and rushing touchdowns this season,
and he's a likely candidate for a second Heisman and third
Harrison Diamond/ Alligator Staff Maxwell Award.
Quarterback Tim Tebow is on pace to leave UF as the SEC's career recordholder in yards gained, rushing touchdowns and Those numbers, combined with a 22-5 record as a starter,
total touchdowns. He already holds the league's all-time mark in passing efficiency despite his run-first reputation. SEE TEBOW, PAGE 46


Publish the country's best sports section and get you involved? Yes we can!


It might be a year late, but we here at alligatorSports be-
lieve in change too.
So this fall, expect a lot of changes. Some will go well,
some will not. Hopefully you love most of them and only
hate a few of them. It will be a bit of an experiment, but we
feel really good about some of the ideas we've come up
with to improve one of the best college newspaper sports
sections in the country.
After all, people claim the 2009 Florida football team
could go down as one of the greatest in history.
We hold our coverage and reporting to similar stan-
dards.
Onto the changes!
alligatorSports Fantasy Challenge: A big part of our
overhaul has to do with getting you, the reader, more in-
volved. After all, you're the one that reads our stuff, wheth-
er it be in print or online, so let's make it a little more of a
two-way conversation.
On that note, I'd like to introduce the Readers vs. Writ-
ers showdown in the realm of Fantasy College Football.


The league will consist of ten teams
our five football beat writers (Bob-
by Callovi, Mike DiFerdinando, Kyle
Maistri, Mike McCall and myself) and
five readers (I'm looking at you.)
How will we pick? A contest, of
Phil Kegler course.
If you think you have what it takes
Editorial Notebook to take us down (bring the trash talk,
pkegler@alligator org
_______pkegler@ag we certainly will) tell us why in
100 words or less. Send it to sports@
alligator.org by Friday at 5 p.m. We will publish the five
winners' entries, so you must keep it clean. Anything goes,
but foul language gets you eliminated.
Things to keep in mind:
You have to be able to make the online live draft, sched-
uled for Sept. 2 at 7:45 p.m. The player pool will consist of
the six BCS conferences only. We're playing on CBSSports.
com, so you will have to sign up there if we pick you as a
contestant. Feel free to check out the complete rules while


you're there.
And why would you like to do this? Besides simply be-
ing able to claim you're the best, we have a special treat in
store if a reader wins the league championship.
Take home the title, and you get your very own 525-
word guest column, appearing in the Alligator's sports sec-
tion.
And if you're not one of the lucky five we pick, you'll
still be able to enjoy the fun along the way. Coverage of the
showdown will appear from time to time whether it be
online, in print or on our podcast.
Wait, you have a podcast?: Yes, indeed we do alli-
gatorSports The Podcast has been going strong for a little
more than six months after we reincarnated it from a ter-
rible former state. We record at least twice weekly in the
fall and give you the scoop on everything UF athletics and
touching on the rest of college sports and more. The de-
bates are numerous and fiery to say the least, just the way
we like it.
SEE PHIL, PAGE 46


* Is there any doubt Usain Bolt is the most dominant athlete in the world? Tiger
Woods and Roger Federer/Rafael Nadal don't stand a chance against Bolt, who
has enough charisma to carry the globe.... I couldn't be more disgusted watch-
ing fans do the wave at Saturday's Rays-Rangers game while it was tied 4-4 in
the eighth inning.... What two voters picked Texas in the preseason AP poll?


PL QUSTN I


Today's question: Who do you think is more likely to
throw a touchdown pass for the Gators this year:
Chas Henry or Joe Haden?

Previous question: What will be the closest margin of a
UF football game this year? (see right for results)


Percent (Votes)
W, 1-6 pts 50% (156)
W, 7-13 pts 26% (80)
L, 1-6 pts 13% (39)
W, 14+ pts 9% (29)
L, 7+ pts 3% (8)
312 TOTAL VOTES






42, ALLIGATOR U MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009


UF VOLLEYBALL

Orange and Blue Scrimmage signals first last for Cusack


By ANTHONY CHIANG
Alligator Writer

Sunday not only acted as a re-
minder of the beginning of a new
volleyball season, it also marked
the beginning of the end of senior
libero Elyse Cusack's career at
Florida.
Cusack and the UF volleyball
team played in the Orange and
Blue Scrimmage on Sunday in the
O'Connell Center as they do every
year. This one, however, was spe-
cial for Cusack because it was the
last one she would play in.
But as she enters her senior
year, the pressure to succeed still
does not supersede the excitement
she feels.
"This is my last go-around and
I just love playing here, there is no
better place to be," Cusack said. "It
gets a little emotional, but I'm ex-
cited about the season."
The pressure to meet expecta-
tions still exists for her, even in
Sunday's intrasquad scrimmage in
which players switched from one
team to another.
The Orange team won the first
set 25-19 and the Blue team won
the second set 28-26.
"There was a serve where Elyse
didn't pass perfectly, and I think
I heard a gasp from the fans," UF
coach Mary Wise said. "She creat-
ed those expectations for herself by
how hard she plays each night."


After a summer of training, the
players are eager to start the sea-
son, but Wise is grateful for the
opportunity the scrimmage gives
her.
"They are ready to play some-


body else, there is no question and
I think if the team had their choice,
the season would start tomorrow
night," she said. "But I am glad we
have five more days to practice."
As Florida begins its season on


Friday against UNLV, the Gators
are hoping their improved play
near the net will help them over-
come some of their weaknesses
from last year.
Outside hitters Callie Rivers,


nalluIIbllu Ulaill llu iU M111 OLuu a ll
UF libero Elyse Cusack bumps the ball during the Orange and Blue scrimmage in the O'Connell Center
on Sunday. She enters her senior season as the Gators' career digs leader.


Kristy Jaeckel and Colleen Ward
showed signs of big improvement
on Sunday as they combined for 19
kills.
"I think we can be very physical
from left to right and we are going
to be a big-time, quick and high-
jumping team," Wise said.
Although the entire starting
lineup did not play together in the
scrimmage, four of the probable
starters Cusack, Jaeckel, Kelly
Murphy and Lauren Bledsoe -
teamed up to win the first set in
convincing fashion.

"This is my last go around
and I just love playing here,
there is no better place to
be. It gets a little emotion-
al, but I'm excited about
the season."
Elyse Cusack
UF senior libero

But in the second set, players
were switched around multiple
times to observe how they would
handle different positions.
Although the scrimmage will
not count, Wise believes Sunday
was a preview of things to come.
"The best thing about being able
to do this is that it is like a dress re-
hearsal," she said. "There is noth-
ing we can do in practice that has
this kind of game like feel to it."


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we've got a place for you!
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mVote by Mail -Vote Early -Vote At Your Poll
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must update your address.
iTo Vote by Mail, contact our office at www.VoteAlachua.com or call (352)
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mYou must present photo and signature ID at the polls or you must vote a
provisional ballot. It is illegal to vote in a precinct in which you no longer
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T or subscribe on
Tune in for the latest Gators sports iTunes.
news and analysis from our beat ...
writers and columnists. allig'a or




MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009 U ALLIGATOR, 43


ii7 MTD IT


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U 0


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44, ALLIGATOR U MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009


zooq (olumnist Predictions


Sept. 19, Oct. 10, Oct. 31 and Nov. 28 are all dates that
will be circled on the Gators' schedule.
Those are the dates UF plays Tennessee, LSU, Georgia
and FSU.
Though that quartet is the best competition the Gators will
face, it is these games that are easiest to get hyped up for and
UF will easily show its dominance over four teams that still
have not returned to their former cham-
pionship form.
But if those teams cannot stop the
Gators, then who on the rest of their soft
schedule will?
The answer is nobody will.
Charleston Southern, Troy and Flor-
Bobby Callovi ida International will give the Gators'
backups plenty of game experience.
Bobby's World Kentucky, Vanderbilt and South
bcallovi@aligatororg Carolina will give the defending nation-
al champions a little more of a challenge
but none will be able to keep it close for the duration of a game.
That leaves it up to two teams with plenty of question marks.
Arkansas' chances depend on transfer quarterback Ryan
Mallett, who alongside preseason All-SEC tailback Michael
Smith could make the Razorbacks' offense dangerous.
Then, there is Mississippi State. No one knows how Dan
Mullen will fare in his first season as a head coach. No one
knows how the Bulldogs will handle his spread offense. Even
with all the uncertainties, Mullen knows better than any other
opposing coach what he can expect to see from the Gators,
making the Bulldogs a dangerous road game for the Gators.
But unlike last year's surprising loss to Ole Miss, there will
be no need for Tim Tebow to give another heartfelt speech be-
cause the Gators know what is needed to pull out a victory in
a close game.
The leadership Tebow shows in those close games on the
way to a perfect season will allow him to steal the Heisman
Trophy away from Colt McCoy and Sam Bradford despite
them having better numbers.
Once the Gators get through regular season, they will not
be stopped. By that point, it won't matter who they circled
because this team will be too motivated and too good to be
detoured for their inevitable end of repeating as BCS National
Champions.


Though I have not seen everyone else's predictions be-

fore writing this, I would be seriously shocked if any-
one predicted that the Gators will not win their third
national championship in the last four years, something that
has never been done in the history of college football.
With Tim Tebow and Brandon Spikes returning for their
senior years, UF not only has the talent to accomplish that feat,
but the leadership as well.
The depth on this team is unfathom-
Eably great and I'm not so sure the Gators
wouldn't have a shot at repeating even
if Timmy Heisman went down with an
injury.
Defensive coordinator Charlie Strong
has talked about his unit's goal of hold-
Kyle Maistri ing every team under 16 points in any
one game, but if you were to cut that
Kyle Points number in half, that should be just about
kmaistri@alligator.org what UF foes will average this season.
I don't see any regular season game
giving the Gators trouble, not even an October 10 matchup
with LSU in vaunted Tigers Stadium.
The toughest game on the schedule looks like FSU at home
if you ask me (which all of you did by reading this).
Anyway, UF will take an undefeated record into the South-
eastern Conference Championship game where they will get
Ole Miss in a revenge match.
Tebow and co. will be so jacked up to prove last season's
loss to the Rebels was a fluke that they rout Ole Miss by 30
points.
Unfortunately, the nation gets a rematch of last years cham-
pionship game as UF draws one-loss Oklahoma yet again.
The game looks significantly different than last year's as
Tebow is determined not to have a disastrous first half the way
he did in the Orange Bowl.
The Gators don't come up with the critical stops in short
yardage this time around and it becomes something of a shoo-
tout between the two squads.
In the end, UF defeats Oklahoma 42-30, cementing the first
undefeated season in school history.
Oh, and No. 15 takes home his second Heisman Trophy and
goes out as the greatest player in college football history.
Why not?


his is the most talented team both offensively and
defensively UF has ever produced and anything
less than a return to the National Championship
game should be considered a failure.
Urban Meyer will stick to his "Our goal is to make it
to Atlanta" mantra, but even he can't expect everyone to
believe UF doesn't have aspirations higher than another
SEC championship.
The real question isn't
whether or not the Gators will
make it to Pasadena, but how
impressive will they be in the
process.
UF has never gone unde-
feated and if there has ever
Mike Diferinandobeen a team capable of run-
Beg to Difer ning the table this is it.
mdiferdinando@alligator.org The Gators only real tests
come on the road against LSU
and a home finale against Florida State on senior day.
Baton Rouge is a tough place to play, but Tim Tebow
hasn't forgotten the loss he suffered to the Tigers in his last
trip to Death Valley.
Rivalry games can only go one way for so long, which
makes me think FSU might be the most dangerous game
on the schedule.
The Seminoles appear to be poised for a return to prom-
inence, but the tears of 90,000 grown men carry Tebow and
the Gators to a thrilling come-from-behind victory in the
Heisman Trophy winner's last game in the Swamp.
No Heisman this year though. Too many blowouts
mean Tebow won't get the chance to pad his stats like he
did in 2007. This year the award goes to Texas quarterback
Colt McCoy.
A rematch with Alabama in the SEC title game lacks the
drama of last year and UF rolls to the national title game
and a showdown with fellow juggernaut USC.
When it's all said and done Tebow will be standing un-
derneath a shower of confetti with a rose in his mouth and
a crystal ball in his hand.
After a Hesiman Trophy and three titles in four years,
Tebow leaves UF as the greatest college player of all time
and with the win UF replaces Southern Cal as the nation's
premier program.


