Group Title: Independent Florida Alligator
Title: The Independent Florida alligator
ALL ISSUES CITATION THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028290/00836
 Material Information
Title: The Independent Florida alligator
Alternate Title: Florida allgator
Alligator
University digest
University of Florida digest
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some col.) ; 36 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Independent Florida Alligator
Publisher: The students of the University of Florida
Campus Communications, Inc.
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: March 5, 2008
Frequency: daily (except saturdays, sundays, holidays and exam periods, aug.-apr.); semiweekly (may-july)
daily
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates: 29.665245 x -82.336097 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Online ed. available via the World Wide Web.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 65, no. 75 (Feb. 1, 1973)-
General Note: "Not officially associated with the University of Florida."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028290
Volume ID: VID00836
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 13827512
alephbibnum - 000470760
lccn - sn 86010448
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lccn - sn 86010448
 Related Items
Preceded by: Florida alligator

Full Text


the independent florida
1011111111 A


Not officially associated with the University of Florida


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2008


VOLUME 101 ISSUE 113


Buildings evacuated after threat, flooding

l BOMB THREAT CLOSES FLORIDA GYM; PLUMB-
ING PROBLEMS SHUT DOWN LIBRARY WEST.

By ILEANA MORALES and
DEBORAH SWERDLOW
Alligator Writers

Hundreds of UF students, faculty and staff were forced
outside during stormy weather Tuesday after the Florida Gym .
was evacuated due to a bomb threat and Library West was
cleared out because of a plumbing problem.
The Florida Gym was reopened after two hours, and
Library West was dosed for the night. At press time, it was
unknown if the library would open today.
Jeff Holcomb, University Police Department spokesman,
said a male caller told an Alachua County's 911 dispatcher
around 2 p.m. that a bomb would go off in the Florida Gym
and then hung up.
UPD didn't send emergency text-messages to students be- .
cause the threat was confined to one building, Holcomb said. _40 _-
He said 11 officers were on the scene by 2:08 p.m. .
They evacuated the Florida Gym, blocked off Stadium
Road and searched the building for suspicious materials. -
Nothing was found, he said.
UPD tracked the call to an off-campus pay phone, but there
was no one at the phone when investigators arrived, Holcomb "
said. There are no suspects.
He said Regional Transit System buses were rerouted. UPD
kept everyone about 100 feet away from the Florida Gym dur-
ing the search.
Police dog named Gator also searched the building. After .Carlos Baez / Alligator
Gator cleared the common areas, faculty were allowed back Students and faculty stand across from the Florida Gym on Tuesday afternoon after the building was evacuated due
SEE BUILDINGS, PAGE 10 to a bomb threat. Police reopened the building Tuesday evening.


STUDENT GOVERNMENT

Judge takes voting case


By ILEANA MORALES
Alligator Writer
imorales@alligator.org

The lines have been drawn; the first
few battles have been fought. And on
Tuesday, supporters of online voting in
Student Government elections received
notice they are one step closer in the
virtual-ballot war their lawsuit is le-
gitimate.
A court order from Alachua County'
Circuit Judge Frederick D. Smith filed
on Feb. 28 told members of Students for
Online Voting, the UF group fighting
for the new system, that UF must "show
good cause" as to why online voting was
shot down.
The group, known as SOLVe, filed a
lawsuit against UF on Feb. 22 after the


UF Supreme Court ruled that an online-
voting amendment would be unconstitu-
tional. The court said online voting could
interfere with SG's ability to prevent
voter coercion.
"I don't know how they'll defend
something that's undefendable."
Sam MIorelll
SOLVe executive director

UF must respond within 20 days of
when the suit was filed.
Janine Sikes, UF spokeswoman, said
the university received the court order
on Tuesday and would draft its response
within the required time. Sikes said she
couldn't comment on the order until
SEE LAWSUIT PAGE 16


Police add gang units


By WILL AFFORD
Alligator Writer
wpafford@alligator.org

Two officers jumped out of the po-
lice cruiser in a dead sprint.
A moment before, they were pull-
ing up slowly behind two young
men walking down NE 26th Terrace
around 9 p.m on Feb. 20.
When the car got close, one of the
men suddenly ran through a neigh-
bor's yard.
Gainesville Police Department de-
tective Jon Rappa sprained his ankle
as he turned the comer of an unlit
sidewalk, but officer Brett Kikendall
finally tackled the man as he was en-
tering a house.


The man was Keith L. Singleton,
20, a suspected gang member, Rappa
said.
Cases like Singleton's have re-
cently led both the Gainesville Police
Department and the
Special Alachua County Sheriff's
Report Office to investigate and
document gang activity
in Gainesville in order to keep it from
growing into a larger problem.

State Law and Gainesville Gangs
Investigation teams were formed
after a Florida statute was passed in
2007 that enhances penalties for gang
members.
SEE GANGS, PAGE 8


Freshman
forward Adam
Allen knows the UF
men's basketball
team could get
a big boost to its
tournament re-
sume tonight. The
Gators host No. 4
Tennessee at 9.
See story, Page 18.


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


0 The state
legislative ses-
sion got under-
way Tuesday,
and lawmakers
are preparing
for a tough
financial year.
See story,
Page 3.


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"



visit www.alligator.org







2, ALLIGATOR U WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2008
News Today


WHAT'S HAPPENING
UF Saves
Florida Gym, 6 p.m., tonight
This event is for students in-
terested in learning about how
to save money, read their cred-
it report and find out more
about their financial future.
See story at www.alligator.org.

ON CAMPUS
Library West to host Guitar
Hero jam session today
Library West is no longer just
a place to study.
Students will have a chance
to take a break from cramming
for midterms to play Guitar
Hero from noon to 2 p.m. today
in the group presentation area
on the library's third floor.
The organizers of the event,
Library West Info Commons,
hosted the same event in
December, as a part of the
library's experiment to explore
libraries as places to study,
work and play.
Holding games and educa-


S "Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


tional events in libraries is
a trend, said Stacey Ewing,
head of Library West Info
Commons. Other universi-
ties have developed similar
units to deliver services by
integrating technology and
research services. In addition,
they create communities that
offer social opportunities for
library users.
Ewing added that she
hopes the event will also
bring more people. into the
library, so they can discover
facilities they didn't know
about before. Ewing said the
event is not a competition and
all UF students and staff are
welcome to the "first come,
first play event."
- KARUNA SZE-NGAR TSANG


CORRECTIONS
Daniel Smith, a UF political
science professor, was mis-
quoted in Tuesday's Alligator.
He said, "It basically raises
eyebrows as to what are the pri-
orities of the state Legislature
when individual members are
feeding at the public trough."

Sen. Mike Haridopolos is
the highest-paid political sci-
ence lecturer at UF. Eleven as-
sociate and full political science
professors make more than
Haridopolos. We reported oth-
erwise in Tuesday's Alligator.

The Alligator strives to be accurate and
clear In its news reports and editonals.
if you find an error, please call our
newsroom at (352) 3764458 or send an
e-mail to edltoralllgator.org.


Sthe independent florida

alligator and I11i


announces the openings for the positions


ator.o,rg


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the independent florida

alligator
VOLUME 101 ISSUE 113 ISSN 0889-2423
Not officially associated with the University of Florida
Published by Campus Communications Inc., of Gainesville, Florida
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The Independent Florida Alligator is a student newspaper serving the University of Florida, pub-
lished by a nonprofit 501 (c)(3) educational organization, Campus Communications Inc., P.O. Box
14257, Gainesville, Florida, 32604-2257. The Alligator is published Monday through Friday morn-
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that location from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, except for holidays. Classifieds also can
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The Board ofDirectors of Campus Communications, Inc., publisher of






WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2008 ALLIGATOR, 3

STATE

Legislature gears up for tough financial session


By KATIE GALLAGHER
Alligator Writer
kgallagher@alligator.org

As the Florida Legislature opened its 2008
session Tuesday, state finances were a major
concern in both the Senate and House of
Representatives. Republican Speaker of the
House Marco Rubio said he expects to find
out next week that incoming tax revenue will
be $4 billion less than expected.
Rep. Larry Cretul, a Republican represent-


ing part of Alachua County including the UF
campus, said the reduced budget would have
a severe effect on the session.
"Today is the opening day of a session in a
year that will probably go down as one of the
most difficult years financially in the state's
history," Cretul said Tuesday.
According to a letter from Rubio sent to
representatives Feb. 29, priorities for this ses-
sion include making homeowner's insurance
and health care more affordable, exploring
alternative fuel sources, making Florida


"It's a lot easier to lead when
there's a lot of money."
Ken Pruitt
state Senate president

more attractive to investors and expanding
the property-tax amendment that passed in
January.
But Democrats have said tax breaks are cut-
ting into the state's social services and budget.


"It's not fat that they're cutting," said
Senate minority leader Steven Geller, a
Democrat. "We're now breaking the bones
and trying to eat the marrow."
In opening speeches, both Rubio and
Republican Senate President Ken Pruitt said
government spending needs to be limited.
Pruitt said this will be a year to reject many
new initiatives. "It's a lot easier to lead when
there's a lot of money," Pruitt said.
The Associated Press contributed to this
report.


CLAS dean candidate outlines vision for college, budget


* SAYS BUDGET CUTS WOULD
INCLUDE FACULTY INPUT.

By DEBORAH SWERDLOW
Alligator Writer
dswerdlow@alligator.org
Paul D'Anieri, one of the candi-
dates for the UF College of Liberal
Arts and Sciences dean position,
assured the UF community during


his visit to campus Tuesday that
he would act as CLAS' advocate to
the administration during budget
difficulties.
D'Anieri, University of Kansas
CLAS associate humanities dean,
said UF's CLAS could use impend-
ing budget cuts as an opportunity to
improve the way the college works.
At an open forum during his
two-day campus visit, D'Anieri pre-
sented an analysis of UF's budget


situation and his vision for CLAS.
He said outside pressure on
universities to be economically
productive creates pressure within
the univer-
UF sities es-
Administration pecially on
CLASS to
fund more research and carry larger
teaching burdens.
After researching CLAS' budget
problems, D'Anieri said he would


make sure faculty members agree
on the budget-cut process, which
should be transparent. But he said
he doesn't have any "magical an-
swers" to fix the problem.
Audience members, mostly fac-
ulty, also spent an hour asking him'
about his educational philosophy,
fundraising experience and ideas
for retaining faculty.
Randy Duran, a UF associate
professor of chemistry, asked how


D'Anieri would deal with "the ma-
jor problem" of UF student under-
performance. Duran said students
come in with at least 30 college
credits and then take 12 credits each
semester, "which is a crime."
D'Anieri said students who take
only 12 credits a semester probably
would not graduate on time, so he
would make sure parents under-
stand the costs of college beyond
four years.


GA II I am---7lpmlLf:: :]
EVER-YDAY
WED LAISIH


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FOR LIFE


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Come join our celebration of life!


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4, ALLIGATOR N WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5,2008


Pulitzer winner speaks


* DAVID McCULLOUGH APPEARS
FOR GRAHAM CENTER OPENING.

By LIA GANOSELLIS
Alligator Writer
eganosellis@alligator.org

David McCullough, a two-time
Pulitzer Prize-winning historian
for the books "Truman" and "John
Adams," spoke to a sold-out UF audi-
ence Tuesday night about the impor-
tance of writing.
McCullough's speech at the
University Auditorium was part of the
grand-opening celebration for the Bob
Graham Center for Public Service. The
center's dedication ceremony will take
place today at 10:30 a.m.
McCullough, who also wrote
"1776," emphasized the importance of
documenting history to enable future
learning.
"Everything that we have, some-
body before us has made it possible,"
he said.
People have a false notion that read-
ing information is a sufficient way to
learn, McCullough said, but that isn't
enough.


In order to really gain knowledge
about something, you have to write
about it, too, he said.
"If you were to memorize the World
Almanac, you wouldn't be educated
- you would be weird," he said, evok-
ing laughter from the audience.
But students cannot learn if they
don't have good teachers, McCullough
added.
It's important for teachers to share
subjects they are passionate about with
their students, children or grandchil-
dren, he said.
"Show what you love," he said.
"That's the secret of teaching."
In an interview following
McCullough's speech, former U.S. Sen.
Bob Graham said the author set a prec-
edent for the quality of speakers the
Graham Center hopes to host in the fu-
ture. Graham said he was most pleased
with McCullough's encouragement of
students to go beyond school to learn
about their country's history.
"Preparing for citizenship is not just
a matter of taking a course in American
government," he said. "It involves an
understanding of core values and
skills. It's a challenge to each of us
individually."


ndrribUil iUiiw ull / Wii IIu[ o,1*11
Two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning author David McCullough speaks about the history of leader-
ship in America as part of the opening events for the Bob Graham Center for Public Service
at the University Auditorium Tuesday night.


Treasurer resigns


at Senate meeting


Student Body Treasurer E.J.
Walicki announced his resigna-
tion at Tuesday night's Student
Senate meeting.
Thursday will be his last day
in office, he said. Walicki said he
is returning home to Baltimore,
Md., for the rest of the semester
to be with his family following
his father's death in January.
His announcement came
during the first of two Student
Senate meetings at which sev-
eral members shared memories
before the newest group of
senators, elected Feb. 26 and 27,
assumed their places.
Kevin Reilly, former Senate
president and incoming
Student Body president, touted
several goals past senators ac-
complished, including improv-


ing Chomp the Vote, passing
a graduate bill of rights and
creating a sustainability minor
that will begin in fall.
Steven Hoffstetter, Gator
Party chairman, said he felt a
sense of success during his last
Senate meeting as a sophomore
representative.
In the
Student S enate' s
Government second
meeting, the
new sena-
tors elected their leaders. Kellie
Dale was elected Student Senate
president, and MaryGrace Bell
was elected Student Senate pro
tempore.
The new Senate members
were sworn in at about 10 p.m.
KATIE SANDERS


STATE

BOG upset over proposed changes


By LIA GANOSELLIS
Alligator Writer
eganosellis@alligator.org

Members of the Florida Board
of Governors are up in arms about
a proposed joint legislative resolu-
tion that would strip the board
of many powers and put higher
education in the hands of the
Legislature.
Sen. Lisa Carlton proposed a
joint resolution Feb. 26 that would
reduce members on the Board
of Governors, which oversees
Florida's 11 public universities.
Instead of 14 govenor-appointed
members serving seven-year
terms, five appointed members
would serve four-year terms.
The commissioner of educa-
tion, chairman of the advisory
council of faculty senates and the
president of the Florida Student
Association would retain their
positions.
The resolution also proposes
placing the commissioner of edu-


cation on the Florida Cabinet to
supervise public education. The
state Board of Education would be
replaced with Gov. Charlie Crist
and his Florida Cabinet.
The Legislature would deter-
mine the board's powers.
During an emergency confer-
ence call with the rest of the board
Tuesday morn-
ing, Chancellor
MarkRosenberg
said the
Legislature's
direct control
over state uni-
versities could
carton lead to more
politicized
curriculums, more crowded class-
rooms and a faculty "brain drain"
due to the system's instability.
"The direction that the pro-
posal moves in, in essence, may
be an opportunity for our public
universities to be highly criticized
institutions driven by political
agendas," Rosenberg said. "That's


not the way for our students to be
educated."
Carlton said the new system
would only improve state educa-
tion. It's not meant to abolish the
board, she said.
Carolyn Roberts, chairwoman
of the board, said what's troubling
about Carlton's suggestion is that
it was a surprise, and she hoped
the Legislature would not "fast
track" the proposal.
If legislators acts quickly, it
could be approved by three-fifths
of both the state Senate and House
of Representatives by next week,
Roberts said. There must be time
to discuss the resolution's implica-
tions, she said. Anything less is un-
fair to Florida families, students,
faculty and university leaders.
"We have an understanding
with the presidents, and they have
an understanding with us, that
we'll try to keep the surprises to a
minimum," Roberts said.
Alligator staff writer Kim
Wilmath contributed to this report.


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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2008 N ALLIGATOR, 5


Puppy video


brings up


bigger issue
y the time the average reader
views this article, most will have
seen the supposed video of a
member of the United States military
throwing puppy off of a cliff in Iraq.
As a veteran of the United States
Marine Corps, Operation Iraqi
Freedom and Operation Enduring
Freedom, I am disgusted at his actions
and certainly would hope that his
command comes down with swiftpun-
ishment under the Uniform Code of
Military Justice.
However, before people overreact
and threaten his life or the lives of his
family, I think it's important to look at
the bigger picture.
What brought him to that point in
his military career or his life for that
matter that would make him think
that this sort of behavior is acceptable?
Let's face the facts: the dirty little
secret Uncle Sam doesn't care to pub-
licize in his military recruiting pam-
phlets is that during your boot camp,
the military trains you to kill.
Not only does it train you to kill,
but it also trains you to have no sec-
ond thoughts about it. It continually
pounds into your head: "Kill them be-
fore they kill you."
The government does not want
soldiers and Marines who second-
guess themselves. It wants robots who
perform instantly and obediently to
lawful orders given by superiors.
If you couple that "kill" mentality
with being put in a stressful environ-
ment like Iraq, then you are bound to
have young men who completely lose
it and do stuff like this young man did,
or maybe even worse. Given the state
of Iraq in the past few years, there is
a high probability that he has seen
things that would make the average
person sick, and naturally, it has had a
profound effect on him.
This man should be removed from
whatever combat zone he is in right
now and get mandatory psychological
help before he does something worse.
This incident will no doubt put
another blemish on our military
However, it should also be noted that
when you take 18- and 19-year-old
kids, give them three to six months
worth of training and send them to
combat-prone theaters like Iraq, do
you not think that some will certainly
lose their hold on reality? Reality over
there is car bombs, improvised explo-
sive devices and seeing guys you serve
with die right in front of you.
The court of public opinion will no
doubt condemn this young man, but to
a degree, it needs to hold the govern-
ment accountable for having him there
in the first place.
Don Kershaw is a student at Sante Fe
Community College and a member of the
editorial board.


Viewpoints


ALLIGATOR
www.alligator.org/opinion


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Marine should be dishonorably discharged


SIlhe actions of the U.S. Marine shown
throwing a puppy off a cliff in an
Internet video are shameful and de-
nounced by the Animal Activists of Alachua.
That a person could take pleasure in
the abuse and suffering of an innocent
animal is appalling and cannot be justified.
Animal cruelty is a felony in many states, and
the Marine should be dishonorably discharged
and serve prison time if the video is depicting
reality. He should not be shown leniency in this
matter based on the fact that he is a Marine. In
fact, members of the military should be held to
a higher standard.
This matter also should not be taken lightly
because the victim is an animal. Every creature


has a right to live its life freely, whether it is hu-
man or not. An animal's basic interests should
be shown the same consideration as ours, and
sympathy should be given to all victims of in-
justice, regardless of their species.
Some say the video is doctored, but
humans commit millions of similar acts
of animal abuse every day; the only differ-
ence is not all of them make it to YouTube.
So why do only a few acts of animal cru-
elty ever surface to catch the .attention of the
public? Americans are interested in cases
such as this and Michael Vick's dog fighting,
but they turn a blind eye to many others.
Unfortunately, animal cruelty reachesfarbeyond
this one case and reaches far beyond cute pup-


pies. The puppy in the video feels the same pain
as animals slaughtered for food, yet for some
reason many don't make that connection. Some
would say a soldier who is trained to kill in war
could become desensitized to such cruelty. That
is no excuse for the actions seen in the video.
It is unfortunate our tax dollars fund a Marine
who makes light of animal abuse. Though we
cannot control where our tax dollars are spent,
we can take many things into our own hands to
eliminate unnecessary suffering. It is our hope
that people will make the connection between
their choices and the consequences they have
on other living beings.
Shivani Patel is the former president of the
Animal Activists of Alachua.


This extended Opinions section appears the first
and third Wednesday of every month, giving two
members of the community the opportunity to
share their opposing views.


Isn't it a coincidence that the last name
of recent UF hire and state Sen. Mike
Haridopolos begins with the Greek
word "hari," which translates into
"favor" in English?


alligator.org Comment Corner
"We should all follow our president. He knows what's best for us.
Please stop all of this treasonous talk. You're only helping the
terrorists."
Inflatable Jesus, on a columnist's opinion
that true patriots question the country's path






6, ALLIGATOR U WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5,2008

Editorial


Lower Education

Eliminating Board of

Governors wrong move
r hough Gov. Charlie Crist would have you believe the
| state of Florida is not overcome with serious financial
Difficulties judging by his overly optimistic State of the
State speech Tuesday night, a storm is brewing for this legisla-
tive session.
And it's not going to be pretty.
While the governor was busy figuring out how to success-
fully downplay concerns over budget cuts and a softening
housing market in his dinnertime debut, state Senate President
Ken Pruitt was gearing up to put it all on the table.
In his opening address of the 2008 legislative session, he let
voters know that he wants to bring back an elected education
commissioner and do away with the university oversight pow-
ers of the Board of Governors.
"We are going to leave it to voters," he said. "Do they want
an unelected board to set tuition? Or do they want their elected
legislators to set it?"
Well, actually, Pruitt, the voters have already decided. But
just in case it slipped his mind, we'll give him a quick refresher.
In 2002, voters approved a constitutional amendment creat-
ing the Board of Governors to oversee Florida's 11 public uni-
versities. The ridiculous power struggle over who has the right
to set tuition came to a head when the board unanimously ap-
proved a tuition increase to combat the embarrassing student-
teacher ratios and retain faculty in the state.
A lawsuit between Pruitt and the board soon followed, and
the power has yet to be defined. Unfortunately, by doing the job
it was appointed to do and attempting to maintain some stan-
dard of quality at Florida's public institutions, the board may
have hammered the nails in its own coffin.
The current proposal, which is hard to view as anything
more than underhanded revenge, filed by Sen. Lisa Carlton,
seeks to reduce the 17-member Board of Governors to just
seven. Their job would be limited to "administer the state uni-
versity system as provided by law."
How conveniently ambiguous.
If the Legislature has its way, there would be no student or
faculty voice to weigh in on issues that directly affect them, and
that is not any way to run a state university system.
By essentially removing any power the board has, the
Legislature would be attempting to drop the enormous respon-
sibility of overseeing higher education in the hands of unin-
formed officials heavily influenced by public whim.
An independent board should be allowed to set tuition for
the very reason elected officials should not.
How could elected officials be expected to resist doing ev-
erything they can to keep tuition low when it would look so
good on their next election's campaign literature?
Therein lies the problem, but the solution is already in
place.
The board's appointed officials including 14 members
appointed by the governor, the Florida commissioner of educa-
tion, the chair of the advisory council of faculty senates, and the
president of the Florida Student Association have a vested
interest in keeping educational quality high, rather than a per-
ceived civic duty to keep costs unreasonably low.
They also happen to know what they're talking about.
We think it's not the wisest choice to allow elected officials
whose only educational credentials include certification in
wastewater treatment from Indian River Community College
- like Pruitt, according to his Senate Web siet to make com-
plicated, involved decisions about higher education.
If the Legislature strives to create an educational system it
can be proud of, it's best to stop trying to figure out what voters
want and listen to the message they have already sent.


j I the independent florida
alligator


Chad Smith
EDITOR
Devin Culclasure
MANAGING EDITOR


Panagiota Papakos
OPINIONS EDITOR
Don Kershaw
Leigh Shapiro
EDITORIAL BOARD


The Alligator encourages comments from readers. Letters to the editor should not exceed 150
words (about one letter-sized page). They must be typed, double-spaced and must include the
author's name, classification and phone number. Names will be withheld if the writer shows
just cause. We reserve the right to edit for length, grammar, style and libel. Send letters to
letters@alligator.org, bring them to 1105 W. University Ave., or send them to P.O. Box 14257,
Gainesville, FL 32604-2257. Columns of about 550 words about original topics and editorial
cartoons are also welcome. Questions? Call 376-4458.


