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The Independent Florida alligator
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028290/00221
 Material Information
Title: The Independent Florida alligator
Portion of title: Florida allgator
Alligator
Alternate Title: University digest
University of Florida digest
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some col.) ; 36 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Campus Communications, Inc.
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Creation Date: March 30, 2006
Publication Date: 1973-
Frequency: daily (except saturdays, sundays, holidays and exam periods, aug.-apr.); semiweekly (may-july)
daily
normalized irregular
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Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates: 29.665245 x -82.336097 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Additional Physical Form: Also available online.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 65, no. 75 (Feb. 1, 1973)-
General Note: "Not officially associated with the University of Florida."
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Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000470760
oclc - 13827512
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System ID: UF00028290:00221
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Preceded by: Florida alligator

Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Main: Opinions
        page 6
    Main continued
        page 7
        page 8
    Main: The Avenue
        page 9
        page 10
        page 11
        page 12
        page 13
        page 14
        page 15
    Main: Classifieds
        page 16
        page 17
        page 18
        page 19
        page 20
        page 21
        page 22
        page 23
    Main: Sports
        page 24
        page 25
        page 26
        page 27
        page 28
    Scaling the Ivory Tower
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
        page 6
        page 7
        page 8
Full Text



the independent florida




illi ato
Not officially associated with the University of Florida Published by Campus Communications, Inc. of Gainesville, Florida
We Inform. You Decide.


r
THURSDAY, MARCH 30,2006
THURSDAY, MARCH 30, 2006


Burning pot



trips alarm

* SFCC STUDENT MONDO LUIS CAMINAS
ACCIDENTLY SET OFF A FIRE ALARM AFTER
BURNING A POT OF PASTA RONI.

By MARIA LAVERGHETTA
Alligator Writer

A burning pot of Pasta Roni angel-hair noodles
triggered a fire alarm and caused a frenzy in a
University Commons apartment Wednesday.
SFCC student Mondo Luis Caminas, 21, rushed
around his apartment passing by the burning pot on
the stove as the fire alarm sounded.
Standing in his smoke-filled apartment, he said
the pot was the least of his worries
when the alarm started ringing. So was
NewS the thought of his house burning down,
he said.
Caminas was concerned with only
one thing the burning "kryp" in his hand and
what he was going to do with it.
He had just bought a fresh batch of marijuana, and
he said hiding it and his multiple bongs from police
was the only way he could keep all of it and not get
arrested.
"Burning to death wouldn't be cool," said
Caminas.
In a room decorated with 32 liquor bottles on the
windowsills and more than 500 bottle caps pushed
into the ceiling, Caminas said that for him, acciden-
tally burning things was nothing new.
A few years ago while in the Army, he set his bar-
racks on fire when he forgot about something in the
oven, he said.
"I'm kind of a ditzy person," Caminas said.
After he got out of the Army in October 2004, he
started attending SFCC, but his habits followed him
to Gainesville.
"If you let me, I'll bur water," Caminas said. "I
SEE FIRE, PAGE 4


Concrete canoes defy the odds


By JESSICA DUCHENE
Alligator Contributing Writer

Sanded, smoothed and stained
orange and blue, a concrete canoe
made by six UF civil engineer-
ing students will race on Lake
Wauburg on Friday.
The UF chapter of the American


Society of Civil Engineers is com-
peting in the Regional Concrete
Canoe Competition, a three-day
event starting Thursday as a part
of the ASCE 2006 Southeastern
Regional Conference. UF hosts
the competition this year and
welcomes all competing schools
within the Southeastern Regional


Conference.
"The purpose of the competi-
tion is to make a concrete canoe
that floats, races and hopefully
wins," said Reuben Franklin, a
fifth-year UF civil engineering stu-
dent and member of the concrete


SEE CANOES. PAGE 4


Mike Burns, Anthony Dion and James Gravesen pose next to a concrete canoe they made for a race at Lake
Wauburg on Friday.


FINAL "i

Testing during Final Four leaves students crying foul


By STEPHANIE SHAEFFER
Alligator Contributing Writer

Brittany Bustle rushed to eBay
to bid on tickets to the NCAA
Final Four.
After seven hours, she won
her chance to see the Gators play
in Indianapolis.
But almost $1,000 in expenses
later, she remembered she had a


Forward Chris
Richard attributes
UF's defensive in-
tensity to assistant
coach Larry Shyatt.
After 31 years of
coaching, the well-
traveled assistant
has finally reached
the Final Four. See
story, pg. 28.


biology test next Monday the
day of the final game.
Bustle is not the only one with
such problems the extended
Final Four weekend will be a
major distraction for all UF bas-
ketball fans.
UF's Student Senate attempt-
ed to acknowledge the situation
Tuesday night, when a resolution
was proposed to suggest that


faculty allow
all students
attending the
Final Four to
Stake make-up
exams. The pro-
posal was shot
Talenfeld down.
Sen. Sasha
Talenfeld said the resolution was
not passed because it isn't fair to


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


* A record number
of students logged
on to vote Tuesday
and Wednesday
in SFCC's an-
nual Student
Government elec-
tion. See story,
pg. 5.


students who cannot afford to at-
tend the game.
Luckily for Bustle, her teacher,
Ted Schuur, will not penalize her
for going to the games.
For other students making the
trip to Indianapolis, they must
arrange make-up tests on an indi-
vidual basis with their teachers.
Richard Lutz, professor of
Principles of Marketing, sent


*' Merve Kavakci,
a former member
of.the Turkish
Parliament, spoke
out Wednesday
against the ban-
ning of head
scarves. See story,
pg. 4.


an e-mail to his 1,400 students
scheduled to take an exam
Monday night. In the e-mail,
he said students traveling to
Indianapolis or participating in
Dance Marathon are eligible to
take a make-up exam April 10.
Lutz, who is also going to see
the Gators take on George Mason
SEE TESTS, PAGE 4


Today
FORECAST 2
OPINIONS -6 '
the AVENUE 9 ,,
CLASSIFIED 16 Sunny
CROSSWORD 18 83/57
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visit www.alligator.org


VOLUME 99 ISSUE 126


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VOLUME 99 ISSUE 126--






2, ALLIGATOR S THURSDAY, MARCH 30, 2006

News Today


LOCAL
Co-op goes to court Friday
UF did not notify the
Collegiate Living Organization
co-op about the lawsuit it filed
last week, contrary to what the
Alligator was told last week.
UF spokesman Steve Orlando
said he misunderstood officials
when he said UF had notified
CLO attorney Scott Krueger.
about the lawsuit.
Orlando said UF was not
legally obligated to notify the
CLO.
Krueger did not comment.
UF wants the court to deem
the UF Board of Trustees, the
university's highest governing
body, the final authority on the
117 NW 15th St. property, where
the low-cost building houses 65
residents.
The first hearing will be held
Friday at 9 a.m. at the Alachua
County Courthouse in down-
town Gainesville.
DAVID COHEN

Students win national awards
And the award goes to...
UF took home five wins
out of eight nominations in
the Student Electronic Media
Competition on March 18 at the
National Broadcasting Society
Convention in Washington D.C.
More than 1,500 members
of the National Broadcasting
Society representing 50 universi-
ties across the U.S., and at least
450 entries were submitted for
nomination.
More than 100 awards were
given based on different levels
of participation in competitive

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I igai- ,


TODAY


SUNNY
83/57


FRIDAY


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radio and television programs,
said Jim Wilson, executive
director for the National
Broadcasting Society.
"It is a great opportunity for
people to be recognized for a
year's worth of work," Wilson
said. "We really have so many
students in the organization
that could be recognized. It's
a shame we can't get them all
up there."
UF won awards in best
news program for WUFT-TV
Channel 5, the television news
cast that airs every afternoon at
5:30 p.m.; best audio news pro-
gram for WRUF-AM 850, UF's
CBS affiliate; and additional
awards for best audio feature
segment, best audio feature
package and best audio news
segment, said Shelby Radloff,
UF. National Broadcasting
Society president.
"It's the first year we have
won these awards in a long
time," Radloff said.
The UF chapter of the
National Broadcasting Society
also received honorable men-
tion for the most improved
chapter award.
One large surprise for the
evening was Radloff winning
the student member of the
year award, of which she did
not even know she had been


SUNDAY


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THUNDER
STORMS
85/58


nominated for, Radloff said.
"The chapter nominated me
behind my back," Radloff said.
"As they read the speech about
the winner I kept thinking, 'I
did that; that sounds familiar.'
I forgot who I was, where I was
and what was going on. I was in
complete shock."
RACHEL WORMSER

WHAT'S HAPPENING
Women in Nonprofits Forum
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Engineering Building,
Room 229, 6:30 p.m.
Professionals speak about ca-
reers in nonprofits.

Essential Medicines Teach-In
New Physics Building,
Room 1002, 6:30 p.m,
Universities Allied for Essential
Medicines presents information
on the role of research universi-
ties in developing medicines.

Capoeira Workshop
Unified Training Center, TBA
Brazilian Student Association
co-sponsors self-defense form.