D uring the offseason, I've been more intrigued
with the number of shutouts the Gators will pitch
than the number of losses they'll suffer.
UF's defense is totally stacked.
Good thing, too, because the offense will need some
help. The loss of Percy Harvin and a so-so receiving corps
will hurt the Gators' attack more than you think, but they're
sure to get great field position and plenty of possessions be-
cause of the D.
UF will post Armageddon-like
smackdowns on Charleston South-
ern, Mississippi State, Vanderbilt
and FIU. Tennessee, LSU, and Geor-
gia will put up respectable fights but
get put away in the second half, and
Mike McCall the rest will be your run-of-the-mill
three-to-four touchdown victories.
McCall-in' It The schedule is pretty lame, but
mmcca liae toorg the postseason will be plenty of fun.
mrcca@aig g The Gators will get revenge against
Ole Miss in the SEC Championship,
where Tim Tebow will put on a show before collecting his
second Heisman Trophy.
From there, it's on to Pasadena for a matchup with Texas
and quarterback Colt McCoy, who will have finished sec-
ond to Tebow in the Heisman voting.
Florida is the nation's best team, hands down, but the
playing field will be leveled after the Longhorns have a
month to prepare. It's easy to forget, but if not for some red-
zone blunders by Oklahoma and Ahmad Black's incredible
interception, the BCS Championship might have fallen into
different hands. This time, the breaks go against the Gators.
McCoy wins it all and finally steps out of Tebow's shad-
ow. If only for a moment, he'll be the too-good-to-be-true
college quarterback standing atop the world.
How could I make such a ridiculous pick?
Karma.
UF fans have watched their basketball and football teams
dominate on the national stage in recent years, and they're
due for a fall. This isn't how the world works.
If I'm right, consider UF's karmic debt for all this win-
ning paid off. If I'm wrong, start buying lottery tickets.


Another year, another opportunity for UF fans to hate
me for my prediction.
Then again, I had the 2008 Gators losing the SEC
East to Georgia, so that was a huge swing-and-a-miss.
I will, however, stick with two predictions I made a year
ago: Tebow will win his second Heisman in 2009, and the
biggest X-factor surrounding the season is Percy Harvin's
absence.
Andre Debose does not equal
Percy Harvin. And I'm beginning to
believe four guys can't equal Percy
Harvin, either.
There are guys that can catch
passes (to varying degrees), and
Phil Kegler some who are quick and elusive with
the ball. I'm just not convinced the
Phil on the Hill Gators will have enough threats to
pkegler@alligator.org make opposing defensive coordina-
tors cringe.
What UF will have plenty of is defense. I believe the
Gators will have a legendary defense, one that is remem-
bered for years to come.
The closest regular-season affair will be Arkansas, but
Tim Tebow and Brandon Spikes will refuse to have another
Ole Miss-like blemish and win by 10.
The talk of an undefeated season will continue through
the SEC Championship Game when UF gets its revenge
against Ole Miss. From Dec. 5 (the SEC title game) to Jan. 7
(the BCS title game), people will talk about the Gators as one
of the most dominant teams in college football history. They
will talk about an average win margin that is in the 30s.
Everyone will forget similar mistakes from four years
ago. The 2005 USC team was all set to repeat as national
champs and rolled through its regular-season schedule un-
til it faced a team from Texas that didn't get the memo to
roll over.
Colt McCoy and the Longhorns are about to pull some
deja vu. The Texas quarterback will be enraged after finish-
ing second in the Heisman race for the second straight year
and will shred UF's defense like no one could all year.
Tim Tebow's college career will end in tears in Pasade-
na.
Longhorns 31, Gators 30.




MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009 U ALLIGATOR, 45


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46, ALLIGATOR U MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009


Heartbreaking Ole Miss loss still haunts Florida even after national title


TEBOW, from page 41


his off-field persona and the potential for an-
other big year, have led some to crown him as
one of the best college football players ever.
"If he would do either one, or maybe both, I
think he'll go down as one of the great leaders
and great stories in college football history,"
ESPN analyst and former Notre Dame coach
Lou Holtz said. "The Ernie Davises and Ar-
chie Griffins although Archie didn't win a
national championship some of the people
who really accomplished great things."
That hole in Griffin's resume is exactly
where UF coach Urban Meyer believes his
player stands apart from the rest.
"I always think the quarterback's job, the
point guard's job, the Michael Jordan's job, is
to win," Meyer said. "Tim has the label of a


winner. He won a state championship in high
school, he's done tremendous in college so far,
and he has another year left. Without ques-
tion, he'll be in that conversation."
Tebow shies away from such talk.
His competitive nature gives him a desire
to be the best, but he gets visibly restless and
uncomfortable when the subject is brought up,
doing his best to deflect it.
"I'd just rather not hear about that until I'm
done with college and everything," he said.
"I just want to go work and get isolated away
from everything else. It's definitely humbling,
and it's an honor when people talk about it or
write something, but I don't want to hear it."

Fueling His Fire
What Tebow does want to hear are re-
minders of the Ole Miss game last season and


the concerns that he won't make a good pro,
though he says the latter has been generated
more by reporters than by coaches.
It was clear how badly Tebow wanted
an undefeated season during his emotional
speech after the loss to the Rebels, and it's clear
now that the game still bothers him.
"It does, especially when
Syou hear, 'How did you feel
about that 4th-and-short when
you got stuffed?'" Tebow said,
Football referring to a question from
earlier in the interview. "It def-
initely does. A comment like
that will even motivate me more because I get
irritated about that."
Although the Gators ran roughshod over
opponents following the upset and attribut-
ed some of their success to the wake-up call,


Tebow can't look back on it without being
bothered.
"It's cool the change we made from there,
but I think if you ask (Brandon) Spikes, the
Pounceys or anyone, they'll still say it irritates
them," Tebow said. "It's a good thing, but it's
never a good thing. That loss is still frustrat-
ing to everybody although a lot of good came
from it.
"That's one of the good things about our
team though just how upset and mad we
get about something like that. ...We still use
that today in practice."
The more Tebow thinks about that game,
the more determined he is to prevent it from
happening again.
And if he can lead the Gators to their first-
ever undefeated season, there will be little
doubt as to his place in the program's history.


PHIL, from page 41

Give us a listen sometime -
you can find a link on our Web
site (alligatorSports.org) or search
for us on iTunes. If you like us, go
ahead and subscribe on iTunes.
It gives us a chance to know how
many people are out there listen-
ing. We're doing a lot recently to
improve our audio quality and
will continue to make improve-
ments.
And hey- we love reader mail!
Send us something (sports@alliga-
tor.org) and as long as it's clean,
we will read it on the show.


Twitter & possible Mailbags:
So if you're looking for another
way to get your alligatorSports fix
as well as another way to interact
with us, follow us on Twitter at
twitter.com/alligatorSports.
Also, we'd love for you to get
your voice heard (are you getting
what our theme is yet?), so we'd
like to start a mailbag segment for
print and/or online.
Here's how it works you
write us an e-mail (sports@alliga-
tor.org) and we publish your note
along with our response. Make
sure you give us a first name and
last initial. And if you're from
outside Gainesville, let us know


where you're from. Funny and
thoughtful responses are likely to
be picked first. We love to have
people hate on us.
But you know how it goes: If
we don't get any e-mails, then we
don't have anything to respond
to!
Just the tip of the iceberg: The
stuff I just blabbered about is just
the beginning. Here's some other
things to keep your eyes on this
fall:
You know the boxes on the bot-
tom of our main Sports page (the
one with "Sports" written at the
top)? Did you ever listen to our
recommendations for what's on


television or wait for a copy of the
Alligator to tell you last night's
NBA score? We didn't think so.
Now those boxes will feature dai-
ly ramblings with one of our col-
umnists in our Teeing Off section.
You might disagree with what we
say, but at least it'll be better than
skipping over an old NHL score.
The Alligator's Web site as a
whole is set to go under some
renovations this semester. Look
forward to a clearer layout as
well as some new gimmicks up
our sleeves including columnist
biographies and exclusive online
content.
We're still all about giving you


the best coverage of UF sports,
though. Look for more complete
coverage of SEC football, and our
own Heisman Watch segment
debuting midway through the
college football season. We are
also planning a weekly question-
and-answer segment to feature
some of UF's athletes from lesser-
known sports.
Last, but not least, be sure to
catch our new-and-improved
Kickoffs this fall (get it, catch our
kickoffs?). We don't want to spoil
all the fun just yet, but expect
the Alligator to be your one-stop
source for Gators gameday news
and info.


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MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009 U ALLIGATOR, 47


UF VOLLEYBALL

Murphy looks to top '08


ndrrlluii Uldlllullu/II llgt1 u OLdll
UF sophomore opposite hitter/setter Kelly Murphy (right) hopes to avoid a dropoff after
becoming the Gators' first AVCA National Freshman of the Year in 2008.


By ADAM BERRY
Alligator Staff Writer
aberry@alligator.org

Kelly Murphy isn't worried about a
sophomore slump.
UF's first-ever AVCA National Fresh-
man of the Year will start her second season
in Gainesville with plenty of expectations
to live up to, but she is taking them all in
stride.
"There's always pressure because every-
one's going to be expecting me to match up
to what happened last year," Murphy said.
"I'm just excited to start playing again. I'm
ready for the season to start."
In 2008, Murphy performed about as ef-
ficiently and impressively as anyone could
have expected from the nation's top recruit.
She broke the school record for career tri-
ple-doubles with six in her first 27 matches
as a freshman.
Murphy finished the year leading the
team in kills (357) and hitting percentage
(.358) and second in assists (610) and digs
(209) while recording 12 straight double-
doubles during Southeastern Conference
play.
"For a freshman to come in and be that
dominant, it's kind of unheard of," senior
libero Elyse Cusack said. "But she's an ex-
ceptional player, and she's a special player.
I'm just glad she's on my team."
After a productive offseason in
Gainesville, Murphy is back on the court
and, according to her coach and teammates,
better than ever.