Opinions


Column

Fear tactics used to divide electorate


he American people have been fed a steady diet of
fear for the better part of the last seven years. Since
the harrowing hours of Sept. 11, our media and poli-
ticians have done their best to scare the living daylights
out us by incessantly informing us that its not a matter of
if there will be another terrorist attack, but when.
Perhaps no one has been more skilled in the art of
fear-mongering than our leader, President Bush. For all
the talk of his deficient intellect, Bush has proven to be
exceptionally shrewd when it comes to using the fear card
to gain support for his ruinous policies. The selling of the
war in Iraq and the deletion of privacy rights from the
Constitution come to mind.
Fear is an American pastime. It's as American as base-
ball and apple pie. Fear enabled slavery to survive for
two-and-a-half centuries, then precipitated its evolution
into the Black Codes and finally Jim Crow. Fear caused
innocent Japanese Americans to be locked away in intern-
ment camps during World War II. Fear is the reason Lou
Dobbs gets to spew his nationalist, anti-immigrant invec-
tive on national television.
No one is completely immune from fear; it is the most
basic human emotion. The one who says he or she isn't
afraid of anything is either a liar or an automaton. It's only
natural to be afraid from time to time, especially when our
leaders tell us we ought to be.
Some are afraid of Islamofascist terrorism, others
- myself included of Hannah Montana mania. Still
others are afraid of losing elections.
Sen. Hillary Clinton falls into the latter category.
After a string of demoralizing defeats, the former
Democratic front-runner is on the ropes. Unable to find
a positive message to match Sen. Barack Obama's breath-
taking oratory and growing grassroots movement, Sen.
Clinton has turned to the divisive and irrational politics of
fear in attempts to revive her campaign.
Last week, Clinton's campaign leaked a photo of
Obama wearing traditional African dress during a trip


to his ancestral homeland, Kenya.
The implication being since he
wore what Muslims in that re-
gion wear, the rumors about him
secretly being a Muslim must be
Joshua true! Failing that, at least the photo
ha might place some doubts into the
Frederickson minds' of voters about casting a
editor@alligator.org ballot for him. Never mind that
donning traditional ethnic dress is
a time-honored gesture of good will and friendship.
Case in point: a perusal of the William J. Clinton
Presidential Library & Museum Web site will produce
photos of then first lady Hillary- Clinton wearing the hi-
jab Islamic head covering as well as shots of former
President Clinton himself sporting African attire during a
visit to the continent.
Even if Obama were a Muslim for the record, he is a
Christian why should that matter? There is no religious
test for holding office in this country.
The Clinton campaign's attempt to use fear to divide
us doesn't stop with questioning Obama's faith. Last week
also marked the launch of a new Clinton TV spot that
again sought to use fear to scare up votes. It shows a sub-
urban woman checking in on her sleeping children: "It's
3 a.m. and your children are safe and asleep. But there's
a phone in the White House and it's ringing. Something
is happening in the world. Your vote will decide who an-
swers that call." The ad is a blatant attempt to exploit the
national security concerns of many, hinting that Obama
shouldn't be trusted with our safety.
This is more than the symptoms of "silly season;" it's a
calculated attempt to instill fear in the hearts and minds of
the American people.
I hope that this time we will see through this deplor-
able ploy and reject it vigorously at the ballot.
Joshua Fredrickson is a political science senior. His column
appears Wednesdays.


Reader response
Today's question: Should the
state Board of Governors be
dissolved?
Vote or post a me


Tuesday's question: Do you still 54% YES
practice the religion you grew up 46% NO
with? 9 TOTAL VOTES
89 TOTAL VOTES


message at www.alligator.org


The views expressed here are not necessarily those of the Alligator.






WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2008 E ALLIGATOR, 7


Letters to the Editor
Police handled bomb threat poorly
When the alarm went off in the Florida
Gym Tuesday, it was chaotic. There were no
direct instructions other than the standard fire
alarm the building is equipped with. All the
message said was to evacuate the building.
Students and faculty lingered because no one
was given instructions.
The professors were just as lost as stu-
dents on what to do because the police were
not helping organize the situation. One of
-my classmates called the University Police
Department, and they said there was a bomb
threat. As I was walking, I saw several officers
in their cars just sitting there. There didn't
seem to be enough officers at the scene taking
care of the situation.
I feel like there was a complete failure to


keep us safe. There have been several inci-
dents at other schools this year, and every
time President Bernie Machen tells us that UF
has a system in place. Last semester, we gave
the university our cell phone numbers so they
could text-message us if there was an emer-
gency. There is also supposed to be informa-
tion on the UF Web site, and we are supposed
to receive e-mail messages. There seems to be
two logical explanations to why this system
didn't work: they did not consider the situa-
tion an emergency or the system failed.
Maybe it is only an emergency when stu-
dents or faculty are injured, but it seems when
someone threatens to blow up a building on
campus, it is worth informing students about
immediately. The way UPD took care of the
situation made it seem like this was the first


bomb threat it has ever encountered. As a
citizen, I expect police officers to provide me
with the necessary information to keep me
safe. Instead, the situation was chaotic and
disorganized. The university needs to take a
closer look at the emergency preparedness
plan because after today, I truly question its
ability to keep anyone safe.
Jennifer Meyerson
3JM



Tuition increase will prevent disadvantage
Within the past two semesters on campus,
I experienced my second UF professor dose
to tears when it comes to the budget cuts.
The most recent 6 percent cut that depart-


ments must meet makes matters even worse
at a school that is trying to become a top 10
institution. I want UF to be that top 10 school,
and I'm confident that the only way that will
happen is tuition is increased to similar rates
of other public schools. One can take a look at
the University of Michigan. According to its
Web site, tuition and fees for in-state students
are currently $10,448 for students in their first
two years, and $11,776 for students in their
third and fourth years. In comparison, UF's
tuition and fees are $3,370. UF is an amazing
institution, and I'm afraid that without an in-
crease in tuition, The Gator Nation will be at a
severe disadvantage in the future.
Jason Silver
UF Interfraternity Council vice president
of administrative affairs


A TTETION!

ALLIGTORDVETISRS


Due to Spring Break, the Alligator will have the following
advanced deadlines:
Deadline for Monday, March 17th paper:
THURSDAY, March 6th, by 4 pm
Deadline for Tuesday, March 18th paper:
FRIDAY, March 7th, by 4 pm
Theses deadlines apply to both Display and Classified advertising, as well as all
customers wishing to renew their classified ads March 19th or March 20th.


Classifieds
373-FIND


Display
376-4482


GRZZK BL86D DRIVZ FAU 28
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25 through WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5
---------------

Greek Blood Drive Spring 2008
Donations as of 6 p.m. on 03/03/08


'Sororities
Total Donations
I-Sigma Kappa-30
2-Kappa Kappa Gamma-26
3-Phi Mu-24
Tied for 4th
4-Alpha Delta Pi- 13
4-Chi Omega-1 3
5-Pi Beta Phi-10


S Sororities
S Percentage
S1-Sigma Kappa-30%
2-Kappa Kappa Gamma-19%
3-Phi Mu- 17%
* 4-Chi Omega-8%
Tied for Sth
* 5-Alpha Della Pi-7o
6-Pi Beta Phi-7%


" Fraternities
* Percentage
I-Delta Upsilon-61%
* 2-Sigma Nu-50%
* 3-Phi Kappa Tau-28*'o
4* .Alpha Gamma Rho-22%0
a 4-Pi Kappa Phi-21%


FINAL NIGHT CELEBRATION
at Norman Field 6 p.m. to 10p.m.
3 Bloodmobiles, Gator Domino's, Pepsi,
Ben & Jerry's, and KISS 105.3 will be on site.


Fraternities
: Total Donations
I -Phi Kappa Tau-23

Tied for 2nd
* 2-Sigma Nu.2 I
* 2-Theto Chi-2 I


3-Pi Kappa Phi-18
4-Delta Upsilon-1 4
5-Pi Lambda Phi-I I


-I,...o e .l om .o-n & rI' ]


2S Z1.


*rNIiSN M


BURN


VICTIM.


1666666SS 663 66666 660660


J. AYNE
) J. Wayne Reitz Union

Board of Managers
Applications are currently being accepted for
Student Membership on the 2008-2009 Board of Managers

Candidates MUST:
Be currently enrolled for at least 12 credit hours
Be available to serve a one-year term
Be free of conduct probation and academic probation
Have a minimum of 2.5 cumulative GPA

Applications are available at Peabody Hall, SWRC, Student
Recreational and Fitness Center, Reitz Union Information Desk,
Student Organization Resource Center,
and the Reitz Union website at: www.union.ufl.edu

Applications must be completed and returned to the
Director's Office, 101 JWRU (attention Melody Trapani),
no later than 3:30 p.m. Friday, March 28, 2008.

Applicants will be required to attend a 15-minute interview.
You will be contacted to schedule an interview once the
interview schedule has been finalized.


AmS MS.3 FM






8, ALLIGATOR U WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5,2008


LOCAL

Veteran stabs


self at hospital

* VETERAN WRAPS HIMSELF IN GASOLINE-
SOAKED FLAG, THREATENS TO IGNITE SELF.

By JESSICA PONN
Alligator Staff Writer
jponn@alligator.org

Gainesville police subdued a man who was
threatening to light himself on fire Tuesday morn-
ing outside of Gainesville's Malcolm Randall VA
Medical Center.
The man, who remains unidentified, cut him-
self across his chest with a 4-inch knife, wrapped
himself in a gasoline-soaked flag and threatened
to put a lighter to the flag, said Gainesville Police
Department spokeswoman Officer Summer
Hallett.
The man had a can of gasoline with him and
began to -pour it around himself when police ar-
rived at the hospital, located off of Archer Road
and Southwest 16th Street, Hallett said.
After the man refused the officers' requests to
put down his knife and lighter, police fired two
"bean bag" shots non-lethal rounds made of the
same material as bean bags both of which hit
the man in his chest and stunned him.
The man, who Hallett said is a veteran, was
handed over to hospital staff for treatment.
He will not be charged with a crime, Hallett
said.


Police: Majority of Gainesville gangs aren't national but 'neighborhood cliques'


GANG, from.page 1


The statute defines a gang as a group of
three or more people who have a common
name or unifying signs, colors or symbols
and have two or more members who, indi-
vidually or collectively, engage in or have
engaged in criminal street gang activity.
Also last year, Rappa and other GPD
officers attended a class on how to pursue
gang prosecutions.
A few months ago, GPD assigned Rappa
and another investigator to focus on gang-
related crime, though they don't have an
official "gang unit."
The sheriff's office created a formal gang
unit comprised of one deputy around
the same time.
Although Gainesville does have a
small presence of national gangs, such as
Latin Kings, Bloods and Crips, the major-
ity of street gangs are what Rappa calls
"neighborhood cliques." These gangs are
spread throughout Gainesville. Most gang
members are between 14 and 18 years old,
Rappa said.
The crimes they commit usually involve
burglary, theft, property damage and, when
they're older, narcotic sales.
Gang graffiti is also common, Rappa
said, with the Star of David or a crown with
five points representing different loyalties.
Rappa said he has documented about
eight gangs in Gainesville so far, half of
them being national gangs.
Deputy Richard LaLonde, who heads
the gang unit for the sheriff's office, es-
timates the number of gangs in Alachua
County to be about 16, including national
gangs, neighborhood cliques and even mo-
torcycle gangs.

The Importance of Intel
Before someone can be prosecuted as a
gangs member, police must document the


gang and prove that the suspect is a mem-
ber of that gang.
Therefore, intelligence gathering is the
most action GPD is taking to combat gang
activity, Rappa said.
"Information and intelligence are just so
important to a police department," Rappa
said. "It's just vital."
Because the gang teams at both GPD
and the sheriff's office were created so re-
cently, they haven't yet done much more
than gather information. Rappa said while
he receives most of his information from
road patrol, the tactical impact unit and
the street crime unit, he also conducts field
interviews.
Sometimes he sees people hanging out
on a street comer and approaches them.
"It doesn't have to be confrontational,"
he said. "You never know what you can
find just getting out and talking to them."
Rappa keeps field cards from his inter-
views of different suspected or confirmed
gang members containing their names,
dates of birth, where they were found and
descriptions of their clothes.
"It just helps us know who is hanging
out where," he said.
Rappa and LaLonde also work together,
sharing information, LaLonde said.
The sheriff's office is working on new
ways of storing intelligence, as well as
educating local' law enforcement agencies
about how to recognize the signs of gang
activity.
LaLonde also communicates with agen-
cies in surrounding counties.

Street Families
The Rev. Karl Anderson is the president
of People Against Violence Enterprises, or
P.A.V.E., a Gainesville organization that
raises awareness about youth violence.
Anderson said neighborhood cliques are
prevalent throughout the city, and his orga-
nization seeks to reduce gang activity by


informing parents and raising awareness in
the community.
Anderson believes the main reason
young people join gangs is for acceptance,
he said.
"Parents don't spend time with them,"
he said. "They feel more loved and receive
more attention on the streets."
LaLonde agreed that gangs offer mem-
bers a sense of family they may be missing.
But many gangs require initiations, such
as beat-ins or criminal activity, which are
supposed to build trust, LaLonde said.
"It also means now they have something
"I think if we have one gang in
Alachua County, we have one too
many."
Richard LaLonde
Alachua County Sheriff's Office deputy

on you," he said. "That doesn't sound like
love to me."
Erick Baker, the director for the Boys &
Girls Club of America Woodland Park Unit
in East Gainesville, said it is not just a lack
of family supervision that pushes kids into
gangs.
"A lot of it comes from kids who aren't
bad, but kids who are bored," Baker said.
He said Alachua County doesn't of-
fer enough age-appropriate activities for
middle- and high school-age children, and
most jobs that would normally be filled
by this age group are given to college stu-
dents.
A lack of discipline, and structured fam-
ily life also contribute to neighborhood
gangs, Baker said.
"The friends are now taking the place of
the family," he said. "They're more loyal to
the streets than they are to their family."
Gangs have also been glorified in popu-
lar culture by icons like Snoop Dogg and 50
Cent, LaLonde said.


Growing Pains
Unlike national gangs, the allegiance
of neighborhood clique members to their
gang is usually fairly loose.
Anderson said that once gang members
move to a new neighborhood, their alli-
ances change.
"They're territorial but the individu-
als aren't as devoted as, say, a Blood or a
Crip," he said.
Rappa said most members start to out-
grow their neighborhood groups in their
early 20s. Some then join a more serious
gang, but others choose to just move on.
The loyalty of gang members is also usu-
ally quickly forgotten when they're facing
serious charges, LaLonde said, and many
will snitch under pressure.
"There isn't too much honor among
thieves," he said.
Warren English, the Florida Department
of Juvenile Justice Gainesville coordina-
tor, said most neighborhood cliques aren't
gangs, just children thinking they're a
gang.
"To me it's just immaturity and not un-
derstanding what a gang is," English said.
English said although young people
may represent their neighborhoods, they're
usually not committing crimes together in
an organized way, and they usually stop
after high school. Despite local law enforce-
ment's recent focus on gangs, Rappa said
he doesn't think Gainesville has a "gang
problem" because gangs are not rampant
and are invisible to the average citizen.
"If you don't stay on top of it, you'll
have a problem," Rappa said. "That's all
we're trying to do stay on top of it."
LaLonde said although gangs are not a
big problem right now in Alachua County,
gang activity is increasing statewide, and
law enforcement needs to monitor it.
"I think if we have one gang in Alachua
County, we have one too many," he said.
"They're like cockroaches."


Raylaz Khan / Alligator
Get a Grip
UF students Hillary Smith and Racheal Stewart climb a rock wall provided by the National Outdoor Leadership
School on the Plaza of the Americas on Tuesday before rain drenched the campus in the afternoon.






WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2008 N ALLIGATOR, 9


Faith In Her


Local pastor

reaches out

to young, old
Pentecostal pastor Kathleen
Dames' faith in God is unwaver-
ing.
In a community constantly
dealing with crime, her followers
have resolute faith in her, seeking
guidance and salvation.
As overseer of the Deliverance
Gospel Temple Worship and a
preschool director, her righteous
reach extends well beyond the
church to young and old.
She says she does her best to
instill respect and confidence
needed for her pupils to succeed
in life.
But Dames' selflessness and
care for others 'leaves her little
time and energy to spend on her-
self.
PHOTOS AND TEXT
BY JASON HENRY


ABOVE: Her hands worn and weathered, Dames leads a child inside
after he fell and scraped his knee.
TOP RIGHT: Dames blesses parishioner Jessuca Milton during
prayer, admonishing that if she doesn't stop associating with a cer-
tain crowd, she'll end up having to go to church in jail.
CENTER RIGHT: Dames' outreach extends to driving the children
home from the day care center she manages. While attempting to
gather the children to her car, she laughs at a co-worker's remark
about needing to retire the wig she was wearing for a new one.
BOTTOM RIGHT: After Malik, 7, threw a toy at a pupil, Dames firmly
explains to his behavior is unacceptable.







10, ALLIGATOR N WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5,2008


Bomb threats common at UF in 1990s


BUILDINGS, from page 1

inside around 4 p.m. to search their offices for any suspi-
cious items.
Holcomb said it was safe for faculty members to enter
the building at that time because their offices were more
secure than common areas, so there was a slim chance a
bomb could have been planted there.
He said students were allowed in at 4:17 p.m.
Steve Orlando, UF spokesman, said bomb threats
during midterms were common in the 1990s as a way for
students to avoid exams.
Orlando said he wasn't sure if midterms motivated
Tuesday's threat.
Stacey Wroble, a history junior, said she had been in
her religion class in the Florida Gym for about 10 min-
utes when a voice on a loudspeaker told occupants they
needed to exit the building.
She said students filed downstairs and huddled in
the lobby to avoid the rain, but officers told them to wait
across the street.
Wroble said no one seemed worried, and no one asked
the police any questions.
"I feel like I was the only person who was freaked
out," she said. "I started thinking of Columbine. Those
kids were having just a normal day like I was."
Danielle Dennis, an advertising junior, also said most
students seemed calm. After waiting outside for 10 min-
utes, Dennis said she went to a meeting in Weimer Hall


and then to Library West.
But a half hour after she settled in to study at the
library, another announcement ordered occupants to
evacuate within 15 minutes.
Dennis said she saw a puddle less than an inch deep
leaking from the bathrooms near the second-floor eleva-
tors before she left the library.
Jim Stevens, circulation department supervisor, said li-
brary officials were notified at about 4p.m. that bathrooms
on all floors of the building's west side were leaking,
"I started thinking of Columbine. Those
kids were having just a normal day like I
was."
Stacey Wroble
UF student

Stevens said students were asked to leave just before 5
p.m., and the building was dosed for the rest of Tuesday.
Bill Covey, interim director for UF library support
services, wrote in an e-mail that backed-up sewage lines
caused overflows in the bathrooms, making them unus-
able. Covey said he wasn't sure how much it would cost
to fix the damages.
But, explanation or not, Dennis and other students
said they found it hard to muster enthusiasm to study
after being interrupted by the evacuations.
"I was kicked out of two buildings in one day," Dennis
said. "At least it's not raining now."


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Graduation 2008.


Reach out to readers by advertising

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Special election on table

LAWSUIT, from page 1

then.
Sam Miorelli, SOLVe's executive director, said the
group has "won round one."
"It is everything we ever could've dreamed of,"
Miorelli said.
He said he has no idea how UF might proceed.
"I don't know how they'll defend something that's
undefendable," he said.
Student Miorelli said SOLVe wants SG to
Government hold a special election for students
to decide if they want online voting
for future SG elections.
Sarah Krantz, SG supervisor of elections, said a spe-
cial election would be possible if the court decides the
request is warranted.
Krantz said a special election in the fall would be
ideal to give SG more time to plan and order materi-
als.
The cost of a special election would depend on
the number of polling locations and voting days, she
added.


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AN INFORMATIONAL GUIDE TO HEALTHY LIVING


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2, FUN AND FITNESS, ALLIGATOR U WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2008

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION


UF scientists test safety of experimental vision loss drug


In a first-of-its-kind safety re-
search study, University of Florida.
researchers have injected an anti-
inflammatory compound into the
eye of a person with a sight-rob-
bing disease.
The procedure was performed
last month to test the .safety and
effectiveness of a synthetic peptide
a small protein fragment in
procedures involving the human
eye.
"All patients with macular de-
generation have good peripheral,
or side, vision, but it's their cen-
tral vision that's affected in both
the dry and the wet forms of the
disease," said Shalesh Kaushal,
M.D., Ph.D., an assistant professor
of ophthalmology and director of
- the vitreoretinal service in the UF
department of ophthalmology.
Macular degeneration affects
about 9 million Americans, accord-
ing to the National Eye Institute.
About 15 percent of those people
have the wet form of the disease,
in which leaky blood vessels crop
up like weeds beneath the macula,
a part of the retina responsible for
central vision.
Doctors can inject the eyes with
drugs to stem the abnormal growth
of blood vessels, but that approach
benefits only the 15 percent of pa-
tients afflicted with the wet version,
leaving the vast majority of people
with macular degeneration in the
dark.
These therapies only man-
age the symptoms, according to
Cedric Francois, M.D., Ph.D., the


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Pharmaceuticals Inc., the company
that designed the anti-inflamma-
tory compound and is funding the
safety trial at UF.
"In about 15 percent of people
with macular degeneration, you get
bleeding in the back of the eye. The
drugs that are on the market can
stop that bleeding from occurring
but they don't treat the cause of the
disease," said Francois. "The prob-
lem was that until recently, no one
knew how the illness worked."
That changed two years ago,
when a series of reports in the
journal Science shed light on the
underlying mechanisms of macu-
lar degeneration. The reports re-
vealed a link between the chronic
inflammation and tissue damage
that accompany both forms of the
disease and a genetic defect in the
complement system, a series of en-
zymes that defend the body against
pathogens by stimulating a potent
inflammatory response.
"Complement is a set of proteins


that are often triggered in inflam-
matory diseases, including the eye
in particular," Kaushal said. "There
are now multiple reports that these
complement proteins may be over-
stimulated in wet macular degen-
eration."
Those reports allowed scientists
to begin tackling the disease from
the roots up.
"What's become clear in the bi-
ology of this disease is that there are
multiple facets to the disease pro-
cess. The inflammatory component
may be central to the development
of age-related macular degenera-
tion because it affects the survival
of visual cells and also promotes
new blood vessel growth," Kaushal
said.
With that in mind, researchers
from Potentia Pharmaceuticals Inc.
set out to develop an existing fam-
ily of complement inhibitors called
Compstatin for use in the human
eye. In animal studies, complement
inhibitors have been shown to pre-
vent the inappropriate inflammato-


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ry response that accompanies both
the wet and dry forms of macular
degeneration.
Compstatin and its derivative,
POT-4, are the first molecules of
their kind to prevent overactivation
of the complement pathway.
"Compstatin is a unique
complement inhibitor," said John
Lambris, Ph.D., the University of
Pennsylvania professor of pathol-
ogy and laboratory medicine who
initially discovered the peptide
over 12 years ago. "POT-4 is a much
more active version of the original
compound."
Now, teams from Florida,
New Hampshire, Minnesota and
Arizona are evaluating the safety
of POT-4 in humans with the wet
form of macular degeneration. The
first and third subjects received
injections of the peptide at UF in
November and December. The
second subject was treated in New
Hampshire in November.
The UF scientists continue to
monitor the subjects closely to


gather important information
about the safety profile of POT-4.
After a safety committee reviews
data from the first round of partici-
pants, an additional 12 subjects will
participate in the study.
"Any peptide or protein that
you inject into the eye has the
potential for kicking up inflam-
mation," Kaushal said, noting that
because POT-4 is injected locally
into the eye in the same method
used to deliver existing treatments
for macular degeneration, the pos-
sibilities for widespread side effects
are limited.
Scientists are beginning to
explore the role of complement
in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis,
asthma and Alzheimer's disease.
"There are many human diseas-
es related to complement," Kaushal
said. "That whole area of research
has just blossomed over the last
four or five years."
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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2008 0 ALLIGATOR, FUN AND FITNESS, 3

.-
-. ,: -j -


How To:

Measure and Obtain Exercise Goals


Attaining desired results in any exercise pro-
gram is the product of many factors. These include
the amount of exercise, the body's adaptation to
exercise, musculoskeletal efficiency, motivation
and diet. The most effective way to measure exer-
cise results is through fitness testing. Fitness test-
ing creates a foundation for an exercise program
and helps to monitor progress over time.
To maximize performance it is important to
improve on factors that can be easily manipulated
through exercise such as muscular imbalances or
flexibility. It is also important to retest every 4 to
8 weeks to monitor progress throughout a training
program. This will allow beneficial changes to be
made during a program instead of after.
Many fitness centers offer free fitness testing,
such as Personal Training and Assessment. These
types of assessments are designed to offer novice
and experienced participants a baseline of their
current fitness level so realistic goals can be set.
During assessments participants should ask
questions and learn why the test is conducted,
what it measures and how proper exercise can
improve scores and how that relates to fitness
results. With effective testing and explanation of
results individual strengths and .weaknesses can
be addressed.
For more information about exercise testing
and what the PTAC can offer students please visit
recsports.ufl.edu.