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a the independent florida

alligator
VOLUME 99 ISSUE 126 ISSN 0889-2423
Not officially associated with the University of Florida
Published by Campus Communications Inc., of Gainesville, Florida
NEWSROOM
352-3764458 (Voice), 352-376-4467 (Fax)
Editor Emily Yehle, eyehle@alligator.org
Managing Editor/ Print Bridget Carey, bcarey@alligator.org
Managing Editor/ New Media Gwen Heimburg, gheimburg@alligator.org
University Editor Warren Kagarise,wkagarise@alligator.org
Metro Editor Jessica Riffel,jriffel@alligator.org
Special Projects Editor Neil Hughes, nhughes@alligator.org
Assignments Editor Stephanie Garry, smgarry@alligator.org
Opinions Editor Tom Durrenberger,
tdurrenberger@alligator.org
Sports Editor Bryan App, bapp@alligator.org
Sports Assistant Editor Nick Zaccardi, nzaccardi@alligator.org
alligatorSports.org Editor Spencer pavis-VanNess,
sdvanness@alligator.org
Editorial Board Emily Yehle, Bridget Carey,
Tom Durrenberger
Photo Editor Casey Anderson, canderson@alligator.org
Assistant Photo Editor Andrea Morales, amorales@alligator.org
Photo Staff Andy Apicella, Tim Hussin
the Avenue Editor Natasha Weinstein,
nweinstein@alligator.org
the Avenue Assistant Editor Karolena Bielecki
Graphics Chief MichelleStewart, mstewart@alligator.org
Graphics Jennifer LaBrie
Copy Desk Chiefs Josh Armstrong, Ashton Grosz
Kevin Mahadeo, Jen Zei
Copy Editors Amanda Brown, Juliana Casale,
Jaci Charney-Perez, Erin Chenderlin,
Jennifer Freihofer, Jonathan Hill,
Elizabeth Holman, Jennifer Klee,
Kat Laskowski, Jesse Mogle,
Jenn Pfaff, Beth Romanik,
Brittany Schlorff, Lauren Sheppard,
Christina Simak
New Media Assistant Editor Brett Roegiers
Staff Louis Anastasis, Christine Cusatis,
Dan Treat
DISPLAY ADVERTISING
352-376-4482, 800-496-0265 (Voice), 352-376-4556 (Fax)
Advertising Director Brad Smith, bsmith@alligator.org
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Advertising Office Assistants Sara Henry, Sarah Buckwald,
Miran Bobadilla
Sales Representatives Whitney Lawson, Ana Paula De Lima,
Laura Gerszewski, Lindsey Kuhn,
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Classified Advertising Manager Ellen Light, ellight@alligator.org
Classified Clerks Erin Yepis, Dan Cribb,
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CIRCULATION
Operations Manager Scott McKearnan,
smckearnan@alligator.org
Operations Assistant Clint Day
BUSINESS
352-376-4446 (Voice), 352-376-4556 (Fax)
Comptroller Ramona Pelham, rpelham@alligator.org
Accounts Receivable Supervisor Sharin Sexton
Bookkeeper Deborah Myers
Student Accounting Clerks Chris Brink, Brent Lowman, Greg Sellick
ADMINISTRATION
352-376-4446 (Voice), 352-376-4556 (Fax)
General Manager C.E. Barber, cebarber@alligator.org
Assistant General Manager Patricia Carey, tcarey@alligator.org
Administrative Manager Lorena Crowley, Catherine McNamara
Allison Sinclair
Administrative Assistant Lenora McGowan, Imcgowan@alligator.org
PRODUCTION/SYSTEMS
Production/Systems Manager Vern Bean, vbean@alligator.org
Assistant Production Manager Stephanie Gocklin, sgocklin@alligator.org
Editorial Production Supervisor Amy Oglesby
Advertising Production Staff Kate Barnes, Alicia Bennatts, Ben Hofer,
Maggie Peuler, Michelle Stewart,
Erin Swartz
Editorial Production Staff Billy Bender, James Hibbs,
Andy Lewis, Didi Williamson
The Independent Florida Alligator is a student newspaper serving the University of Florida, pub-
lished by a nonprofit 501 (c)(3) educational organization, Campus Communications Inc., P.O. Box
14257, Gainesville, Florida, 32604-2257. The Alligator is published Monday through Friday morn-
ings, except during holidays and exam periods. During UF summer academic terms The Alligator is
published Tuesdays and Thursdays.
The Alligator is a member of the Newspaper Association of America, National Newspaper Associa-
tion, Florida Press Association and Southern University Newspapers.
Subscription Rates: One Semester (Fall or Spring) $18
Summer Semester $10
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The Alligator offices are located at 1106 W. University Ave. Classified advertising can be placed at
that location from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, except for holidays. Classifieds also can
be placed at the UF Bookstore. Copyright 2005. All rights reserved. No portion of The Alligator
may be reproduced in any means without the written consent of an officer of Campus Communica-
tions Inc.


_ _







THURSDAY, MARCH 30, 2006 U ALLIGATOR, 3


Lab short on paper


By DANIELLE TORRENT
Alligator Contributing Writer

Students, count your blessings
- or your pages.
Six million sheets of paper
were not enough to meet de-
mands this year
in the Student
COna s Government
Cam1pUs Computer Lab.
SG allocated
$30,000 for the paper in this
year's budget, but supplies ran
dry three months shy of the new
budget year, which begins July 1.
"I've never seen that lab when
it wasn't running at 100 percent
capacity," said SG Business
Manager Stan Beckerdite. "It's
usually got a line running out
the door."
To keep the printers fed when
the supply ran out Wednesday,
employees of the facility on the


third floor of the Reitz Union bor-
rowed paper from the SG Finance
Office.
SG officials produced an extra
$2,500 to purchase the 500,000
sheets of paper needed to keep
the lab running. The money
was borrowed from the Off-
Campus Housing Cabinet of SG,
Beckerdite said.
One reason for the increase
in printing was the addition of
two faster printers, which the law
school unexpectedly gave to the
lab in February. SG purchased
them for the law school a few
years ago, but they were passed
on to have more frequent usage,
Beckerdite said.
Rachel Pax, 21, who works in
the lab five days a week, was no-
tified of the shortage after arriv-
ing there at 2:30 p.m. Wednesday.
"They can't really be upset
about it because it's free," Pax
said. "Its an easy job for me."


UF ACADEMICS

Class clickers replaced for free


By ERIN EHRLICH
Alligator Contributing Writer

About 10,000 students will
be required to turn in their old
TuringPoint remotes for new
ones this week. These remotes are
commonly used in large lecture
classes to take quizzes.
They can be swapped at the
Reitz Union west\ colonnade
underneath the Career Resource
Center on Thursday from 8:30
a.m. to 5 p.m.
These remotes, commonly
referred to as clickers, have been
found to contain a defective
voltage regulator chip, said John
Mocko, a senior teaching labo-
ratory specialist in the physics
department.
He said this has caused many
students' remotes to die very
quickly since the batteries use
almost six times the amount of
electricity they require.
If students' remotes are not
causing any trouble, Mocko said
they still need to turn their click-


ers in for new ones because they
still have a defective chip.
TurningPoint/ Responsive
Innovations, the manufacturer of
the remotes, is going to replace
every remote brought to them.
"We're going to take a proac-
tive approach and take care of our
clients," said Laura Fusselman,
a representative for Turning
Technologies.
Fusselman also gave a state-
ment on the remote situation.
"We're going to take a
proactive approach and
take care of our clients."
Laura Fusselman
Turning Technologies
representative

"Hopefully this has not caused
too much inconvenience, and
our actions will demonstrate our
commitment to stand behind all
of our products," she said in the
statement.
Students are allowed to bring


more than one remote to be re-
placed.
Mocko said students' remotes
were "dying left and right," and
he had been giving out free bat-
teries for students to replace the
old ones. The manufacturer sent
out a couple of hundred replace-
ment remotes for students.
The only thing a student needs
to do is re-register the remote
with WebCT in order for new
scores and grades to be recorded,
he said.
A few professors are keeping
the old remote system until the
end of this semester, including
professor Andrew Zimmerman,
who teaches Introduction to
Oceanography.
Zimmerman said since he
would have to manually input the
new remote codes into the com-
puter because he is not registered
with WebCT, he will just give new
batteries to students who have re-
motes that die during class.
However, he said he would
use the new remote system for
future semesters.


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4, ALLIGATOR E THURSDAY, MARCH 30,2006


ON CAMPUS


Speaker irked by Turkish scarf ban


By SASHA MURADALI
Alligator Contributing Writer

Stripped of her nationality
and exiled from her native land,
Merve Kavaki is fighting back.
Speaking with an impas-
sioned sense of her beliefs,
Kavakci addressed an audience
of about 200 people Wednesday
night about the repercussions
and implications of the 1998
Turkish ban prohibiting women
who work for the government
from wearing head scarves.
Islam on Campus spon-
sored the speech, titled "Forced
to Uncover: Human Rights
Violations Against Muslim
Women." The speech was
held in the Health Professions,
Nursing and Pharmacy
Building.
Kavakci, who was a mem-
ber of Parliament before being
ejected for wearing a head
scarf, is currently on trial with
the European Court of Human
-Rights. She had been elected in
the first district of Istanbul.
Secularists in Turkey see the
head scarf as an emotionally
driven symbol, indicating the
attempts of a political Islam to
overturn Turkey's secular gov-
ernment, according to the BBC.
Kavakci does not completely
agree with the western view
of Turkey as a role model of
democracy in.the Middle East,
Kavakci said.
'Turkish secularism isn't
equal to secularism," she said.
"We have a unique take on
the separation of religion and


state."
"I would prefer to call it a
good candidate for democracy,"
she said.
Kavakci depicts Turkey as
a country with a state religion,
rather than a religious state, say-
ing the head-scarf ban hinders a
part of national identity.
As the daughter of two
professors, Kavakci recited
the story of a female professor
who was forced to remove her
"hijab" the Arabic term for
head scarf upon entering the
classroom, but who continued
to wear it outside the university
setting. This is a trend, Kavakci
said, that has spilled over to the
female students as well.
Burcin Unel, a Turkish citi-
zen and UF economics doctoral
candidate, completely disagrees
with Kavakci's perspective.
"I went to school and college
in Turkey. I had friends who
wore the hijab to class, gradua-
tion ceremonies, exams and ev-
erything else," Unel said. "What
she is saying is false."
Kavakci said the head-scarf
ban has caused both her loss
of citizenship and the migra-
tion of many female students
to the U.S., Canada and Austria.
Canada has given many stu-
dents political asylum.
Angered but interested to
hear what Kavakci had to say,
Unel said, "The reason she lost
her Turkish citizenship was
because she didn't notify the
Turkish government about her
dual citizenship with the United
States, not because she wore a


head scarf to parliament."
Kavakci said she was proud
to speak at a university while
wearing a head scarf because in
her own country she could not.


"My own story is only an
example," she said. "It's only
significant because it caused a
spillover. The public eye caught
it."


Merve Kavakci speaks about women's rights in Turkey at
the Health Professions, Nursing and Pharmacy Building on
Wednesday evening.


Smoky rooms


not new for


SFCC student

FIRE, from page 1


leave the pot on the stove a lot. I usually
catch it before it gets bad, but I didn't
this time."
He continues to cook all the time be-
cause he often gets the "munchies," and
he can't stand fast food, he said.
"That shit's horrible. It's poison,"
he said.
"If you let me, I'll burn water.
I leave the pot on the stove
a lot. I usually catch it before
it gets bad, but I didn't this
time."
Mondo Luis Caminas
SFCC student

He tries to remember to use a timer
when he cooks, but he said he often
forgets.
Caminas said he is forgetful for one
reason only.
"I've burnt too many brain cells,"
he said.
The Alachua County Fire Rescue ar-
rivedpromptly at 5:45 p.m. Wednesday,
answering the fire alarm with two fire
trucks, a rescue unit, a police car and an
ambulance.
The fire alarm triggered dispatch
within seconds, said Scotty Taylor, a
firefighter for the Alachua County Fire
Rescue.
"We could have some hellacious
fires here if we aren't on top of it,"
Taylor said.
Taylor added that about three-
fourths of the calls reported in
Gainesville are not fires at all they're
flukes like this one.