The versatile opposite hitter/setter spent
the spring improving her setting, and the
team's offseason conditioning and weight
lifting has made her faster and fitter than
she was during her record-setting first year
at UF.
Add a season of experience at the col-
lege level and stronger team chemistry, and
Murphy has established a sense of confi-
dence in her ability and her teammates that
should allow her to develop as a leader.
Murphy said she hopes to become a more
vocal and emotional presence on the court,
a role that should come more naturally
without the occasional nervousness she felt
as a freshman.
Although all signs point to Murphy hav-
ing improved nearly every aspect of her
game, her teammates said she just needs to
be as good as she was last year for the team
to be successful.
"Murph, she just has to be Murph, hon-
estly," junior opposite hitter Lauren Bled-
soe said. "There's not too much that she has
to do. If she just does a nice little repeat of
last year, I'll be fine with that."
But after a full spring and summer of
training at UF, Murphy is prepared to do
more in 2009 than just rehash her freshman
campaign. Gators coach Mary Wise called
her one of the most competitive players on
the team, a trait that should keep her mo-
tivated to continue improving throughout
her time in Gainesville.
"She wants to win and will do anything
to win," Wise said. "If I asked her to be our
libero, she would do it to win."


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48, ALLIGATOR U MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009


Transfers create, fill hole at setter


By ADAM BERRY
Alligator Staff Writer
aberry@alligator.org

During the offseason, the Gators
lost their starting setter to another
school, but they added a transfer of
their own to make up for it.
Sophomore Cindy Bathelt left UF
for the University of Colorado at
Colorado Springs in June. A native
of Colorado Springs, Bathelt chose
to attend school and continue play-
ing in her hometown despite her ini-
tial success with the Gators.
"I think it was just homesick-
ness," sophomore outside hitter and
fellow Colorado native Kristy Jaeck-
el said. "We were a little surprised
by it, but we wish her the best of
luck and hope she does the best she
can wherever she ends up."
Replacing Bathelt will not be easy
for UF coach Mary Wise. Bathelt led
the Gators with 623 assists as one of
five freshmen who saw meaningful
playing time for UF in 2008.
Wise, who was a setter at Purdue
and has lectured about the position
at national coaches' conferences,
added two more distributors to her
roster this year. She recruited fresh-
man Sundai Weston and pursued
Brynja Rodgers, then a sophomore


at New Mexico State, to compensate
for the loss of Bathelt.
Wise first tried to touch base with
Rodgers through her hometown
coaches in Iowa. They passed along
the message to her coach at NMSU,
who advised Rodgers to get in touch
with Wise.
"She kind of sought after me,
which I thought was kind of cool,"
Rodgers said. "Playing for the Uni-
versity of Florida is something all
volleyball players dream about, and
getting the chance to actually do it
- I took that chance right away."
"(UF coach Mary Wise) kind
of sought after me, which
I thought was kind of cool.
Playing for the University of
Florida is something all vol-
leyball players dream about,
and getting the chance to
actually do it I took that
chance right away."
Brynja Rodgers
UF junior setter

The junior setter is still learning
the intricacies of UF's 6-2 offense,
but her adjustment has been made
easier by her experience in a similar


system while at NMSU.
As a sophomore, Rodgers played
in 23 of the Aggies' 35 matches, but
she saw the floor in only 34 sets, re-
cording 86 assists.
As the "new kid" for the Gators,
Rodgers said she has felt some pres-
sure, and the program's decorated
history including 18 straight
Southeastern Conference champion-
ships says all she needs to know
about the extremely high expecta-
tions she will face in Gainesville.
NMSU finished 26-9 and shared
the Western Athletic Conference
regular-season title during Rodgers'
sophomore year, but the Gators'
lofty postseason goals anything
less than a Sweet 16 appearance
would be considered a disappoint-
ment have been emphasized
more than she was used to.
Despite the expectations, her
coaches and teammates have ex-
pressed their confidence in Rodgers'
ability to make a successful transi-
tion to UF and help fill the void left
by Bathelt.
"We expect the same as we
would've expected out of Cindy,"
sophomore opposite hitter/setter
Kelly Murphy said. "We've got to
spread the ball around and get good
sets to all our hitters."


Courtesy to me Alligator
UF junior setter Brynja Rodgers, a transfer from New Mexico
State, will look to compensate for the loss of Cindy Bathelt.


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MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009 U ALLIGATOR, 49


Johnson's knee fully recovered


Team excited for healthy senior


By ADAM BERRY
Alligator Staff Writer
aberry@alligator.org

At the UF volleyball team's me-
dia day on Aug. 13, Lauren Bledsoe
could barely contain her excitement
when asked about senior Kristina
Johnson.
The question regarding John-
son's recovery from the nagging
knee injury she dealt with last year
had barely ended when Bledsoe
began to praise "KJ," as her team-
mates call her.
"Oh, you guys have no idea. In
practice, when she's hitting, it's
amazing," Bledsoe said. "It's so ef-
fortless, literally. When she jumps
up to hit, it's so easy for her, and
she's so powerful. There's no tenta-
tiveness about her."
The praise for Johnson didn't
stop with Bledsoe. Junior transfer
Brynja Rodgers said the 6-foot-2
middle blocker was the player she
was most excited about setting for,
detalining how talented and physi-
cally impressive she has been dur-
ing two-a-days.
Coach Mary Wise added her sap-
proval as well, telling reporters this


was the year Johnson, who strug-
gled with an injury in her surgically
repaired knee last season, would fi-
nally reach her full potential.
"A year ago today, she had just
been cleared to play the day before,
and she had no summer to train, no
spring," Wise said. "That knee is
completely healed. This year, our
fans will see the Kristina Johnson
we had hoped we would have be-
fore the injury."
Johnson's trou-
bles with her knee
and then-senior
Volleyball Kelsey Bowers'
back injury plagued
the middle blocker
position for the Gators in 2008.
Although it led to inconsistent
play and forced players into unfa-
miliar roles, it may have had the
unintentional benefit of adding
depth at the position.
Week to week, middle blocker
was a question for the Gators last
year.
With Bowers and Johnson oc-
casionally sidelined, Cassandra
Anderson played extra rotations
as a freshman she played in 25
matches and started 15 and fin-


ished the year with an average of
just more than one block and one
kill per game.
Now in her sophomore year, An-
derson will split time with Johnson
and redshirt freshman Betsy Smith
in a unit that is looking to increase
its output of blocks and kills in
2009.
Wise has repeatedly stressed the
importance of outblocking oppo-
nents as a key to winning matches,
and the Gators proved the effect
a blocking advantage can have in
their two matches against Colorado
State last season.
In the regular season, the Gators
were outblocked 12-2 in an 3-0 loss
to the Rams. In the postseason, UF
turned that around and had nine
blocks to Colorado State's five in a
3-0 victory to advance to the Sweet
16.
To make it further than the
Sweet 16 this year, the trio of mid-
dle blockers is just hoping to finally
stay healthy for an entire season.
"Our middles are going to be a
really good presence on our team
this year, a lot stronger than they
have been in the past," outside hit-
ter Kristy Jaeckel said. "No matter
who's on the court, we're going to
get a good showing out of them."


Harrison Diamona/ Alligator stall
Senior Kristina Johnson's health will be key for a middle block-
ing unit that was plagued with injuries a season ago.


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MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009 0 ALLIGATOR, 51


Replacing Murphy proving to be tougher than expected


* COOPER AND THOMPSON
LOOK TO BE TOP FILL-INS.

By MIKE DiFERDINANDO
Alligator Staff Writer
mdiferdinando@alligator.org

Much of the talk during fall
camp has centered on filling the
void left by do-it-all receiver Per-
cy Harvin, but the production of
fellow former Gator Louis Mur-
phy may prove to be just as hard
to replace.
"People always talk about re-
placing Percy. At the same time,
people forget about how critical
Murph was in us being successful
last year," wide receivers coach
Billy Gonzales said.
Murphy caught 38 balls for
655 yards and seven touchdowns
during the Gators' national-title
run in 2008.
His sure hands and 6-foot-2
frame made him a go-to option
for quarterback Tim Tebow last
year.
"You put him on another team
and he's probably an All-Amer-
ican," UF coach Urban Meyer
said. "That's how good a player
he was. Right now, we're having


Harrison Diamond/ Alligator Start
Wide receiver Deonte Thompson will be counted upon to play an integral role in UF's offense this fall.
The sophomore, along with seniors Riley Cooper and David Nelson, are the top wideouts right now.
a hard time filling his void." Cooper and sophomore Deonte playing baseball and recently
The two likely replacements Thompson. agreed to a professional contract
for Murphy are senior Riley Cooper spent the summer with the Texas Rangers. He start-


ed 12 games last season but only
has 30 career receptions.
It could take time for Cooper
to work his way back into foot-
ball shape.
"Cooper has been there, he's
played in every game, he's a
starter for us," Gonzales said. "I
trust Cooper. I trust him with ev-
erything out there.
"I've got to get that kind of
trust in the other guys."
Thompson played mostly on
special teams last season, catch-
ing just 18 passes on the year.
But he has speed and has
shown that he can stretch the de-
fense and be a threat down the
field.
"I hope Deonte is ready right
now. He's performing," Gonzales
said. "I want Deonte to play as
hard as Murph, as hard as Dallas
Baker, as hard as Bubba Caldwell.
Murph was developed.
"He didn't happen overnight.
He grew on special teams. Deon-
te last year basically was a special
teams player and has worked his
way."
Gonzales said Cooper and
Thompson continue to split reps
at the position during practice.




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52, ALLIGATOR U MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009


WEST
ALABAMA
Coach: Nick Saban (14-8 at UA, five wins from 2007 vacated by NCAA)
2008 record: 12-2 (8-0 SEC)
Players to watch: WR Julio Jones, DT Terrence Cody, CB/KR Javier Arenas, LB
Rolando McClain, RB Mark Ingram.
Overview: The Crimson Tide will have to break in new quarterback Greg McE1-
roy, and he'll lead an offense that returns just four starters from last season,
though he'll still have one of the nation's best wideouts in Jones. The defense
should be just as good as 2008, but it remains to be seen whether McElroy and
Ingram can provide the firepower to navigate a tough schedule.
Key Games: Sept. 5 vs. Virginia Tech (Atlanta), Oct. 10 at Mississippi, Nov. 7 vs.
LSU.

ARKANSAS
Coach: Bobby Petrino (5-7 at UA)
2008 record: 5-7 (2-6 SEC)
Players to watch: TE D.J. Williams, QB Ryan Mallett, RB Michael Smith, DT Mal-
colm Sheppard, LB Jerry Franklin.
Overview: There doesn't seem to be enough room in the SEC West race for the
Razorbacks, but if former Michigan quarterback Mallett gets off to a quick start,
they could turn some heads. Arkansas faces the league's toughest schedule
though, and there's little reason to think the team can improve on last year's 1-4
road record as trips to Alabama, Florida, Ole Miss and LSU loom.
Key Games: Sept. 26 at Alabama, Oct. 17 at Florida, Oct. 24 at Mississippi.