The following assessments are
offered to all UF students and
members of the recreation facilities:
Resting heart rate and blood pres-
sure.
Body composition testing (body fat
%). Exercise may decrease body fat
mass and increase lean mass, minimiz-
ing overall weight loss. Therefore, it
is important to have body composition
measured every 6 to 8 weeks to track
progress.
Core strength and endurance. This
is a series of 5 tests to determine the
overall stability and endurance of the
abdominal and low back musculature.
Dynamic assessment.
Flexibility assessment (for Personal
Training clients only)
* V02 max testing (cardiovascular en-
durance)


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"Fun& Fitness" is best described Challenge, Adventurer's Club and
as a family adventure living day to multiple programs in childcare,
day. Families trying diligently ev- sports, gymnastics and swimming.
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lar routines and then trying to add nity and our members active pro-
more to their schedules. Sometimes motes & supports the Florida & US
in the mix of it all, we as a commu- Department of Health & Human
nity forget to pay attention to how Services Wellness Programs.
fun & fitness can impact our overall From the President's Fitness
spirit, mind and body. challenge, to the multiple dietary
The YMCA's wellness mission is advertisements, to learning how
to serve everyone while providing to prevent multiple diseases long
a plethora of fitness opportunities, term, our families could find it
The YMCA Activate America ini- challenging to keep up with the
tiative promotes community com- most current protocols related to
mitment to maintaining a healthy health & fitness.
lifestyle for all ages. We have part- Our job as health and fitness
ners from the University of Florida professional is to share our knowl-
(HHP & Dietetic dept's.) as well edge, encourage commitment to
as local physicians that share the the overall well-being of the indi-
commitment of building strong vidual, invite fun into the format
kids, strong families and strong of the programs we provide and
communities. We partake in senior create an adventure for our families
programs that promote functional- to return day after day.
ity and strength training while their Stay fit, be active and encourage
health insurance meets the goals of fun to protect the spirit, mind and
reduced visits to the doctor. body.
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4, FUN AND FITNESS, ALLIGATOR WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5,2008


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION


Sex Education varies widely, not available to all FL students


A University of Florida study reveals
sex education programs in Florida's public
schools vary widely in content and often
are afforded little class time and many
students miss out altogether.
The findings were presented to-
day (Nov. 5) at the American Public
Health Association's annual meeting in
Washington, D.C.
"What we found was quite concerning,
particularly in light of the fact that levels
of sexually transmitted infections and
unintended pregnancies continue to rise
in Florida and the state ranks second in
the nation in terms of annual incident HIV
infections," said lead investigator Brian
Dodge, Ph.D., formerly of the UF College
of Public Health and Health Professions.
Florida's rates of gonorrhea, chlamydia
and syphilis have risen from 307 cases per
100,000 residents in 1997 to 399 in 2006,
a 23 percent increase, according to the
Florida Department of Health.
Previous national studies have con-
sistently shown that most parents want


some form of sex education to take place
in schools, said Dodge, who is now as-
sociate director of the Center for Sexual
Health Promotion at Indiana University


Bloomington.
Although
Florida is tech-
nically one of
23 states that
require schools
to teach sex
education and
HIV prevention
classes during
the course of the
students' aca-
demic careers,
it is unclear
- whether scien-
tifically accurate


was known about what topics are typically
covered.
To find out, in 2006 the research team-
performed the first statewide assess-
ment of sex education in Florida's public


"Given the sensitive nature of this top-
ic, it was essential that the study had,
guidance from the people who really
understood how Florida school systems
work, and how state and local policies
impact the teachers' ability to educate
their students."
Ellen Lopez, Ph.D.
UF Department of Behavioral Science and Com-
munity Health assistant professor


and comprehensive information regard-
ing the risks and benefits of sexuality is
being offered to students, he said. There
are no requirements or standards for the
course content and, until the study, little


middle and high
schools, funded
by The Picower
Foundation. Data
were collected from
surveys completed
by instructors who
are most commonly
responsible for sex
education those
teaching health,
science, physical
education or fani-
ily and consumer
sciences.


The survey was developed with input
from a six-member scientific advisory
committee and a 20-member community
advisory committee that included teach-
ers, public health workers, nurses, doctors


and school administrators from across the
state.
"Given the sensitive nature of this top-
ic, it was essential that the study had guid-
ance from the people who really under-
stood how Florida school systems work,
and how state and local policies impact the
teachers' ability to educate their students,"
said researcher Ellen Lopez, Ph.D., an as-
sistant professor in UF's department of
behavioral science and community health.
"It was also important to gain insight from
people who had different views about sex
education."
The results of the study, based on 479
respondents, showed that 87 percent of
the teachers surveyed acknowledged that
sex education, in some form, took place
in their schools in the 2005-06 school year.
However, sex education was a requirement
for all students in only 16 percent of the
respondents' schools, and most teachers

SEX EDUCATION
CONTINUED ON PAGE 10


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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2008 a ALLIGATOR, FUN AND FITNESS, 5


Attention snowbirds and spring
breakers: Beachgoers who stay high
and dry may have healthier fun in
the sun than those frolicking on wet
sand or in the water, according to
a University of Florida veterinary
researcher.
"Our objective was to under-
stand whether beach sand could
pose a health risk to beachgoers,"
said Tonya D. Bonilla, a doc-
toral student in the UF College of
Veterinary Medicine's department
of infectious diseases and patholo-
gy who studied three South Florida
beaches over a two-year period to
see whether human health risks ap-
pear to increase based on the level
of sand exposure.
"What we found was that there
was no increased health risk due
to exposure to sand on the upper
beach," Bonilla said. "However,
the longer the period of time people
spent in the water and in the wet
sand, the higher the probability
that they would experience some
gastrointestinal illness."


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Bonilla's research was con-
ducted at Fort Lauderdale Beach,
Hollywood Beach and Hobie
Beach. There were 882 respondents
who participated in the pilot epide-
miological study and 609 who par-
ticipated in the control group.
Beachgoers were made aware of
the study and, if willing to partici-
pate, were given a survey form to
complete four days after their beach
visit. The questionnaire focused on
type and duration of beach activity
and inquired whether participants
became ill during the four days
after the beach visit. The control
group consisted of people random-
ly chosen from the general popula-
tion who had not visited a beach in
at least nine days.
Jay M. Fleisher, Ph.D., an as-
sociate professor in the College
of Osteopathic Medicine at Nova
Southeastern University, analyzed
the epidemiological data collected
in the study.
"Our findings suggest that there
is an increased risk of acquiring


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gastroenteritis the longer a bather
either sits in the wet sand or stays.
in the water," Fleisher said. "The
probability that an individual will
become sick increases over ex-
pected non-exposure rates from six
out of 1,000 people for a 10-minute
exposure to ap-
proximately 12 "Our finding,
out of 100 people
for a two-hour there is an in
stay in the wet acquiring gas
sand. longer a bath
"For exposure t e w t s
to water, these the wet sand
rates increase wa
from seven out Ja
of 1,000 people J
affected over Nova Sout
expected non-ex- College of Os
posure rates for
a 10-minute stay
to approximately
seven out of 100 people exposed for
a 70-minute stay," Fleisher added.
"Both show a clear dose-response
relationship in risk with increasing
time of exposure. These estimates
of increased risk might seem small,
but when one considers how many
people use this beach in the course
of a year, we can end up with a sub-
stantial public health problem."
While fecal indicator levels in
the near-shore waters of South


Florida's recreational beaches are
routinely monitored, sand samples
from the surf zone the wet sand
- and the upper beach are not.
Beach sand may become contami-
nated by gull droppings and other
sources of.fecal-derived organisms
that then diffuse
suggestthat into wet sand
and water, said
reased risk of Bonilla, whose
roenteritis the research was
r either sits in published in the.
MarinePollution
r stays in the Bulletin. Her
r. work, part of her
VM1. Fishe, Ph.D. master's thesis
M. Flesher, work at Nova
eastern University Southeastern
opathic Medicine University, was
sociate professor funded by a
grant from the
Environmental
Protection Agency. She has contin-
ued her water-quality work at UF,
where she is pursuing her doctoral
degree.
Her former mentor, Andrew
Rogerson, Ph.D., a professor of
biology who is now at Marshall
University in West Virginia, is a
study co-author. Their findings
suggest water is an important fac-
tor for pathogen transmission.
"At this point, we don't know


3
C
tr
e
o
te

h
te
as


whether the increased health risk
is due to pathogen exposure,"
Bonilla said. "To really understand
this, a more comprehensive and
targeted epidemiological approach
is needed."
Helena Solo-Gabriele, Ph.D., a
professor of environmental engi-
neering at the University of Miami
and a collaborator in the National
Science Foundation's Oceans and
Human Health Center, is working
on understanding how fecal indica-
tor levels correlate with pathogen
levels in her own research. Her
work primarily focuses on environ-
mental measurements, specifically
of microbial indicators in water.
In addition to evaluating the po-
tential human health effects of mi-
crobes from beach sands, Bonilla's
paper provides new information
concerning the reservoirs and
sources of fecal indicator bacteria,
Solo-Gabriele said.
"This study emphasizes that
beach sands serve as the most sig-
nificant reservoir of fecal indicator
bacteria, and shows that the situa-
tion is not isolated to one specific
beach, but canbe widespread across
regions," she said. "Bonilla and her
collaborators provide a mechanistic
explanation for the potential spread
of fecal indicator bacteria through
gull droppings and subsequent
distribution through natural dif-
fusion in the environment, as well
as by people walking on the beach.
The suggestion of an association be-
tween fecal indicator levels in sand
and illness rates among humans is
very significant and points to the
need to conduct more comprehen-
sive studies of beach sand."

UF Health Science Center
UNIVERSITY of FLORIDA




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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION


Beachgoers who stay high and dry may stay healthier


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6, FUN AND FITNESS, ALLIGATOR N WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5,2008


SPECIAL ADVER


The Fun and Fitness question answers were written by GatorWell
Health Promotion staff members Catrina Liott, Taylor Bennett, health
professionals at the Student Health Care Center and professionals at
the University of Florida.


What is a healthy amount of
time to be in the sun during
the week of spring break?
There is no "safe" amount
of time to be in the sun, but
there are several preventative
measures to take to protect your
skin. Continually apply sunscreen
generously over your body every
two hours. If you sweat heavily or
get wet, re-apply the sunscreen
more frequently. Keep in mind, the
sun's rays are strongest between
10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m., so seek
shade whenever possible, wear
a hat that shades your face and
neck, and use a beach umbrella
especially in the middle of the day.

What is happening to your
skin when you get burned
from the sun?
With every sunburn, your skin
cells are being damaged. The
outermost layer of your skin, the
epidermis, is comprised of dead
skin cells (the skin that you feel)
and living skin cells. The sun
gives off ultra violet rays which go
through your dead skin cells and
damages or kills your living skin
cells. Regardless of the color of
your skin you should always protect
it. Every time you get sunburn you
are increasing your skin of getting
skin cancer.

Are dark sunglasses worse
for your eyes?
No, dark sunglasses are not
worse for you eyes! Actually, dark
sunglasses are better for you eyes
than lighter sunglasses. In fact,
your eyes can become sunburned
just like your skin. Photokeratitis,
sunburn of the eye, can be painful
causing redness or extreme
sensitivity to light. Although
photokeratitis is usually temporary
it is very important to protect your
eyes when you are outside in tlhe
sun. Purchase sunglasses with the
following features:
Blocks out
99% to 100% of both UV-A and
UV-B radiation
Screens out
75% to 90% of visible light
The color is.
the same on both lenses and free
of distortion and imperfections

Does anti-aging sunscreen
really work, or is it just a
waste of money?
"Regular" sunscreen is the best
anti-aging product on the market
if used daily. It protects your skin


from UV rays which cause pre-
mature aging. Ninety percent of the
visual characteristics associated
with aging including fine lines,
wrinkles, loss of elasticity and
hyper-pigmented spots are
increased with sun exposure.

Does sitting in a hot tub or
sauna while you are drinking
make you feel drunk faster?
There is no research that shows
drinking in a hot tub will make you
feel drunk faster, but there are
several health concerns. Alcohol
is a diuretic which results in
dehydration and a hot environment
only exacerbates the problem.
When you are drinking you
may not notice how hot you are
getting and this may subsequently
contribute to heat exhaustion. If
you do not address this issue it
can lead to heat stroke which is
a life threatening health condition.
If you do choose to drink in a hut
tub, avoid using glass containers
because broken glass can be a
safety hazard.

How much water should
you drink to keep from
dehydrating if you're
drinking a lot of alcohol?
You should alternate alcoholic
drinks with non-alcoholic drinks
like water to prevent dehydration.
Dehydration contributes to a
hangover so the more hydrated you
are the less severe the symptoms
you'll experience. So as a general
rule, drink water before, during and
after you party AND do your best
to limit the total amount of alcohol
you consume.

Does alcohol really destroy
the effectiveness of
antibiotics?
There is no clear answer to this
question, but there are a couple
of guidelines that are good to
follow. First, you should consult
with your doctor or a pharmacist
before drinking any alcohol while
taking antibiotics. Second, you
should always read the labels of
your antibiotics and follow them!
They are put there for a reason.
Finally, keep in mind that alcohol
depresses the immune system. If
you are sick and need antibiotics
it's best to take extra care of
yourself by getting plenty of rest
and eating healthy. Drinking
alcohol may actually compromise
your recovery time.


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What's the safest, most
effective way to sober up
and avoid a hangover?
Time is the only way to sober
up if you have had too much to
drink. To reduce the effect of a
hangover, drink water before and
while you are partying and drink
2-3 large glasses of water before
you go to bed. Also consider a
sports drink like as Gatorade or
PowerAde to replenish your body
with the electrolytes excreted
during drinking.

What are the signs of
alcohol poisoning?
Alcohol poisoning can.happen
to anyone who consumes
too much alcohol and it is
very dangerous so it is very
important to know the signs and
symptoms. A person's blood
alcohol concentration (BAC)
can continue to rise even after
passing out or sleeping. Do not
assume that a person will be fine
by going to sleep. Some of the
signs and symptoms of alcohol
poisoning include:
Mental confusion, stupor,
coma, or person cannot be
roused
Vomiting
Seizures
Slow breathing (fewer than
eight breaths per minute)
Irregular breathing (10
seconds or more between
breaths)
Hypothermia (low body
temperature), bluish skin color,
paleness
Call 911 if someone is
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showing these signs and don't
leave the person alone!

Is smoking hazardous to my
health even if I only smoke
while drinking or out with
friends?
This is called social smoking,
and it can contribute to tobacco
addiction among young adults.
When you are out drinking, it
is easy to increase the amount
you are smoking without really
even noticing. Social smoking
also poses risks to others due
to secondhand smoke especially
people with asthma or allergies

Is smoking a hookah as
harmful to your health as
cigarettes?
Smoking a hookah or
waterpipe is often thought of as a
safe alternative to cigarettes but it
is not! You can actually get more
nicotine from a hookah than from
smoking cigarettes and increased
nicotine intake increases the risk
of addiction. A typical hookah
smoking session also lasts,about
45 minutes which is much longer
than a typical cigarette break.
Just because the smoke is going
through water does not mean
that the cancer-causing agents
are filtered out. Hookah smoke
has numerous toxins including
some that cause lung cancer,
heart disease, and other health
complications/
Remember, inhaling hookah
smoke is just as harmful as
inhaling cigarette smoke.


I like to run at night with
my iPod on. How can I stay
safe?
Here are some tips on how to
be safe when you are running at
night:
-Be aware of your surroundings!
Watch what is going on around
you and watch for anything that
might seem odd.
-Use only one headphone
or earphone. By using both
earphones you make yourself
more susceptible to danger
because you can't hear things
around you.
-If you don't like using only one
earphone, keep the volume lower.
It is important to hear sounds
around you like cars.
-Wear something that can be seen
by drivers like white clothing or
something reflective.


How can I protect myself
when walking home alone
after my evening class?
Be alert and aware of your
surroundings. Walk confidently.
Carry your keys in hand to get
in your car quickly or to use as a
weapon. If you feel threatened,
cause a disturbance to be noticed.
Have your cell phone handy,
but avoid talking or texting
while walking because this will
decrease your awareness of your
surroundings.
Remember, you can always call
392-SNAP for a ride.


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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2008 E ALLIGATOR, FUN AND FITNESS, 7


USING SECTION

What are some safety tips
you can give while out
partyingldrinking?
It is important to have a plan
before you go out that includes
where you will be, transportation,
how many drinks you will have
and the people you will be with.
Make sure you watch out for
yourself and your friends. Look
after personal belongings, and
never leave a drink unattended.
Avoid drinking games and keep
track of how many drinks you are
consuming. Pace your drinking to
one or fewer per hour.
When out with your friends,
appoint a "drink watcher,"
preferably someone who stays
sober. Last, but not least, leave
with the people you came with.
Never leave with a stranger.

What do you do if you have
unprotected sex?
If you have unprotected sex
the first thing you do whether
male or female is get tested for
sexually transmitted infections
(STIs). You can do this at the
Student Health Care Center,
Planned Parenthood, Alachua
County Health Department, or
your personal doctor.
It is important to keep in mind
that some STIs don't show up on
tests until a couple of months
after transmission, so check with
your doctor on this.
Females should also be
concerned about getting
pregnant. If you are on some kind
of hormonal birth control and take
it regularly then you are 99% not
likely to get pregnant.
If you are not on some kind
of hormonal birth control or you
have not taken it regularly around
the time of the unprotected
sex, then you should consider
emergency contraception.

What is Plan B and where
can I get it?
Plan B, or emergency
contraception, reduces the risk
of becoming pregnant after
unprotected sex.
It can be used right away or
up to five days after sex if you


think your birth control failed,
you did not use contraception,
or you were forced to have sex.
Emergency contraception is not
designed to be a routine birth
control method.
Plan B is available to men
and women over 1,8 years old
over the counter in most major
pharmacies (including the
Student Health Care Center
pharmacy). Persons under 18
years old need a prescription for
Plan B.

Do your chances of getting
pregnant increase with
certain sexual positions?
You may have heard that
positions that deposit the sperm
closest to the cervix such as
the missionary position (man on
top) are more promising than
other positions, however there's
no evidence that any particular
sexual position is more likely to
lead to conception.
Proper timing is a crucial
factor. Having sex a day or two
before you expect to ovulate and
then again on the day of ovulation
is the best way to increase one's
chances of getting pregnant.

I would like to get an HIV
test, and I do not have
insurance.
Where can I get one and how
much would it cost?
There are several places in
Gainesville that offer free or low-
cost HIV testing:
* UF students can get confidential
testing at the Student Health Care
Center (392-1161) for $30. A
"rapid test is available with results
in 30 minutes, but may require
confirmatory testing.
SPlanned Parenthood (377-0881)
offers free, anonymous HIV
testing on Wednesdays from 9
a.m. to 12 p.m.
Alachua County Health
Department (334-7960, ext.
79621) offers anonymous HIV
testing by appointment for an
optional $20 fee. You can pay
some, none, or all of this fee and
still be tested.


What is the link between
exercise and stress?
According to research, exercise
may improve mental health by
helping the brain cope better with
stress. During the stress response,
the body releases hormones which
help the body respond to a particular
stressor. These hormones prepare
the body to fight or to flee. Aerobic
activity uses the stress hormones
that are released during the stressful
events of day and helps boost
energy and improve sleep, definitely
a bonus! Exercise does not always
have to happen at the gym. Take
some friends canoeing or paddle
boating at Lake Wauburg, or play
frisbee in one of the beautiful open
areas of campus.

Can listening to my iPod
affect my hearing?
Whether your iPod affects your
hearing depends on how loud the
volume is. iPods and other MP3
players have a maximum volume
of 120 decibels. Any sound over
85 decibels (dBs) exceeds what
hearing experts consider a "safe"
range. Listening at more than that
level over time will increase the
chances that you'll damage your
hearing. Using earphones for
hours at high volumes damages
delicate hair-like cells deep
within the inner ear that help the
brain process sound. Apple has
provided a new update for the
iPod nano and fifth generation
iPod, allowing customers to
easily set their own personal
maximum volume limit. Also,
remember that some people
are more susceptible to noise
induced hearing loss than others.
If you have to raise your voice to
be heard over the noise, then it
is too loud. Signs to watch for
include a ringing or buzzing in the
ear and sounds being "dull."

It's hard for me to get back
on track with sleeping after
I have been off for a week
or even just staying up later
over the weekend. What do
you recommend to get back
on a normal schedule?
The best thing you can do to


stay on track is go to bed and
awaken within a two hour time
frame regardless of the day or
week.
Because this might not be
realistic, especially on the
weekends, there are some
other things you may want to
try. First, try taking classes that
start later in the day. This can
help make a later sleep/wake
cycle on the weekends less of a
drastic change from your normal
schedule.
Next, try to pick Friday to be
your late night out. This will give
you more time to resume your
sleep schedule on Saturday
and Sunday nights. Finally, get
outside and exercise Monday
morning before class. Sunshine
and exercise can reset your
biological sleep clock.
For more tips on sleep, check
out Sleeping in the Swamp at
HealthyGators.hhp.ufl.edu.

How long can the body
really go without sleep?
It is difficult to determine
the maximum amount of time a
human can stay awake without
serious consequences, but when
lab rats are denied the chance
to rest they will die within two to
three weeks. S
evere sleep deprivation
causes serious physical and
mental impairments in humans.
Inadequate rest impairs
concentration and memory and
the brain's ability to function
quickly deteriorates.
Other typical effects of sleep
deprivation include depression,
heart disease, hypertension,
irritability, slower reaction times,
slurred speech, and tremors.
Our body's ability to maintain
a healthy immune system also
declines. Dramatic weight
change, especially weight gain,
is another common side effect.
The amount of sleep needed
varies from person to person
so it's important to find out how
much sleep you need to function
at your best and then honor it by
going to bed!


I tend to go to bed around
three or four a.m. and sleep
for four hours, and then, I
take a four-hour nap during
the day. Is this a good
solution, or will I be more
tired than if I slept eight
hours straight at night?
It's normal for some students to
feel most alert late at night, however,
it's important to find a way to get
about 8 hours of sleep each nigktpf
the week and maintain a consistent
sleep schedule. Studies have
shown that sleeping or napping for 2
- 4 hours is not particularly effective
at improving alertness or academic
performance. Other studies have
shown that a 10-minute nap
produces the most benefit in
terms of reduced sleepiness and"
improved cognitive performance. A
nap lasting more than 30 minutes
or longer is more likely to make you
feel more tired. The bottom line is,
if you are having problems sleeping
at night, a nap will only magnify the
problem.

What is the best way to eat
healthy on the go?
Go for balance. Choose meals
that contain a balance of lean
proteins (like fish, chicken, or
beans if you're a vegetarian), fruits
and vegetables (fries and potato
chips don't qualify as veggies!),
and whole-grain breads. That's
why a turkey sandwich on whole
wheat with lettuce and tomato is a
better choice than a cheeseburger
on a white bun. Also, watch
portion sizes. The portion sizes of
American foods have increased
over the past few decades so that
we are now eating way more' than
we need. Lastly, drink water or
low-fat milk. Regular sodas, juices,
and energy drinks usually contain
"empty" calories that you don't
need not to mention other stuff,
like caffeine.

What is a good energy
boosting snack?
Here are some good ideas for
snacks to keep your energy up
throughout the day!
Nuts
Any kind of low-fat dairy- such as
yogurt or chocolate milk
Whole grain cereal

Q&A
CONTINUED ON PAGE 8

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8, FUN AND FITNESS, ALLIGATOR E WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5,2008


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION


UF. French scientists seek test to


detect gene dopi


Gene doping has the potential
to spawn athletes capable of out-
running, out-jumping and out-cy-
cling the strongest of champions.
But research under way at the
University of Florida could help
level the playing field by de-
tecting the first cases of gene
doping in professional athletes
before the practice enters the a
mainstream.
In the wake of recent Tour de
France drug violations and
with the 2008 Olympics loom-
ing the need to stay ahead
of the game has never been
more evident. That's why the
.Montreal-based World Anti-
Doping Agency, or WADA,
charged with monitoring the
conduct of athletes, is work-
ing with investigators around the
globe to develop a test that would
bust competitors for injecting
themselves with genetic material
capable of enhancing muscle mass
or heightening endurance.
"If an athlete injects himself in
the muscle with DNA, would we
be able to detect that?" asked one
of France's leading gene therapy
researchers, Philippe Moullier,
M.D., Ph.D., an adjunct professor


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SPORTS INJURY? DEPRESSION?



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Vasanthi Vanniasingham

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of microbiology and molecular
genetics at UF and director of the
Gene Therapy Laboratory at the
University de Nantes in France.
Right now the answer is no,
he said. But the UF scientists are
"The next variation of boosting
red blood cell production is to
actually inject the EPO gene itse
which would cause increases i
red blood cells. So the idea is t
develop a test that could detec
the gene that's administered.'
Richard Snyder, Pi
JF's Center of Excellence for Regenera
Health Biotechnology dire(


among several groups collaborat-
ing with national and global anti-
doping' organizations to develop
a test that could detect evidence
of "doped" DNA.


ng in at
"WADA has had a research
program in place for some years
now, to try to develop tests
for gene-based doping," said
Theodore Friedmann, M.D., head
of the agency's panel on genetic
doping and director of the
g gene therapy program at the
University of California, San
.lf Diego.
It sounds futuristic, but ex-
n perts say it's only a matter of
.0 time. Unscrupulous athletes
>t began showing an interest in
, gene doping in 2004, when
the first reports of muscle-
.D. boosting therapies in mice
tive were published by University
actor of Pennsylvania researchers.
Since then, several poten-
tial targets of gene doping
have emerged, including the
gene for erythropoietin, or EPO.
A bioengineered version of the
hormone, currently on the mar-
ket, increases red blood cell pro-


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duction in patients with anemia
and boosts oxygen delivery to the
body. In athletes, this translates to
enhanced stamina and a competi-
tive edge.
But because synthetic hor-
mones such as EPO are prohibited
by WADA and readily detected
through drug tests, performance-
driven athletes have begun
searching for stealthier and more
powerful alternatives.
"The next variation of boost-
ing red blood cell production is to
actually inject the EPO gene itself,
which would cause increases in
red blood cells," said Richard
Snyder, Ph.D., an assistant pro-
fessor of microbiology and mo-
lecular genetics at UF and direc-
tor of UF's Center of Excellence
for Regenerative Health
Biotechnology. "So the idea is to
GENE DOPING
CONTINUED ON PAGE 10


Q&A,

FROM PAGE 7
Fruits (canned fruits are just as
good just make sure they are stored
in their own fruit juice!)
Dried fruits
* Keep in mind that you might not be
hungry and you just might be thirsty
so drink plenty of water during the
day or with these snacks!
Does eating late at night
make you gain weight?
It really does not matter what
time of the day you eat, rather
how many total calories that you
consume, the types of food you
are eating at night, and what you
are doing while eating. Late night
munchies tend to be high calorie
foods. Eating at this time of day
often goes hand in hand with
doing other things like hanging
out with friends, watching TV,
doing homework, or surfing
the net. We tend to eat more
calories when we are distracted
or socializing. Consider being
more mindful about what you eat
as the night goes on and replace
high calorie foods with fruit and
veggies, yogurt or other lower
calorie choices.