Students have worked on concrete canoes for more than a semester


CANOES, from page 1

canoe team.
Made from a mold, the canoe
floats after careful testing of wa-
ter displacement and the mixture
of the concrete. Concrete is made
up of cement and aggregates,
which is like fine sands or rocks,
and can be made lighter depend-
ing on the mixture, Franklin
said.
The competition consists of
three days worth of display-


ing, racing and presenting the
canoes to the ASCE judges.
The visual part of the competi-
tion begins Thursday with a
display of the concrete canoes in
the Stephen C. O'Connell Center
from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Students,
faculty and the Gainesville com-
munity will get the opportunity
to see the canoes out of the water
and up close.
On the second day of the com-
petition, the concrete canoes will
race at Lake Wauburg from 8 a.m.
to 5 p.m. The UF chapter of ASCE
has a team of six paddlers who


will race its canoe, "Gatorstrong,"
in a series of five different races.
The final step of the competition
is a presentation in the Florida
Gym on Saturday
Student morning, which ex-
Life plains the designing,
planning and build-
ing process of the canoe.
The -theme of the canoe is
"Built Gator Tough" and repre-
sents the hard work put into the
project by all the team members,
said Michael Burns, concrete ca-
noe captain and project manager.
Burs said he hopes to im-


press fellow UF students with the
canoe and encourages everyone
to come out to the competition,
which offers the unique opportu-
nity to inform the general public-
about concrete as a successful
construction product, he said.
"You get to see what civil
engineers can really do," Burns
said. "We can make concrete float
- now that's an accomplish-
ment."
Burns began working with the
rest of the team on the canoe as
early as the Fall semester. The UF
chapter of ASCE started early to


recruit members for the project,
plan the design for the -canoe
and begin paddling practice for
those participating in the rac-
ing portion of the competition.
Burns said his. biggest personal
accomplishment in -the project
was to see the final product.
"You come, up with this idea
in your head," Burs said as he
pointed to the canoe. "And in the
end you think, 'Wow, there it is.'
That's really satisfying.
For more information on the UF
chapter of the ASCE, visit the Web
site at www.ufasce.com.


Some teachers make special arrangements for students who will miss exams


S I S from page 1 makes sense.to let students go." "It's not my place to tell students
fm age 1 Between Dance Marathon and the Final
Four, Lutz said he has had 70 students ask they can't go. It's their choice."
to take the make-up exam. Rory DeSimone
University in the semi-final game, said to take the make-up exam.ry DeSimone
students must be able to show documenta- Rory DeSimone, lecturer for the UF lecturer
tion that they attended the event. He will class Problem Solving Using Computer
accept travel documents or ticket stubs. Software, which has 760 students, is tak- uled for Monday at 8:20 p.ii. can bring
"I told students they can't just go to ing a similar approach to Final Four make- in documentation showing they attended
Indianapolis to party," Lutz said. "But ups. the event to qualify for a make-up exam
this is a huge event for the Gators, and it Students who miss the exam sched- on May 2.


Unfortunately for those who just want
to watch the game Monday, whether or not
the Gators advance, there are no plans to
postpone either of the tests.
DeSimone said only a half dozen stu-
dents have scheduled to take the make-
up.
"It's not my place to tell students
they can't go," DeSimone said. "It's their
choice."






THURSDAY, MARCH 30, 2006 E ALLIGATOR, 5


Record turnout in SFCC vote


N ABOUT 8 PERCENT OF
THE STUDENT BODY VOTED.

By ALEJANDRA CANCINO
Alligator Writer
acancino@alligator.org

A record number of students
logged on to vote Tuesday and
Wednesday in SFCC's annual
Student Government election.
About 8 percent of the student
body 1,224 voters chose
Gene Findley as Student Body
president and Matthew Barker as
Student Body vice president.
Findley, a freshman, received
53 percent of the vote to defeat
Dianna Ordway.
SFCC students also selected
new members of Student Senate
and filled other executive offices.
"Apparently people really en-
joyed the pizza," SG Supervisor
of Elections Dori Goldstein said
of the record turnout. Students
were able to vote computers at
campus locations


SFCC students voted on the
Internet through their eSantaFe
accounts. The only election prob-
lem occurred when eSantaFe went
down for 18 minutes Tuesday
because the SFCC finance office
had to run an emergency test,
Goldstein said. She announced
the election at Wednesday after-
noon's senate meeting.
"As I said before,
'Everything happens
for a reason.'"
Dianna Ordway
defeated Student Body
presidential candidate

Voters elected 29 senators this
week a mix of independent
candidates and members of
Findley's Students United Party
and Ordway's TEAM Party.
Every Senate candidate who
campaigned for a seat won, in-
cluding 10 independents, 11 with
TEAM and eight with Students


United.
However, 23 senate seats
remain open because no can-
didates contested them in the
election. Students may apply for
those open seats, Goldstein said.
A teary-eyed Ordway walked
into Wednesday's senate meet-
ing about 10 minutes late.
TEAM, an acronym for
Together Everyone Achieves
More, received 47 percent of
the vote for president and vice
president.
In a later interview, Ordway
said she would continue to serve
in the senate even though she
lost the presidential race.
"As I said before, 'Everything
happens for a reason,'" she said.
However, Ordway's. party
was successful in two executive
races: TEAM treasurer candidate
Jennifer Silvers won her race
with 56 percent of the vote, and
judicial secretary hopeful Ramon
Lopez won with 51 percent of
the vote.


Gifts lure tenants


By DOMINICK E. TAO
Alligator Writer

Free condoms, back massag-
es and cheap trinkets mean big
business for some Gainesville
realtors.
These gimmicks were the
sales tools used to coax students
away from dorms and into
apartments or condominiums
at UF's off-campus housing fair
Wednesday.
Tracy Campbell, the leas-
ing manager for Gainesville
Place Apartments, gave out
plastic ice cubes with a blinking
light inside, stamped with the
Gainesville Place logo.
"Oh my goodness, we had
crowds of people thronging
around," Campbell said.
Rob Myers, the property
manager for Gainesville Place,


said the items apartment com-
plexes give away at housing
fairs are more than just fun toys.
"They're investments," he
said.
By getting its name circulat-
ing in the community through
items like the
blinking cubes,
.',. :s.:.- Gainesville Place
might get 75 or
more students to sign up for
yearlong leases, Myers said.
Other apartment representa-
tives used similar tactics to lure
students to their displays on the
Reitz Union Colonnade.
By handing but candy and T-
shirts, Towne Parc Apartments
expects to see a 50 percent in-
crease in student inquiries about
leases, said Matt Goldstein, the
leasing manager for Towne
Parc.


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6, ALLIGATOR U THURSDAY, MARCH 30, 2006

Editorial


A house divided

Making sense of

immigration reform
The U.S. recently discovered that widespread protests
over proposed legislation aren't confined to France.
People around the country are taking to the streets
to oppose controversial immigration reform bills. Hundreds
of thousands of protesters, largely Hispanic, are objecting
while Congress remains divided.
But while the government waffles on the issue of immi-
gration reform, we've decided to tackle it head-on.
As we see it, there are, in broad terms, three real issues on
the table: border security, citizenship for illegal immigrants
and harsher penalties for illegal immigration.
As for border security, we are undeniably and whole-
heartedly in favor of tighter standards. News this week that
U.S. investigators were able to slip radioactive material past
border security and into the country did nothing to allay our
fears of another terrorist attack. And having to rely on vigi-
lante organizations like the Minuteman Project to police the
border is a national embarrassment.
We're starting to wonder what the Department of
Homeland Security has been doing since Sept. 11.
It's time to take a stand. The government must regain
control of the borders.
But when it comes to allowing illegal immigrants to apply
for citizenship, we're more conflicted.
On one hand, we'd like to see illegal immigrants come out
into the open instead of being pushed into the back rooms
of America. On the other, granting clemency to such a huge
group of people who broke the law is a slap in the face to all
of the immigrants who entered the U.S. legally.
But on the whole, we think granting illegal immigrants
.citizenship is a good thing. They would then become subject
to all the labor rights and regulations guaranteed to U.S. citi-
zens, thereby decreasing employers' incentives to hire illegal
immigrants and keep them working in substandard condi-
tions for substandard wages.
Maybe then we'll stop hearing so many misguided com-
plaints that immigrants are stealing U.S. jobs.
And on the increased criminalization of illegal immigra-
tion, we have to agree with the protesters; that's just not
smart legislation. Literally nothing good can come of mak-
ing it a felony to be in the U.S. illegally, as Congress is now
considering doing. We will have to find more space for more
inmates in our already-crowded prisons.
And there's just no reason to punish so severely people
who just want to work here. We suspect that harsher penal-
ties would have little effect in stemming the tide of illegal
immigration, serving only to push workers even farther
underground.
Congress has even considered making it illegal for
charitable groups and citizens to provide aid to illegal immi-
grants. Forcing individuals, under the threat of prosecution,
to snitch on their neighbors or family members can't be good
policy, regardless of the desired goals.
Perhaps the best solution to the problem of illegal im-
migration is the implementation of a guest worker program.
Such a program would grant workers visas to temporar-
ily stay in the U.S. and work, but would also allow them to
travel back to their homes in Mexico.
The program probably wouldn't eliminate all illegal im-
migrants. But it is a dignified answer to a complex problem,
and that's more than we can say about a lot of other so-called
solutions.


S the independent florida

alligator


Emily Yehle
EDITOR
Bridget Carey
MANAGING EDITOR


Tom Durrenberger
OPINIONS EDITOR


The Alligator encourages comments from readers. Letters to the editor should not exceed 150
words (about one letter-sized page). They must be typed, double-spaced and must include the
author's name, classification and phone number. Names will be withheld if the writer shows
just cause. We reserve the right to edit for length, grammar, style and libel. Send letters to
letters@alligator.org, bring them to 1105 W. University Ave., or send them to P.O. Box 14257.
Gainesville, FL 32604-2257.Columns of about 450 words about original topics and editorial
cartoons are also welcome. QuBstions? Call 376-4458.