AUBURN
Coach: Gene Chizik (first year at AU)
2008 record: 5-7 (2-6 SEC)
Players to watch: RB Ben Tate, QB Chris Todd, DE Antonio Coleman, OT Lee
Ziemba, DE Antoine Carter.
Overview: Chizik inherits an experienced team, but the Tigers have lost their spot
in the West's top three to Ole Miss. Todd and dual threat Kodi Burns are both
average quarterbacks, and the offense is running its fourth system in three years.
The defense has the talent to hold its own, but can Todd & Co. put up enough
points?
Key Games: Sept. 19 vs. West Virginia, Oct. 31 vs. Mississippi, Nov. 27 vs. Ala-
bama.

LSU
Coach: Les Miles (42-11 at LSU)
2008 record: 8-5 (3-5 SEC)
Players to watch: RB Charles Scott, WR Brandon LaFell, KR Trindon Holliday, DE
Rahim Alem, QB Jordan Jefferson.
Overview: The Tigers will be improved from last season, but they must conquer a
brutal schedule. Scott and Keiland Williams are solid ball carriers and the receiv-
ing corps is talented, but Jefferson is unproven and the offense will only go as far
as he takes it. LSU's defense allowed 24.2 points per game last year, the team's
worst in the last decade, but the seven returning starters will be looking to change
that.
Key Games: Oct. 10 vs. Florida, Nov. 7 at Alabama, Nov. 21 at Mississippi


MISSISSIPPI
Coach: Houston Nutt (9-4 at UM)
2008 record: 9-4 (5-3 SEC)
Players to watch: QB Jevan Snead, WR/RB Dexter McCluster, S Kendrick Lewis,
WR Shay Hodge, DE Greg Hardy.
Overview: The Rebels are the darling SEC West pick after upsetting Florida, LSU
and Texas Tech last year. Expectations are higher in Oxford than they've been in
a long time, and much of that pressure will fall on Snead, who has gotten some
dark-horse Heisman talk. Ole Miss' schedule sets up nicely, and with plenty of
returning starters, the key will be handling the hype. The Rebels will be hunted
rather than hunting.
Key Games: Oct. 10 vs. Alabama, Oct. 24 vs. Arkansas, Nov. 21 vs. LSU.

MISSISSIPPI STATE
Coach: Dan Mullen (first year at MSU)
2008 record: 4-8 (2-6 SEC)
Players to watch: RB Anthony Dixon, LB Jamar Chaney, WR Brandon McRae, QB
Tyson Lee, LB K.J. Wright.
Overview: Mullen has his work cut out for him. The Bulldogs are in the West's
cellar, and it'll take some serious work to climb out. MSU will lean heavily on
Dixon, and Lee and Chris Relf are locked in a battle for the starting QB spot. The
Bulldogs return 10 total starters from a 2008 squad that allowed 24.7 points per
game and scored just 15.2, and there's little room for optimism at this point.
Key Games: Oct. 3 vs. Georgia Tech, Oct. 24 vs. Florida, Nov. 28 vs. Mississippi.


By MIKE McCALL
Alligator Staff Writer


EAST
GEORGIA
Coach: Mark Richt (82-22 at UGA)
2008 record: 10-3 (6-2 SEC)
Players to watch: WR A.J. Green, QB Joe Cox, LB Rennie Curran, RB Caleb King,
S Reshad Jones.
Overview: Cox will try and duplicate D.J. Shockley's feat of winning the SEC in
his only year as a starter, but the Bulldogs will have to get past the Gators to do
so. King will be dynamic in the backfield if he can overcome injuries and Green
is an elite receiver, but the pressure will be on UGA's defense to improve on its
24.5 points per game allowed last year, the school's worst since 1999.
Key Games: Sept. 5 at Oklahoma St., Oct. 3 vs. LSU, Oct. 31 vs. Florida (Jackson-
ville).




KENTUCKY
Coach: Rich Brooks (32-41 at UK)
2008 record: 7-6 (2-6 SEC)
Players to watch: CB Trevard Lindley, WR Randall Cobb, LB Micah Johnson, QB
Mike Hartline, RB Alfonso Smith.
Overview: Brooks has some solid playmakers in the above-mentioned names,
but Hartline will need to be more consistent for the offense to click. Cobb showed
last year that he can pass, run and catch at a high level, and he will be a constant
threat. Johnson and Lindley are solid NFL prospects, but they're two of just four
returning starters to a defense that struggled late last season. Kentucky is likely
looking at a battle for the fifth spot in the East.
Key Games: Sept. 26 vs. Florida, Oct. 3 vs. Alabama, Nov. 21 at Georgia.




SOUTH CAROLINA
Coach: Steve Spurrier (28-22 at USC)
2008 record: 7-6 (4-4 SEC)
Players to watch: QB Stephen Garcia, LB Eric Norwood, RB Jarvis Giles, WR
Alshon Jeffery, S Chris Culliver.
Overview: Garcia was a highly touted recruit, and after overcoming off-field
problems, it's time for him to reach his potential. The offense will need contribu-
tions from some talented freshmen, and Norwood has to keep up his all-world
performances to hold the defense together. With a tough schedule ahead, the
Gamecocks will have an uphill battle to notch their first winning conference re-
cord since 2005.
Key Games: Sept. 24 vs. Mississippi, Oct. 17 at Alabama, Nov. 14 vs. Florida.




TENNESSEE
Coach: Lane Kiffin (first year at UT)
2008 record: 5-7 (3-5 SEC)
Players to watch: S Eric Berry, QB Jonathan Crompton, LB Rico McCoy, WR
Gerald Jones, RB Montario Hardesty.
Overview: Kiffin did a lot of talking during the offseason, and now it's time to
back it up. Crompton is looking to erase the disappointment of last season, and
he has a talented crop of backs behind him to help out. The secondary is the
strength of the defense, led by Berry, and they'll aim to keep holding opponents
to the stout 16.8 points per game they allowed last year. Can Kiffin's talented
freshmen handle three tough road games?
Key Games: Sept. 19 at Florida, Oct. 24 at Alabama, Nov. 14 at Mississippi.




VANDERBILT
Coach: Bobby Johnson (27-56 at VU)
2008 record: 7-6 (4-4 SEC)
Players to watch: QB Mackenzi Adams, QB Larry Smith, LB Patrick Benoist, LB
Chris Marve, CB Myron Lewis.
Overview: The Commodores return plenty of starters, but it'll be a struggle to
finish with a 4-4 conference record again this season. Vandy will be on the road
every other week for a total of six away games. VU mostly survived off of turn-
overs last year, and without those same breaks in 2009, it'll be tough to make it
two bowl games in a row.
Key Games: Sept. 12 at LSU, Oct. 3 vs. Mississippi, Nov. 7 at Florida.


I






MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009 U ALLIGATOR, 53


UF DEFENSE


Gators hope to shed 'bend-but-don't-break' label


By KYLE MAISTRI
Alligator Staff Writer
kmaistri@alligator.org

Call UF's defense intimidating.
Call it deep. Call it limitless in its
potential.
Just don't call it bend-but-don't-
break. Not this year.
"No defense likes to hear that
we're a bend-but-don't-break
defense," defensive tackle Ter-
ron Sanders said. "One thing you
would love to hear somebody say is
that defense is a brick wall. Nobody
can run through them, nobody can
complete a pass. That would be one
of the good goals that we have is
not allowing so many yards, not al-
lowing so many yards through the
air."
The Gators allowed 285 yards
per game in 2008, and 180 of those
came through opponent's passing
games.
When Ole Miss handed UF its
only loss in The Swamp last season,
it was an 86-yard pass play from Je-
van Snead to Shay Hodge that put
the Rebels up 31-24 with just more
than five minutes to play.
Linebacker Brandon Spikes said
that loss still motivates the team to
this day, and he expects the defense
to be even better than the unit that
allowed 12.9 points per game a sea-
son ago.


The way to do that is by getting
off the field faster than ever.
"I feel like we have the talent
to go three-and-out every series,"


Spikes said. "That bend-but-don't- If the defense is able to clamp
break, sometimes that will get you down right from the beginning of
in a hole, so we just try to go three- every series, Tim Tebow and the
and-out." offense might not have time to do


narrlson ulamona / ilgaior alari
Ends Justin Trattou (94), Carlos Dunlap (8) and Jermaine Cunningham (49) and linebacker Brandon
Spikes (51) are all parts of a defense that comes into the season striving for more three-and-outs.


much more than grab a drink of
water between offensive posses-
sions.
"We allowed people to drive
the ball last year," defensive coor-
dinator Charlie Strong said. "What
we need to do is just go out there
and be ready to play right from the
start."
That type of attitude is being
formed in training camp, where
complacency was targeted as the
first opponent on UF's schedule.
Every day, the players are an-
swering questions on whether or
not this defense has the makings of
one of the greatest of all time.
For those players who answered
affirmatively, Strong has a mes-
sage.
"If you're going to sell those
tickets, you better be ready to cash
them," he said.
Leadership is sure to play a big
role in the mentality of the unit, and
Strong can count on Spikes and fel-
low senior linebacker Ryan Stamp-
er to provide plenty of that.
When Charleston Southern
rolls into Gainesville on Sept. 5, the
Gators will be ready to prove to ev-
ery team on the slate that they're
dead set on not suffering another
letdown.
"If we come out thinking we're
the big bad Florida Gators, people
could beat us," Spikes said.


`W~BOOKPP~G~
c~j4

~55






54, ALLIGATOR U MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009


Gators win season opener


* ELLIOTT LIFTS FLORIDA PAST
MIAMI IN 1-0 ROAD WIN.

By EUGENIO TORRENS
Alligator Writer

Senior Ashlee Elliott promised pizazz this
year and delivered after one game.
After a scoreless first half against in-state
rival Miami, Elliott scored what turned out
to be the game-winning goal on a header
sent in from Tricia Townsend.
Before classes even started, the Gators
soccer team went to work and nabbed a 1-0
win over the Hurricanes in Coral Gables on
Friday night.
"A lot more excitement, a lot more pi-
zazz," Elliott said about this year's team. "I
feel like there's going to be a lot more cre-
ativity."
UF coach Becky Burleigh said her team
exhibited more nerves than rust.
"To have a chance to get a lot of freshmen
get experience, to start on the road, to get the
win was a good result for us," Burleigh said.
The Gators' first match of the season was
a learning experience for a team with 25 un-
derclassmen on the 33-woman roster.
"It was good to get a chance to actually
play another team and just for the freshmen


to get to see what college soccer is all about,"
goalkeeper Katie Fraine said.
Fraine racked up five saves en route to
her shutout and sealed the win as the Hurri-
canes applied pressure late with shots in the
89th and 90th minutes.
"It was just awesome to get to see our
ideas and creativity work against a team
that didn't know what was coming," Fraine
said.
Fraine acknowledged the first game
wasn't the prettiest but that some rust was to
be expected with a younger team.
"We're not going tobe mad
Sat them, it's their first game,"
Elliott said. "I was there, and
I'm not going to blame them
Soccer if they miss a pass, miss a
goal."
Youth hasn't quelled the
preseason hype.
The Gators (1-0-0) headed into this season
ranked 10th in the National Soccer Coaches
Association of America (NSCAA) preseason
poll and were also picked by league coaches
as the preseason favorite to win the South-
eastern Conference.
"For this team and the level of talent we
have, being able to establish ourselves at
home and on the road is both very impor-
tant," Burleigh said.