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veggies are
already in
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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2008 U ALLIGATOR, FUN AND FITNESS, 9


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION


Simple reason helps males evolve more quickly


The observation that males evolve more quickly than
females has been around since 19th century biologist Charles
Darwin noted the majesty of a peacock's tail feather in com-
parison with the plainness of the peahen's.
No matter the species, males apparently ramp up flashier
features and more melodious warbles in an eternal competi-
tion to win the best mates, a con-
cept known as sexual selection. f
Why males are in evolution- n contrast to femc
ary overdrive even though they chromosomes, on
have essentially the same genes parent, males hav
as females has been a mystery,
but an explanation by University only from their mo
of Florida Genetics Institute mechanism that cot
researchers to appear online in eration with sexual s
the Proceedings of the National
Academy of Sciences this week evolve m(
may shed light on the subject.
"It's because males are sim- UF College of Medicine nm
pler," said Marta Wayne, an as-
sociate professor of zoology in
the College of Liberal Arts and
Sciences and director of UF's Graduate Program in Genetics
and Genomics. "The mode of inheritance in males involves
simpler genetic architecture that does not include as many
interactions between genes as could be involved in female
inheritance."
The finding may also be useful to scientists studying why
diseases may present themselves or respond to treatment dif-
ferently in men and women.
Researchers examined how gene expression is inherited
differently in male and female fruit flies using microarray
analysis, which is a way to monitor the activity of thousands
of genes simultaneously. The flies were identical genetically,
except that females have two X chromosomes and males have


e
e

t
u

0


a single X and a single Y chromosome.
It turns out that the extra X in females may make answer-
ing the call of selection more complicated.
In flies or humans, sex cells from a mother and a father
combine to make what eventually becomes an embryo.
Females are equipped with two versions of X-linked genes
that interact not only with each
other, but also with other genes.
les, which have two X Males have only one version of
inherited from each the X chromosome, making for
only one X inherited fewer interactions and more
straightforward male inheri-
,her. This is a simple tance, especially since the male's
Id be working in coop- Y chromosome contains very
election to help males few genes.
r k. "In females, a dominant allele
re quickly." can hide the presence of a reces-
Lauren McIntyre sive allele," said Lauren McIntyre,
molecular genetics and micro- an associate professor of molecu-
biology associate professor lar genetics and microbiology in
UF's College of Medicine. "In
contrast to females, which have
two X chromosomes, one inherited from each parent, males
have only one X inherited only from their mother. This is a
simple mechanism that could be working in cooperation with
sexual selection to help males evolve more quickly."
Researchers believe this relatively uncomplicated genetic
pathway helps males respond to the pressures of sexual selec-
tion,'ultimately enabling them to win females and produce
greater numbers of offspring.
Relationships between gene expression and modes of in-
heritance have been addressed before, but this study analyzed
an extremely large data set that involved most of the genes in
the fruit fly genome, said David Rand, a professor of biology
at Brown University who was not involved in the study.


"This research shows how recessive and dominant taits
are important in determining variation in populations," Rand
said. "The best way to think of it is males play with one card,
but females get to play one and hold one. If males have got
a good trait, it's promoted; something bad, it's eliminated. In
females you can have a bad card, but a good card can protect it.
As a result, females can carry deleterious traits but not express
them." ,-
UF scientists analyzed 8,607 genes that are shared by both
sexes of a fruit fly called Drosophila melanogaster. Of those
genes, 7,617 are expressed differently meaning the same
genes do different things in males and females.
Over the years, fruit fly research has helped scientists un-
derstand the role of genes in diseases, development, popula-
tion genetics, cell biology, neurobiology, behavior and evolu-
tion. Humans share more than 65 percent of their genes with
the fruit fly, including many implicated in certain cancers,
Alzheimer's disease and heart disease.
The finding helps explain fundamental processes that may
factor into why men and women may show different symp-
toms or respond differently to diseases.
"There's a health aspect in figuring out differences in
gene expression between the sexes," said Wayne. "To make a
male or a female, even in a fly, it's all about turning things on
- either in different places or different amounts or at differ-
ent times because we all basically have the same starting
set of genes."
The research was supported by a National Institutes of
Health grant. Scientists from the University of Nebraska,
Ohio University, the University of California Davis and the
University of Southern California were also involved in the
study.
UF Health Science Center
U UNIVERSITY of FLORIDA






10WFUN AND FITNESS, ALLIGATOR WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5,2008


develop a test that could detect the
gene that's administered."
The task isn't easy the re-
searchers are faced with a myriad
of uncertainties, such as which
tissues in the body to sample and
how to distinguish a "doped" gene
from a naturally occurring form of
thegene. Ultimately, the test will
compare how many copies of the
EPO gene are found in an athlete's
body to levels found in the average
person who has not been doping.
"Our research aims to develop
the ability to detect gene doping, pri-
marily in athletes. But it has a wider
purpose, and that's to understand
how gene therapies are dissemi-
nated throughout the body," added
Snyder, whose research stemmed
from a cooperative agreement be-
tween the UF Genetics Institute and
two biomedical research organiza-
tions in France: INSERM, the French
version of the Natipnal Institutes
of Health, and the French national
blood bank, Etablissement Francais
du Sang Pays de Loire. The agree-
ment allows Snyder and Moullier to
pool their expertise and resources.
A major objective of the UF-
French collaboration is to decipher
the structure of AAV, a virus com-
monly used to deliver genes into
the body for therapeutic purposes.
Gene "doping" would enter the
body through a similar route, but
scientists say the two procedures
are as different as night and day
from therapeutic standpoint.
"When you use the phrase 'gene
therapy' it should be very clear
that you're talking about therapy,"
Friedmann emphasized. "But the
same process of transferring genes


would also be relevant in sport
doping settings. And there you
cannot talk about gene 'therapy'
- you can simply refer to the same
technology as gene 'transfer.'"
Gene therapy has progressed
in leaps and bounds over the
years, but the field has proved
anything but predictable.
Scientists say gene doping will be
no different. Current technologies
could prove ineffective or even
lethal in humans. When the
EPO gene was first introduced
into macaques, for example,
the animals produced so many
red blood cells that their veins
dogged, and many eventually
died after developing massive al-
lergic responses to the therapy.
"I think many athletes know of
the technology. They're aware and
they're concerned. WADA's aware
and concerned," Friedmann said.
"One can overestimate the ur-
gency, or one can be sort of blind
to it. But the technology is rela-
tively straightforward and people
involved in gene therapy studies
could very well see how it could
be applied to sport doping." -
Health Science Center
UNIVERSITY of FLORIDA


reported that parents or caregiv-
ers were able to control whether
their children participated in the
classes. In a third of the schools,
parents need to opt in, rather
than opt out, for their child to
receive sex education.
The sex education course con-
tent overwhelmingly fell in line
with the state of Florida's official
"abstinence-only until marriage"
policy for sex education and in-
struction on HIV/AIDS. Nearly
every educator who responded
to the survey stated they taught
abstinence from sexual activity as
the only way to avoid unintend-
ed pregnancy, sexually transmit-
ted diseases and other associated
health problems.
The researchers found region-
al differences in program con-
tent in Florida's public schools.
Teachers in North Florida were
twice as likely as teachers in
Central Florida and three times
as likely as those in South Florida
to teach an abstinence-only cur-
riculum, which typically does
not cover the risks and benefits
of contraceptives, said research
team member, Frank Bandiera,
a graduate of UF's Master of


Public Health program and a
doctoral student in epidemiology
at the University of Miami Miller
School of Medicine.
"Most people are aware that
there are major cultural differ-
ences between, say, Miami and
Tallahassee," Bandiera said.
"What we found in terms of sex
education, though, is that these
places may as well be on differ-
ent planets."
The investigators also dis-
covered many differences in the
source of Florida teacher's sex
education curriculum.
"More than half of sex educa-
tors used a 'locally developed
curriculum,'" Dodge said. "In
reality this could be anything.
Respondents to our survey re-
ported using everything from
formal state guidelines to ran-
dom Internet information and
outdated county curricula. In
short, there appears to be no uni-
formity in terms of underlying
value systems or philosophical
foundations for sex education in
Florida."
In addition, the teachers re-
ported that less than one-quarter
of overall classroom time was de-


voted to sex education and that
it was most often taught as part
of another course, such as family
and consumer sciences or health.
"This is an important study,"
said Theo Sandfort, Ph.D., a re-
search scientist at the HIV Center
for Clinical and Behavioral
Studies and an associate pro-
fessor at the Mailman School
of Public Health at Columbia
University. "While unintended
pregnancies and sexually trans-
mitted infections in young
people form a great concern,
little seems to be in place to actu-
ally promote responsible sexual
behavior. Education has a major
role to play in promoting young
people's sexual health, but it
cannot be effective if supportive
policies, skills and resources are
lacking. Hopefully this study will
not be without consequences."
The results of the UF study
are currently in press and will
appear in the peer-reviewed
journals "Sex Education" and
"American Journal of Sexuality
Education."
U F Health Science Center
U UNIVERSITY of FLORIDA


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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2008 U ALLIGATOR, FUN AND FITNESS. 11


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION


Outdoor Adventure


ADVENTURE OUTPOST
815 NW Santa Fe Blvd. US Hwy 441)
Hign Springs. FL 32643
(3861454-0611
,ww.adventuJrec'utposi.net

BIVENS ARM NATURE PARK
3650 S Main St.
Gainesville. FL
,352) 334-2231
www.na ureoperatiorns org


DUDLEY FARM HISTORIC STATE PARK
18730 W Neiwte.rrv Rd.
N[Jewberr,. FL 32669
Locaied 7 rni. west or I 75
i.LEii 7i or' Newaerr, Rd.. SR 26t.
k?521 472 1142
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GAINESVILLE TO HAWTHORNE RAIL TRAIL
3300 SE 15th St.
Gaine-wiile, FL
(3521 -66-1E397


KANAPAHA BOTANTICAL GARDENS
4700 SW 5SE-r Dr.
Gainesville, FL
One mi vwest of 1-75
(Exit 3841] on A..her Rd iSR 24)
(3521 372-4981
,ww kancaraha.org

PAYNES PRAIRIE STATE PRESERVE
10 mr SOurLh oA Gai-niiville on LIS Hwi 4-1
(3521466 33'-"
w ,w prai neririierJs org


POE SPRINGS PARK
3.2 ri. west or High Springs or CR 340 ,
High Spnrings. FL
i386) 454-1992

SANTA FE CANOE OUTPOST
US Hwv 441 at the Santa Fe Rier Bridge
High Springs, FL
i386) 454-2050
www samriaeriver.com -


Museulis and Galleries


ALACHUA COUNTY HISTORICAL TRUST:
MATHESON MUSEUM, INC.
513 E university Aive
Ga.lies'lle, FL
13521 378-2280

ARCHER RAILROAD MUSEUM
Corner of Magnolia and Main. SP 24 at US 41/27
Archer, FL
13521495 1044
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FLORIDA MUSEUM OF NATURAL
HISTORY, POWELL HALL
will R'- an-, SW 34trr St.
IUi iij,.r ., .Dt Flou iila. G,rie.iville. FL
1-75 E-.i 384
(352) 846-2000

HAWTHORNE MUSEUM
& CULTURAL CENTER
7225 SE 221si st. (S Johrison ST..
Hawthorne, FL 32640
(352) 481-4491


Miscellaneous
DOG WOOD PARK
5505 S 'VW ,rcher Rd. 01 mi '*.,- n I 75 orn hr.:11er P.1 i
Ga,nr.,e-iii1.. FL
S352335- 191


.... ,Theatre


CURTIS M. PHILLIPS CENTER FOR THE PER-
FORMING ARTS
Hull Rd. and SW 34th St.
University of Florida, Gainesville. FL
Box Office: (352) 392-ARTS (2,7871
Vw. ,,,.perforriinrgarts uil.e'ju

GAINESVILLE COMMUNITY PLAYHOUSE
4039 NW 16th Blvd. -
Gainesville, FL 32605
Ticket Information: (352) 375- 355
ori352i 376-4949
www.gcplayhouse.org


ALACHUA COUNTY FARMERS
MARKET
Carrier of Hwy 441 and r.jNW 34th SL
iSR 1211
Gainesille. FL
i3521 371-8236








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130 NE 1st Ave
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ACROSSTOWN REPERTORY THEATRE
t.l 1S MIa iri
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T, .e irnttri'ol n i i i 3 1-1234
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Shopping
OAKS MALL
6419 NJe b,,rr% Rd..
I 75 Exii 387. Gainesville. FL
1352) 331.4411



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SURF SHOPI 373-SURF (7873) 420 NW 13th St


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WALDO FARMERS
AND FLEA MARKET
US H.'/. 301 (1 mi. north of Waldoi
Wala.a. FL
(3521468 2255
. ., T' "
., ,. ' ... .- _. .


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UNIVERSITY GALLERY
xcateid at the inTrrse,:ni-.:i ct SW 1Iln St. and SW
4mn Ave. in Blag. B of the Finie Arts complex%
ULnersit5 or Fl.rida, Gairlezvilie. FL
1352 i?92.0201 e'i 228
Vi.sT i-.ne wes1itCe otr addiiionral galleries operated
Ov trie ULniers.i of Florida
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THE THOMAS CENTER
302 NE 6ui Ae.
Gadinesvill. FL
;352) 334-2197


Recreation and Sports
CANTERBURY-FLORIDA'S GAINESVILLE RACEWAY
EQUESTRIAN SHOWPLACE 11211 N CR 225
.. 23100 W Newberry Rd. (10 ml. west Gainesville, FL
of 1-75 Exit 387 on SR 26) (352) 377-0046
Newberry, FL ini:. adnr s..'iiieracev. aycor ,
(352) 472-6758
www.canterburyshowplace.com
-, ,. .,
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.ranapaha Parv To er R.-J. anrd SW J-11 Pi
1 75 E .387 '.'.-st Gainme-.rlic. FL

BUTTERFLY RAINFOREST
Hull RO arid SV 34th St
Ilinrversir .if Florida. Gaine;ville, FL
. 7 5 E t 384
13521 S46-2000

HISTORIC HALE HOMESTEAD AT KANAPAHA PLANTATION
Lorrated 3 mi11. west of 1-75 or Archer R 1SR 24-
3521 336-9096
wvw.Na3 lehl iies.,al.org

MARJORIE KINNAN RAWLINGS STATE HISTORIC SITE
Cross CreeK, 21 mi. SE of Gainesville on Hw, 325
(3521466-3672
www florda:.taleparks.org.'narjorie-ninnanra.lings ,/

MORNINGSIDE NATURE CENTER
3540 E Lln, ersity Ave.
Gainesville, FL
(352)i 334-2170
www natureoperalions.org

RETIREMENT HOME FOR HORSES
Mill CreeP Farm. CR 235-A. Aiac-nua. FL -
(Travel west on Hwy 441 from 1-75 Exit 399.
Just past Santa Fe High School, turn right-on CR 235-A:
Farm is 3 mi. north of school.)
(386)462-1001

SANTA FE COMMUNITY COLLEGE TEACHING ZOO
3000 NW 83rd St.
1-75 Exit 390, Gainesville, FL
(352) 395-5604
Source: Alachua County Visitors and Convention Bureau


MICANOPY HISTORICAL SOCIETY
MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES
LOCat.l or On Choloika BlI,1 in.J Ba. St
Miariopy. FL
1-75 Exit 374,10 mi. south of Gainesville on US 441
(352).466-3200
www.afn.org/~-iicanopy

SAMUEL P. HARN MUSEUM OF ART
Hull Rd aniJ SW 34M St.
tiniversit) .t FIri.ja, Gar3iei .ill, FL
(352) 392-9826
www.arts.ufl.edu/harn
..- ,,, ,.0 .


' *. .... -


I r. '






1l, FUN AND FITNESS, ALLIGATOR E WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5,2008


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION


UF study examines heart risks of stimulants in children with ADHD


Stimulant medications used to treat chil-
dren with attention-deficit hyperactivity
disorder may be responsible for an increased
number of visits to the emergency room or
doctor's office because of cardiac symptoms,
but deaths or serious heart complications
are rare, a new University of Florida study
reveals.
"Treatment decisions are always a risk-
benefit assessment for doctors," said Almut
Winterstein, Ph.D., an assistant professor of
pharmacy health care administration at the
University of Florida's College of Pharmacy.
"We know about the benefits of central ner--
vous system stimulants. There are a lot of
advantages to the patient improved con-
centration, the improved ability to interact
socially but the risks have been very poorly
defined."
Despite concerns about the risks of tak-
ing medications such as Adderall and Ritalin
for the treatment of ADHD the drugs are
known to raise blood pressure and heart rate,
and other members of this drug class, such
as methamphetamine, are associated with
serious adverse effects use of the drugs has
steadily risen over the past decade.
Winterstein, a pharmacoepidemiologist,
led a team of researchers in pharmacy, pedi-
atric medicine and psychiatry who analyzed
records from 55,000 children ages 3 to 20 who
had ADHD and were undergoing treatment
between 1994 to 2004. The UF study, which
sought to assess the effects of these drugs on
the risk for heart disease, relied on the Florida
Medicaid database of more than 2 million
youth, cross-matched with vital statistics re-
cords the first of this magnitude in ADHD


safety research.
The researchers published their findings
Saturday (Dec. 1) in the journal Pediatrics.
Children who used central nervous system
stimulants were 20 percent more likely to visit
an emergency clinic or doctor's office with car-
diac-related symptoms,
such as a racing heart- "Treatment de
beat, than children wlo Treatment deci
had never used or dis- risk-benefit ass
continued treatment. We know a
The researchers also tors. We know a
reported that the rates of central nervo
of death or hospital plants. There ar
admission for serious
heart conditions were tages to the pa
no different than the concentration, th
national rates among
the general population, to interact social
but the total number of have been very
events was too small to Air
allow definite conclu- UF Coll of Pha
sions.ege
Since 1995, the num- care administrat
ber of patients newly
diagnosed with ADHD
has grown at a fairly constant rate, Winterstein
said. Today, nearly one-third of these patients
- more than 5 percent of American children
- chronically take stimulant medications.
Approximately 3 million to 4 million
youngsters in the U.S. are prescribed stimu-
lant medications for ADHD, said Daniel Safer,
M.D., an associate professor in psychiatry and
pediatrics at Johns Hopkins University School
of Medicine.
Safer added that the major side effects from
stimulant treatment are decreased appetite


si
e
b
'u
e
ti
Ie
II

ni
m
rm
ic


and, in some cases, difficulty falling asleep.
"Methylphenidate and dextroamphet-
amine have been carefully studied for cardio-
vascular side effects in children for periods up
to three years in extended clinical trials, and
the reports indicate minor blood pressure and
heart rate changes
which the authors
ons are always a deem clinically insig-
ssment for doc- nificant," Safer said.
out thebenefits As national atten-
out the benefits ion at the close of the
IS system stimu- 20th century focused
a lot of advan- on the problem of
ADHD in the class-
ent improved room, the debate over
improved ability the safety of prescrib-
ing stimulants for
y but the risks chronic use intensified,
poorly defined." especially as the num-
ut Winterstein, Ph.D. ber of children taking
acy pharmacy health the drugs rose rapidly.
acy parmacyIn 2006, the U.S.
>n assistant professor Food and Drug
Administration's
Drug Safety and Risk
Management Advisory Committee recom-
mended a black-box warning regarding the
drugs' cardiovascular risks be added to the
package insert.
However, the FDA's Pediatric Advisory
Committee disagreed, saying there was strong
scientific evidence the drugs were beneficial,
whereas data regarding risks indicated cardiac
effects were often mild and could be treated by
adjusting the dose or timing of medication.
The UF research team's recent findings
raise several important issues that warrant


further investigation, Winterstein said. Critical
concerns include stimulant safety in popula-
tions with cardiac risk factors and in those
who use the drugs for several years. The UF
study found that more than 25 percent of
stimulant users also used antidepressant or
antipsychotic drugs, which are known to af-
fect the heart and blood pressure as well.
UF researcher Arwa Saidi, MB.BCh., an as-
sociate professor of pediatrics in UF's College
of Medicine, believes more research is needed
to evaluate potential effects of chronic expo-
sure to stimulants in childhood and how their
use might influence the development of high
blood pressure or heart disease later in life.
"We don't know if the increased heart
rate and blood pressure in childhood will
have long-term implications," said Saidi, a
study co-author. "It is furthermore unknown
whether the risk is similar among the various
stimulant agents."
Risk management strategies should be
identified and implemented, the researchers
say, pointing to recent FDA recommendations
asking drug manufacturers to issue medica-
tion guides, which explain the potential risk
and emphasize precautions to patients who
use their products.
In his practice, most parents whose chil-
dren were diagnosed with ADHD and pre-
scribed stimulants have been satisfied with
the treatment effects, Safer said.
"In fact," Safer added, "more parents than
previously are requesting such treatment
if their child is having serious problems in
school."
U FI I Health Science Center
F .UNIVERSITY of FLORIDA


NOW LEASING


p


THE BARTRAM


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CONTEMPORARY
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BUY IT. SELL IT. FIND IT. 373-FIND







Classif ieds
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2008


ALLIGATOR
www.alligator.org/classiffeds


i For Rent
a furnished

*SICK OF SHARING A BATHROOM?*
Get your own this fall!
2Br/2Ba flats, *3Br/3Ba townhms
FREE Tanning, W/D, 24hr gym
PC Lab, Gated, All Amenities, Pt Friendly
Leasing for FALL*377-2777
4-23-72-1

GET HOOKED UPI
Luxurious 3's and 4's.
Giant 2/2.5 Townhomes.
No Hassle Roommate Matchingl
Get itAlII-Fumiture, Utilities, & Internetl
FREE Cable-HBO/Shtime, Tanning, Alarms
24 hr Fitness Center, W/D in Every Unit!
336-3838 TheLandingsUF.com
Great Bus Route 2 Miles to UF
4-23-72-1

"Live in the Moment"
Massive-Lavish 1,2&3 Beds
Pool*Hot Tub*Tanning*PC Lab*W/D
FREE Cable with HBO*Most Utilities FREE
One Month Free/Immed. Move! 372-8100
4-23-72-1

1, 2, 3, 4BR Apts.
www.ApartmentslnGainesville.com
4-23-72-1

Don't Be The Only One Out!
The FINEST in student living
2/2 & 4/4's starting @ just $529
All inclusive, PC lab, Tan, Soccer field
3 Buses & RM Match! Going Fast!
352-271-3131
4-23-72-1

Roll Out of Bed & Into Class
$469 $499 Gets you all this!
Fully Furnished, Free Ethernet, Free Cable
w/HBO, FREE UTILITIES, W/D,
Roommate match. 379-9300
4-23-72-1

Let's Face It
Size Does Matter!
Huge Floor plans
Huge Parties
Huge Savings
Lexington Crossing...Don't Miss Out!
352-373-9009
4-23-72-1

Roommate wanted-Beautiful Mill Pond
Condo 2/2 furnished. minutes from UF bus
stop right in front to UF., no smoking! $600
month, 441 NW48 Blvd, directly across from
Gainesville Health and Fitness. If interested
call Ashley at 305-323-9742. 1-20-7-1


For Rent
furnished

Two block to UF. Furn room in 4BR condo.
Rent includes all utilities, internet, cable TV,
pool, laundry, TV & microwave. Very nice.
$395 378-4626 3-31-08-61-1

2BLKS to UF-$360/Mo
4Br-$360/Rm Museum Rd-cable, internet,
water incl Move in now or fall. 281-3651.
4-23-72-1

Female roommate, own bed/bath, furnished,
new apple, w/d. Windsor Park, close to UF on
bus stop, pool, hot tub, tennis, gym, $495,
1/3 utilities; avail now. Katie 407-361-1154
3-5-40-1

NEW OXFORD TERRACE II CONDO, 3
blocks from campus, 2BR/2BA of 4BR/4BA
condo, furn. W/D, cable/internet, 1 year
lease, $550/mo + util (954)937-8080 3-
19-08-16-1