Opinions


ALLIGATOR
www.alligator.org/opinions


"Copyrighted Material

SSyndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"
*


Journalism require
A t the 2003 UF football game against Florida State
University, I noticed a zealous fan holding a
Photoshopped picture of Bobby Bowden and
Saddam Hussein sharing a convivial embrace. A little over
the top? Sure.
But it still made me chuckle.
Then. I heard something shocking. An FSU student
shouted, "How can you joke about the man that killed
thousands 4Americans on Sept. 11?"
Did I mention that he went to FSU?
Saddam, despite his gross villainy, was not linked
to Sept. 11. With no links to al-Qaeda and no weapons
of mass destruction, Americans can no longer use the
cockamamie argument that we invaded Iraq to protect
ourselves from terrorism.
But a disturbing number of Americans still believe.this
fallacy. A recent Zogby poll reports that almost 90 percent
of our soldiers in Iraq think that the war is in retaliation for
Saddam's role in Sept. 11.
So how is it possible that this confusion still exists?
Why is America so ill-informed?
Too many Rush Limbaughs.
.In 1987, former President Reagan's Federal
Communications Commission abolished the decades-old
Fairness Doctrine, which ensured that broadcast networks
would inform the electorate of public issues. It did this by
forcing the networks to give comparable representation to
opposing sides of controversial matters of public interest.
If a healthy media is the foundation of a healthy democ-
racy, as it is often said, then this tenet gave society a.shot in
the arm by promoting balance in editorial journalism. The
doctrine would moderate the number of Limbaughs out
there and restore some balance to the public airwaves.
Today, there are many signs that this is exactly the kind
of affirmative action needed in some sectors of our wither-
ing media. Just look at Sinclair Broadcasting, the largest
TV-station owner in the country. Due to its strong ties to


as more fair play
the GOP, Sinclair has repeatedly
censored programming that chal-
lenges conservatives, and in 2004,
i it planned to use its airwaves for
.f blatant propaganda against the
Kerry campaign.
Mike Day Conservative talk radio is an-
Word of the Day other illustrative example in the
letters@alligator.org black-or-white world of Limbaughs,
O'Reillys and Hannitys, it's easy to
lose perspective.
Some might say, "The government shouldn't force
people to listen to Al Franken let the market decide
who gets broadcasted."
If frequencies weren't a limited resource, that would
be a good point. But broadcasting frequencies can't be
compared to newspapers or cable TV, where material re-
sources are virtually infinite.
Instead, frequencies should be thought in terms of a
public park, where space is a constraint. If Rush wanted
to fill a particular park with a rally against oh, I don't
know prescription drug abuse, then he'd have every
right, until someone else wanted to launch a counter dem-
onstration. At that point, no matter how anti-drug that
community might be, it would have to allow the opposing
rally to occupy a fair part of the public park.
Even though the market hasn't demanded a greater lib-
eral voice on the airwaves, that doesn't mean the govern-
ment shouldn't require it to have a comparable presence
in public platforms.
UF lost that game against FSU in 2003, and everyone
knew it was due to biased ACC officiating. That night, I
learned that two things needed better referees: football
and the media.
Mike Day is a political science senior. His column appears
on Thursday.


The views expressed here are not necessarily those of the Alligator.


Reader response
Today's question: Should illegal
immigrants be granted U.S. citi-
zenship?


SWednesday's question: Does the
No Child Left Behind Act decrease
the quality of public education?


Vote or post a message at www.alligator.org


61% YES
39% NO
49 TOTAL VOTES


I I I


o


1







THURSDAY, MARCH 30, 2006 E ALLIGATOR, 7


Letters to the Editor
Gators are not aided by satanic power
I am writing in reference to Andrew
Abramson's March 27 column, "Remaining
field busts brackets." Abramson claims that
the Gators are being helped by "satanic pow-
er" in their quest for the national title, based
on the fact that the Gators' three Final Four
appearances are separated by six-year inter-
vals 666. While this is an interesting claim,
Abramson might be interested to know that
there are only two six-year intervals between
1994 and 2006 and that, therefore, we are still
at 66. Perhaps in another six years we can have
this "satanic power" he seems to appreciate so
much. This year, it seems the team will have to
rely on its own talent, which is good enough
for me.
Samuel Pierce
9LS



Telles-Irvin should listen to UF students
In yesterday's article, Vice President for
Student Affairs Patricia Telles-Irvin unveiled
her most recent attack on alcohol where she
alluded to her interest in the Museum Nights
and Gator Nights programs. For example,
as a member of the Reitz Union Board of
Managers, I have learned that she hopes to
extend Gator Nights to Saturday in addition
to Friday.


That sounds like it would cost a lot of ad-
ditional money. It might even cost enough
to permanently fund a director of Asian
American Affairs.
Hey, haven't the students been begging
and pleading for that director for years? Telles-
Irvin, I have some mild suggestions:
Step 1: Pause crazy attack on alcohol.
Step 2: Listen to your students and hire a
director of Asian American Affairs.
Step 3: Resume crazy attack on alcohol.
You were hired to represent us, and if
something doesn't change soon, I will person-
ally rally for your resignation.
Ryan Nelson
Marketing and Finance Committee Chairman,
Reitz Union Board of Managers



UF sold students out in switch to Pepsi
I understand that the "soda wars" are over
and that UF sold us out for Pepsi to fill its own
pockets. I understand that we are supposed to
just shut up and take it because we're all a part
of the Gator Nation and we should be proud
of our campus. But are they serious when you
can't buy a Gatorade on campus because the
vending machines are empty day after day?
I don't drink soft drinks; I drink Gatorade. I
don't mind paying for Gatorade. Yet, you can't
supply it. That's pathetic.


To Pepsi, if you are going to steal a contract
away from Coca-Cola, you should probably
figure out how to run a business in a manner
that pleases your consumers.
To the administration, you cannot just buy
us T-shirts at football games and expect it to
pacify us when Pepsi performs in a manner of
complete incompetence. UF recruited students
to create a Top 10 research university. We're
not idiots and we're not going to shut up.
Josh Czupryk
3JM



Spinal Tech not to blame for BSU troubles
Regarding your piece on the Mr. and Miss
Black Student Union Pageant- Spinal Tech has
a reservation policy in which customers are
asked to come in and fill out a technical request
at least 10 days prior to their event. This isn't
even business days we're talking about just
10 regular days. BSU's contact failed to request
our services within the given time frame and
due to the contact's tardiness, Spinal Tech was
unable to fit the pageant into our already full
schedule. I know it's hard being a news source
so slanted toward the hoi polloi that your
words fall off the page, but please, demand
more of your reporters and their painfully
inadequate coverage. Jennifer Cox may write
her skewed story, but we, Spinal Tech, still


have to work with the implications made in
her startling failure to report.
Michaele Bradford
3LS

U..

Columnist practices what he preaches
Matt Melone happens to be a friend of
mine, and I'm sick of readers criticizing him
for not joining the military. He's actually con-
tracted with the Army and is pursuing work
in infantry. Unlike readers like Jessica Holland,
he joined unconditionally with no thoughts
about medical benefits and extended tours
of duty. Does anyone really believe that he
would name his column "Taking Up Arms"
and write the things he writes if he was not in
the Army?
And Matt's not "anti-education."
Everybody has their place and a job to do
in this country. Matt merely suggested that
everybody give the military just a few years
of their time, Besides, did you ever hear of the
Reserves?
Everybody got offended and now they're
scrambling to make excuses. No matter how
you feel, at least give Matt a little credit.
Believe me, he is in ful practice of what he
preaches.
Joe Erskine
4LS


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THURSDAY, MARCH 30, 2006 www.alligator.org/avenue




Frisbees float closer to Nationals


d Club teams advance


UF Ultimate Frisbee club teams
are aiming high for a chance to at-
tend this year's national tourna-
ment in May.
Last weekend the men and
women's teams placed second
and fourth respectively at Centex,
a tournament in Austin, Texas.
The competition pools the top
teams in the country rated by the
Ultimate Players Association.
The private tournament gave
UF teams a chance to size up their
opponents before next week's
qualifying games for the 2006
College Championship.
UFUCT, the men's UF Ultimate
Club Team, lost to Wisconsin
in the tournament finals by one
point, but they still keep their
spot as No. 1 in the country, ac-


cording to the UPA. With 32 wins
and only 1 loss under their belt,
team captain Bill MacQueen said
he is confident they will get a bid
to nationals.
"It would be our first trip to
nationals since the mid-'80s," he
said. "But, we have to get past
Georgia first."
MacQueen said they've played
the team only once this year, but
placed higher than Georgia in ev-
ery tournament. UFUCT has faith
in players Kurt Gibson and Tim
Gehret to get the team where they
need to be, he said. MacQueen
called his teammates the best
players in the country and said
they could win the Callahan
Award this year, the Heisman of
Frisbee.
"For the women, it was the


Tim Hussin / Alligator Staff
Nicole Hawkins passes the Frisbee off during practice Tuesday
evening outside of the Southwest Recreational Center.


Tim Hussin/ Alligator Staff
Steven Johnson, coach of the Women's UF Ultimate Frisbee team, talks strategy
with the players during practice Tuesday evening.


first time they've placed in a na-
tionally ranked tournament," he
said. "I would say their chances
are better than ours."
FUEL, the Florida Ultimate
Elite Ladies, is closer to nationals
than they've ever been, said 22-
year-old player Alexa Dix.
"We have a lot of fifth-year
players," she said. "This is our
year to shine as a unit."
FUEL's strategy at the Centex
tournament relied on its more
experienced players to get them
to the semifinals, where they sub-
stituted in newer players to rotate
big game experience, Dix said.
Their fourth place finish is ex-
pected to move the team back to a
ranking within the UPA's top five,
Dix said.
"I think we played well, but
we could play better," said Kristen


Lamm, a second-year FUEL player.
"We need to be more confident, be-
cause now we know what the West
Coast has to offer."
FUELmembers agree that their
main competition is'University of
Georgia and University of North
Carolina, two teams they will
have to beat at regionals in order
to get one of two bids to the cham-
pionship.
In the meantime, both teams
concentrate on getting in shape
with three to four practices a week
and two weekly track regiments.
"A lot of people underestimate
the athleticism of the sport,"
MacQueen said. "Most people
think Frisbee involves dogs in
some way, or they confuse it with
disc golf."
Most often, Ultimate Frisbee
is commonly described as a cross


between soc-
cer and foot-
ball. The goal
is to catch the
disc in an end zone for a point.
There are no referees or observers
of play.
"It is a self-governed sport,
but you do have to rely on the
spirit of the game," Dix said.
FUEL's sectional games will
be held at the field adjacent to the
Southwest Recreational Center on
April 8 and 9.
"People should come out and
support some of UF's hottest la-
dies on and off the field," Dix said.
While UFUCT will travel to
Athens, Ga., a week after the
women for their sectionals; you
can track both teams' progress
on their journey to nationals at
www.upa.org.