Doe settles legal issues,


not practicing with team


By PHIL KEGLER
Alligator Staff Writer
pkegler@alligator.org

Florida linebacker Dustin Doe settled
his legal issues Thursday, but coach Ur-
ban Meyer said he hasn't completely re-
joined the Gators yet.
Meyer said the senior will be suspend-
ed at least one game, although no final
decision has been made.
Doe has not practiced with the team
this fall after being suspended in late July
following his arrest for driving with a
suspended license. Doe is currently train-
ing individually while he tries to regain
his playing shape.
Doe pled guilty Thursday to driving
with a suspended license and driving
without a valid license. The first charge
came with a sentence of a year of unsu-
pervised probation, a $300 fine and 16


hours of work detail. The second charge
resulted in six months of unsupervised
probation, another $300 fine and another
eight hours of work detail.
Doe's suspended li-
cense had been caused
by outstanding traffic
tickets.
"He's a good guy,
but don't drive,"
Meyer said Friday.
"Don't drive. I don't
Doe understand it. I don't
want to make light
of a guy's career, because he has a lot of
promise. The great thing is it's not over.
We're certainly not turning our back on a
guy for that kind of a situation. However,
you live in the United States of America
and there are laws. Follow the laws."
Information from The Associated Press
contributed to this report.


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MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009 U ALLIGATOR, 55
i,, f1<,






56, ALLIGATOR 0 MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009


PAY FOR PLAY


Athletes missing out on their own earning potential


Editor's Note: This is the first of
a four-part alligatorSports series
in which we examine whether
college athletes deserve to be
paid for their athletic efforts.

By LAURA KUBITZ, KYLE
MAISTRI and MIKE McCALL
Alligator Writers

When Tim Tebow left Ponte Ve-
dra Nease High School for the Uni-
versity of Florida, his coach kept his
helmet.
Craig Howard didn't want it as
a memento to remind him of the
quarterback he helped mold into an
eventual Heisman Trophy winner,
and he wasn't looking to make a
quick buck by selling it.
Howard stowed it away at Nease
for the opposite reason: to keep
someone else from selling it.
That's also why Howard who
now coaches at Lake City Columbia
High didn't sell jerseys bearing
Tebow's No. 5, a venture that surely
would have raised lots of money for
the Panthers' program.
"I thought about it, but I thought
it would be too much commercial-
ism," Howard said. "We could have
made money off of it, but guys like
that come along only a few times.
"I was always very protective of
Timmy's stuff."
Though Howard has certainly
gained from coaching Tebow he
won a state title and coached a game
on ESPN he is one of the few peo-
ple who hasn't taken advantage of a
chance to make money off him.
Sometime between an athlete's
final prep contest and his arrival on
a college campus, that line is broken.
From one amateur, student-athlete-
driven sports association to another,
it becomes commonplace for people
to make large profits off of players.
And since arriving in Gainesville,


Tebow has become a cash cow.
The UF Bookstore, located
on campus, sold around 2,000 of
Tebow's No. 15 jerseys last year.
That's a rate of 166 per month, rang-
ing in price from $75 to $150.
A search on eBay.com for "Tim
Tebow" nets 393 results, ranging
from 99-cent football cards to an au-
tographed jersey up for $515.15.
At The Perfect Gift, a shop locat-
ed in Haile Village, a painting titled
"Lord of The Swamp" that featured
Tebow running through the Okla-
homa defense with Bible verses
placed all over him was on the mar-
ket for $6,500. At the Haile Village
Art Fair outside the store last spring,
more paintings, sketches and even
jewelry bearing Tebow's likeness or
jersey number were for sale.
His image has sold magazines,
newspapers, highlight videos and T-
shirts. His play on the field has sold
tickets and earned UF millions for
playing in high-profile bowl games.
And as Howard points out, a
10-year-old Tebow family Christmas
card went for $50 online last fall.
"It's almost disgusting," Howard
said. "So many people make money
off of athletes and off of sports, and
a lot of times the athletes don't get
any financial reward from it."
Due to NCAA rules, Tebow is
prevented from benefiting financial-
ly as a result of his status as an ath-
lete. He even has to jump through
hoops just to do charity work.
In the week leading up to UF's
spring football game, Tebow partic-
ipated in charity events that raised
around $300,000 for the children's
hospital at Shands at UF and an or-
phanage in the Philippines.
Tebow was only allowed to help
after months of dialogue with the
NCAA to ensure that Tebow, his
family and his father's ministry, the
Bob Tebow Evangelistic Associa-
tion, would not benefit.


"I don't really care about get-
ting paid, but sometimes I do wish
I could do more charity work and
help out with stuff like that," Tebow
said.
It seems everyone is making
money off Tim Tebow except for
Tim Tebow, but some believe he
has the ability to change the college
system.
After the 2007 Heisman Trophy
presentation, professor Rick Karch-
er, who heads the Center for Law
and Sports at the Florida Coastal
School of Law, sent Tebow a letter
congratulating him on the win.
The letter also urged Tebow to
sue the commercial entities profiting
from his identity, which would not
cause a loss of eligibility. If Tebow
were to be awarded damages,
Karcher wrote, it would be too late
for the NCAA to punish him.
"But by the time you receive that
judgment, you will have already
exhausted your eligibility," Karcher
wrote in the letter, which he later
published on the Internet. "Your
lawsuit could be the impetus for the
NCAA to begin negotiating with its
licensees for an annual royalty to be
held in trust for the benefit of colle-
giate athletes in the future, without
destroying their eligibility."
Karcher's idea was that Tebow
could do for college sports what
Curt Flood did for free agency in
baseball. But the debate about pay-
ing student-athletes is long and
twisted, with legal issues, gender
equality, economics and the spirit of
amateurism all playing a role.

The Football Machine
Because there is no fair system to
pay college athletes, and doing so
under current rules would remove
their eligibility, Tebow and his
teammates are not able to cash in on
their work.
According to the U.S. Depart-


eBay Search Results


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Source: eBay.com


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asOther Sportsll
,4 Basketballil


ment of Education, the UF football
program generated more than $66
million in 2007-08, while the men's
basketball program brought in $9.9
million. After expenses, those teams
made $47.2 million and $2.1 mil-
lion, respectively, while all other UF
sports recorded a net loss of $13.5
million.
It's clear that the gridiron Gators
are the framework holding the ath-
letics program together.
"The ability of our football pro-
gram to generate significant dollars
is the key component to our finan-
cial stability," the UAA stated in its
2008-2009 budget summary.
The numbers will be much larger
for the 2008 season.
The UAA projected to make $8.6
million in Southeastern Conference
revenue from bowl games, televi-
sion contracts and championships,
$2.1 million from advertising and
$29.9 million in donations from
boosters.
Also, since Tebow's jersey hit
the shelves, licensing revenues have
almost doubled to a projected $4
million, a number that will likely be
surpassed in the wake of the Gators'
recent national title.
Those numbers, especially from
the football team, have convinced
many that the athletes doing the
work on the field deserve a cut.
"Honestly, I think we should get
a little something," cornerback Joe
Haden said. "When you look at all
the money coming in for the games
and everything, [the university gets]
all the money. It wouldn't hurt for
us to just get a little something."
Of the Gators' 122 players, 85 are
on athletic scholarships, ranging in
value from $12,300 for in-state stu-
dents to $29,150 for non-Floridians.
The scholarships cover tuition,
housing, a meal plan and books, and
there are other benefits that come
with being a student-athlete, such as
trainers, tutors and special advisers
to help with scheduling.
"There's a lot of other things they
do for us," wide receiver David Nel-
son said. "If there's an emergency


Source: U.S Department of Education
and we have to go home, they'll pay
for our flight. They do a great job of
taking care of us, and they provide
us with meal plans and housing, so
there really isn't that much else that
we need."
The bases are covered, Haden
said, but in the shadow of coach
Urban Meyer's $4 million-per-year
contract and the program's sky-high
revenues and success, the players
should get a little more.
"We have a meal plan at the din-
ing hall, and not to be talking down
about it, but it's the same food all
the time, and sometimes you don't
want to go there," Haden said. "You
might want to take your girl out to
eat or something."
Big-time players are sure to
cash in on their careers eventually.
Tebow will likely have endorse-
ments and a pro contract waiting for
him this spring, and he took out an
insurance policy to guard against an
injury derailing his plans.
But for those without a future in
athletics, earning a degree is every-
thing.
According to the U.S. Census
Bureau, adults with a college degree
earn four times more than those with
less than a high school diploma. A
high school dropout, on average,
earned about $20,873 in 2006 while
a person with an advanced college
degree earned about $82,320.
Those benefits aren't lost on safe-
ty Major Wright, who plans to use
his communications degree to pur-
sue a broadcasting career after foot-
ball. But he still believes he should
be compensated with a stipend.
"The majority of our time as a
student-athlete is either studying or
on the field," Wright said. "I feel like
we should be paid because we're
here 24/7. We're here during the
breaks when other people go home,
and even though our team is like a
family, we can't get to be with our
immediate family much. Taking
that away can push some people
down sometimes."
Melissa Rodgers contributed to this
report.






MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009 U ALLIGATOR, 57


Breakout season leaves Dunlap wanting more


* THE JUNIOR HAD 9.5
SACKS IN 2008.

By PHIL KEGLER
Alligator Staff Writer
pkegler@alligator.org

Carlos Dunlap stepped into the
national spotlight in January, but
that may have been just the begin-
ning.
The defensive end earned Defen-
sive MVP honors during UF's 24-14
win over Oklahoma in the BCS Na-
tional Championship Game and ad-
mits to being recognized more than
ever.
The scary thought for UF oppo-
nents is the junior says he reached
only half of his potential in 2008, a
year in which he blocked three punts
and led the team with 9.5 sacks.
He tallied those stats while split-
ting time with Justin Trattou, but the
breakout season has Dunlap primed
to be the starter opposite Jermaine
Cunningham in 2009.
"Last year, it was just hard to get
Dunlap to run from me to that door,"
said defensive coordinator Charlie
Strong, referring to a door about six
feet away. "I think that what helped
him was being MVP last year of the
national championship game. He's
got so much publicity. He's taken
that upon himself to be a better foot-
ball player."
Then again, Dunlap's potential
was never in question. The 6-foot-
6, 290-pounder has always earned
praise for his freakish athletic ability


and physique.
He returned kickoffs in high
school. Strong has seen Dunlap
catch a ball carrier from behind.
But it was a different story when


he arrived in Gainesville as the fifth- week, coach Urban Meyer charac-
best recruit in the country, according terized Dunlap as a "dog" his fresh-
to Rivals.com. man year.
Struggling with the pressure, "When I came in, a lot was ex-
coaches saw him as lazy. Just last pected of me," Dunlap said. "When


narrson ulamona / ilgaior ~alri
UF defensive end Carlos Dunlap initially struggled to develop his work ethic but is receiving lots of praise
this fall. The junior has targeted the Alex Brown's single-season school record of 13 sacks, set in 1999.