Lodging for 4 students. Partially furnished.
14 min to UF, all utils incl, W/D, sauna,
decks. Come and see! $350/mo each. 1st,
last, $200 damage dep. Call 352-466-0165
3-17-10-1

1st floor Condo @ Univ Terrace West on
SW 34th Street on bus route near UF 4
bedroom/4 bath, washer, dryer, carpet, TV,
etc $350 pp plus utilities, 1 year lease Aug
15, 2008- Aug 14, 2009 352-586-6468 3-
21-08-10-1

Room for rent $450/mo
near SFCC & Oaks Mall & 1-75. All utilities
included. 786-325-7941 or 258-0277 3-28-
08-13-1


For Rent )
unfurnished

*QUIET, CLEAN, LOTS of GREEN SPACE.
Rustic 1BR apt. $375/mo.
*1BR cottage $435/mo. Call 378-9220 or
mobile 213-3901.4-23-72-2

2 BLOCKS TO UFI WOOD FLOORS
1 and 2 bedrooms for Fall 2008
As low as $535/person
We love pets!
Open late! 371-7777
4-23-72-2

*LYONS SPECIAL*
$199 1st month's rent 377-8797
4-23-08-72-2


For Rent
unfurnished

MOVE IN TODAY OR AUGUST!
1 BR Available Now!
1's, 2's, 3's For Fall!
HUGE Floorplans! Great Rates!
Bike to UF 335-7275
4-23-08-72-2

Be Unique Have Options!
Studios*1/1*2/2*3/3 Townhomes
Make your apartment yours 57 floorplansl
Wood floors*Fireplaces*Reserved Parking
Why be ordinary? 338-0002
4-23-72-2

Apartments off SW 20th Ave. Close to
shopping, bus line and a few miles from UF.
Price range $435 to $550. Includes water,
sewer, garbage and pest control. Sorry no
pets allowed. Call 335-7066 Mon-Fri. 4-
23-08-72-2

WELCOME HOME
LEASING FOR FALL
1BR $560 2BR $619
Pets Loved Walk/Bike to UF
Quiet Peaceful *372-7555 4-23-08-72-2

Deluxe, Large 3, 4, 5, 6, 7BR apt/house, 60
second walk to UF. Remodeled, Old House
charm. Central AC, washer/dryer included.
Wood floors. With Parking. By Private Owner.
538-2181 Iv message 4-23-08-72-2

Home Sweet Home
Huge 3 BR open NOWI
Alarm, patio, D/W, tennis, pool
Call today! 352-376-4002
4-23-72-2

Deluxe, large one or two bedroom, 60 second
walk to UF. Wood firs, washer dryer included,
fireplace, patio deck. Can furnish. Short term
available. Private Owner. $595-up. 352-538-
2181. Lv msg 4-23-08-72-2

*SLEEP IN*
*GET TO CLASS ON TIME*
Close to UF!!!
Luxury 1/1, 2/2 flats & 3/3 TH
FREE cable HBO/Show & Tanning
Gated Alarms Pet Friendly
Oxford Manor, 377-2777
4-23-72-2

** ELLIE'S HOUSES **
Quality single family homes. Walk or bike to
UF. www.ellieshouses.com 352-215-4991 or
352-215-4990 12-6-71-2


For Rent
unfurnished

APTS ACROSS FROM UF
Available FALL 2008
Rooms, Studios and 1/1s
From only $589 per month!
371-0769 Collegeparkuf.com
4-23-72-2

A SWEET DEAL
on our Luxury 1/1, 2/2 & 3/3 townhomes
FREE cable w/HBO & Showtime
All Amenities plus FREE Tanning
Gated*Alarm*Pet Friendly 335-4455
www.thelaurelsuf.Com
4-23-08-72-2

Right where YOU Want to BEI
HUGE 1, 2, & 3 BRSI
Pet Friendly*FREE Parking @ UF
Pool*Gym*Clubhouse
373-1111 www.spanishtrace.org
4-23-72-2

Up your Game! Live large!
Stunning 2/2 & 3/3 twn hms
Garages avail. Prvt Dog Park,
Tanning bed, Bus stop, Sauna
352-377-2801
4-23-72-2

BIVENS COVE Leasing for Fall & NOWI
1BR-$729, 2BR-$453/person,
3BR-$385/person, 4BR-$395/person
FREE TANNING! TWO POOLS!
W/D in select units. 376-2507
4-23-08-72-2

Knock Knock, Whose there?
1,2&3 Beds From $367/bed
One Month Free Move Now
Cable*Full W/D*Tanning*Pool
We love pets! Call Now: 372-8100
4-23-72-2

The Boardwalk-Leasing for Fall & Nowl
1BR-$709, 2BR-$425/person,
3BR-$335/person
W/D in select units. FREE Tanning!
377-7401
4-23-72-2

Be the BIGGEST on the block!
2Bdrs for FALL $839. We love ALL pets!
Pool, Gym, Park @ UF, Bball, Tennis
GREAT Specials! 352-332-7401
4-23-72-2

STUDIO APT
60 sec walk to UF. Short term avail. 1 or 2
rooms $425 & up. Call 352-538-2181 4-23-
08-72-2


For Rent
unfurnished

Biggest Town homes in Titletownl
1600 + SQF of awesomenessk .
Garages/ 10ft ceilings/ Gate'
Best kept secret in Gville- For Fall!
Must see to believe, 372-0400
4-23-72-2

Live at a Legend!
The Polos of Gainesville
Leasing for fall & immediate!
Spacious 1, 2 & 3 bedrooms. W/D in EVERY
unit, 3 pools, large 24 hour gym, computer
lab with free printing, tanning and morel
Minutes from UF, shopping and Shands. On
all major bus routes. Pets welcome. Call now
forspecials: 335-7656, www.thepolosuf.com
4-23-72-2

Move In Today!
1/1's starting at $529
2/1's for fall $410/person
Quiet, pet-loving community
376-1248 hiddenvillageapt.com
4-23-72-2

LUXURY STUDENT CRIBS
All Inclusive 3's and 4's.
GINORMOUS 212.5 Townhouses
Roommate Matching Available
FREE Cable, Tanning, Alarms, W/D
FREE 24 hr Fitness Center.
Furniture, Utility and Internet Packages!
336-3838 TheLandingsUF.com
Convenient Bus Route! 2 Miles to UF
4-23-72-2

FORGET YOU HAVE ROOMMATES!
Huge 4BR townhomes w/W/D. 1662 sq.ft.
FREE gym membership and FREE cable!
352-332-7401 4-23-72-2

LIVE THE LIFE
All Inclusive Ind. leases
Big 2/2s 3/3s & 4/4s
Filling fast Lease now
373-9009 4-23-72-2

Who Would Have Thought?
HUGE & COZE 1 & 3 Beds
From $323/bed
One Month FREE Move Now
Call now: 372-8100" We love pets!
4-23-08-72-2

BIG AND CHEAP
2/1.5 apt 1100 sq ft $675
3/2 apt 1300 sq ft $750
1800 NW 4th St. Over 20 houses also
available 373-4423 www.maximumre.com
8-11-111-2


How To Place A Classified Ad:


In Person:
Cash, Check, MC, or Visa
The Alligator Office
1105 W. University Ave.
M-F, 8am 4pm
UF Bookstore at Reitz Union
M-F, 8am 6pm, Sat. 10am 5pm
By Mail:


Use forms appearing weekly in The
Alligator. Sorry, no cash by mail. MC,
Visa or checks only.
By Phone: (352) 373-FIND
Payment by Visa or MasterCard ONLY.
M-F, 8am 4pm
By Fax: (352) 376-4556
When Will Your Ad Run?


Classifieds begin TWO WORKING DAYS
after they are placed. Ads placed at the
UF Bookstore may take THREE days to
appear. Ads may run for any length of
time and be cancelled at any time. Sorry,
but there can be no refunds or credits
for cancelled ads.


Corrections and Cancellations:
Cancellations: Call 373-FIND M-F, 8am 4pm. No refunds or cred-
its can be given.
Alligator errors: Check your ad the FIRST day it runs. Call 373-FIND
with any corrections before noon. THE ALLIGATOR IS ONLY RE-
SPONSIBLE FOR THE FIRST DAYTHE AD RUNS INCORRECTLY.
Corrected ads will be extended one day. No refunds or credits can be
given after placing the ad. Changes called in after the first day will not
be further compensated.
Customer error or changes: Changes must be made BEFORE
NOON for the next day's paper. There will be a $2.00 charge for
minor changes.


1 For Rent: Furnished 6 Furnishings 11 Motorcycles, Mopeds 16 "Health Services 21 Entertainment
2 For Rent:; Unfurnished 7 Computers 12 Autos 17 Typing Services 22 Tickets '
3 Sublease 8 Electronics 13 Wanted 18 Personals 23 Rides
.4 Roommates. 9 Bicycles 14 Help Wanted 19 Connections 24 Pets
5 Real Estate 10 For Sale 15 Services 20 Event Notices 25 Lost & Found

All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make limitation, or discrimination." We will
not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. All employment opportunities advertised herein are subject to the laws which prohibit discrimina-
tion in employment (barring legal exceptions) because of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, handicap, familial status, age, or any other covered status. This newspaper assumes no responsibility for injury or loss arising from contacts made through the type of advertising that
is know as "personal" or "connections" whether or not they actually appear under those classifications. We suggest that any reader who responds to t Although-bhis
newspaper uses great care in accepting or rejecting advertising according to its suitability, we cannot verify that all advertising claims or offers are completely valid in every case and, therefore, cannot assume any responsibility for any injury or loss arising from offers and acceptance of
offers of goods and/or services through any advertising contained herein.


981~1~4111~888~1~


c' ' --







12,-ALLIGATOR 0 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5,2008


-I For Rent
unfurnished

The Perfect Location at the Best Pricel
Live in Downtown Luxury for Fall!
Two and Three Bedroom Townhomes
Washer/Dryers*Patios*We Love Pets!
www.arlingtonsquare.org*
Sign NOW for fall! 338-0002
4-23-72-2

MUSEUM WALK
Gainesville's Best Kept Secret
Leasing for Fall & NOW!
Luxury 2/2 TH & 3/3 Flats
FRiS Cable, FREE Tanning, FREE Alarms
Walk to UF *379-WALK
4-23-72-2

Move-in TODAY
All inclusive studios from $575
2brs from $395/room
Walk to class, free parking!
Pets Welcome! 352-372-7111
4-23-08-72-2

YOU'VE HEARD ABOUT IT
NOW EXPERIENCE IT
Live the Condo lifestyle in one of our
1, 2, or 3 bdrm apts.
Open Sat 10-5/Sun by appt.
Windmeadows Apartments
3700 Windmeadows Apts
(behind Butler Plaza)
352-373-3558
4-23-71-2

LAKEWOOD VILLAS
NOW LEASING FOR AUGUST
Large 1, 2 & 3 bdrm Floor Plans;
Furniture Packages Inc. Washer/Dryer;
Workout Rm, Tennis Court; Swimming Pool;
Saunp etc. Mon-Fri 9-6, Sat 10-3
700 SW 62nd Blvd 877-781-8314
www.lakewoodvilllas.com
04-23-08-72-2

SPYGLASS *
NOW LEASING FOR AUGUST
Individual Leases: Furniture Packages,
Incl Washer/Dryer, FREE Hispeed Internet;
Every Unit is an End Unit
Mon-Fri 9-6, Sat 10-3
701 SW 62nd Blvd 866-747-8443
4,8 -www.spy lassapts.com
4-23-08-72-2

CRICKET CLUB II
NOW LEASING
Brand new 1, 2, & 3 bdrm
Luxury apartments
Conveniently located near
shopping, restaurants
and SFCC. For more info. Call:
888-509-4649
M-F 9-6, Sat b, Sun 1-5
4-23-08-72-2

ARBOR
Ask About Our Move In Specials
1BR/1BA starting at $655
Close to UF & Shands
2411 SW 35th PI
866-650-8069
M-F 9-6, Sat. 10-2
4-23-08-72-2

ACROSS FROM UF!
All inclusive studios from $575
1BRs from $599 -Avail Fall 2008
Pets loved. Wood floors available
372-7111 Collegemanor.org
4-23-08-72-2

Available Now & Fall
Visions South Apts.
Walk to UF. new complex 1BR $999
2BR 2.5 BA washer/Dryer
$1499 pets allowed
Gore-Rabell Realty 378-1387
wwfwore-rabell.com 4-23-08-72-2

Your new home is here & waiting
Fall openings for 1,2,3, & 4 BR's
HUGE BR's, alarm, patio, d/w, tennis, pool
Call 352-376-4002 or pinetreegardens.com
4-23-72-2

BEAUTIFULAND LUXURIOUS
Ceramic tile, maple cabinets, TV in Kitchen
Huge Scr. Porches, W/D, Walk-in Closets
Only 1.5 miles to UF
2/2's & 3/3's Starting at $500/per person
Hidden Lake 374-FUNN 4-23-72-2


For Rent
-unfurnished

**CAMPUS EDGE CONDO**
2BR/2BAwalk to class/gym. Mins to Shands.
Tile floor, WD in unit. $535/room. Available
fall 239-250-6149, 239-992-2449 3-24-08-
22-2

LUXURY 2/2 STEPS TO UFI
LEASING FOR FALL 2008
Private baths, W/D, monitored alarm
From under $650 per person! Pets OK
371-7777 Collegeparkuf.com
4-23-08-72-2







4BR/4BA Furnished $1099
5BR/2BA Near UF $1095
3BR/2BA Duckpond $995
Ask about Move-In Specials!

30 + Properties Available!
www.BosshardtPM.com
352-371-2118 4-23-72-2

1 Block to UF 1 BR apt $600/mo.
2BR apt. $650/mo NW 15th Ave & 5th St.
3BR home $975 NW 7th Ave.
Call Michael 331-2100 3-7-44-2

3 bedroom Across from UF!
Available fall 2008
ONLY $505 per person!
Open late and weekends
371-0769 collegeparkuf.com
4-23-08-69-2

MOVE IN TODAY
Studios and 1/1s
From as low as $629/person!
Open late and weekends
371-7777 collegeparkuf.com
4-23-08-69-2

SORORITY ROW APTS
Brand new luxury apts w/gourmet kitchens,
balconies & swings. Walk to UF classes & so-
rorities next year! Tourtoday 352-376-6223.
Virtual tours: www.SororityRowApts.com.
4-23-59-2


60,Apts Near UF
on 1 website: www.Trimarkproperties.com
Photos & Virtual Tours for 60 apts near UF.
Studios $615+ 1 BR $659+ 2BR $829+ *
3BR $617/br+ 4BR $474/br *352-376-6223
4-23-68-2


*SUN ISLAND APTO
**Walk or Bike to Campus**
1-1 from $560/mo*02-1 from $660/mo
www.sunisland.infoe00376-6720
4-23-58-2


** LUXURY APTS **

CLOSEST TO CLASS
2bd/2ba available for Fall
www.LookingGlassApartments.com
111 NW 16th St. #1, Call 376-1111
4-23-59-2

$200 Signing Bonus
Sorority Row Townhomes
Luxury 2/2.5 from $635/room
Wood floors avail. Pets loved.
372-7111 CollegeManor.org
4-23-08-58-2

Sun Island
Summer Rates
Plus July free on
15 month lease
May 08 July 09
1.1 from $560
2.1 from $650
376-6720
4-23-58-2

Cute cottage 2 bedroom 1 bath, with study,
nice yard 310 N.W. 20th Avenue $795/mo
call Barbara 317-4392, Green Tree Realty,
Inc. 3-24-08-40-2 ,


S For Rent
unfurnished







3 BLOCKS to UF
1,2, & 3 Bdrms
The Nicest Luxury Apts in Gville
www.jacksonsquarecondominiums.com
Call 352-375-8256
4-23-58-2

Walk/bike to class. Summit House Condos,
across the street from the VA on 16th Ave.
2/1, avail 8/1, quiet, safe, renovated, added
features: micro, DW & island counter. Dep
$200/person, Rent $900/mo 352-843-0862.
3-17,31-2

**ONE MONTH FREE**
Private Single-story Villas
*"BR ONLY $529-
"2BR ONLY $599*
2 Pools*Pond*Laundry
Alarms Avail*Small pets ok
Move-in Today*375-1519 4-23-60-2

*2BR + BONUS ROOM*
TODAY Only $699
POOL*GYM*POND
*ONE MONTH FREE*
Move in TODAY!! 376-0828 4-23-60-2

"HUMONGOUS VILLAS"
WD HU*Storage*Large Kitchen
2BR/2BA ONLY $759
3BR/2BA ONLY $864
**ONE MONTH FREE**
Near Oaks Mall & Tower Rd.
"NEWLY RENOVATED"
Move-in TODAY*333-1120 4-23-60-2

Walk to UF. May: 3bd 2bth house $1300.
2bd 2.5 bth twn house $1000. 2bd lbth
$700. 1bd lbth $550. Studio $400.00 Aug:
2bd 2.5 bth twn house $1000. 2 bd 1 bth
$700. 1bd 1bth $550. 1 yr, SD, NS, No pets.
gvll32601@gmail.com or 352-870-7256. 3-
28-08-40-2

BRAND NEW 2/2 TH AVAILABLE NOW!
2 BLOCKS TO CAMPUS
JACKSON SQUARE
W/D, DW, Granite! Pets welcome
Call Today! Open lately 371-7777
4-23-08-57-2

Haile Plantation Villa 2/2 garage.
$1,100 per mo. avail. Feb. 2008
9779 SW 52 Rd. Call 305-542-4650 3-18-
08-30-2

BLOCKS TO UF Houses & Apts w/ample
parking. Rent directly from owner. No dealing
w/brokers or agents. Houses from $1500/mo;
apts from $525/mo. See dalypropertiescom
or call Carol 352-377-3852 3-31-08-39-2

SW GAINESVILLE
2 bed/1 baths Avail.Now!
$575/mo. On busline,
Mins. To Shands, VA & UF.
Union Properties 352-373-7578
www.rentgainesville.com
4-23-55-2

Walk to UF from our many
Locations, 1,2,3, or 4 bedrooms
Behind Norman Hall or
Along Univ. Ave.
Don't Wait, Call Todayl'
Union Properties 352-373-7578
www.rentgainesville.com
4-23-55-2

Union Properties of Gainesville, In.
Friendly, Professional Service.
Call us today so we may help you
find your next home.
352-373-7578
www.rentgainesville.com
4-23-55-2

CALLING ALL GATORS
Walk to campus from our many
Properties close to UF.
1,2,3 & 4 bedrooms for FALL.
Union Properties 352-373-7578
www.rentgainesville.com
4-23-55-2 .;, :


II


For Rent
unfurnished


WINDSOR TERRACE APTS.
3520 SW 20th Avenue
1bed/1bath $475/mo
Bus Route, close to shops
Private courtyards
Union Properites 352-373-7578
www.rentgainesville.com
4-23-55-2


MALIBU COVE APTS.
1114 SW 7th Avenue
Spacious Loft Style
Behind Norman Hall
Union Properties 352-373-7578.
www.rentgainesville.com 4-23-55-2


Move In TODAY...
Start LIVING Tomorrowl
Huge 2BR w/Patio
Located behind Butler Plaza
373-1111 spanishtrace.org
4-23-54-2


2158 sq ft 4/3 home in NW Gville. Minutes
to UF. Appl. included. Remodeled. Ceramic
and wood floors, 2 car gar, deck, 1/2 acre
lot, fenced. $1,550/m, $2,000 sec. dep. 3120
NW 31st Blvd. 352 466-0358. Avail May. 3-
21-08-30-2


2br 2ba 1 car gar Home on 1 acre. Millhopper
$875 or we do lawn $1000. 1 br 1 ba each a
garden apt SW $540 Pets ok both locations
mature only. 352-377-2150 Please leave us a
msg. 3-25-08-30-2

Moving/living off campus? Use UFL?s im-
proved off-campus housing service. Go to
www.offcampushousing.dso.ufl.edu to find
housing, roommates, and more. 4-23-48-2


1 For Rent
J UII unfurnished


1BR & 2BR/1BAAPTS
with W/D, cent H/AC, DW, ceramic tile,
private patio, pets arranged. Off SW 34th
St near bus rte. From $689/mo 377-1633
www.lenoxcorner.com 3-31-32-2



COTTAGE GROVE
2, 3, 4 br. Upscale condos for rent
Sign a lease by March 15th
& receive a $500 signing bonus.
Visit our website:
www.cottagegroveatgainesville.com
352-373-7959
4-23-47-2


Raise Your Standards
Why settle for less than you deserve?
FREE Utilities,, FREE Cable, FREE Internet
Luxury 2s & 4s starting at just $499
RM Match & 1 Mi from UF 271-3131
4-23-47-2


Creek Forest, NW 1br minutes from shop-
ping, downtown $ UF, central air/heat, back
deck, w/d hookup, includes some utilities,
$500/mo. www.edbaurmanagement.com
1731 NW6th St. 375-7104 x 113
4-23-47-2


Whispering Pines, brand new units
convenient to hospitals and vet school,
2br/2ba, fully equipped kitchen, icemaker,
washer and dryer, monitored alarm system,
$1000/mo, now renting for summer/fall
semesters, ask about our specials!
www.edbaurmanagement.com
1731 NW6th St. 375-7104 x113
4-23-47-2


J


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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 20080 ALLIGATOR, 13


,ll For Rent
a ll unfurnished

Luxury Living Just off Sorority Rowl
New this year COTTAGES AT NORMAN.
Act Now Only 2 cottages left. 2BR/2BA
or 3BR/2BA. Less than 100 feet from
Norman Hall. Ask about rent special.
www.bellaproperties.net or 352-335-5424.
3-7-08-18-2

Escape complex living at Palm Villas Apt.
Luxury Apartments targeting grad students
and young professionals. Very quiet, yet con-
venient to shopping. On RTS Bus Route #12.
See web page for photos and floor plans.
www.bellaproperties.net or 352-335-5424
3-7-08-18-2

Spacious*Affordable*Close to Campus
Available NOW and Fall 2008
4/2 from $420/mo & 2/1 from $509/mo
Fully furnished, Cable w/HBO included
Fitness, Pool, Volleyball, B-ball and more!
Call now, spaces limited 352-377-6700
4-23-46-2

Houses, Duplexes, Condo, Townhouses.
Walk/Bike/Bus to campus. Neat, clean, good
qua!tty. Visit www.gatorpads.com for avail-
able units or call 284-0316 4-23-08-43-2


AVAILABLE NOW
2BR/1BA Downtown $450/mo
3BR/2BA Townhouse w/d, 8 mo old, $1200
Gore-Rabell Real Estate
378-1387
www.gore-rabell.com
4-23-08-47-2

4/2 Family Home in Duckpond
Wood floors, new kitchen, big fenced yard.
$1350. Jeffrey 352-246-5801 3-7-08-15-2

Action Real Estate Services
Houses to Condos
1-4 BR, Starting at $450
www.action-realtors.com
352-331-1133
4-23-08-45-2

10houses.com
2 & 3 bd houses for Aug in quiet areas.
Cute, clean, cent H/AC, WD, wood floors,
nice yards, bike to UF, $690 to $1200. 352-
336-6116 or email nancy@10houses.com
3-18-08-16-2

Spacious and Affordable 4BR/3BA House.
Located near campus on Archer Rd across
from bus route and Best Buy. $900/mo. 352-
281-0099 3-18-15-2


For Rent ]
unfurnished .