New Panic Tour supports, features small-time bands


By DAVID LOW
Avenue Writer

For every band that makes it in the world
of music, there are hundreds more still scrimp-
ing to tour, slogging it out in dank cubs and
sleeping in the backseats of vans. Sometimes,
bands just need a helping hand.
Enter the New Panic Tour.
In its first year of existence, the tour will
have many partitions simultaneously touring
on the East and West coasts, as well as the
Midwest.
One such partition will arrive Sunday at
Common Grounds starting at 6:30 p.m. Tickets
are $6. The bands to be featured in Gainesville


SThose interested in signing up
for local artist Jimmie Williams'
art classes can find out more
information on his site http:
//www.jwexperience.com.


are the lead-guitar-driven Strike Fire Fall, the
indie-rock Blood on the Tracks, and the alter-
ative rockers Afterdrama, with a local act to be
announced.
As the only unsigned band on the tour,
Afterdrama is learning about the music in-
dustry, and touring with New Panic is its first
touring experience.
"We're learning a lot," said Afterdrama
keyboardist and singer Stephanie West. "There
are a lot of bands showing us the ropes on tour.
It's been easier than we thought it would be,
but sometimes you just want to have a place
to go home to."
The New Panic Tour is a nationwide tour of
independent bands that have all the talent and


* OverRated/OverHyped: comedy
by Theatre Strike Force, The Norse-
men, 88mph and Jared Whitham
free at the Reitz Union Grand
Ballroom tonight at 8 p.m.


drive, but not the proportionate recognition
that give larger acts the funds to tour.
"The tour wanted to feature alternative
rock and pop-punk bands
who exemplified the lifestyle
LOCal and core values of great mu-
MUSic sic," said Karen Donnelly,
publicity spokeswomen for
Sthe New Panic Tour. "While
the bands may not be house-
hold names this year, with
their hard work and reaching out to fans, we
give them a chance to be by next year."
The tour was set in motion by three inde-
pendent record labels: Takeover Records, Em
Dash Music, and Militia Group. Takeover


"They've said 'I'm not really shocked you were in
ifi a video having sex with four girls. I'm not surprised
P someone got it on tape. But, man what the hell
were you doing hanging out with Scott Stapp?'"
Kid Rock
on his fans' reaction to his leaked sex tape, to
Newsweek


Records was founded by Ben Harper, for-
mer guitarist of the hit pop-punk group
Yellowcard. Along with the labels and some
star power driving the tour, some big name
sponsors are backing it, including Suicide
Girls and Alternative Press Magazine.
While the tour features mainly bands
hand-picked by sponsoring labels, local bands
in the venue's cities are being recruited as
opening acts.
"In most cases, the locals selected were the
winner of the Sonic Bids Opening Bands con-
test," said Donnelly. "Where we did not hold
the contest, the locals were either bands we
have worked with in the past or were recom-
mended by the local venue."


"Ellen," Ellen DeGeneres'
popular show about single thirty-
somethings living in Los Angeles,
premiered today in 1994.







10, ALLIGATOR R THURSDAY, MARCH 30, 2006


Dogs: trick of the trade I c l d
9 c .aIe n dar


ho do you love more -me or her?" In fact, I encourage the ladies to take a
Iblurted out. piece of the "how-old-is-your-dog?" pie.
He looked at me as if I had USA Today recently reported that more
just asked him if I was as hot as Jessica than half of Americans under 35 who live
Simpson. alone and almost three-quarters of singles
"Why would you ask something like with roommates have pets, and they're
that?" he responded. And after an un- starting to realize what I now know:
comfortable pause, he answered, "Well ... Bonding over a snuggly, slobbery friend
She came first." is a great way to get to know someone.
"Good. That's good," I said. What better way to break the barrier of
And it was. Dearest and I were talking communication? Asking about someone's
about Lucy, his adorable black pet is a lot less awkward than
Lab that I consider one of my Maghan McDowell the old "do-you-come-here-of-


best friends and one of the
first things that instantly en-
deared me to him.
Lately I've been noticing the
important role she plays in not
only his life, but in our relation-
ship.
I wasn't always a fan of dogs. In fact,
Lucy is the first dog I've ever loved. But
as soon as I saw them together, I melted.
In addition to being just plain cute, a man
who loves his dog is revealing a lot about
his personality. Not only is he not afraid
to show affection, but he also shows re-
sponsibility and stability, as well as his
capability for being less than 100 percent
selfish.
But this is no mystery. It's a generally
well-accepted fact that girls go ga-ga over
puppies, and I've seen more than a few
men on campus using this phenomenon
to their advantage. Not that I blame them.


Springtime

udging by the calendar, the
bursts of fresh green foliage
- and the plenitude of bare
skin on campus, spring has officially
sprung.
With the new season comes the
desire to abandon cold weather ways
and explore the great outdoors.
If post-break midterms and lack
of cash leave you without the op-
tion of a longer excursion,
Gainesville boasts several Katie
scenic activities that take
little time and little money.
First up is the SFCC
Teaching Zoo. The zoo, at
3000 NW .83rd St.,- offers
free daily tours from 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. In the zoo's natu-
rally wooded environment, there are
more than 200 animals and 75 species.
For a weekday tour, call (352) 395-
5601 three days in advance. Weekend
tours don't require appointments.
For a nighttime jaunt, head to the


I


ten" approach.
. Another great thing about
having a dog (or approaching a
cutie walking one) is that most
dogs haven't really grasped the
concept of personal space, so
bending down to pet someone's dog is a
completely acceptable approach. And it
will always give you something to do or
talk about on a first date.
And if you aren't sure what you think
of someone, "man's best friend" might
provide better insight than your other,
upright roommate.
So even if Mr. or Ms. Perfect doesn't
come knocking the minute you leave
the Humane Society, you've gained a
companion that will never blow you off
and would be thrilled if smothered with
affection as soon as you both met. In other
words, I've never left the dog park feel-
ing fat.


cash-savers

Campus Teaching Observatory off
Museum Road, south of the Reitz
Union parking lot and west of the
Aerospace Engineering building. The
UF Department of Astronomy holds
free public nights each Friday from
8:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., weather permit-
ting. Planets like Mars and Saturn,
the Orion Nebula and more can be
seen in March and April.
Burns Call (352) 392-2052, Ext.
" 201 during business hours
or (352) 392-1016 after 7:30
p.m. to make sure weather
i.. conditions are suitable.
.* A third option is Devil's
Millhopper State Park, at
4732 Millhopper Road, This
120-foot sinkhole can be explored
from the boardwalks and stairways
descending from the nature trail
around the rim. Small streams, ani-

SEE CHEAP THRILLS, PAGE 13


Ham Museum of Art, Museum Nights: Harn MUSE's present Images and Memories, dis-
cover how art and images play a vital role in forming our personal and cultural memo-
ries, 6-8 p.m., free


03.30


University Auditorium, live music: Piano prodigy Lang Lang, 7:30 p.m, tickets $30-$40


03.51


Common Grounds, live music: The Books, Grizzly Bear, 9 p.m., $10
Phillips Center for Performing Arts, dance: Nrityagram Dance Ensemble, 7:30 p.m.,
tickets $15-$25

04.01


Common Grounds, live music: New Panic Tour: Strike Fire Fall, Blood on the Tracks,
Afterdrama, 5:30 p.m., $5

04.02


Reitz Union Cinema, film: Stolen Summer, 7 p.m., free
Reitz Union Cinema, film: A History of Violence, 9 p.m., 11 p.m., free

04.03


Debate of video games as art


L t this year's Game Developers
Conference, industry people and
governmental workers convened
Friday, the last day of the San Jose summit,
for a discussion entitled "Murder, Sex and
Censorship: Debating the Morals
of Creative Freedom." Kent Ru
There's no doubt that this
roundtable of professors, the
head of the International Game
Developers Association and a -y
California legislator came about
thanks to the stink raised by "Hot Ie ,
Coffee."
For the luckily uniformed,
"Hot Coffee" was a readily accessible modi-
fication to "Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas"
that let players see what trying to start a fire
by rubbing two fully clothed mannequins
together looked like. In actuality, the player'
rhythmically manipulated the joystick in or-
der to sexually satisfy his in-game girlfriend,


presumably the only girlfriend the player has,
in a semigraphic, semihilarious on-screen
display.
Regardless of what precipitated the dis-
cussion, it reminds me that games still aren't
regarded as legitimate artistic expres-
ssell sion, with good reason.
Sure, there are sex and violence
and zombie robots in every expres-
sive medium, but there's usually
some socially redeeming value in
exploitative books or movies.
What's the lasting message in
"BMX XXX?" If you pull sweet tricks,
you unlock video clips of boobies.
Granted, videogames can immerse some-
one in wonderfully vivid-worlds or challenge
his or her cognition and reflexes. And not ev-
ery game has to be pixilated Hemingway. But
as technology has exponentially increased,
SEE VIDEO GAME, PAGE 13


Free drinks and fraternizing at International Coffee House


By KATIE BURNS
Avenue Writer

For those seeking a cultural
weekend experience, a free eve-
ning of caffeine, company and
new friends from abroad is avail-
able.
International Coffee House,


occurring Fridays at Gator ship and unexpected popularity,
Nights, allows international and the program is held nearly every
domestic students, faculty and Friday. This year's sponsors in-
staff to mingle in a relaxed envi- clude Gator Nights and the Asian
ronment complete with refresh- and African studies centers.
ments. Leslie Owen of the UF
The coffee nights were in- International Center, which runs
produced last Fall as a monthly the coffee nights, said about 100
event. Now, thanks to sponsor- people attend each week.

S.f : I t 4 .;


The program emphasizes
meeting new people and gives
participants the chance to social-
ize with and learn about students
from other countries, she said.
"[International Coffee House]
really took off," Owen said. "We
didn't expect it to do as well as it
did. We're delighted about it."


Friday's event will take place
from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. in the
lounge, rooms 122 and 123, of
the Reitz Union. A special coffee
night is scheduled in Weaver Hall
on April 7.
For more information, contact
the LF International Center at
(352) 392-5323.
.i. ~` ; "- t 'f ,,^^* ^yt ^^.:


I


S






THURSDAY, MARCH 30, 2006 E ALLIGATOR, 11


Baby inspires indie band


Yoga to fit your lifestyle


By DAVID LOW
Avenue Writer

Who would have thought that a baby girl
would make two rock stars better musicians?
In the case of the husband and wife indie-pop
duo, Mates of State, that was just the case.
Jason Hammel and Kori Gardner took up
music as a full-time career after
quitting their jobs and getting "We're not
married in 2001. You can catch more with
their set tonight at 9 for a crisp zines or su
$10 at Common Grounds. like that. W
Despite .only Hammel on focused o
drums and Gardner on key- life th
boards, the Mates have a sur-
prisingly full sound, which is Jasor
evident on their four full-length Mates of
albums. Their latest release,
"Bring It Back," is their best and most com-
plex work yet, Hammel said.
"We decided to not be so concerned with
how we sound live, but to make the songs as
good as we could in the studio," Hammel said
in a telephone interview.
Not only did the technical side of making
music change, but also the very way the pair
went about writing had tobe adjusted in order
to care for their infant daughter, Magnolia.
"Before we had our child, we were kind of
lazy. If we felt like practicing, we would; if we
felt like writing, we would," Hammel said.
"All of a sudden, we have a-certain amount of


c
b


n
a
n
s


time to do it in, so we just became a lot more
disciplined."
The Mates took turns, alternating between
writing music and caring for their daughter in
five- to six-hour shifts.
"It was actually really inspiring to have
this block of time to concentrate solely on
music," said Hammel.
The Mates of State are
concerned any- known for their live shows,
being in maga- which ooze adorableness
erficial things and radiate the love between
we're a lot more both players.
the things in "Theyrereally cute," said
Smarter freshman psychology major
Laura Howell, 19. "They
Hammel play like they're together,
tate drummer and they are together. What
could be sweeter?"
According to Hammel, having their
daughter along with them on tour makes it
sweeter.
"Our first tour with her was when she was
3 months old, and then we went to England
when she was 5 months old, and then another
one when she was about a year old," said
Hammel.
He recounts the tours with his daughter in
such a way that it's apparent he adores her.
"We're not concerned anymore with being
in magazines or superficial things like that,"
said Hammel. "We're a lot more focused on
the things in life that matter."