I messed up, coaches got on me, and
I took it the wrong way.
"Everybody that comes to Florida
is a star at their high school. When
they get here, they expect to make
plays like they did in high school."
The last year has seen quite a
transformation from Dunlap. His
'08 success has him training harder
than ever during two-a-days, and
coaches and teammates can't help
but praise his newfound work ethic.
Defensive line coach Dan Mc-
Camey said he has seen a change in
maturity from meetings to the prac-
tice field. Fellow lineman Earl Okine
looks up to Dunlap and says he
doesn't want to let his upperclass-
man teammate down.
"His practice habits (this fall)
have been better than they've ever
been," McCamey said. "I never had
one issue with him on game day.
"He just needed to put more em-
phasis on (practice) and give more
effort and be more relentless and
just practice better and prepare bet-
ter, and he's doing that right now."
In addition to the Gators' quest to
repeat as national champs, Dunlap
still has some things to prove.
He has targeted Alex Brown's
single-season record of 13 sacks set
in 1999, and McCamey agrees he's
capable of breaking that mark. Scout.
com currently has Dunlap slotted as
the eighth-best defensive end if he
were to leave UF and enter the 2010
NFL Draft.
But for now, he'll just keep wor-
rying about practice.


In 1924, students at Notre Dame made history

by defeating the KKK.


In 2008, one university made history


by punishing a student for reading about it.



When a college student was found guilty of racial
harassment simply for reading a book, he called
on FIRE to help clear his name.

Join the thousands of students in FIRE's
Campus Freedom Network who are defending
their rights on campus. Don't wait until it's too late.


Learn about UF's stance on student rights:

www.thecfn.org/uf

Because your liberty is a precious thing.


FiRE's



CAMPUS FREEDOM NETWORK






58, ALLIGATOR U MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009


Does your fandom need questioning?


"Smokey, this is not 'Nam. This
is bowling. There are rules."
That is one of my favorite movie
quotes, delivered by John Good-
man as Walter Sobchak in The Big
Lebowski.
Sports fandom is also unlike
'Nam. There are rules to this as
well.
What are the rules of sports loy-
alty?
I'm glad you asked.
Too many times our friends are
quick to pull a maneuver that draws
our ire, jumping recklessly from
bandwagon to bandwagon without
dignity or nobility in mind.
After meditating on the matter
at hand and discussing the subject
with a well-respected colleague and
friend of mine (Mike DiFerdinan-
do), I believe I have come up with
some basic rules and regulations
that should be observed when as-
sessing the validity of one's sports
fandom.
The following is to be considered the
ultimate authority on sports allegianc-
es and a reference point for when it is or
is not acceptable to bust your buddy's
balls for questionable practices.

ARTICLE I: There are only two no-
ble reasons to claim a sports team
(college or professional) as your
own:
a) Regional proximity
b) Family ties
If you are from a city, or are
choosing a nearby team to root for,
you're well within the perimeters of
logical fandom. If you were raised
ona team, or root for a team because
that's what your dad did when you
were a little kid, we understand.

ARTICLE II: All sports allegiances
must be formed before the teenage
years. And once formed, only un-
der a precious few circumstances is
it OK to jump to another team.
Pro Teams: If you chose to root
for the Buffalo Bills when you were
a wee lad because you liked the
team's jerseys, this is a Level 1 Of-
fense. I see this as the probation of
fandom. The fact that you picked a
team at an early age and stuck with
it to this day allows you to avoid be


By KYLE MAISTRI I Kyle Points
ing called out completely, but itputs
you on extremely thin ice. If I catch
this same Bills fan ever rooting for
another team or claiming to be "not
as invested in the Bills" or "starting
to like another team more," he can
consider his fandom denied. Under
no circumstances is it OK to change
allegiances to another pro franchise.
This is to be deemed bandwagoning
or front running, and the guilty par-
ty should be mocked mercilessly.
The Bailout Exception: A sud-
denly enlightened fan may jump
ship from a once-likeable team that
has made the switch to a dynastic
team that drives everyone insane
and represents everything evil in
sports. Your new team, however,
must be downright terrible. I'm
not talking first-round-playoff-loss
bad, I'm talking brunt-of-jokes bad.
When done right, this move maybe
applauded by other card-carrying
Fanifesto members.
College: The collegiate ranks
are infinitely more complex than
the pros. College teams, far more
than pro teams, really represent a
fan base. By taking the time to root
for a college team, you are making
the statement, "See those guys out
there, they represent me." I don't
see it the same way with pro fran-
chises. I hold far stronger to the
rules outlined in Article I that col-
lege teams can only be chosen by
regional or family ties, though at-
tending a school allows you a legal
exception. If you chose a random
college team when you were small
while not obeying Article I, that
team better suck ass, and they bet-
ter suck ass every year. They better
have a ceiling of "just happy to be
in a big game." They better come
without expectations.
College programs, for the most
part, are different than pro teams.
There's no up-and-down cycle of
who's good and who isn't. Power-
houses are powerhouses and that's
just how it goes. If you chose to root
for FSU, grew up in New York City,
moved to South Florida, attend UF
and have never been to an FSU
game, that's a Level 2 Offense and
you should be appropriately tor-
mented. Furthermore, your charac-


BANNED-WAGONING
Editor's Note: There are a few teams you may not root for or "just
like" unless they are your team. These teams represent everything
we hate about sports.
MLB: Yankees, Red Sox, Rays


NFL: Patriots, Cowboys


NBA: Lakers, Celtics


NCAA FOOTBALL: USC, Ohio State, Notre Dame, UF


NCAA BASKETBALL: Duke, UCLA, UNC


EUROPEAN SOCCER: Chelsea, Man U, Real Madrid


ter should be called into question.
Switches in college sports are also
very tricky, and I have a bipartisan
policy that sees things both ways.
If you grew up in South Florida
and rooted for Miami because the
'Canes were the closest regional
team, then got accepted to UF and
became a Gators fan, that is per-
fectly fine. You are always allowed
to switch to the school you attend,
even under rivalry circumstances.
At the same time, if you grew up in
South Florida, rooted for the 'Canes,
Dad took you to games your whole
life and you got accepted to UF,
you may retain your fandom of the
prior school. It's in your blood, we
understand.

ARTICLE III: Additional college
rules:
a) You root for an entire college
program, not individual sports at
the school. If you are a Gators fan,
you are a Gators fan across the
board. You CANNOT root for UF
basketball and another school's
football team. This is a Level 2 Of-
fense. If you not only split your alle-
giance between football and basket-
ball, but those two schools happen
to be rivals, this is a Level 3 Offense.
Let's just say if someone wanted to
terminate your existence, we'd un-
derstand and turn a blind eye.
b) You may have a secondary
college team under the following
circumstances:
It's not your fault if you go to a
school with a smaller sports pro-
gram, and it's not your fault if you
go to a powerhouse school that
never gets to experience the magic
of coming out of nowhere and
"shocking the world." It is for this
reason I will allow college fans to
have two teams if they meet the fol-
lowing conditions:
i) One of the schools is in a BCS
conference, and the other is not.
ii) Your No. 1 school is clearly
defined.
If you attend the small schools
of the world, your big school must
be chosen based on the noble rea-
sons already outlined. I don't want
to hear about liberal arts students
in the Northeast cheering for USC.
If you attend the powerhouses of
the world, your small school can be
chosen under any conditions you
like, but you must do the follow-
ing:
i) Follow the team. Know the
team. Act as if you were a student
there, and make sure your knowl-
edge is on the same level.
ii) Don't treat them as the flavor
of the week. For someone like my-
self, who loves mid-major basket-
ball, it is very tempting to fall for
each new Cinderella on a year-to-
year basis. It is important not to be
swept up in switching from George
Mason to St. Mary's to Davidson.
Be faithful.
The "Major" Clause: In basket-
ball, the BCS conference rule is just
a general outline. Do some research
in finding a complete list of what
are considered MAJOR programs,
as you can only have one of these.
For example: Memphis, Xavier and
Gonzaga (along with a few others


MLB:



1u I-i )?


E -r A -


MY TEAMS


Primary Team: New York Mets
Secondary Team: Florida Marlins
My father was nice enough to curse me
with the Mets, and I grew up 45 minutes
north of where the Marlins play.


NBA:i


Primary Team: Miami Heat
The Heat have been perhaps my most
enjoyable regional team, blessing me with the
only professional sports title won by one of my MIAMIj
American primary teams during my lifetime. HEAT

NFL:

SPrimary Team: Miami Dolphins
The Dolphins have been a heart-
breaking regional selection.



NHL:
Primary Team: Florida Panthers
Be sure to do as I do and pick up your
local NHL squad come playoff time.


COLLEGE:


Primary Team: Miami Hurricanes
to Florida Gators to None
I was a Miami fan growing up but
became a Gators fan when I enrolled
at UF Now that I'm a sports journalist
s (kind of), I've worked hard to pretty
much strip myself of college fanhood.


SMALL SCHOOL:
Secondary Team: Dayton Flyers
For college basketball, I officially claim
Dayton as my small school team of
choice.


EUROPEAN SOCCER:
Primary Team: Arsenal
Secondary Team: Lyon
I've adopted Arsenal from the EPL (although I'll
admit to being a half-assed fan lately) and Lyon
(a French league team) as my second team.


I'm likely forgetting) are not to be
looked at as small schools simply
because they are not in BCS con-
ferences. You may not be a fan of a
BCS school and one of those three
schools.
The God Clause: I dislike this
rule, but I've been told by a gaggle
(more than a few, less than a myri-
ad) of peers that it is legitimate and
to be observed. If you are Catholic,
you may claim Notre Dame as a
second team. I don't like it, but I'll
respect it. By the same standards,
I think BYU should be seen as fair
game for any Mormon fans.

ARTICLE IV: Wearing a team's
gear is not to be seen as a declara-
tion of fanhood.
Wearing a team's clothes does


not make you a qualified fan of that
team. And just because you are a
fan of one team, that does not nec-
essarily exclude you from wearing
other teams' gear. Jerseys or player-
specific sportswear are especially
appropriate in this case. You may
absolutely like players on other
teams and wear their jerseys as a
result. Some teams just have sweet
colors that match an outfit. This is
another legal move.
The LeBron Clause: If caught
wearing another team's shirt/hat,
and asked about it (Oh, you're a
Yankees fan?), you must immedi-
ately set them straight, say you only
like the shirt/hat and declare your
actual team of preference. IMPOR-
SEE FANIFESTO, PAGE 59





MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009 U ALLIGATOR, 59


FANIFESTO, from page 58

TANT: You may NEVER, EVER, EVER wear
the gear of a rival, even under the player-spe-
cific provision.
The College Loyalty Exception: A player
from your college team was drafted by a rival
of your favorite pro team. This is a terrible co-
nundrum for any fan, we understand.

ARTICLE V: Rooting for a team is different
than being a fan of a team.
There are plenty of teams I like. I root for
them openly and wish them well. This is a
perfectly legal move as long as you never blur
the line of being a fan of that team.
The Game Theory Clause: You may not
root for a team that you "just like" if it will
have a negative consequence on your own
team. By the same token, you may root for
rivals or otherwise despised teams if the out-
come will benefit your team.
The Everyone Loses Clause: If you are a
true sports fan, you may find yourself in situ-
ations where you are watching a game, yet
not rooting for anyone. When the Yankees
play the Red Sox in the playoffs, rooting for
a stadium-wide swine flu outbreak may be
seen as cruel, but perfectly acceptable under
the Fanifesto.