3BR/1BA 1 BLOCK TO UF. 1227 SW 4th
Ave. -Aug 1st. $1475/mo. Cent H/AC, wood
floors, parking. Call 352-331-0590 and 352-
514-5060 cell. 3-6-08-10-2

Immediate Move In! Great location near
Oaks MaIll 2br 1 1/2bth condo,$755 per
mnth.Unit features tile & wood floors, w/d,
all major appliances in the kitchen, fireplace.
For additional info call (352)514-0372 3-21-
08-14-2

1700 sq ft 3BR/2BA house for rent. Wood
floors, screened-in large back porch, jacuzzi,
W/D, corner lot. $1400/mo + utils. Call 352-
258-9116 to see. 3-24-08-15-2

Looking Glass Apartment for rent 2BR/2BA
across street from Library West. Reduced
Tent $1000/mo. Luxury apartment with bay
windows, full kitchen 813-767-9536 3-18-
10-2

CRICKET CLUB II gated condos,
Tower Rd, NEW 1,2,3 bedrooms,
pool, gym, washer and dryer.
Starting at $119,900, 332-4544.
Choose your own incentives! 4-23-35-2

2/1 Completely upgraded throughoutAll new
kitchen stainless appliances All new bath
Cable/high speed internet avail Separate
laundry room 1 mile from UF, Shands,
shopping $765/mo. Sorry, no pets e-mail
jlglackin@yahoo.com or 727-423-9463.
Bckgrd/credit check required. 3-7-08-7-2

Save $$$ on PARKING & GAS. PERFECT
for Medical, Dental, Vet, Grad. Students 2
min. walk to UF, Shands & VA. 1 BR/1 Bath
avail. April, $610/mo. Very clean & quiet.
COUNTRY GARDENS (352)373-4500
3-19-8-2


Save gas & kick the roommate habit
1BR/1BA now renting for Fall 20081
Gatomest Apts. 3 blks to UF
300 NW 18th St $5851mo.
Gatorside Apts. 4 biks to UF
1600 NW 4th Ave $430/mo.
Centerpoint Apts. Bike to UF
1220 NW 12th St $4751mo.
Email Rentals@EFNProperties.com
or Call 352-371-3636
**No Application Fee**
3-7-08-5-2

***Near UF***
4BR/2BA, Study Room, Washer & Dryer,
Dishwasher. Available for August 2008.610
NW 34 Terr. Call Manny 352 317 4408
3-7-08-5-2




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.1 For Rent
unfurnished

***Near UF***
3BR/2BA, Washer & Dryer, Family room/
Study room. Available August 2008. 929
NW 22 St. Call Manny 352 317 4408
3-7-08-5-2

*** Walk to UF***
2BR/1BA, Washer & Dryer, 2 Cars Tenant
Permits. 204 NW 18 ST. Call Manny 352-
317-4408 3-7-08-5-2

PET'S PARADISE
$375-$425. No app or pet fee. 1 & 2 BR, pri-
vacy fenced. SW. 352-331-2099 3-7-08-4-2
1/1 available August #750/month. 640
sq. ft. Pets welcome. Bus routes 9 and 35.
5 minutes to UF. Quiet building, spacious
apartment. 941-468-6475 or klgoff@ufl.edu
for questions. 3-5-08-1-2
3bd 2.5bth w/large spacious Rooms.Water
and Garbage included in rent Property also
has amenities: pool,sauna & exercise room
$900.00 a month for entire condo. Hurry! Call
352-219-5603 ask for Starling 3-18-08-5-2

1/1, Ridgeview, free water, next to park, on
the bus line, cent H/A, courtyard, 2 miles to
UF, convenient to shopping, no smoking/pets.
$450 S.D., $450/mo. 562-2824 3-18-08-5-2

3/2 house mins from UF. Wood floors, 2 car
garage, fenced yard. Pets WelcomelAvail 8/6
and Only $975/mon. 3237 NW 30th PL. Call
514-1441. 3-18-08-5-2
Available March 18th, 1BR/1BA apart-
ment at Arbor Park on SW 16th Ave. near
Main St. Rent is $595/mo and there is no
security deposit. Apartment is approx. 750
sq. ft. Bus stops at front door and grocery
store directly across the street. About one
mile from clubs and nightlife downtown and
within walking distance to Shands medical
center and UF campus. Building is quiet and
friendly and pets'are ok. For questions or to
schedule a viewing, contact Aaron Kirkland
at pakirkland@gmail.com 3-5-08-1-2

1920'S BUNGELOW
NE 10th St. W/D hk-ups. Hardwood, fans,
large backyard, excellent condition, $900/mo
No Dogs 373-3736 No Section 8. 4-23-
31-2

HISTORIC APARTMENTS
Available in Fall. 1-2-3 bedrooms, Hardwood
floors, fans, porches, downtown. No dogs.
1st-last-security. 373-3736 No Section 8
4-23-31-2

MILL POND CONDO
3BR/2BA, garage, across from GHFC.
$1100/mo Avail May. Call 331-6872 3-28-
08-13-2


a ll| Subleases ]

DON'T WAIT

TO PLACE

YOUR

SUBLEASE AD
Last spring semester
paper published on
April 23rd.

CALL TODAY!!!
or
PLACE YOUR AD AT
WWW.ALLIGATOR.ORG!

Apartments Sublet & Roommates
Browse FREE
www.SUBLET.com
1-877-FOR-RENT/201-845-7300
8-13-149-3
SUBLEASE Madison Pointe 1BR 1 BA Apt.
with W/D, dishwasher, & screen porch. Pool,
exercise room, sauna tennis, BBall court,
security guard on-site. $795/mo. + utilities.
Available April or May 1st-July 31st. Call Jen
651-263-5195 4-1-30-3


a Subleases I Subleases I


lbd/1lbr in the polo's, fireplace, vaulted
ceilings, washer and dryer included, walk-
in closet, Great Amenties, Great Location
AVAILABLE NOW! $730/mon. Call Kerri 561-
306-6871 4-4-08-30-3

SUMMER SUBLEASE- 1/1 in 2/2 @ Museum
Walk. Huge apartment, fully furnished, WID,
dishwasher. Quiet neighborhood. $550/mo
inc. all utilities. Female only, please. Call
Brianna (727)492-0577. 3-20-16-3

1 BR apt in Spyglass. Furnished including TV.
Sublease thru July. $1100/mo OBO. Includes
cable & utils. 352-538-3559 3-6-08-10-3

Sublease Homestead Apt 2BR/2BA March
1 thru July 31. $719/mo. 3 miles from cam-
pus. No last or security. Call 352-494-7857
3-6-10-3

SUMMER SUBLEASE- Cabana Beach Apts.
1/1 in 4/4. Furnished. ALL utilities incl. (w/d,
cable, internet, gym, pool, study rm) Gated.
2 bus stops in complex. Avail May-Aug $505/
month. Female only. Call Cathy (305)528-
8540 3-5-5-3

2/2 Sublet in Stoneridge Apts, May-July, 2nd
floor, next to pool tennis bball, fitness center
& laundry, 12 & 35 bus, 1,111 sqft!, cats al-
lowed, $710/mo negotiable,
starlightl612@hotmail.com 3-7-08-6-3

SUMMER SUBLEASE: 3/3 townhouse apt. in
Greenwich Green. ALL ROOMS AVAIL. May
thru July. $1190/mo, cable + water inc. W/D,
furn. avail, pool. Close to campus. Bus 12
Sam 561-602-6589 or Nicole 561-307-9380
3-6-08-5-3

2008 SUMMER SUBLEASE: 1BDRM IN
2/1 apartment, located 2 blocks behind
The Swamp Restaurant. Rent is $472/mon.
Including utilities and cable, approximately
$550. Enjoy mid-town at night GREAT
LOCATIONI Contact:ufgator73@gmail.com
3-5-08-3-3

Live only steps from campus & get a view
overlooking the stadium Sublease 2B/2Ba
apt at Looking Glass. The rent is $575 per
person. Available May until Aug & half the
rent for may will be payed! For more info, plz
call (954) 494-9856 3-31-16-3

SUMMER SUBLEASE- Huge 1BR/1BA
at Boardwalk. Avail. May-Aug4. Pet
friendly.Pool/gym/laundry room/tennis court.
Rent $695/mo. Close to UF and has bus stop.
Call Andrea 617-448-9332. 3-6-3-3

SUBLEASE Pinetree Gardens! 1 BR/1BA
2nd floor overlooking pool. Pets allowed.
Quiet. Pool and tennis courts. $663/mo + util-
ities. Available May 1st-July 31st. Opportunity
to renew for fall. Call Jenn 352-870-0714 3-
6-08-3-3

Summer Sublease at Royal Village. Rent
negotiable. Room avail in 4BR/2BA, 5 min
bus ride to campus, 30 s drive to Winn Dixie,
pool, tanning bed, furnished 727-420-2978
3-17-5-3

Luxury 1/1 in a 1/1 The Estates. No room-
matesi Fully furnished, W/D, cable, utilities,
Internet incid. Gym, B-ball, 3 pools, gated.
Bus 20, 21. 5 min to campus Aval. May-Aug
$695 Call (954) 478-9599 3-21-08-8-3

BEST SUBLEASE DEAL! lbr in 4/2 avail.
at Royal Village. 7 min from class, fully
furnished, pool, gym, utilities included, only
$460/month but negotiable. (727)698-5242.
3-21-5-3

March-July sublease. MARCH FREE! 1BR-
1BA Towne Parc Apt. $615/mo. Walk-in
closet, Pool, Gym, W/D, Close to Campus,
Bus Stop, B-ball & tennis court. Call Brittany
@ 3057854128 or britt87@ufl.edu. 3-18-
08-5-3

ONE MONTH. FREE RENT Spacious 2bed/
2bath, washer and dryer in unit. Courtyard
view, large porch, dog friendly and access to
all amenities. Short and easy 1 mile bus ride
to UF, 5 min drive to SFCC. For showing call
Erin 321-961-4850 3-18-5-3

Cabana Beach Apt for Sublet
May -Aug summer session
Private bedroom/bath
Many Amenities $530 OBO
Call Mike at 813-841-9851 3-18-08-5-3


2BR/2BA @ Rocky Point avail summer A or
until July 31st. Partially furnished if desired.
$325/mo/rm/OBO + utils. On bus route 34 &
35. Pool & on site laundry. Call 305-773-3761
or 786-253-6798 3-18-08-5-3


Roommates


Roommate Matching HERE
Oxford Manor 377-2777
The Landings 336-3838
The Laurels 335-4455
Cobblestone 377-2801 y.
Hidden Lake 374-3866
4-23-72-4

* $280-$310/mo Nice rooms. Walk to UF.
Short term ok. Low move-in. Small pet pos-
sible.
* ALSO 5BR house, bike to UF. $1000. 352-
371-9409 3-28-08-40-4

$275 or $300/month for female students) to
join a female UF student in sharing attractive
3BR house near NW 8th Ave, less than 3mi.
from UF and on bus rte. #43, tile/hardwood,
large yard, $275/mo for smaller -BR and
$300/mo for larger BR, + 1/3 GRU & Cable
HSInternet-TV, call 332-3852. 3-31-08-30-4

Male roomie needed. Share furn 3BR/2BA
house w/yng prof $400/mo + 1/2 util Directv,
ph, wireless, Vonage, elec. W/D, office space
pvt BA (morn) Ig yd fenced, pets ok, trees,
wooddeck, hottub, pond. 15 min drive to UF,
near bus, Lakeview Ests 352-682-6297 Ken
3-7-15-4

Female, UF, roommates wanted by UF
student to share Three beds/two bath,
furn/unfurn townhouse. 5 mins to campus.
Washer/dryer. No smoking. No pets. 813-
892-3996 3-5-10-4

HANDYMAN SPECIAL Disc 4 wk. Share 2/2
MH Cornerstone. Furn rm avail now. $200
N/R dep. $400/m $100/wk incl elec, ph, cab,
laun & cook sve. N/A,N/S, N/D. Need vehicle.
Near bus/shops. Sm caged pet ok. 331-3666
3-17-10-4

Walk/bike to class, male to share 2/1 at
Summit House on SW 16th Ave. & half
utilities, $450/mo rent, $200 security.7-Aail.
now. Call 352-843-0862. No pets or smok-
ing. 3-7-9-4

ENJOY A ROMANTIC OLD HOUSE
Near library downtown. $285-$370/rm + utils.
Short term. No pets. No smoking. 378-1304
3-7-9-4

Close to UF. Responsible individual needed
to share beautiful 4BR/2BA house. W/D.
$325/mo plus share of utilities and security
deposit. (352)-328-4210. 3-7-08-8-4

Large furnished room, private bath NW Gvlle
house incl all utils + hi spd. $475/mo Male
preferred. Call Mike 352-372-7387 3-21-
10-4

Clean, quiet, non-smoking pre-profes-
sional female for 2BR/2.5BA townhouse.
Unfurnished. Very quiet neighborhood. $550/
mo + utils & cable & internet. Call 561-827-
4970 3-17-08-5-4

Roommate wanted in 2 bedroom townhome
located near UF, Shands and Archer Road.
Female preffered. Rent $300/mo. Call 321-
505-3115. 3-7-08-3-4

Roommate Needed NOW!!
M/F needed for 2br/2ba apt off
campus. Rent is 340$ + 1/2 of
utils inc net, ph, & pwr. call
Sky for details 352-682-6384 3-21-8-4

NS M to share a 2br 1.5ba condo ineSW
area near Paramount Hotel. $400 mo + $200
deposit. Rent includes util, cable, internet.
Condo has washer, dryer and pool. NO
Lease (352) 373-8712. 3-18-5-4

Furnished 2 BR/ 2.5 BA new townhouse
5 min from UF. One room with prvt bath
avail for rent. Low Fall rate of $490 Mo Utill
Internet/ Cable/ Pool/ Gym included. Perf
female Grad/ Med student. 904-608-7609.
3-31-08-14-4


at 1T


B


-Ma 4ms -No
"D W Sam







14, ALli6ATOR V1 DNESDAY, MARCH 5, 008


_.Real Estate E Real Etate Furnishings
^^^*11t Rea Estatei '_j ^____


H Motorcycles, Mopeds" Autos -


Sell your house, condo, acreage, mobile
home and much more in the ALLIGATOR
CLASSIFIEDSI Reach thousands of pos-
sible buyers! Mastercard and Visa accepted
over the phone, by fax, email or CHECK
OUT PLACING YOUR AD ONLINE AT
www.alligator.org. or please call 373-Find

SEE ALL CONDOS
WWW.UFCONDOMINIUMS.COM
Matt Price Campus Realty, 352-281-3551
4-23-72-5-5

NEW CONDOS -WALK to UF
3 BIks to UF. For Info on ALL 1, 2, 3, 4
Bedrooms for Sale, Call Eric Leightman,
Campus Realty at 352-219-2879. 4-23-72-5

GATOR PLACE CONDOS
2/1, w/d, 800 sq ft, 1 1/2 miles to Shands.
3600 SW 23rd St. $84,900 or rent for $650/
mo 352-372-0507 4-23-72-5


*New 2, 3, & 4BR Upscale Condos
with unique Architectural detailing. Starting at
$215,000 Opening August 2008. 352-373-
7959 www.cottagegroveatgainesville.com
4-23-08-72-5







Walk to UF and Stadium from Luxurious
Jackson Square Condominiums
Built to last a lifetime. Prices starting at
$220s. Call 352-870-9453
4-23-58-5

2/1 condo, walking/biking distance to UF, VA,
Vet School, Summit House on SW 16th Ave.
$135,999. Call 352-843-0862 See photos
and description at forsalebyowner.com, list-
ing #20885030 3-5-30-5

MILL"TUN $123,900 2 BR, 1? BATownhouse
wood floors thru-out, RTS bus stop at front
door, almost! Deck upstairs, patio outside,
W/D included Call 352/514.7328 ALVIN C.
TATE, Keller Williams Realty 3-7-08-14-5

LOCATION! 3/2 townhouse 1.400 sqf with
many upgrades and big size backyard.
The lowest HOA $60. Tile and wood floors
everywhere. New paint, newer roof-sidings.
included all appliances. 352-328-9117 3-
20-14-5

4/4 condo @ University Terrace West.
Owner asking $165K. See website for
details and photos ufcondoforsale.com.
All furniture and decorations seen in the
photos are included. Call 954-802-1776
3-7-10-5

2/2 Like new condo 125k
3/2.5 townhouse $159K
3/2 with office $235K
3/2 with pool $260K
5/4 9 blocks from UF $349,900
5/3 8 blocks from UF $659,900
www.exitgainesville.com 352-262-2621
Jay Jolicoeur Exit Realty Producers 3-27-
15-5

Need Quiet To Study? 1BR/1-1/2BA condo
in gated community has 1003SF, open floor
plan, sim. wood floors, comm. pool & ten-
nis.$153,000. Call Judie Irwin, CB MM
Parrish @ 352-339-6879. 2-6-08-5-5

2BR/28A CAPSTONE QUARTERS CONDO.
Close to UF/ShandsNA. Fumished. Good"
Condition. $124,500. Heather Swanson, Pru-
dential Preferred Properties, 352-222-6344,
www.hswanson.com/capstonequarters 3-
7-08-5-5


4BR/4BA LUXURY CONDO
NR SORORITY ROW-BLTAUG 05
$275K INCLALLAPPL
AVAILABLE SUMMER 2008
ELEV 6N PREMISE-904-838-7581
10-5


MELROSE LAKE HOME 3BR/2BA home,
lighted deck w/hot tub, appliances included,
new carpet/paint, 2 storage sheds w/carport,
sandy beach. Great home to study, relax,
and have fun!! $279K. Call 352-332-4997
3-21-10-5

CAMPUS REALTY
Ricardo Kokkas/Realtor
10 years serving UF area
Buyers and Sellers. Call today for
a FREE consultation. 352-318-3384
3-21-08-10-5

2BR/2BA Immaculate condo fully furnished.
Sunroom, many-upgrades. Moving, must sell!
See pics on craigslist.org, select Gainesville,
real estate for sale, enter 567004863, call
352-373-6191, 352-213-5476 3-7-3-5


-O | Furnishings 1


BED QUEEN $110 ORTHOPEDIC-
Extra thick, pillow-top, mattress & box. Name
brand, new, still in plastic. Call 352-372-7490
will deliver. 4-23-08-72-6

BED FULL SIZE $85 ORTHOPEDIC
Pillow-top mattress & box. New, unused, still
in plastic w/warranty. Can deliver. Call 352-
377-9846 4-23-08-72-6

MICROFIBER SOFA & LOVESEAT $375
Brand new still packaged w/warranty. Must
sell. Can deliver. Retail $1600. 352-372-7490
4-23-08-72-6

BED KING $170 PILLOWTOP
mattress & box springs. Orthopedic rated.
Name brand, new, never been used, in
plastic with warranty. Call 352-372-8588 Can
deliver. 4-23-08-72-6

CHERRY SLEIGH BED solid with Pillowtop
Mattress & Box. All new still boxed. Cost
$1500, sacrifice $450 352-333-7516

Sofa $175 Brand new in pkg 333-7516
4-23-72-6

BEDROOM SET. 7pc Cherry, Queen/ king
bed, dresser w/mirror, 2 nightstands, chests
avail. Dovetail const. New, in boxes. Can de-
liver. Retail $6500, must sell, sacrifice $1100
(352) 372-7490 4-23-08-71-6

SOFA & LOVESEAT 100% Italian leather.
Brand new in plastic w/warranty. Retail
$2650. Sacrifice $750. Call 352-377-9846
4-23-08-72-6

DINING ROOM Beautiful cherry set w/table,
6 Chippendale chairs, hutch & buffet. New,
still in boxes. Retail $5200, sacrifice $1100.
Must sell. Can deliver. 352-372-8588 4-23-
72-6

FUTON Solid oak mission-style frame w/
mattress. New, in box. $140 332-9899

DINETTE SET 5pc $85 Brand new in box.
Never used. 352-377-9846 4-23-72-6

"BEDS -ALL BRAND NEW**
"Full $80 Queen $100 King $170"*
Orthopedic pillow-top sets. Brand name
matching sets not used or refurbished. Still
in plastic, direct from factory 352-333-7516.
4-23-72-6

BED- QUEEN New orthopedic pillowtop mat-
tress and boxspring set. Brand name, brand
new, still in plastic with warranty. Can deliver.
$120 352-377-9846. 4-23-72-6

Bed-All New King! 3pc Orthopedic pillowtop
mattress set. Brand NEW, still in plastic with
warranty. Can deliver. $200 352-333-7516.
4-23-72-6

BEDROOM SET- $300 BRAND NEW
Still in boxes! 6 pieces include: Headboard,
2 Nightstands, Dresser, Mirror, Chest. Must
sell, can deliver. 352-377-9846. 4-23-08-
72-6

FUTON $60 Solid Oak Mission Style. With
plush mattress $140. All brand NEW still in
box. Can deliver. 352-333-7516 4-23-72-6


Pool Table Gorgeous 8" All wood table.
Leather pockets, Italian 1" slate, carved legs.
Brand new still in crate. MUST SELL Retail
3-11- $5500. Sell $950. Can deliver 352-377-9846
4-23-72-6


Hot Tub/Spa $1295 Brand New Loaded!
Waterfall, LED lights, cupholders, 110-v
energy efficient with warranty. Free delivery,
MUST SELL 352-372-8588 4-23-72-6

Bed-FULL size pillowtop mattress & box.
New, in plastic, warr. Can del. $90 317-4031

Sofa $185 Brand new! Love seat $150 still in
pkg. Can del 352-333-7516 4-23-72-6


- Computers

CASH PAID FOR LAPTOPS
Working or not, Joel
www.pcrecycle.biz 336-0075 4-23-72-7






COMPUTERS
4-23-59-7

Computer Help Fast Gatorland Computers
House/Dorm Fast response. No waiting/
unplugging/hassels. $30 Gator discount
wilD. Certified MCSE Technicians. 338-8041.
www.GatorlandComputers.com 4-23-59-7

COMPUTER & LAPTOP REPAIRS
Network specialists
We buy computers and laptops
Working and Non-working
378-4009, 607 NW 13th Street
4-23-08-32-7


Bicycles

In the market for a new set of wheels or just
looking to add a second to that collection?
Want personalized handlebars or a fitted
seat? Check in the Alligator Classifieds

NEW& USED BIKES FOR SALE
WE REPAIR ALL BRANDS
Best Prices in Town *
SPIN CYCLE 373-3355
424 W UNIV AVE (DOWNTOWN)
3-31-18-9


OI For Sale

PARKING:
Private, Secure, Guaranteed. 60 sec to UF.
Reserve now! Reasonable rates. 352-538-
2181. Can leave mssg. 4-23-08-72-10

UF SURPLUS EQUIPMENT AUCTIONS
are underway...
bikes, computers, printers, vehicles and
more. All individuals interested in bidding go
to: http://www.surplus.ufl.edu/online/
4-23-72-10

NANTUCKET POLYLINK 3
YELLOW KAYAK
Length 14'9", width 26", depth 13", 55 Ibs,
350 Ibs capacity, cockpit 17" x 34". Priced to
sell $500. 352-335-3959 3-5-5-10

Futon never slept on. Walnut with Rose Cover
52: Euro Love Seat Double bed. Bought at
Main St. Bedding for $700 Will sell for $250
- Call 352-332-9271 3-17-08-5-10


E Motorcycles, Mopeds

** SCOOTERS **
RPM MOTORCYCLES INC
SALES, SERVICE, PARTS
Many Brands Available 518 SE 2nd St.
www.RPMmotorcycles.com 377-6974
4-23-08-72-11

*****New Scooters 4 Less*****
Motor Scooter Sales and Service!
Great Scooters, Service & Prices!
118 NW 14th Ave, Ste D, 336-1271
www.NS4L.com
4-23-08-72-11

***GatorMoto*** Our new state of
the art facility will be completed this Spring!
We have new scooters starting at $999. lyr
Warranties. We also service ALL brands of
scooters. Pickup Available. Low Labor Rates.
Free estimates. 376-6275 GatorMoto.com
4-23-08-72-11


SCOOTER SERVICE
New Scooters 4 Less has LOW service rates!
Will service any make/model. Close to UF!
Pick-ups avail $19.99 oil changes!! 336-1271
4-23-72-11

SWAMP CYCLES
CLOSE TO CAMPUS 534 SW 4th Ave.
Scooters, E-bikes, Offroad, & Accessories!!
Best Prices and Customer Service!!
www.swampcycles.com
4-23-71-11

***www. BuyMyScooter.com***
Buy A New Scooter, Buy A Used Scooter
All on one site! Check the website or call
336-1271 for more info! 4-23-08-72-11

GATORMOTO is Gainesville's number 1
service facility. We repair ALL brands of
scooters. Pickups available. Lowest labor
rates around. Quickest turnaround time. Run
by Gator Grads so we know how to treat our
customers! 376-6275 4-23-08-72-11

3 New Electric Mopeds/Scooters
Burgundy, Blue, & Black. $689/ea.
Call 352-284-7174 Other models also
available at www.relectricscooters.com
4-23-71-11

HONDA CBR F3600cc 1995, Fast & in Great
Condition. 15k miles. Many Extras must see!
$3000'OBO. 352-258-0134 3-5-10-11

2005 Yamaha YZF R6
red/black/silver. Flawless, garage kept,only
1500 mi. Carbon fiber exhaust. Call Chris
407-923-1775 3-25-08-10-11


i Autos

*FAST CASH PAID FOR ANY CARS
ORunning or note
*NEED HONDA, TOYOTA, PICKUPS
*Over 10 yr svc to UF students
OCall Don @ 215-7987 4-23-72-12

CARS -CARS Buy*Sell*Trade
Clean BMW, Volvo, Mercedes
Toyota, Honda, Nissan cars
3432 N Main St. www.carrsmith.com
CARRSMITH AUTO SALES 373-1150
4-23-72-12

OVER 50 IMPORTS UNDER $10,000
SELECT MOTOR CAR
THE YELLOW BUILDING
2715 N MAIN 377-1616
www.selectmotorcar.us
4-23-08-72-12


*FAST CASH PAID*
For any car, truck, or SUV Running or not.
'94 and up. Call Segovia 352-284-8619 4-
23-72-12

* Sun City Auto Sales
* 2000 discount off finance price
* No credit check.
* All vehicles "0" down
* 352-338-1999 4-23-08-58-12

* Sun City Auto Sales
* Buy Here/Pay Here
* More than 300 vehicles in stock
* 30 days warranty any finance
* 352-338-1999 4-23-08-58-12

* Sun City Auto Sales
* Free service until end of contract
* Any vehicle finance
* Oil change/tune up/brake job
* 352-338-1999 4-23-08-58-12

1997 MUSTANG COBRA
Leather interior, 5 SPD manual, 4.6L V8,
cobra rims, CD, cold AC, ABS, 100k mi,
very clean, Cruise control, Mack 460, head
turner! MANY EXTRASM!I Call 407 460 6884
3-7-08-28-12

* Sunrise Auto Sales
* 2000 discount off finance price
* No credit check
* All vehicles inspected by mechanic
* 352-375-9090 4-23-57-12

* Sunrise Auto Sales
* Buy here/Pay here
* More than 300 vehicles in stock
* 30 days warranty any finance
* 352-375-9090 4-23-57-12

* Sunrise Auto Sales
* Free service until end of contract
* Any vehicle finance
* Oil change/tune-up/brake job
* 352-375-9090 4-23-57-12

* Sunrise Auto Sales
0 06 Honda Civic EX, 2Dr, 39k, BIk $11,999
0 04 Honda Civic, EX, 76k, $10,999
0 04 Honda Accord, LX, 58k, $11,999
* 352-275-9090 4-23-57-12

* Sunrise Auto Sales
* 04 Honda Element, EX, $11,999
* 03 Honda Civic LX, 56k, $9999
* 02 Honda Odyssey, $9999
0 352-375-9090 4-23-57-12

* Sunrise Ato Sales
0 02 Honda Accord, EX, $8999
0 02 Honda Accord, SE, $9999
* 01 Honda Accord, SE, $7999
0 00 Honda Accord, SE, $7999 4-23-57-12


$500! POLICE IMPOUNDS! 94 EXPLORER
S Hot air, Runs good, looks great $1950. Call
HONDAS, CHEVYS, TOYOTAS, ETC. Steve 226-1973 3-17-08-20-12
For listings 800-366-9813 ext 4622
4-23-72-12 1007 I-lsnA r;ir,


JUNK CARS HAULED AWAY!
00*** FREE 0 FREE FREE* FREE***
MUST HAVE TITLE! METRO GNV ONLY
CALL DON 215-7987 4-23-72-12

CARS FROM $29/MO!
Hondas Chevys Jeeps and morel
$0 Down, 36 Months @ 8.5% apr.
For listings call 800-366-9813 ext 9765
4-23-72-12

**HEADLINERS SAGGING?**
POWER WINDOWS DON'T WORK?
On site available. Call Steve 352-226-1973
4-23-08-72-12


4 door LX, Black, 134,000 miles, great gas
mileage, $3,600 OBO, call Jessica 727 744
1266 3-6-10-12

1968 Camaro SS,396
Big Block,350 turbo trans, Automatic, Price
5800 USD, Black on Black, 18000 miles,
contact: (567) 201 4106/ david68@live.com(
(e-mail for pictures/details)
3-21-08-10-12

Subaru Forester S 1998 $4950
121k miles, forest green, manual transmis-
sion, clean, cloth interior. Well maintained,
timing belt changed, no accidents. Pics at
http://www.shenkin.org/al/albums/gj/gj Call
202-251-8637. 3-7-3-12


- a --


S* "- Ii

* "Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers" f

a h *
m b-.