Sog, child, cat and warrior
have all come to help us get
in shape.
;Or, rather, their poses, practiced in
traditional yoga, have.
The downward-facing dog, child,
cat, and warrior poses are some of
the fundamentals a beginning yoga


student learns. .
Priel Schmalbach, a yoga
instructor and UF student,
has been practicing yoga
for about four years. He has
found himself in these poses
many times and has noticed
results.
He says that the changes


Vera Hadz



f


from yoga happen "constantly and fre-
quently," but only if you practice yoga
constantly and frequently.
"Do yoga at home with a passion,"
Schlualbach says. "Go to your favorite
yoga class once a week and take home
what you learned from that class."
In "Yoga Chick," author Bess
Gallanis recommends at-home yoga
be practiced in a warm room with
good light, a lightly scented candle or
incense and enough room to stretch in
every direction. A yoga mat, according
to Gallanis' book, is not necessary. A


beach towel works just fine.
Okay let's be honest here. I
have only been to a few yoga classes
myself, so I decided to practice yoga
under the guidance of Gallanis' book
for two weeks straight and see what I
noticed.
I set up my beach towel, turned on
some relaxing jazz, lit my
zi-Antich favorite lavender-scented
candle and floated away
into yoga land.
Poses went from being
uncomfortable to interest-
ing, and then rewarding.
My firsthand experience
let me see that yoga will not
only improve flexibility, but it will also
tone especially in the abdominal
region.
Schmalbach explained why the
abdominals received such a great
workout.
"Yoga targets the core in an incred-
ible way," Schmalbach says. "Your
abdominals are engaged in every
exhalation. It targets your abs just by
breathing, but once you start moving
oh yeah."
So try and streeeeeeetch yourself
thin. You might be surprised.


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Thu 3-30: MATES OF STATE with Maria Taylor $10
Sat 4-1: THE BOOKS with Grizzly Bear $10
Sun 4-2: New Panic Tour 2006 Doors at 5:30 $6
Sat 4-8: Voice of the People, Edan Archer
Tue 4-11: HIGH ON.FIRE Goatwhore, Watch Them Die $10
Wed 4-12: KRS ONE, Cyne, JTodd $15
Thu 4-13: Dear and Glorious Physician, Swayze
Fri 4-14: AGAINST ALL AUTHORITY $8


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--_Mom


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12, ALLIGATOR E THURSDAY, MARCH 30; 2006


Re-vamped show offers TV time for local bands


By KENT RUSSELL
Avenue Writer

In a town long since bloated with
guitar picks, where garage walls
swell from one too many power
chords, a man looks to found a mu-
sical empire.
Steve "Wolfman" Veninga prefers
to say that he's invested, not wasted,
a couple years and more than
$13,000 to realize his lifelong musi-
cal dreams. And in a few weeks, he
hopes everyone will know.


"Underground Downtown TV,"
the hour-long music variety show
Wolfman created to promote local
independent musicians, was yanked
from public airwaves in early
January. Out of the original's poorly
produced, sloppily edited ashes will
emerge a new "UDTV" in about a
month one Wolfman believes will
reflect his love of music and desire to
nurture fledgling artists.
Wolfman, who earned his
moniker eight years ago thanks to
a goatee longer than a T-ball bat,
doesn't like to call the upcoming


"UDTV" programs "Season Two."
It draws too many parallels between
his original program where half the
crew was tanked before finishing
the day's filming, he
said.
Local "I was so disap-
Music pointed with how
some of the episodes
<< were coming out, I
S was ashamed to put
my name on the prod-
uct," Wolfman said about his first
year of "UDTV."
But now he's tuning a tighter


"UDTV" that'll be 30 minutes short-
er and will hopefully air on a regular
cable channel like UPN.
He calls it "'Headbangers Ball'
meets 'Talk Soup.'"
"We want to be able to not only
promote the music scene, but also
help it grow," he said.
Wolfman's grand scheme also
includes live concerts for bands he
works with he's held shows reli-
giously at Eddie C's since January.
"We just provide the stage,"
said Eddie Clark, who's owned the
lounge for 22 years. "When I was a


kid, everybody wanted to start their
own newspaper. I think that paral-
lels what [Wolfman] is doing."
Wolfman foresees bands contact-
ing him to play at his gigs, have
a live video shot and then have it
played on "UDTV," all at a third of
the price being offered elsewhere.
"Bands from Orlando and
Miami are actually now contacting
Wolfman to get on to some of the
shows," said Xavier Acorea, mem-
ber of Black Web Media, a promoter
for Wolfman. "It's not like a small
Gainesville thing anymore."


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THURSDAY, MARCH 30, 2006 0 ALLIGATOR, 13


Nature on a dime

CHEAP THRILLS from page 10

mals and lush plants provide beautiful scenery
and a nice study break (not to mention the
great stair-climbing workout). The park is open
Wednesday through Sunday from 9 a.m. to 5
p.m. Admission is $2 a vehicle or $1 for pedestri-
ans and bicyclists.

Great game debate

VIDEO GAME, from page 10

rather than focusing on better ways to convey
an idea or emotion, video game creators have
been preoccupying themselves with the physics
of shooting a Nazi's eyeball through the back of
his skull.
But it's a fledgling industry. I can only hope
that in 30 years, when my ungrateful niece
tells me she's bored and that my house smells
like cabbage, I can whip out a dusty copy of
"Monster Jam: Maximum Destruction," and
she'll wonder why we ever bothered play-
ing games at all. Either that or she and I will
take turns stomping invalids in "Grand Theft
Hovercraft: Eugene, Oregon."


U


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t C iit. L:r o me .

iIa 3.S borcIer
arCuurnd I-h empty





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THURSDAY, MARCH 30, 2006 ALLIGATOR, 13


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14, ALLIGATOR U.THURSDAY, MARCH.30, 2006'',


Liquid Ginger Asian Grille
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steaksl and =tir-fry r. a relaxing upscale
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Mildred's Big City Food
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always, generous portions, fast service & super
lunch/dinner combos. FREE DEUVERY
613 NW 16th Ave. 3724282.
Full menu and specials @
GainesvilleGoldenBuddha.com.






Gyros Plus
1011 W. University Ave. 11-10 Mon-Sun
336-5323. We have the best Falafel, Tabouli,
-Hummus, Bab,. Grape Leaves & Gyros-beef or
chicken. Fresh smoothie bar & Baklava. Pita
Bread Bakery at 2401 SW 13th St., 372-
4995. \A'e sell hookahs parts, ciarcoals fine
tobacco and halal meat.


The New Deal Cafe
Conristcrrl,, .eso caT burger in Gaine s'itle.
either be. o s.''ra c r include: satla3 dessert,
BmanT.r-. r.lne Ist ?'Ba3 Jnrierst., A.& -
371 .-;4 ",
J.N' i!drei--l ,'[. fcC, cort






Virtually Cuban
Finally! Authentic Cuban food at an affordable
price! Virtually Cuban serves a savory selec-
tion of Cuban dishes, like Ropa Vieja made with
tender shredded beef in a tomato-based wine
sauce, or tender slow-roasted pork. All meals
are served with rice and your choice of beans,
yuca or plantains to satisfy your craving for
real Cuban food Virtually Cuban also offers
a variety of sandwiches pressed on warm
Cuban bread, f"e ,' 'acTries, Cuban coffee and
appetizers. And with an array of vegetarian
optio-n- sier Z -rs m zi ning for everyone! Why
wai;? Corme experience the best Cu bar food in
Gainesville! 2409 SW 13th Street. Mon-Sat.
11am -9pm.Sun. 12prr 4pm:336-4125 or
Ji~i'\.i Liit'.j.jiiytiUiai *Ccm VCL'f Erl' srl"


Deja Brew Cafe
This is a coffee shop Th3t s'-.ioula ore a stop on
everyone's list. Deja Er., sa-'r.es 2in'- f';",ast r-,f-
f&e irn r r'u E !..n ..",' f-in, C'il-ee. spe';:atI1 Orr-l .5
gourmet pastries and more. All served to you by
e rl ij; l, r J-, '- c. d~ e tjl-ar'l- t D'jh t rew is
spear E 3'-0a-i!-12:30am seven days a week, so
you will have plenty of time to enjoy one or more
of your favorite drinks. Hope to see you there!
1412 V 'Jr.,i r-i, Ave 372-6169

\ ^ ... ^ _____


Bento Cafe
3830 W. Newberry Rd Suite 15 Royal Park
Plaza Ineai to Gator Docis'idei Enjoy sushi, rice
bowls, noodle bowls, and bento boxes. Try our
Eoba Tea with over 30 different flavors. First
in Gainesville in a trendy, hip armosphere Open
everyday 11 am-10:30pm. Carry-out or dihe-in
checkout our menu at Gatorfood.com.
- 77-8686.






Junior's
Gainesville's premiere spot for southern style
rome-cooking. Featuring fresh greens, maca-
roni and cheese, fried chicken, pork chops, and
more. Lunch buffet Tues. & Fri., 11 am-3pm.
Breakfast Sat. & Sun. 7am-1 am. Saturday
seafood buffet 11 am-Bpm. Sunday buffet
1 lam-8pm. 121i8 N. Main St. Call 371-8008.







Caf6 Jerusalem
Delicious Gornmet .Koshi-r drning rr F:3/'s Place
inside thenew Hill building Lunch served 11:
30am-2pm and dinner 6pm-Bpm daily. Ray's
Place serves .a variety of dishes. You didn't
think Cacciatore could be Kosher? How about
Jerk Chicken? Beef Lo Mein? All this plus
traditional Jewish dishes and Deli; fresh soup
& salad bar ,.-egetaran entrei, and home-
made de-sierts Shabbat dinner F-rdav; Meal
Plans and C3t-'eirg evailatblj. 01' Campus Dining
Cards Accepted. iDelivery available r.hrougli
Gatorfood.com. Weekend hours vary.
372-29L0 D 2020 Vv. Jin-,erlrty Ave

Leonardo's 706
Serving gouririer. pasTas, california pizzas, fresh
fish, steak, chops, salads, and desserts. Live jazz
7:30pm Monday and Tr,.irsday Sunriay brunch
10:30am featuring international brunch buffet
with never-endiing mimosas .starting at
1:00pm. Open 5-11 pm Mon.-Thurs. Open until
midnight Friday and Saturday. Sunday brunch
10:30am, dinner 4-11 pm. Call 378-2001 for
reservations or carry-out. Or visit our website at
www.Leonardos706.com






El Toro
You've had the rest, now try the BEST Mexican
food in Gainesville. Loved by Gators past and
present. Best homemade salsa in town. Open
7 days a week for lunch and dinner. 1723 SW
13th St. Take out and catering available. Live
music 2nd and 4th Saturday of the month.