ARTICLE VI: Smack talk is usually OK, but it
is a practice to be handled with care.
Everyone loves poking fun at a friend's
latest sports disaster. It brings a smile to our
face that your team just flamed out in the
worst way imaginable. Smack talking a fallen
friend is to be treated much like smack talk-
ing an eccentric public figure who has passed
away. If you make a joke too soon, you will be
viewed as classless. And if you take offense
on behalf of your team too easily, you should
be viewed as a whiny, perspective-less sports
fan.


The Equal Footing Clause: If you are
smack talking a friend's team beyond a quick
good-natured remark, your team must be at
least on equal standing with your friend's
team, and preferably in better standing. For
an FSU fan, the only thing worse than being
made fun of by a UF fan (whose team is enjoy-
ing unprecedented success) is being made fun
of by a Miami fan. The Seminoles may be get-
ting whooped on by the Gators year after year,
but the 'Canes aren't exactly in better shape.
The Gentlemen's Clause: Know which
teams your friends are most emotionally in-
vested in and act accordingly. Explore the
boundaries, but try not to cross them. A "con-
gratulations" to friends when their team does
well is a classy move and earns you bonus
points in my book.

ARTICLE VII: How to handle the soccer
phenomenon:
Somehow, while you were asleep, soccer
has made a serious movement in this country.
Most of us Americans didn't grow up with
the sport and have found it later in life. The
best soccer in the world is played overseas,
and picking European teams to follow is ex-
tremely difficult (ask ESPN's Bill Simmons).
The English Premier League is exactly
that, the premier soccer league in the world.
I frequently compare European soccer to col-
lege football due to the intense fan worship,
and the different leagues compare favor-
ably to college conferences. The EPL is the
Southeastern Conference of European soccer.
Everyone who wants to follow soccer across
the pond needs to pick an EPL team; unfor-
tunately, there are really only four legitimate
choices.
Arsenal, Liverpool, Chelsea and Man-
chester United are by far the cream of the
crop and the only teams that have a shot at
winning the league year-in and year-out.
Unfortunately for you, prospective soccer
fan, Chelsea and Man U have to be thrown


out right away as choices because they are
the Red Sox and Yankees (or USC and UF) of
soccer and cannot be adopted by Americans
looking to attach some importance to their
newfound sport. Arsenal and Liverpool are
fine choices, and I recommend one of those
two teams. If you think you can handle fol-
lowing a frustrating, slightly lower-level
team that doesn't have as good of a chance to
win, then Fulham, Tottenham Hotspur, As-
ton Villa and Everton are all solid choices. In
addition to your EPL team, you may choose
one other team from all the other leagues
combined to root for when it comes time for
Champions League play. However, be sure to
designate which of the two teams is your No.
1 so your allegiances are clear if the two are
ever to meet.
The Inferior League Clause: The MLS is a
joke of a league no matter what Mike McCall
tells you. I don't really want to get into choos-
ing an MLS team. Pick whoever you want ex-
cept for the Los Angeles Galaxy.

ARTICLE VIII: Addressing the international
conflict:
I had the opportunity to add to my ever-
expanding list of cool sporting events I've
been to this spring when a few of my friends
and I went to see a World Baseball Classic
game in the aforementioned Land Shark Sta-
dium. Puerto Rico was playing the United
States, and I can vouch for the 5:1 ratio of
Puerto Rican fans to American fans. I'm sure
many of them can legitimately root for Puerto
Rico under the rules I'm about to outline, but
I assure you many of them cannot.
a) Your international fanhood lies simply
with your citizenship. You don't have to be
born in the United States to be a citizen, but
you damn sure have to have been natural-
ized. Similarly, you don't have to be bom in
Puerto Rico to be a fan, but you damn sure
have to have been naturalized. (I understand
that Puerto Ricans have American citizen-


ship, but stay with me.) Any country that
you have citizenship in, you can claim. If you
have dual citizenship, you may claim two
countries. If you don't, you can't. If you are
an American by citizenship, you should be a
fan of the United States.
b) This does not follow the rules outlined
in Article I for picking a professional or col-
legiate team. Family ties do not count for this
one. Half of my family is French, and my fa-
ther was born in France and flaunts his fan-
hood for the other Red, White and Blue any
chance he gets, but that doesn't mean that I'm
allowed to. I root for France as a second team,
but I can't claim fanhood of that team.

LEVELS OF

OFFENSE


(I)


Level 1 A warning.
You are skating on
thin ice and need to
take a long look in
the mirror.

Level 2 -You have
shamed your family.
You need to repent
and set things right.

Level 3 -You have
done something
reprehensible and
bodily harm may
be justifiably done
against you.


HEY FRESHMEN!


The UF Student Rlumni Association (SRF) welcomes you

to the University of Florida and the Gator Notion!


You are invited to the Class of 2013
Welcome Reception on Monday, Rugust 24th
6:00-8:00pm at Emerson Alumni Hall.

Free Class of 2013 T-shirt for the

first 1500 attendees
Come out for FREE Domino's Pizza and Ben & Jerry's
ice cream. The event will also feature a JanSport Fashion
Show, an F Book trivia contest and tons of prizes. Come out
and meet your new Gator classmates. Bring your friends!

Prizes include:

* Set of BEAT T-shirts for all home football games
* Free Jansport gear
* Free Semester Plus tutoring packages from Tutoring Zone
* Free semester worth of books from Gator textbooks
* Gift Cards from Designer Greens
* Gift Cards from Dragonfly Rolls 'n Bowls
* Free pizza for a year from Gator Domino's
* Free ice cream for a year from Ben & Jerry's
* Free coffee for a month from Bourbon Street Coffee Co.
* Free Gator Wrap Class Rings from Herff Jones
* Free passes to Sea World
* Free passes to Busch Gardens
* And so much more!!!

Go Gators!
www.ufalumni.ufl.edu/saa 352-392-9533






60, ALLIGATOR U MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009


Top 10 UF Athletes of 2008-09


.I Nelson leaves mark on UF


Harrison Diamond/ Alligator Staff
Quarterback Tim Tebow led UF to its second title in three years after giving a now-famous speech fol-
lowing the loss to Ole Miss.


Tebow's speech, play sparks team's title run


By ADAM BERRY
Alligator Staff Writer
sports@alligator.org

Stacey Nelson did not receive
the national recognition Tim Tebow
did, but she may have been better at
her sport than any other athlete in
Gainesville.
Her relaxed, humble attitude off
the field was matched only by her
intensity and dominance once she
stepped into the circle. With 41 wins
on the year, Nelson led the Gators
to a 63-5 record, a No. 1 ranking for
most of the season and a Women's
College World Series finals appear-
ance against Washingon where the
Gators fell just short.
Coach Tim Walton said she,
along with senior Kim Waleszonia,
will be honored even after their four
outstanding years on the field.
"As long as I coach here, you
won't ever see a No. 5 (Waleszonia),
you won't ever see a No. 42 (Nelson)
on anybody else's back," Walton
said. "We don't really retire num-
bers, but they won't be worn as long
as I'm the coach here at the Univer-


sity of Florida."
She became the first Gator to
strike out 1,000 batters, threw two
no-hitters and holds nearly every
UF pitching record.
Even the list of accolades Nelson
earned during and after her final
season is remarkable. In addition to
the Lowe's Senior CLASS Award,
she was a top-three finalist for the
USA Softball Collegiate Player of
the Year, earned first-
Oteam All-America
honors from two dif-
ferent organizations
and, was selected as
one of five pitchers
on the USA Softball
Women's National Team.
For dominating the competition
throughout the season and during
her entire career, Stacey Nelson is
the alligatorSports No. 2 UF Athlete
of 2008-09.
BY THE NUMBERS: Nelson is the
second athlete to receive a vote
from all six panelists. She received
four second-place votes, one third-
place vote and one fourth-place
vote.


BY PHIL KEGLER
Alligator Staff Writer
sports@alligator.org

In 107 words, Tim Tebow went
from hyped hero to living legend.
"To the fans and everybody in Gator
Nation, I'm sorry. I'm extremely sorry.
We were hoping for an undefeated
season. That was my goal, something
Florida has never done here.
"I promise you one thing a lot
of good will come out of this. You will
never see any player in the entire coun-
try play as hard as I will play the rest
of the season. You will never see some-
one push the rest of his team as hard
as I will push everybody the rest of the
season. You will never see a team play
harder than we will the rest of the sea-
son.
"God bless."
Tebow has made plenty of big
plays most notably his fourth-
and-1 conversion at Tennessee in
2006 and his entire record-setting
Heisman-winning campaign of
2007 -but now he had failed in the
unlikeliest of moments.
The Gators had been upset. At
home. Against an unranked Missis-
sippi team.
Having failed on a final fourth-
and-1, the spot where Tebow had
been seen as automatic.
But when he looked at his worst,


he was actually at his best. His
words became a rallying cry for
teammates and fans.
These words would have rung
hollow had the Gators not respond-
ed the way they did.
UF won its remaining 10 games
by double digits, including eight by
28 points or more.
And this is why Tebow was
unanimously picked as our top UF
athlete for last year.
In his junior season, he ran a
prolific offense that averaged 43.6
Points per game
while once again
leading the Gators in
passing and rushing
yards and totaling 42
touchdowns.
Tebow fell short in his quest for
a second straight Heisman Trophy,
finishing third, but earned more
first-place votes than winner Sam
Bradford and runner-up Colt Mc-
Coy.
He was at his best during the
team's two biggest games.
The Jacksonville native earned
BCS Most Outstanding Offensive
Player honors after throwing for
231 yards and two touchdowns and
adding 109 yards on the ground.
This came a month after Tebow
earned Southeastern Conference
Championship MVP honors go-


ing 14 of 22 with 216 passing yards
and 57 rushing yards, including
a 5-yard touchdown pass to Riley
Cooper on a slant that sealed the
game with 2:50 remaining.
"I've had some great players,
and I've got some great players on
this team," UF coach Urban Meyer
said after the game. "But I've never
had one like this. Tim's got some-
thing special inside him. I'm not
talking about throwing.
"I'm not talking about running.
I'm talking about making every-
one around him better. That fourth
quarter was vintage Tim Tebow."
He made an otherwise boring
national championship celebration
inside The Swamp immediately
newsworthy with his drawn-out,
climactic announcement:
"...Oh and by the way, one more
thing let's do it again. I'm com-
ing back!"
After living up to this year's
promise, it's hard to doubt his next
one.
For his near-miraculous leader-
ship in leading the Gators to their
second national championship in
three years while solidifying his
place as one of the best college foot-
ball players of all time, Tim Tebow
is the alligatorSports No. 1 UF Ath-
lete of 2008-09.


Quarterback Tim Tebow led UF to its second title in three years after
giving a now-famous speech following the loss to Ole Miss.






MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009 U ALLIGATOR, 61


Howard bulks up, moves inside


Sophomore gained 25 Ibs


By BOBBY CALLOVI
Alligator Staff Writer
bcallovi@alligator.org

UF relied heavily on a ro-
tation of players at defensive
tackle to create penetration up
the middle a year ago, but with
Torrey Davis and John Brown
off the team and Matt Patchan
switching to the offensive line,
the Gators needed someone to
step up this fall to fill out the
rotation.
Although Jaye Howard is
still listed as a defensive end,
he has been making noise in-
side, pushing starters Terron
Sanders and Lawrence Marsh
for playing time.
"What we always said about
that position is we need to es-
tablish depth at the position,
because if you look at it, Marsh
and Sanders pretty much played
they whole year last year," UF
defensive coordinator Charlie
Strong said.
The transition from defen-
sive end to the inside has been
a long process for Howard.
Last year, he saw limited
time at defensive tackle, record-
ing only eight tackles with just
1.5 sacks.


His lack of playing time was
a result of his poor run defense,
which only allowed him to see
the field in passing situations,
something he worked on in
the offseason with the help of
Marsh.
"During the summer time,
I hit the sled hard on my own
and with Marsh (to improve
my run defense), and he would
push me in our workouts,"
Howard said.

"You have to bring your 'A'
game every day, because
practice is basically a
game and it determines
your role on the team."
Jaye Howard
UF defensive tackle

Getting better at stopping
the inside run wasn't just about
working hard on the field. It
required hard work at meal
times.
Howard gained more than
25 pounds since last season -
bringing him up to 296 to be
better suited to handle the strain
of going up against 300-pound
guards and centers.
While the weight gain was


in order to get him on the field
and stop him from getting em-
barrassed by the Pounceys in
practice, Howard had to make
sure not to lose the quickness he
had when he was 270 pounds,
which hasn't been a problem
for him.
"At first last year, when I
started playing (defensive tack-
le) in the fall, I was 270 and I
was getting blown up every
time," he said. "Now, I am up
to 295 and I am moving quick-
er.
"I am agile and I can move
better than all the guards, so
it's easy right now."
After waiting two years to
get to the point where he has
earned significant playing time,
Howard is ready to make the
most of the his opportunity.
Defensive line coach Dan Mc-
Carney showed last year his
desire to have a deep rotation.
But Howard knows with the
talent behind him, slacking off
could drop him in the depth
chart and out of the playing
time he has waited for.
"You have to bring your 'A'
game every day, because prac-
tice is basically a game and it
determines your role on the
team," he said. "(One bad day)
can really put you behind."


nauuL,, ulailu,, ,llu l/ LaluI aiL,
UF defensive tackle Jaye Howard (6) hopes to have more of an impact
after playing only sparingly last year. He had 1.5 sacks in nine games.






62, ALLIGATOR U MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009


Top 10 Burning Questions of 2009-10


Can Tebow win 2nd Heisman?


By ADAM BERRY
Alligator Staff Writer
sports@alligator.org

During his three seasons at UF,
Tim Tebow has won, in chronologi-
cal order, a national championship, a
Heisman Trophy and another nation-
al championship.
Last year, Tebow finished third in
the Heisman voting behind winner
Sam Bradford and runner-up Colt
McCoy despite receiving the most
first- and third-place votes. In 2009,
those three quarterbacks will once
again battle it out.
So the question is: Will Tebow be-
come the second player ever to win
more than one Heisman Trophy?
Considering the fact Tebow and
Bradford have already won one each,
voters may be swayed to put McCoy
atop their ballots rather than let one of
the two previous winners join Archie
Griffin as the only players with two
Heisman Trophies.
If the argument is boiled down
to statistical success, Tebow may
not have the strongest case. First, it's
likely the Gators will open up such a
big lead on many opponents that the
first-string offense won't even play
the fourth quarter. Second, UF will
look to spread the ball around and in-
volve many of its other weapons on
offense. Finally, the ridiculous num-
bers Tebow put up in 2007 may have
hurt him last year and could do the
same this year, as matching up to his


unbelievable Heisman campaign is
nearly impossible.
Granted, Tebow will likely lead the
Gators in rushing, as he has done the
past two years. Although his passing
numbers may not be as impressive
as they were with Percy Harvin and
Louis Murphy at receiver, they will
still compare favorably to McCoy's.
If voters favor the best player on
the best team, then he could very well
lead the pack. The Gators are, at this
point, the front-runners to win the
national title, and if
they make it, Tebow
S will be the one to lead


them there.
Two more impor-
tant issues will weigh
on Tebow's mind this


season.
In his last season at UF with his
NFL future looming in the distance,
he will likely be looking to become a
more complete, all-around quarter-
back. And as selfless and team-ori-
ented as he has proven himself to be,
he will primarily focus on leading his
team to an undefeated season and an-
other national championship, cement-
ing his already-impressive legacy.
With that in mind, perhaps the
two more interesting questions re-
garding Tebow will not be answered
during the course of the season. Can
he become a more NFL-ready quar-
terback? And will he be remembered
as the greatest player in college foot-
ball history?


Harrison Diamond/ Alligator Statt
UF quarterback Tim Tebow will have one more chance to win a
second Heisman Trophy this fall.


Will UF football team repeat?


Harrison Diamond/Alligator Staff
The Gators enter the 2009 season as the favorite to win a
second straight national championship.


By PHIL KEGLER
Alligator Staff Writer
sports@alligator.org

From the time confetti was falling on
Dolphin Stadium, people started talking
about the 2009 UF football team.
The Gators had just won their second
national championship in three years,
with a pretty young team to boot.
By the time Tim Tebow announced
he was coming back (and was joined by
Brandon Spikes), college football experts
began discussing it.
The question is one that has already
been asked a thousand times: Can the
UF football team repeat as national
champions?
There is certainly little doubt sur-
rounding the consensus preseason pick
for national champion.
The four major preseason magazines
already released Phil Steele, Lindy's,
Athlon and Sporting News all peg the
Gators as No. 1. They have been installed
as 2-1 favorites by sportsbooks, accord-
ing to VegasInsider.com.
At SEC Media Days, UF was the first
unanimous selection to win its division
since the league split into East and West
in 1992. The Gators also earned 63 of 64
media votes to be predicted as overall
SEC champion.
As has been mentioned before, UF
returns its entire two-deep on defense.
Tebow is set to go down as one of the
best college quarterbacks ever, and Jeff
Demps and Chris Rainey showed they
can be home-run threats on any carry.
The offensive line loses two starters
(Jason Watkins and Phil Trautwein) but
has sophomore Matt Patchan switch-
ing back to the O-line, and Sam Robey


showed he could start at center with a
breakout spring.
It should be noted this is a perilous
journey. There has not been an undis-
puted repeat champion since Nebraska
did it in 1994-95.
Teams can become complacent and
expect to roll over opponents. Certainly
UF's experience and leadership from
Tebow and Spikes will help fight that.
The Gators tumbled after winning
the crystal ball in 2006 and finished 9-4
in 2007 with a disappointing 41-35 loss
to Michigan in the Capital One Bowl.
But that 2007 team was much different
from the year prior this time, the 2009
team looks an awful like 2008, only with
another year more expe-
Orience.
Besides complacency,
the biggest factor will be
the departure of Percy
Harvin to the NFL Draft
and the inexperienced
receiving corps.
But even that can't stop the excite-
ment from fans and analysts alike.
In fact, some people have Tebow
holding a crystal ball in Pasadena as such
a sure thing that they started wondering
if UF will lose any games at all.
The Vince Young-led 2005 Texas
team was the last undefeated national
champion.
Lost in the midst of last year's now-
famous The Promise, Tebow let it slip
that an undefeated season was the goal
- last year.
"We were hoping for an undefeated
season. That was my goal, something
Florida has never done here."
Was he just a year off?
Only time will tell.


#2






MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009 a ALLIGATOR, 63


JUMPBALL

Who is more likely to throw a TD pass this season: Haden or Henry?


Editor's Note:
To tell us who
made the more
convincing
argument,
log on to
alligatorSports.
org and cast
your vote.


UF coach Urban Meyer has
called Joe Haden one of the
top five athletes he has ever
coached.
Tight end Aaron Hernandez told re-
porters at UF's media day that Haden,
Carl Moore and himself took down Er-
ving Walker, Ray Shipman and Vernon
Macklin in three-on-three basketball.
I also heard from an onlooker that
Haden looked like the best player on the
court.
The junior cornerback can do it all,
which is why Meyer has decided that
putting Haden in as the Wildcat quar-
terback is a good idea.
When he used Percy Harvin in that
role in the past, defenses knew he was
going to run the ball because the Min-
nesota Vikings' first-round draft pick
wasn't much of a thrower.
Haden was a quarterback in high
school, and a damn good one.
That doesn't mean Haden is going to
sit in the pocket and throw the ball from
sideline to sideline. I'm sure Meyer will
use him primarily to run the ball as well,
but don't be surprised to see Haden roll
out to his right side and drop in a short


pass or two.
Chas Henry,
on the other
hand, is a punt-
er. A fine punt-
er, but a punter
Kyle Maistri nonetheless.
yle aiti He will
Kyle Points probably see
kmaistri@alligator.org no playing time
within the of-
fense, and Mike
knows that.
His argument comes completely on
the belief, or delusion, that Henry will
throw a touchdown on a fake punt try.
Think about how many things have
to go right for that to happen.
If Henry is on the field to punt, that
means that the Gators are no closer to
their opponent's end zone than about 35
yards.
So, Meyer will have to first call for a
fake, Henry will have to complete a pass
and then the play must work so well that
it is able to gain at least 35 yards.
Henry was also a pretty solid quarter-
back in high school, but circumstances
make Haden the obvious choice as more
likely to toss a TD pass this season.


Don't let Urban Meyer and Kyle
Mastri fool you into thinking
Joe Haden will be spending
any real time on offense this season.
Haden might have been an accom-
plished high school quarterback, but
is Meyer really going to let a defensive
back take meaningful snaps while his
Heisman Trophy-winner sits on the
bench?
Do you really want to take the ball
out of the hands of arguably the great-
est college football player of all time? I
don't think so.
All Meyer is doing is throwing out a
smoke screen. He's just giving opppo-
nets one more thing to think about.
If Haden does somehow manage to
make it under center, don't expect him
to be airing it out. Meyer isn't going to
gamble an undefeated season on the
arm of a cornerback. At best, Haden gets
to come in and run a few option plays.
But even that's unlikely. The Gators
have far too much to lose by letting Ha-
den run around for two or three gim-
micky plays every game.
What happens if he gets hurt carry-
ing the ball and UF has to go without its


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BACK TO SCHOOL SPECIAL


All-Southeast-
ern Conference
corner the rest
of the season?
Forget Ha-
den. The off-
Mike the-radar guy
who could
DiFerdinando be throwing
Beg to DiFer a touchdown
mdiferdinando@alligatororg pass this sea-
son is punter
Chas Henry.
Henry threw for more than 1,700
yards and 17 touchdowns his senior year
at Dallas (Ga.) East Paulding High.
Henry has an exceptional arm for a
punter, which makes him a real threat
for a fake punt.
He has already thrown a pass in his
UF career, a 15-yard fake punt conver-
sion to tight end Aaron Hemandez
against Michigan two seasons ago, and
Meyer has been known to roll the dice
with a fake in the right situation. He's 6
for 6 on fake punts as the head coach at
UF.
Don't be shocked to see Henry pick
up a big first down or even a touchdown
when the Gators really need it this year.


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64, ALLIGATOR U MONDAY, AUGUST 24, 2009


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