F






WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2008 N ALLIGATOR, 15


Elf l Wanted


THE AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY
NEEDS VOLUNTEER DRIVERS
Transport patients to/from treatments
Must have valid driver's license,
safe driving record & attend training session.
Call 352-376-6866 ext 114 for more info.


LOCAL ARTIST NEEDS:
Gold Diamonds Gems Class Rings
ETC Top Cash $$$ or Trade *
OZZIE'S FINE JEWELRY 373-9243. 4-23-
72-13


BE AN INSPIRATION!
Take a blind lady to Mass on Sundays and for
walks and shopping as needed. We'll have
lots of fun! And you will make a new friend!
Contact 219-6948. 3-28-08-72-13


UF GRAD PAYS MORE
for gold jewelry, scrap gold, Rolex, diamonds,
guitars, etc. Top $$$. Get my offer before you
sell! Call Jim 376-8090 or 222-8090 4-23-
72-13


Aquatic volunteer partner to have fun with me
at the local Gainesville Koi Club. I am blind, &
I am interested in raising two Koi fish to enter
a show. in Gainesville by next fall, Please
help, we may have fun, 352-219-6948. 3-
28-08-25-3



Help Wanted


This newspaper assumes no responsibil-
ity for injury or loss arising from contacts
made through advertising. We suggest that
any reader who responds to advertising use
caution and investigate, the sincerity of the
advertiser before giving out personal infor-
mation or arranging meetings


CNA CLASS: $250! learn @ your own
time & pace. All you need to be a CNA
& pass the state exam is on VCR tape.
I have a 95%. PASS RATE! check it out:
www.lapcnatraining.com or 800-566-4913
4-23-72-14

LIKE TO WORK WITH LUXURY CARS?
Bright? Enthusiastic? Like people? Must be
over 22, stable work history, clean driving
record, drug-free, personal references.
www.carrsmith.com for details. 4-23-72-14


Sthie independent florida

alliga tor

AD GRAPHIC DESIGNER
The Alligator Ad Graphics Production
Department is accepting student applica-
tions for the position of Ad Graphic Designer.
Experience with Adobe InDesign, Photoshop,
Illustrator, and Acrobat is preferred, but not
required. Friendly work environment, flex-
ible schedule, with hours between 9 a.m.
and 5 p.m. M-F. A one-year commitment is
expected. Fill out application at the front desk
of the Alligator, 1105 W. University Ave. be-
tween 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. M-F. Please include
references and availability on application.
Previous applicants are welcome to reapply
with current schedule. EOE 3-18-08-5-14

Students in Accounting, Aviation, Business/
Sales and computer science needed for vari-
ous positions. Flexible schedules and com-
petitive pay. Join our team! Learn more at
www.gleim.com/employment 4-23-08-72-14

BARTENDING
$250 A DAY POTENTIAL
No experience necessary, training provided.
800-965-6520 ext 138 4-23-72-14

SECRET SHOPPERS
Needed for evaluations of
Local Stores, Restaurants and Theaters
Flexible Hours, Training Provided
Call 1-800-585-9024 ext 6254
4-23-08-72-14

GATOR DOMINOS
Earn $12 15/Hour DRIVERS
$6.79 $7.40/Hour INSIDERS
$8.00-$9.40/hr MANAGERS in training
Apply online at www.gatordominos.com/jobs
Or at any of the 6 locations. 4-23-08-72-14

Gator Domino's is growing again. We are
looking for career oriented team mem-
bers. Now hiring Assistant Managers and
future GMs. $8.00-$9.40/hr for Managers
in training. GMs $40k+. Send resumes to
Freddie@gatordominos.com. Learn more at
www.gatordominos.com 4-23-72-14

COMMERCIAL CALL CENTER
Phone reps needed ASAP Political & Corp
Campaigns. Up to $9/hr + bonus potential.
352/371-5888 X111, 4112 NW 22 Dr. 4-
23-72-14


www.gatorsneedjobs.com
Paid survey takers needed in Gainesville.
100% FREE to join. Click on surveys.
4-23-71-14

PARADIGM PROPERTIES
Leasing Specialist, PT
Sales & customer service exp.'
EOE, DFWP
220 N. Main; 352-375-2152 X301 x301
www.teamparadigm.com
4-23-72-14

DELIVERY DRIVERS up to $12/hr.
KITCHEN HELP $7.00-$7.25/hr.
CALIFORNIA CHICKEN GRILL 378-2442
4-23-72-14

INSIDE SALES PEOPLE
For a major telecom company. Flexible hours.
PT or FT. No nights or weekends. Bilingual a
plus. EEOC. 372-2051 4-23-72-14

EARN $60 THIS WEEK!
Donate Plasma & Save a Life

Best part-time job you'll ever have.
NEW DONORS
Bring this Ad and Earn an
Extra $5 on Your 2nd Donation.
DCI Biologicals 150 NW 6th St.
352-378-9204
4-23-08-72-14

PARK PLACE CAR WASH
Now Hiring FT & PT positions available.
Great environment, flexible hours. Apply in
person 7404 NW4th Blvd-Across from Home
Depot 4-23-08-72-14

Phone survey interviewers wanted.
Start work today! No sales,
opinion research only! Flexible
Scheds! Perceptive Market
Research 336-6760 ex 4081 Call Now!
4-23-65-14

**GATOR MOVING**
P/T, F/T, flex hrs. Good pay, tips
advancement. Apply 505 NW 53rd Ave B/T
Maiin NW 13 St. Bring friend to work with.
4-23-08-72-14

If You're Not Earning
$500 A Day Part Time, visit
www.YouBenefitNow.com 8-15-07-5-14

Summer Jobs
$2100
Co-ed camp
Room and Board included

Get Paid to Play!
The Florida Elks Youth Camp (FEYC) needs
male and female summer camp counselors
ages 18 and up. FEYC is an over-night camp
located off of Highway 450 in Umatilla, FL.
The camp runs June 9 July 26. Please
contact Krys Ragland at 1-800-523-1673
Ext. 251 or 253 455-4267 4-23-71-14.

$STUDENTS GET CASH ON THE SPOT$
For gently used clothing/accessories & fur-
niture. No appt.necessary! Sandy's Savvy
Chic Resale Boutique 2906 NW 13th St. 372-
1226 4-23-08-69-14

Bonuses, Benefits & Upward Mobility:
FT & PT openings for outgoing,
customer friendly sales/leasing agents
wl strong saleslclosing skills. Fax/email
resume, cover letter & avail schedule
352-376-6269 hr@trimarkproperties.com
4-23-59-14

LEASING AGENT, PT
Friendly, energetic person. Experience
preferred. 20 hrs/wk. Hourly & bonus.Great
benefits. Must be avail. weekends.Apply in
person 13400 Progress Blvd. Alachua or
Hunters Crossing Apts. DFWP 4-23-08-
65-14

Statewide Furniture Installers Needed.
Hiring Today for FT&Summer Work. Starting
$10-$12 On EXP. Hotel & Meal Comp.Fast
Advancement, Benefits, Vac & 401K. Must
Have valid FL DL. DFWP 352-373-7516.
6-3-72-14

G8RBAY.com
* Get Paid & Have Fun 0 Flexible Hrs
& Competitive $ 0 Sales Experience
Required 0 eBay exp. + Resume to
g8rbay@bellsouth.net 3-5-08-30-14


I r l HelpWanted


Earn $800-$3200 a month to drive brand
new cars with ads placed on them.
www.AdCarClub.com 4-23-59-14

ADVERTISING SALES REP
Greed is good. We're a Gainesville-area
newspaper looking for an advertising sales
rep who loves to make money. This person
needs to be able to impress a client and
speak eloquently. We need an ad represen-
tative who can not only walk into a business
and show off the paper and its Website but
also write detailed, professional letters to
clients. We need somebody who can attend
Chamber of Commerce meetings and have
no problems starting conversations with
complete strangers. Your reward for having
this sort of talent will be a great paycheck.
We pay a base salary plus a very generous
percentage of whatever you sell. You will not
be disappointed. We don't care if you're just
graduating from college or have decades
of experience. We're looking for somebody
who can dazzle us and our clients. Please
write us a great cover letter and tell us why
we should consider you. If we like what we
see, we'll contact you and answer your ques-
tions. Send your cover letter, resume and any
other supporting material to: Ad Rep Position
P 0 Box 14257, Gainesville, FL 32604 4-
23-58-14

400+ Counselor/Instructor Jobs!
3 Coed Summer Camps in PA.
Travel Paid. Top Salary.
Cool Nights & Warm Days!
1-800-488-4321, www.lohikan.com 4-23-
08-57-14

**DANCERS NEEDED**
For adult entertainment company. Make
$1000+/wk. Flex schedule. 378-3312 4-23-
55-14

GRADUATING PRE-MEDS
Clinical Assistant for full time patient care.
Will train. Email MCAT & resume to: Dr. Levy
afn22025@cox.net 4-23-47-14

House Cleaning Job
All around Cleaning & Laundry
F/T- M-F 10am-5pm $6.75 hr
Call 256-3323 for more info and interview.
3-7-08-15-14

PM NANNY NEEDED ASAP!
M-F 3pm till ?, thru Aug at least $$$
guys w/teen/pre-teen exp welcome;
Noah's Ark.Nanny e-mail resume, pix,
schedule to gnv@nanoneone.com 3-7-08-
15-14


AM NANNY NEEDED ASAP !
for 7 mon. old, M-F am to 2pm,
thru Aug. min. Noah's Ark Nanny
e-mail resume, pix schedule to
gnv@nanoneone.com 3-7-08-15-14

T/TH all day NANNY asap
must be available thru summer
Noah's Ark Nanny e-mail resume,
pix, sched. gnv@nanoneone.com 3-
15-14


Fun summer jobs! Earn Great Pay!
City of Gainesville Parks/Rec Dept.
is now hiring for seasonal recreation
and aquatics positions! Apply Online
today at www.cityofgainesville.jobs
AA/EO/DFW/Vets Pref Employer.
7-10-08-58-14

Moms and or Dads, want to fire your boss,
stay home with your kids, make residual
income, loose financial stress and gain
financial freedom. For more info contact
me at www.changingourlivesforever.info
3-21-17-14

MAGAZINEDISTRIBUTOR
Award Winning Magazine
Part-Time I Make Your Own Schedule
$9-$12 per hour
Email: Lance@frankelmedia.com 3-5-08-
10-14

TECH SUPPORT
FT/PT. Days and evenings.
Flexible hours. Send resume to
hr@gleim.com
www.gleim.com 3-6-08-10-14

Working student needed for horse farm. Start
young horses, feed, clean stalls, etc. Live in
separate house possible horse exp neces-
sary. Micanopy 352-591-2474 3-7-10-14


E l Help Wanted ill Help Wanted


Responsible, loving, fun and smart part-time
after school nanny for two elementary age
children. Pick-up from school. Transport to
activities. Help with homework. Act as role-
model. Educational experience preferred.
References required. Hours between 1:
45pm-7pm M F. Salary dependent on quali-
fications. Call 371-3420 3-5-08-5-14


WANTED: Camp Counselors
Escape to the Shenandoah Mountains of
West Virginia. Timber Ridge Camp is a Co-
ed overnight camp seeking, fun, energetic
staff, to work with children for the summer.
Top salaries, travel allowances
800-258-2267. www.trcamps.com
Email: Trcamps@aol.com 3-7-08-7-14

Looking for a dependable
Clerical worker for office. PT.
352-494-3749 3-5-08-5-14

CLERICAL POSITION FT/PT
Tues/Thurs a must
Please apply in person
Institute of Veterinary Spec
4011 NW43rd St. SuiteA 3-5-5-14

TECHNICIAN NEEDED FT/PT
Tues/Thurs a must
Please apply in person
Institute of veterinary Spec
4011 NW43rd St. SuiteA 3-5-5-14

NEED' EXTRA CASH NOW
LEARN HOW TO SUPPLEMENT YOUR
INCOME. THIS IS NOTA GET RICH QUICK
SCHEME. EARNING POTENTIAL IS
$200-$600 WEEKLY. WE HAVE 24 HOUR
CUSTOMER SERVICE TO HELP GET YOU
STARTED. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION
CALL 888-269-3581 3-6-5-14


7-08-


I


H Help Wanted


Help wanted Entry level web program-
ers, Requires PHP, Java Script, C++,
HTML, CSS, SQL, Please send resume to
lanemartin@mac.com 3-7-08-10-14

WANT TO GO TO DENTAL SCHOOL?
Dental office looking to train to work in our
office while you approach application to
dental schools. Want motivated, reliable in-
dividual that is interested in learning. Good
references provided for your applications
to school. FT or PT positions available. Ph
352-331-4700. Fax resume 352-331-4743.
3-7-08-11-14

Classic Fare Catering, located on the UF
campus, is seeking banquet staff and super-
visors. We offer flexible hours, competitive
pay and a great working environment. No
experience necessary, we will train. Apply
online at www.gatordining.com 3-17-08-
10-14

Get Paid To Play Video Games!
Earn $20-$100 to test and play new video
games, www.videogamepay.com 3-31-20-
14

ASST. PROPERTY MANAGER FT
Friendly, energetic person. Mgmt. exp.
Preferred. Good communication skills &
computer knowledge. Must be avail, week-
ends. Great benefit pkg. Apply in person
Hunters Crossing Apts. 4830 NW43rd Street
DFWP 4-23-08-45-14

Book Keeper, Home Typist as Part-time or
full-time worker.Work 2-3 hours per week
from your PC Earn $1,500-$4,500 per month.-
Experience not necessary.for more details
email at nelsonconrad47@gmail.com 3-
17-08-10-14

Five Star Pizza is now hiring delivery drivers.
Applicants should have a good driving record
& a reliable vehicle. Earn $130+ on closing
shifts. Flex hours, great environment. Apply
in person at 600 NW 75th ST. 333-7979 3-
18-10-14

Sales person wl keen interest in guns/
militarylpolice supplies. 35+hrs/wk-every
sat. 9:30-7. No calls, M&C Army Surplus,
626 NW 13th St. 3-18-10-14

HELP WANTED
25 Dynamic Individuals Needed
$8000-$12000 very flexible!
12-15 hrwk
888-464-0234 4-1-08-20-14







16, ALLIGATOR N WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5,2008


SHelp Wanted ] I Help Wanted 1 Help Wanted


Services


' I e HealthServices


Writers Wanted We?re looking for talented
writers who are looking to spark their careers
and get immediate exposure Interested?
- Email us at Careers@LexerdGroup.com
and'send along your contact information.
3-7-08-5-14

Oak Hall School is seeking energetic,
creative, and enthusiastic individuals with
a love for children to staff its summer day
camp program. Positions in the camp are
available in our preschool day camp, our
kindergarten day camp, and our elementary
school age day camp offered at Oak Hall and
at Ctip McConnell in Micanopy. Individuals
for the day camp should be available to
work daily from June 9-July 25. Interested
applicants should submit a resume to Jeff
Malloy, Oak Hall School 8009 SW 14th
Avenue Gainesville, FL 32607 or via e-
mail at jmalloy@oakhall.org by March 26,
2008. Interview information regarding group
interview on March 29th will be sent out upon
receipt. 3-26-08-14-14

Childcare Needed in my SW Home
M, W, F 8:30 AM Noon
Must have own transportation and refs.
(352)494-8848 3-6-5-14

Technology* "Center "Administrator,* PT-
Resp. for proctoring exams, adhering to se-
curity policies & scheduling appts. Customer
service experience a must. Flexible hrs
including eves. & Sats. E-mail resume and
cover letter to sylvancares@msn.com 3-6-
08-5-14

Perfect Part Time Job
Growing Call Center needs Committed Reps
M-F 6-10pm, Hourly+Comm
Earn up to $20/hr,Pd Training, Pd Weekly
Leave message: 352-377-2573 3-20-08-
10-14

SUNFLOWER HEALTH FOOD
Must have industry knowledge w/ nutritional
or bodybuilding experience. 87 SW 34th ST
3-6-08-5-14

NANNY NEEDED
For 2 adorable infants 10 mon & 7
mon old Wed 9am 3pm, Th 5 9
pm, now through Aug. Email resume to
momsterjsr@yahoo.com 3-20-10-14

SUMMER CAMP JOB FAIR
Counselors, Food Service,& Activity Leaders
Saturday, March 8th 10am 2pm
Florida Sheriffs Caruth Camp
14770 SE US Highway 19
Inglis, FL 34449
352-447-2259
www.youthranches.org
EOE/DFWP 3-7-08-5-14

Swim Coach
Columbia Swim Team in Lake City is seek-
ing swim coaches for its age group seasonal
& year-around teams. Must be able to pro-
vide competitive stroke coaching. Salary is
negotiable. Contact Todd at 386-288-8059.
3-7-08-5-14

SUMMER JOBS: Recreation Camp
Counselors/Supervisors for summer recre-
ation program 6/09/08-8/01/08 for children
ages 5-14. WSI/Lifeguard and Maintenance
Aides (5/08-9/08). Exp desirable. City of
Plantation (west of Ft Lauderdale) 400
NW 73 Ave, Plantation, FL 33317 or
www.plantation.org to download application.
3-7-5-14

Artists/Craftsmen, PT/FT, the following skills
a plus: painters (faux finish, mural, airbrush),
graphic, sculptors (faux rocks), carpenters,
fiberglass (laminate, chop gun). Some posi-
tions may required travel. Fax to 352-336-
2913 or mail PO Box 143203, Gville 32614
3-7-08-5-14

Attention Smokers! Smokers between the
ages of 18 and 50 are needed to participate
in a study on decision making and smoking.
You could earn $8/hour for your participation.
Contact the UF Smoking Lab and Clinic at
352-273-2151 or ufsmokelab@hotmail.com.
3-21-10-14

LIFE COACH needed for high function-
ing 16 y.o. boy with developmental issues.
Spend time each day over spring break 3/16-
28. Ref required. $8-9 per hour plus mileage.
Call 246-2353 3-7-08-5-14


UF GRAD STUDENT SEEKS ARTIST
to illustrate a variety of children's books for
possible publication. Please call 856-816-
6696. 3-7-08-5-14

PIZZA MAKER
for traditional hand tossed New Jersey style
pizza,EXPERIENCE REQUIRED,part time
hrs, every Thurs & Fri,SW GNV,please call
745-0456. 3-24-08-10-14

SALES/CUSTOMER SERVICE POSITION
AVAILABLE
30yr Horticultural Company needs rep
to cover either SFL or CFL. Auto, ben-
efits, & excellent pay. Email resume to
dennis@hillarypeat.com 3-31-15-14

ATTENTION PRE-LAW & LAW STUDENTS!
Kaplan Test Prep & Admissions is currently
hiring LSAT Teachers & Tutors. Kaplan offers
flexible schedules, competitive pay, extensive
training and a benefits package for part-time
employees and their dependents after just 30
days of service. Applicants must be willing to
commit to at least one year of employment.
For more information, please call 1-800-
KAPTEST or email katherine.puller@kapla
n.com. 3-17-08-5-14

Looking for
MATH & SCIENCE TUTOR
for a 7th & a 9th grader. Call for details 352-
331-4638 3-17-08-5-14

Florida Museum of Natural History has open-
ings for two front line ticket sellers & two tick-
et takers. P/T 20 hrs wkdays/wkends. $7/hr.
Email resumes to wcoleman@flmnh.ufl.edu
or fax to 352-846-0253 3-24-08-10-14

COOKS WANTED
Benefits & competitive pay. Flexible hourAp-
ply in person Ruby Tuesday. 3-20-8-14

Valets & Parking Attendants Shands
Hospital. Exc cust service skills/clean driving
record req. 1st, 2nd, 3rd shifts avail, FT & PT.
Excellent pay! Perfect for students 1-888-
'463-1954, Ext. 205 to apply. EOE, DFWP
3-7-08-4-14

NANNY NEEDED W,TH,F ASAP,
20 TO 25 HRS 2 kids, $10.50hr
Noah's Ark Nanny e-mail resume,pix,
schedule to gnv@nanoneone.com 3-19-
08-7-14

NANNY NEEDED T,W,TH ASAP,
25 TO 30 HRS 2 kids, $10.50hr
Noah's Ark Nanny e-mail resume,pix,
schedule to gnv@nanoneone.com 3-19-
08-7-14

UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY
Screen Businesses for Cash Advances
with no Credit Checks
Huge earnings potential
Leave Message: 352.275.9548 3-7-08-3-14

NEEDED: Afterschool nanny for two great
kids, ages 7 & 10. Tues, Wed, & Friday after-
noons. $9/hr. Reliable transportation needed
& references required. Must be willing to
have a background check done. Email re-
sume to wslayton@cox.net or call 352-381-
9971. 3-7-08-3-14

BENTO CAFE
Now hiring experienced sushi and wok chefs.
Flexible hours PT or FT. Apply in person at
Newberry location next to Gator's Dockside
and Moe's. 4-8-08-20-14

Customer service rep for local Home Audio/
Video store. Applicant should be personable,
responsible, detail oriented and have good
communication skills. Position is part time 10/
12 to 6pm 5 days per week and may include
Saturday. $7.50 per hour. Applicant can
email resume to eworld@bellsouth,.net or
fax to 352-332-5668 Attn. Mark 3-7-3-14

HEALTHY ENERGY
Healthy ENERGY DRINK just launched!
Reps wanted for nat'l expansion. Part-time.
Info:1-800-969-8486 VPureEnergy.com.
Kathleen@VPureEnergy.com 4 FREE cans!
3-21-08-8-14

HIRING EXPERIENCED WAITSTAFF.
Apply in person, 39th Ave by Santa Fe,
LaFiesta Mexican Restaurant 3-21-8-14


Mom's Helper for 3 year-old. Duties include
some pre-school pick-up, playing, reading,
etc. To help mom with 'kid chores'. Schedule
flexible. $8. per hour. e-mail resume to
tlane@marketech.us 3-7-08-3-14