Burrito Brothers
Serving Gainesville since 1976.'Made to
order, made from scratch. Many vegetarian
& vegan items available. Open 7 days, 11am-
1.Opm. 1402 W. University Ave. 378-5948;
www.burritobros.com
v . ., ^






THURSDAY, MARCH 30, 2006 E ALLIGATQR, 15


the Guide

to dining out
/




.


Tapas 12 West
e'j.r, I f. ul-'J c.rrnrrr ,,itr.,' Let your tastes
.on- A ,r.hibt i'tas, Ife ci;.er,-ur OL r : pp-i.;-_er.
m.:r,- asr-d p.,rirei, rap, .-. i, lr ed by cuisines the
.'jr'd over, will have you partaking of more than
one dish at a meal. Share orders with friends
and send your tastes on a world tour. We're
,.pe r'-t'.d b< tiF -'j,..'r nir:ir'j -. ff of Steve's
Cafe Americain's Courtyard and c,.f.r H Fp' '-
Hour prices from 5 to 7'-r., i.':r d, ''."J
Saturday.
12 West University Ave. 377-9468





Saigon Legend
.l, :,i', .r:dr.j ,,n' Vietnamese cuisine with
OI:uiar' Asian favorites as well. P; ,.. :-"r,-Cuon,
Banh Xeo, Banh Torn Ha-Noi. Enjoy great food
at great prices. Big new room! Family owned
restaurant, (Ii o 4..41T., *- .l:.,, r,-,,v
Dine in or take out. Catering available.
Mon-Sat 0 .-0.' _F '3- 'p-. Sun 11 3 ',' iprr
374-0934, 1228 W. Univ. Ave.





Farah's
Gainesville's premiere Hookah Lounge A
landmark since 1980. Ser,.; -,o ... & dinner
in our glass atrium or dine by our fireplace.
Famous for our award-winning wings, burgers,
steaks, and gyros. Large mediterranean menu.
Drink specials daily. Enjoy our cozy Hookah
Lounge. We sell only the finest of pipes, natural
charcoal and premium tobacco. Saturday night
belly dancing performances. Call for details.
mon tues 11am-10pm
wed fri 11 am-midnight
sat noon midnight
closed sunday 378-5179
1120 university ave. Next to Bank of America


Mildred's Big City Food
f'.-'e;i: r n- ,.3 0.,; r.,, i.,i ra ,:.n i b.i org*.ir. >nc ic ot'; .
uro. lu.: r '-, r r-.7i.. r ,e ; l -i ta I '
L1 re -i-; 'I..' *l-'V T .: C-.' :.:,r f ,- l. .- ,O.s



I J,- _

Geor.ges at Phil Nicks, Inc.

.-, "6r,,: r '.. s' p r-. r., r. Ij.r..:lie partt.,r.

S&ca w nstt iOf. l ':. 'i '.










Leonardo's Plza
Pizza legend since 1973. Whole pizzas &
slices. Open 7 days a week 9am-11 pm Sun-
Thurs.; Fri & Sat till 12am. Call ahead for
pickup ': 5-.' -U7. For delivery call 379-FOOD.
Located next to Bistro 1245. Leao's Cafe open
daily Sam. Flavored coffees, espressos & fresh
baked pastries. 1245 W Univ Ave. 375-7007
www.Leonardos706.com

Meifow Mushroom
Take a trip to mellowmushroom.com. Since
1974, we've been di, : u z.-q. -.il ingre-
dients in all of :i, Ec7ilr h. r- r,.-, & 1
hoagies, and scrumptious salads. And yes, we
deliver, Dom. Buckets $7, Mon. Trivia 9pm $.
1209 W. University Ave. 367-0E 1.





lennigan's
Happy Hour specials all day everyday. Great food
and attentive service. 3208 SW Archer Road
373-2800. ipe.- [,.:-.,..d:'5.: -3a 1 lm-2am,
Sun 11-11.


for information
contact
Adrian K. Marshall at

Alligator Advertising
376.4482


atl ltd -igatorfida


alligator


I~-r~nrul,,,~cl~nuess=~rpa~,, iP








BUY IT. SELL IT. IT. 373-FIND







Classifieds

THURSDAY, MARCH 30,2006


ALLIGATOR
www.alligator.org/class


*I For Rent 3
furnished

*SICK.F SHARING A BATHROOM?*
Get your own this fall!
2Br/2Ba'flats, *3Br/3Ba townhms
FREE Tanning, WID, 24hr gym
PC Lab, Gated, All Amenities, Pt Friendly
Leasing for FALL*377-2777
4-26-72-1

Super Clean Studio
Walk to Shands-
Annual lease
Now as low as $355 monthly
inc all utilities ph 336-9836
4-26-72-1

NEED ROOMMATES?!
All Inclusive 3's and 4's
FREE Roommate Matching
FREE Cable, Utilities, Intemet
FREE Furn, Tanning, 24hr Fitness Center
Ask About our Huge 212.5 Townhouses
336-3838 TheLandingsUF.com
Convenient Bus Route!
4-26-72-1

Just Bring Your Clothes
Preleasing Huge 2&3 Beds
-Cable *W/D*Pool*Gym*Pets Ok
All we need is you! 372-8100
www.greenwichgreen.net
4-26-72-r '

NEWLY RENOVATED
HUGE 1,2, & 3BR Pool
Affordable & Quiet living
Indv lease avail* 1.5 miles to UF
Renting for Fall 377-7401 4-26-72-1

1, 2, 3, 4BR Apts.
www.ApartmentslnGainesville.com
4-26-72-1

GET YOURS!
Furnished Luxury @ Its Finest
PC lab New 24 hr GYM*
Located in the heart of G'ville!
From $499 352-271-3131
4-26-72-1

FREE PARKING AT UF
Roll Out of Bed & Into Class
$439 Gets you all this!
Fully Furnished, Free Ethernet, Free Cable
w/HBO, FREE UTILITIES, W/D,
Roommate match. 379-9300
4-26-72-1

ACTION REALTY
Furnished apartments close to UF
Individual Bedroom Leases
Semester leases
$399-$620/MO
www.action-realtocs.com
352-331-1133
4-14-61-1

UNBEATABLE MAY SPECIALS!
2BR/2BA*3BR/3BA*4BR/4BA
Roommate matching*Cable w/5
HBO's*FREE ethernet*Cyber Cafe*
2 Pools*24 Hr Gym*Tanning
Leasing for May! *373-9009
4-26-52-1

GET REAL @
LEXINGTON CROSSING!
2BfR/2BA*3BR/3BA*4BR/4BA
RMM Match*Cable w/5 HBO's
FREE Ethernet* Cyber Cafe
2 Pools*24 Hr Gym*Tanning
373-9009
4-26-52-1

HUGE Townhouses
The closest apts to UF! Rent includes:
Ethernet, Electric, Cable, Roommate Match,
Furniturefpackage. Indiv leases! 372-3557
VIRTUAL TOURS & PHOTOS
www.LiveNearCampus.com
4-26-50-1


* For Rent
furnished

SPACIOUS 4BR CONDO! LESS THAN
ONE MILE FROM UF. Spring & annual
leases. 4BR/4BA w/pvt. BA all util. incl. $400/
MO each. CALL NOW 954-560-7286 3-
31-17-1

Countryside Condo 4BR/4BA Ethernet,
util incl., W/D, nicely furnished, secure,
excercise/pool, bus to UF 3 mi. $465/mo/rm.
Vanessa 352-217-3564, Flo 352-357-9656
or 352-634-4814, Sebastion 352-874-8905
4-26-27-1

Cable, ethernet, util, wireless & much more
are free & waiting for you at LaMancha. All
you need is your clothes. Full amenities.
Walk to campus. 4rms avail. Summer leases
avail. .$385 jmj4all@ufl.edu. 561-386-8526
4-4-10-1

* LOCATION, LOCATION *
Windsor Hall. Luxury living for women.
2 Blks to UF. Rent incl furniture, utils,
cable, ethernet, pvt BA, kitchenette,
security, pool, gym, sundeck.
352-337-9255 or www.windsorhall.com.
4-26-26-1

Live in Luxury this Summer!
Brand new 2 bed, 2.5 baths walk to shops,
movies, restaurants and cable, wi-fi, utilities
included! Call Scott at 954-288-7762

Roommates wanted for 4 bedroom house
with pool. Two miles from UF. Some furniture
available. Move in starting Summer. $465/
MO includes everything. Call (954) 401-3738
4-5-10-1

Room for rent great house, nice neighbor-
hood, 1 mile from UF, room has private entry
& bath, wireless, parking, porch. Available
Aug. $350/mo + 1/4 utils. one year lease.
Call 514-7289. 3-30-5-1

Collegiate Living Organization
Summer leases. Includes util, ethernet,
meals & parking. Only 1 block from campus.
377-4269
Only $460/Summer A or B, $920/Summer C
4-26-23-1

UTG, 10 min to UF & Shands
2BR/2BR May 1-Aug 1 $350/mo
352-472-9778 or 305-299-3485 4-7-10-1

4BR/4BA CONDO. University Terrace West.
SW 20th Ave. W/D, $350/mo per room. Avail
Aug 15th. Pool, hottub. Call 352-586-6468
4-26-21-1

2BR/2.5BA townhouse. Walk to campus.
W/D, parking, $800/mo + utils. 1-877-833-
2865 4-5-5-1

U For Rent )
unfurnished

*QUIET, CLEAN, LOTS of GREEN SPACE.
Rustic 1 BR apt. $345/mo.
01BR cottage $375/mo. Call 378-9220 or
mobile 213-3901.4-26-72-2

Available Now at UF
1 and 2 Br's from $555
Laundry on site. Pets ok!
Wood floors, balconies available.
Open until 8PM Weekdays 371-7777
4-26-72-2

LYONS SPECIAL
$99 1st month's rent
377-8797
4-26-72-2

Wake up & walk to UF
Studios & 1 bedrooms
Starting @ $489
Pet friendly, Pool
*Come See! 372-7111*
4-26-72-2


For Rent
0 unfurnished

AUGUST AVAILABILITY!
* 1,2 & 3 BR's! HUGE Floorplans!
* Water/sewer included! Pets OK
* Affordable $559-$799
* Bus/Bike to UF* 335-7275 4-26-72-2

BIG CITY LIVING DOWNTOWN
Stylish Studios, 1/1's, 2/2's, & 3/3's
Pool *Alarm Pets Welcome
Leasing for Fall: 338-0002
4-26-72-2

*SUN ISLAND APTS.
*Some furnished availed
**Walk or Bike to Campus S*
1-1 $480/moO*2-1 $540/mo
www.sunisland.info 0**376-6720
4-26-72-2

1 & 2BR apts. convenient to shopping, bus
line, and just a few miles from UF. Located
off SW 20th Ave. $419 $495, incl water,
sewer, pest control & garbage. Sorry no pets
allowed. Call 335-7066.4-26-72-2