Babysitter
Wanted for afterschool & fulltime in the sum-
mer. onecoolmom@cox.net 3-7-08-3-14


a Services

IMPORT AUTO REPAIR.BMW, Mercedes,
Porsche, Volvo, VW, Honda, Toyota, Nissan,
Mazda. Quality craftsmanship, reasonable
prices, near UF, AAA approved 378-7830
www.carrsmith.com 4-23-72-15

HYPNOTIST Stop smoking. Improve mem-
ory & concentration. Elminate bad habits.
Past life regression. Learn self hypnosis. Low
Student Rates. Leonard Umans AAPH, NGH
certified 379-1079 4-23-72-15

EVERGLADE EQUESTRIAN CENTER
The countryclub for horses & owners.
Customer lounge w/full kitchen & bath. 250' x
160' riding ring, round pen &jump paddock.
Lessons. 30 acres, 40 matted stalls, 19 sepa-
rate paddocks. 24-hr security, 352-591-3175
everglade-equestrian.com 4-23-72-15

Want to be a CNA? Don't want to wait?
Express Training Services can get you certi-
fied under 3 wks! Hands-on exp, no videos.
Day/eve/wkend. Class sizes limited. 338-
1193 for details. expresstrainingservices.com
4-23-07-72-15

PERSONAL TRAINING 300
Personal and Group Training
Flexible Scheduling Exclusive Facility
Call for a free workout
339-2199
4-23-72-15

TLC HORSEBOARD
All facilities & amenities, quality instruc-
tion; 15 minutes from UF. Jan at 376-7762.
Greathouse Equestrian Ctr. 8-13-72-15

** GATOR MOVING & STORAGE **
Ask about the student special!
10 Free Boxes ($35 value!).
FL Reg MI 19 One item or a houseful!
Call Now! 352-374-4791, 800-797-6766
4-23-08-72-15


INJURED?
Law Office of Robert Dixon
Call 352-870-0917
4-23-72-15

**AWARDS & PERSONALIZED GIFTS**
Plaques Name Badges 0 Cups Etc.
Best Selection In Town
www.signpower.com
SignMasters 335-7000
3-5-60-15


***GREAT BANNERS & SIGNS***
Custom Posters Exhibits 0 Awards
Top Quality 0 Fast Service Low Prices
www.signpower.com
SignMasters 335-7000
3-5-60-15


LAUNDRY SERVICE
Same day drop off service
Wash, Dry & Fold. 65 cents/lb
A Best Coin Laundry
2411 SW 13th St, 352-336-0720
3-7-42-15


RECORDAHITAT TAYLOR MADE MUSIC
Recording Studio. Bands, singers, rappers.
3 hour Intro Rock Block $100. Free set-up.
Pro Tools HD. Live rooms, good ears. Ask for
Glenn 374-9230 or 283-0630 3-19-08-30-15


Pineforest Farm Quality Horse BoardingI
20 acres located in Alachua. Excellent care
in a safe and family oriented enviornment.
Call Anna for details (352) 318-9622 or visit
us online @ www.pineforestfarm.com 3-20-
08-29-15


T-SHIRT SCREEN PRINTING
Greeks-Sports-Clubs-Bands
*Call or Stop by for a QUOTE*
MONSTER PRESS 373-3355
424 W UNIVAVE (in Spin Cycle)
3-31-18-15

PROFESSIONAL
RESEARCH & WRITING SERVICES
HELP WITH ALL SUBJECTS
customessay.com 1-888-345-8295 3-20-
08-10-15


DIVORCE
Sharon Ruth, Esq.
(352)494-8848
3-21-11-15


WANT TO LOSE WEIGHT FAST
AND MAKE MONEY DOING IT?
Call (352)390-7413 for more info.
3-7-5-15

PADDOCK WITH SHELTER, 2 ACRES
Private. Watermelon Pond 2000 acre state
riding trails. FREE dog board w/horse. 7 mi
S. of Newberry. RV spot ok. 330-329-8834,
writer777@att.net 3-21-10-15

DATA RECOVERY by DATATRIANGLE
HARD DRIVE CRASH? General Repair
Professional, CCE Certified, and Reliable
$35/Hour, Only $30 minimum charge
http://www.datatriangle.com 352-231-3300
5-13-33-15


- ~ C


0 0


"Copyrighted Material

* Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"



.- Va
---





*--- -' 'I


- *

Ma


*: w


F


All Women's Health Center
ABORTION
Free Pregnancy Test
RU-486 Available
378-9191
www.abortiongainesville.com
4-23-72-16


***CHOOSE LIFEIIO
Adoption confidential & compassionate
adoption advice. Expenses paid if needed.
www.AmericankidzAdoption.com FL Lic
#1107-41 Toll Free 866-303-1573 4-23-
71-16


THE TRUE YOUI
Lose 8-15 pounds in 4 weeks
Only $119!
Gain muscle while you lose fat
Groups forming now. 339-2199
4-23-72-16


ABORTION/ABORTION BY PILL (RU-486)
Student Discount.
Bread & Roses Women's Health Center
www.breadroses.com 352-372-1664
4-23-72-16


RED EYE & DISCHARGE ?
Research participants receive study related
examination, investigational drug and pay-
ment. Call Dr. Levy NOW 331-4040 4-23-
72-16


o






WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2008 E ALLIGATOR, 17


-i ael-t Services personals I- : C section s I J v Event Notices' ] Entertainment -
-- I'.- *''; W ' S'** -, * J ^ __ __ -* -' !Pe E---- ---- ---t


First Care of Gainesville
Urgent-Care / Walk-In Medical Clinic
4343 W. Newbery Rd, Ste #10, 373-2340
Students Welcome-No Appointment Needed
Most Insurances Accepted. 4-23-72-16


ANONYMOUS
HIV ANTIBODY TESTING
Alachua County Health Dept. Call
334-7960 for app't (optional $20 fee)


Want to make a connection? RUNNING CAMP
Place your ad here to look for someone to Reduce your mile time.
share a common interest with or for your 7min. 6min. or run an
true love outstanding 5min. mile.
352 262-0595 3-6-20-20


SHOTGUN SHOOTING SPORTS
Open To Public Wed-Fri-Sat-Sun
1 PM to Dusk -Skeet-Trap-5 Stand
Bunker- Gun Rental- Shells- 352-372-1044
gatorskeetandtrap.com 4-23-72-21 ->


CLINICAL HYPNOSIS For Behavior Change
& Trauma Resolution. Including- Smoking; FLASHBACKS
Stress; Sports; FLASHBACKS
Relationship/Loss; PTSD; Sexual Trauma. Buys and sells modern casual clothing. 509
Institute For Clinical Hypnosis, 665-0928 NW 10th Ave. 375-3752. We pay cash. Open
3-26-08-40-16 10-6. We buy till 5.. 4-23-72-18

Expert help available 24/7 for quitting
smoking. Call the Florida Quitline: 1-877-U- *Family Chiropractic*
CAN NOW (1-877-822-6669). Formal attire Since 1977. Two blocks from U.F.
not required for service! 3-7-08-5-16 373-7070
4-23-72-18
Attention Smokers! Do you want to quit
smoking? Smokers are needed to par-
ticipate in a smoking cessation study. You SAVE ON RAYBAN/SUNGLASSES
will be compensated for your participation. U i O "vri
If interested, call the UF Smoking Lab University Opticians
and Clinic at 352-273-2151 or email us at 300 SW4thAve. 378-4480
ufsmokelab@gmail.com. 3-21-08-10-16 4-23-72-18


Young doctor looking for girlfriend 18-28
for traveling & good times. Send photos &
information to: drtomas2@yahoo.com 3-
31-08-33-19 U Entertainment


,I Event Notices


IS YOUR BUSINESS, CLUB OR
ORGANIZATION HAVING AN EVENT?
DO YOU HAVE A SPECIAL
ANNOUNCEMENT? PLACE YOUR AD
HERE AND GET IT NOTICED


Fitness Bootcamp
4 week camp
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S ports
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5,2008


ALLIGATOR
www.alligatorSports.org


UF faces important


matchup with Vols


* AN UPSET AGAINST NO. 4
TENNESSEE COULD CLINCH
AN NCAA TOURNAMENT BID.

By DANNY KLEIN
Alligator Staff Writer
dklein@alligator.org

Some teams search forever to
prove themselves.
It isn't common for fate to fall
into your own hands.
Yet, here on March 5, in their
most important regular-season
game in recent memory, the
Gators hold the key to their post-
season lives.
When UF (21-8, 8-6
Southeastern Conference) hosts
No. 4 Tennessee (26-3, 12-2 SEC)
Wednesday night at 9, a chance to
play in this year's March Madness
will be on the line.
"Everybody knows our lives
are at stake here," forward Adam
Allen said.
Allen said the team remains
confident but aware of how twist-
ed the road will become if UF fails
to pull the upset.
It's unlikely the Gators will
earn a bid to this year's NCAA
Tolgiament with a .500 confer-


ence record something they
will face if they lose.
It will become do-or-die on
Sunday, when UF heads to the
hostile stomping grounds of al-
ways-stingy Kentucky.
For such a young, inexperi-
enced team, a game of that stature
on the road might not be the ideal
situation UF coach Billy Donovan
wants.
"I think there are a lot of
things that you're trying to piece
together and trying to take a stab
in the dark at it," Donovan said.
"These guys have never experi-
enced this."
If UF can pull off the unlikely
win, all the mounting questions
and anxieties of late will melt
away.
Win and you're in, it's as sim-
ple as that.
As storybook as it sounds,
however, the task is far from easy.
When these teams last met on
Feb. 5, the Gators hung close for
most of the contest before the
Volunteers wiped the floor with
UF in the final minutes.
The scored ended up a deceiv-
ing 104-82.

SEE HOOPS, PAGE 19


Andrew Stanfll. Alligator StaHl
UF forward Adam Allen fouls Auburn's DeWayne Reed during the Gators' 72-56 win on Jan. 12 in the
O'Connell Center. He knows tonight's game with No. 4 Tennessee will be key to UF's NCAA hopes.


Should fans rush the court?


Talk about coming full circle.
It was only two years ago that
Tennessee stopped an upstart
UF team from running its record to
18-0 and ascending to the top of the
national polls. -
I still vividly remember see-
ing that sea of pukey orange spill
out onto the floor of Knoxville's
Thompson-Boling Arena like a
newly opened-and violently shaken
bottle of Sunkist.
Two national titles later, only
Walter Hodge remains from that
UF team, but the Gators are still
having all sorts of problems with
the Volunteers. In fact, Tennessee
has won four of the last five games
between the two schools,
And when the SEC rivals square
off in the O'Connell Center tonight,


it will be a
comp 1 et.e
role reversal
for the two
teams.
Bryan Jones No. 4
Bryan Out Loud Tennessee
bjones@alligator.org will enter a
hostile road
environment
flexing its muscles, while the Gators
will try to prove that they, too, are
still relevant in the college basket-
ball landscape.
So if the Gators pull off the upset
tonight, should Gators fans storm
the court?
Jeremy Foley and Billy Donovan

SEE BRYAN PAGE 19


UF BASEBALL

Gators smoke Camels


By KARL HYPPOLITE
Alligator Writer
khyppolite@alligator.org

It was a night of firsts for Matt den
Dekker.
He got his first career start at pitcher, his
first strikeout, his first walk and his first
career hit batter. Unfortunately for him, he
didn't stay in the game long enough to record
his first career win. The sophomore pitched 2
2/3 innings and allowed five hits and three
walks with just one strikeout.
UF (7-2) on the other hand, earned its
seventh victory of the season after shellacking
Campbell 15-3 in the first half of their two-
game series Tuesday night. The Gators and
the Fighting Camels (3-4) complete the series
Wednesday at 4 p.m.
Den Dekker's performance was shaky at
best, but the Gators expect him to play a key
role in the pitching staff.


"I'm definitely going to be needed down
the road to help the team," den Dekker said.
"I've got to give them some innings with us
playing four or five games a week, so I've
definitely got to be able to give us some in-
nings."
"I'm definitely going to be needed
down the road to help the team."
Matt den Dekker
UF sophomore pitcher

The start of the game was delayed by a
half-hour because of rain, but that didn't
keep the Gators from scorching McKethan
Stadium.
Every UF starter recorded a hit, and the
Gators finished with 17 hits on the night.
Despite what the final score suggests,
the game didn't start very smoothly for the
SEE BASE, PAGE 19


SMen's basketball:
No. 6 Duke vs. Virginia
ESPN, 7 p.m.
INBA:
Phoenix vs. Denver
ESPN, 9 p.m.


Men's basketball:
(15) Purdue
Ohio State
NBA:
Toronto
Orlando


80 (OT)


Today's question: Will you rush the court if the UF men's basketball team defeats
No. 4 Tennessee?


Thursday's question: Do you think Nick Calathes and Billy Dono- Yes
van look alike? No


Percent (Votes)
65% (101)
35% (55)
156 TOTAL VOTES






WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5, 2008 U ALLIGATOR, 19


Saints persevere through rain, sweep doubleheader


* SFCC HAD LOST SIX STRAIGHT.

By SHANNON MCCARTHY
Alligator Writer

After losing six straight games, Santa Fe
Community College desperately needed a
win but almost didn't have the chance thanks
to some inclement weather.
When the rain finally lifted, however, the
Saints ended the losing streak and marked
two in the win column after sweeping a dou-
bleheader against Kellogg (Mich.) Community
College on Tuesday afternoon.
"We fought really hard to get these games
in, and it was definitely worth it," SFCC coach
Johnny Wiggs said. "We needed something
like this to get our confidence going before
conference play started."


The Saints defeated the Bruins 11-3 and 6-5
to improve to 14-9 in the last leg of their non-
conference schedule.
Game One saw two rain delays and was
nearly postponed, but the weather finally
cleared and the Saints scored three runs in the
fifth inning to take a 5-3 lead. The sixth inning
saw another offensive explosion, resulting in
six additional runs.
Catcher Jordan Hollis ignited the Saints
offense by going 3 for 4 at the plate with four
RBIs and was a home run shy of hitting for the
cycle in Game One.
In the second game, SFCC mounted an-
other comeback after trailing 4-1 through five
innings. Hollis once again played a key part
in the rally, stroking a first-pitch single to send
home shortstop Tyler Cook, the first of four
Saints to cross the plate in the sixth inning.
The Bruins tied the game in the top of the


"We needed something to get our
confidence back up. We came out
today and just played together."
Jordan Hollis
SFCC catcher

seventh inning.
In the bottom of the seventh with two outs
and a runner on third base, right fielder Andy
Mee took ball one from Kellogg's Tyler Kelly,
who mishandled the return throw from the
catcher, allowing the Saints' Callahan Hood to
trot home with the winning run.
It may not have been the textbook ending,
but SFCC was happy to come away with both
wins.
"The team was down and we were hum-
bled a bit after losing six straight," Hollis said.


"We needed something to get our confidence
back up. We came out today and just played
together. Everyone contributed and we got
exactly what we needed." $
Eight pitchers took the mound for the
Saints on Tuesday, with only last Sunday's
starter, Matt Hinkle, and the starters for this
weekend, Andy Mee and John Lambert, un-
available. The plan made sure every pitcher is
fresh for the start of conference play.
After seeing solid pitching performances as
well as timely hitting from his dub, the Saints'
coach feels his team is ready to take on iieon-
ference foes.
"Every time we take the field I feel like
we're going to win," Wiggs said. "This is one
of the most talented dubs that I've had. I still
believe that. We may not have played as well
as I'd hoped at times, but we're on the right
track now."


Tennessee guard Lofton makes his final appearance in Gainesville


HOOPS, from page 18

UF showed it could play the
up-tempo, high-octane game
Tennessee loves to play, but it
didn't play it well enough.
The Gators were doomed by
fatigue and a lack of depth, which
was exposed in those final few
minutes, where Donovan felt his
team ran out of gas.
UF's ability to hang with one of
the nation's best helped boost the
confidence of many of its players.

BRYAN, from page 18


would certainly prefer the fans cheer from
a distance, and the SEC offers UF 25,000
good reasons to do just that.
My guess is storming the court probably
won't be a viable option for Gators fans, as
uniformed officers will likely make it quite
an obstacle. Let's hope we can avoid a re-
peat of the Tasergate scandal.
But given the right situation, would
Gators fans engage in that kind of display,
anyway, or are they too proud for that?


They remain confident heading
into Wednesday night's contest
and feel they can steal this win.
Tennessee has won four of
the last five against UF and was
ranked No. 1 last week.
"This time, it's going to be a
40-minute game, and we have
to come with the right mindset,"
Allen said. "We know we can play
with them. It's just a matter of do-
ing it for the whole game."
Defense will be a major con-
cern for the Gators.
Tennessee is the only team to


break the centu-
ry mark against
UF this season
and did so by at-
tempting a stag-
gering 71 shots
from the field.
Guards Chris
Loton Lofton and
JaJuan Smith hit
six 3-pointers each, and four play-
ers scored 10 or more points. .
With the way the Gators are
shooting lately, UF doesn't want
to get caught in another high-


Regardless, whether UF fans storm the
court or even whether the Gators win to-
night isn't the point. What is significant is
that the fans would even have a reason to
rush the court in the first place.
When was the last time any Gators fan
with a blood alcohol level less than three
times the legal limit even thought about
storming the court? UF has been such a
proud program lately that being even a
slight underdog at the O-Dome has been
extremely rare.
The only case in recent history where
fans might have had a reason to consider


scoring affair.
UF connected on just 36.1 per-
cent of its attempts in Saturday's
loss to Mississippi State.
"Well clearly we're playing, if
not the best team, one of the best
teams in the country," Donovan
said. "There's a lot for us to get
prepared for in playing these
guys."
One positive is that UF will
face Lofton for the final time
during the regular season. The
senior will be making his farewell
Gainesville appearance.


leaving their seats was at a 2005 game
against Kentucky. The Wildcats, similar
to what Tennessee has done to the Gators
lately, seemed to have UF's number until
that point, claiming eight straight victories
against the Orange and Blue.
The Gators won that game which es-
sentially served as a changing of the guard
in the SEC and senior David Lee finally
got his first win against the Wildcats.
But the fans didn't storm the court.
Judging by what I heard from a reporter
who was sitting on press row at the time,
it's a good thing they didn't. Let's just say


In two games at the O'Connell
Center, Lofton has scored 22
and 16 points. In this year's win
against UF in Knoxville, he added
26.
Lofton is known for his diffi-
cult shot-making and unconscious
demeanor on the court. Allen
joked about switching roles with
the Tennessee star and imagined
taking some of the shots Lofton is
revered for.
"I probably wouldn't see the
court for the rest of the game,"
Allen said.


the police were very determined to keep
fans off the floor.
But while that truly was a marquee win
for UF, a victory tonight would be more
than just a symbolic achievement.
The Gators desperately need a win to
avoid the NIT, and this is their bestlp-
portunity to make -an impression on the
NCAA selection committee.
A late-season victory against a top-five
team would be the perfect lead note on the
Gators' postseasoln resume.
That would be something that could be
appreciated from the comfort of your seat.


Bullpen throws six scoreless


BASE, from page 18


- .. .


. .. i.
e'. ;..- .-


UF pitcher Matt den Dekker throws a pitch during the first inning of the Gators' 15-3 win against Camp-
bell at McKethan Stadium on Tuesday night.


Gators. Den Dekker struggled
with his control in the first inning,
allowing three singles, a walk and
three runs.
"I've got to throw my pitches
for strikes," den Dekker said. "I've
got to throw them for strikes early.
That's the key to getting better;
working on some things, throwing
for more strikes and having better
command."
Den Dekker also contributed at
the plate, finishing 3 of 5 with two
RBIs and scoring three runs.
Avery Barnes was nearly .flaw-
less.
The left fielder finished the game
3 for 3, scored four runs, drew two
walks and stole a base.
"I'm just trying to stay focused
up at the plate," he said. "I'm trying
to have a quality at-bat every time.
My plan every at-bat is to try and
get on base for my teammates."
Barnes, who leads the team


with a .438 batting average, scored
UF's first run in the bottom of the
first on a Cole Figueroa sacrifice
fly to left-center field. He didn't
wait very long to score again. The
sophomore scored the go-ahead
run in the bottom of the second on
a Figueroa two-run double to right
field. That was Figueroa's only hit
of the game, but he still managed to
drive in four runs.
Senior Josh Edmondson (1-0)
earned the win for the Gators. The
senior pitched 4 1/3 innings, al-
lowed just two hits and struck out
three batters.
Entering the season, UF coach
Kevin O'Sullivan said tha- UF
would be reliant on stellar play
from its defense to make up for a
pitching staff that lacks a power
pitcher. UF's defense responded
Tuesday, turning five double plays.
"We've got to play good de-
fense," O'Sullivan said. "If we do
that, we've got a chance to stay in
every game."







20, ALLIGATOR E WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5,2008


Butler falls short of SEC Coach of the Year honor


By PHIL KEGLER
Alligator Staff Writer
<* pkegler@alligator.org

The person who started the talk about
Amanda Butler possibly earning confer-
ence coach of the year ended up beating
her out for it.
LSU coach Van Chancellor earned
Southeastern Conference Coach of the Year
hor-Is, the league announced Tuesday.
UF junior forward Marshae Dotson, the
only Gator recognized, was named to the
All-SEC First Team. All awards were voted
on by the league's coaches.
Butler made a big turnaround in her
first year with UF (17-12). Last season, the
Gators finished with a dismal 9-22 record,
resulting in Carolyn Peck's firing.
Only two teams made four-game im-
provements upon their conference record
from a year ago Butler's Gators (6-8
from 2-12) and Chancellor's Tigers (14-0
from 10-4).
Of course, Chancellor has the advantage
of coaching SEC Player of the Year Sylvia
Fowles, who topped Tennessee's Candace
Parker for the award. Fowles also won de-
fensive player of the year honors.
Chancellor sang Butler's praises after
UF's 85-71 home loss to LSU on Feb. 3.
Despite the wide margin -of victory, the
Gators forced Chancellor to substitute back
in some of his starters after they cut a 27-
point lead to 15 in the second half.
"Give Florida credit for coming back,"
Chancellor said at the time. "Coach Butler's
really got them playing hard, playing
tough. ... They had a lot of fight about them.
They have a lot of scrap. I can remember
when she played here, and she was gritty
and ,ugh, and this team has exactly her
personality, and I think she's done a great
job. (She's) going to be a strong candidate
for coach of the year."
In the end, LSU's perfect conference
record gave Chancellor the edge. His No. 7


Tigers (25-4) handed No. 3 Tennessee (27-2,
13-1.SEC) its only conference loss on Feb.
14 in a 78-62 decision in Knoxville that the
Volunteers entered ranked No. 1.
Tennessee coach Pat Summitt, who
has 974 career victories and seven NCAA
Championships to her name, also noticed
good things happening in Gainesville.
"Amanda has really gotten this group
to play together," Summitt said on Feb. 27.
"They are playing with a lot of intensity.
For a new coach going in and being able to
bring that out, that is important."
"I see a commitment to each other on
the floor and how they share the basketball.
She has three players averaging double
figures and a couple more right there, so
she has balance. That is a difference in what
I've seen in the team this year."
"(The Gators) had a lot of fight
about them. They have a lot of
scrap. I can- remember when
(Butler) played here, and she was
gritty and tough, and this team
has exactly her personality."
Van Chancellor
LSU women's basketball coach

When asked about being in the running
for the award at her weekly press confer-
ence Monday morning, Butler was taken
aback and deflected praise.
"I have not even considered that," Butler
said Monday. "There's so many coaches in
this league that have done more in my
opinion and deserve that more than I do."
She did, however, follow that up by
admitting it was a compliment to even be
considered for the award, citing Chancellor,
Summitt and Vanderbilt's Melanie Balcomb
as great coaches with the league.
"If that's what someone thinks, that's
an honor for someone even to mention
that and bring that question up, knowing
the coaches that are in this league," Butler


said.
The Gators enter the SEC Tournament as
the No. 7 seed and will face South Carolina
in the first round at 3:30 p.m. Thursday.
The 5-foot-11 Dotson will be a big factor
in how far the team progresses.
The junior leads the Gators in scoring
(14.1 points per game), rebounding (8.4)
and has nine double-doubles. Dotson
eclipsed the 1,000-point plateau earlier this
season, becoming the 20th Gator to do so.
She has slowly progressed her way up
the SEC award teams. Dotson made the
SEC All-Freshman Team two years ago, and
last season, she was named to the All-SEC
Second Team despite UF's lowly record.
Before this season began, the league


coaches made her a preseason All-SEC
Second Team selection along with junior
guard Sha Brooks. Dotson's performance
throughout the season elevated her to the
eight-player top team, while Brooks did not
receive mention in the postseason awards.
Despite her short stature, her stats match
up well with other taller post players. In
conference games, Dotson ranks third in
field-goal percentage, sixth in rebounding
and eighth in scoring.
Dotson said Monday that she was happy
Butler was being considered for SEC Coach
of the Year at the very school where she
once played.
"It brings a lot of credibility and re-
spect," Dotson said.


Alligator File Photo
UF coach Amanda Butler, shown here during the Gators' 67-63 win against Robert
Morris on Nov. 12, has led the Gators to an eight-win turnaround so far this season.


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