AFFORDABLE & QUALITY TOO!
* Your Home For Fall! Great Rates!
* 1BR from $489 2BR from $559
* Beautiful pools/courtyards Pets OK
* Walk/Bike to UF 372-7555 4-26-72-2

*CLOSE TO EVERYTHING*
Our Luxury 2BR Town Homes &.3BR Flats
Starting at only $1034 with many freebees.
FREE cable w/HBO & Show
Fitness Center*Tanning*Pool*Pets
Leasing NOW/FALL*379-9255
4-26-72-2

Deluxe, Large 3 or 4BR apt/house, 60
second walk to UF. Remodeled, Old House
charm. Central AC, washer/dryer included.
Wood floors. With Parking. By Private
Owner. 538-2181 Iv message 4-26-72-2

COZY, CONVENIENT, CLOSE!
1 & 2 bedrooms for Fall
pool, tennis bball, alarms
FREE UF PARKING
376-4002 Pinetreegardens.com
4-26-72-2

Deluxe, large one or two bedroom, 60 sec-
ond walk to UF. Wood firs, washer dryer
included, fireplace, patio deck. Can furnish.
Short term available. Private Owner. $495-
up. 352-538-2181. Lv mssg 4-26-72-2

*NEAR SCHOOL NEAR PLAY
NEAR PERFECT!*
1 BR/1 BA*2BR/2BA*3BR/3BA TH
Close to UF!*Gated*24hr Gym*Tanning
Leasing for FALL*377-2777
4-26-72-2

BEAUTIFUL AND NEW
Ceramic Tile, Maple Cabinets, TV in kitchen
Huge scr. porches, W/D, walk-in closets
Only 1.5 miles to UF
2/2's & 3/3's starting at $458/person
Hidden Lake 374-FUNN
4-26-72-2

** ELLIE'S HOUSES **
Quality single family homes. Walk or bike to,
UF. www.ellieshouses.com 352-215-4991 or
352-215-4990 12-6-168-2

Sun Bay Apartments
Summer Fall Special
Reduced summer rates on
15 Month lease, one bedroom apts.
352-376-6720 4-26-72-2

AFFORDABLE 2BRs at UF
From $589. Pets ok.
Laundry, Free Parking
Open Weekends. 371-7777
4-26-72-2


For Rent
unfurnished


STUDIOS ACROSS FROM UF
From $489. Pool.
Laundry. Pets ok
Free Parking. Avail Fall.
Open Weekends 371-0769
4-26-72-2

The Stuff Dreams are Made of
Luxury 1/1, 2/2 flats & 3BR/3BATownhomes
Free Cable w/ HBO/Sho, Tan, 24 hr gym,
Aerobics, W/D, Gated, Pet Friendly, Alarms
*The Laurels, 335-4455*
4-26-72-2

****FIDO FRIENDLY****
1 br $609, 2br $669, 3br $895
/ Near Butler Plaza Spacious *Alarms
Includes some utilities* Park FREE @UF
www.SpanishTrace.org 373-1111
4-26-72-2


ULTIMATE LUXURY
HUGE 2BR/2BA & 3BR/3BA TNHMS
W/D* Alarm*Gated*Garages* Tanning
ENDLESS AMENITIES- private dog park
FREE Cable* Close to UF & SFCC
Leasing for Summer/Fall 377-2801
4-26-72-2

*IBR & 2BR BEAUTIFUL"
NEW kitchen, tile, carpet, paint
3BR/2BA Flats 00 $839/mo
2BR/2BA Flats 00 $725/mo
2BR- over 1100 sq ft ** $725/mo
1BR-over 800 sq ft 00 $625/mo
Close to UF, beautiful, quiet
High-speed wireless internet
$450 deposit 376-2507
4-26-72-2

THE LUXURY YOU WANT...
AT THE PRICE YOU NEED
Remodeled HUGE 2 & 3 Beds
Cable*W/D*Tanning* We Love Pets
Why spend more? 372-8100
4-26-72-2


) 1


For Rent
unfurnished


HUGE*AFFORDABLE*1,2 & 3BR
Starting at just $639
Pool*Tennis Cts*1.5 Mi 2 UF
Indiv lease & Util Avail
Call Now 377-7401*
4-26-72-2

CLOSE TO CAMPUS
Available now!
2BR/1BAApt. $475
2BR/1.5BAApt. $575
MITCHELL REALTY 374-8579x1 4-26-72-2

Be the BIGGEST on the block!
1 or 2BR this FALL. We love ALL pets!
Pool, Gym, Park @ UF, Bball, Tennis
Call 4 Specials! 352-332-7401
4-26-72-2


STUDIO'APT.
60 Sec. walk to UF. 1 or 2 rooms. Short
term avail. $350 & up. Call 352-538-2181
4-26-72-2

BIG & CHEAP
2/1.5 apt 1100 sq. ft. $595
3/2 apt 1300 sq ft $695
1800 NW 4th St. Over 20 houses also avail.
373-4423 www.maximumre.com
8-16-131-2


Campus Realty
Great home's for rent in the
UF area! 352-692-3800
www.campusrealtygroup.com/rentals
4-26-72-2

GIGANTIC
1,2, & 3 BR flats w/porches
FREE Alarm, FREE Tanning, W/D
24hr Gym, PC Lab, Pool, w/Sundeck
Gated Entry 372-0400
4-26-71-2


"Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


6


- -


- a


)lr~CI bc~t~~c







THURSDAY, MARCH 30, 2006 U ALLIGATOR, 17


-Fl or Rent
i unfurnished


BIG LUXURY
2/2 Flats & 3/3 Townhomes w/Garage
FREE Tanning*FREE Alarms*W/D*
Cyber Cafe*Gated Entry*Screened Porches
24hr Gym & Sauna*Pool w/Sundeck
We Love Pets* ONLY 1.5 miles to UF
Now Leasing for Fall*372-0400
4-26-71-2

NEWLY REMODELED AT UF
Studios and 1BR's from $599
Central Air/Wood Floors available
Reserve for Fall 371-7777
4-26-69-2

ACROSS FROM UF
Studios/1/2 BRs from $589
Central Air, Wood Floors.
Pets ok, Laundry on site.
Reserve for Fall 371-0769
4-26-69-2

ACTION REALTY
Individual and Semester Leases
Available immediately
Convenient UF access. $375 to ;620/MO
352-331-1133
www.action-realtors.com
4-14-61-2

Live at a Legend!
The Polos of Gainesville
will give you the best college experience
with Spacious Apartments, Three Pools
with Jacuzzis, HUGE Gym, Billiards Room,
and many more amenities! Minutes from UF,
shopping and Shands. On all major RTS bus
routes. All at a iate that won't break your
bank! Call now for specials: 335-7656 4-
26-69-2

1BR & 2BR/1BA with W/D, central heat/air,
dishwasher, ceramic tile, private patio, pets
arranged. Off SW 34th St. Near bus rt. From
$545. 377-1633 4-26-18-2

Gator Place 2br/1ba condo, newly renovat-
ed, d/w, hkups, near Shands/Vet School/bus
lines edbaurmanagement.com 375-7104
4-26-65-2

SW Lg 1br, lba. Walk-in closet, d/w, w/d
hkups, near Shands, Vet School & UF, $395
- $425 edbaurmanagement.com 375-71C4
4-26-65-2

Apartment Bargain Shoppers.
Check out our spacious 1 &2 BR. units &
compare the $$. Our location, price & size
will have you puzzled.
Call ahead to avoid waiting 376-1248.
4-26-64-2



%d 0 9


0 unfurnished


PRIVATE BACKYARD
1/1, 2/2, & 3/2 Villas with backyard
Newly Renovated, Full Appliances
FREE cable w/HBO & Showtime
Starting at $428/person
Hidden Lake 374-FUNN (3866)
4-26-62-2

MORE BANG FOR YOUR BUCK
3 & 4 Bedrooms for Fall!
FREE UF PARKING, tennis,
Affordable, Pool, Pets, Alarm
376-4002 Pinetreegardens.com
4-26-60-2

*Picture Perfect, Quiet Living*
1 BR/1BA & 3BR/2BA flats
W/D, Alarms, Pets OK
Close to UF, Shopping & Restaurants
Aspen Ridge, 367-9910.
4-26-60-2

MORE FOR YOUR MONEY
1, 2, & 3 BR Apartments Starting @ $380.
352-331-8225 or 332-5070. 4-26-57-2

MINUTES FROM UF!!!
3/3's from only $405 per Bdrm
4/4's from only $374 per Bdrm
FREE Cable w/ HBO/ SHOWTIME
FREE Tanning, 24hr Fitness Center
Ask About our Huge 2/2.5 Townhouses
336-3838 TheLandingsUF.com
Convenient Bus Route!
4-26-60-2

Destiny Condos- Brand NEW!
1BR/1BA;tile, W/D, dishwasher
1220 NW 1stAve- Walk to UF!
Call for pricing.Campus Realty 692-3800
2-20-20-2

BLOCKS TO UF! 4BR houses from $1500/
MO, 3BR houses from $1075/MO, 2BR apts
from $495/MO, 1BR apts from $450/MO.
Owner operated. See dalyproperties.com
)r Call Carol 377-3852 4-26-55-2

Village Loft Apts. 1BR Loft apts. 650 & 750
*q. t. Starting @ $490MO Quiet, wooded
setti lg. FREE monitored alarm system. 6400
SW 20th Ave. Call 332-0720 3-31-30-2

Lofts & Townhomes
Sign now for Aug! 20flplns 1-5BR next to UF
VIRTUAL TOURS & PHOTOS
www.LiveNearCampus.com 376-6223
4-26-50-2


6 *s*


"Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"

















.-- "


S For Rent
unfurnished


Walk to UF and Shands
1BR/1BA $375-$475
2BR/1.5BA Townhouse
Washer/Dryer $575
Gore-Rabell Realty 378-1387
www.gore-rabell.com
4-26-44-2

HISTORIC APARTMENTS DOWNTOWN
2.5 BR upper, hardwood floors, ceiling
fans, front and back porches. $750/mo.
Efficiency $450/mo includes utilities. No
Dogs. First, last security. 378-3704.
3-31-21-2

JONESVILLE NEW LUXURY TOWNHOME
3BR/2.5BA. Pets ok. All new appliances.
Central H/A. 15 min to UF. $1300/mo 352-
472-9778 or 305-299-3485 4-3-20-2

PET'S PARADISE
No app or pet fee. 2BR, fireplace, new
carpet, privacy fence, W/D hkup. Dog walk.
4511 SW 71 Terr $490/mo Call 331-2099.
Private owner please leave detailed msg.
4-4-20-2

BIKE TO UF!
Large luxury unit $825/MO
2BR/2.5BA, swimming pool
Peartree Realty Inc. '
Realtor 352-335-3802 4-5-20-2

HOUSES, DUPLEXES, CONDOS, OR
TOWNHOUSES Walk/bike/bus to UF. Neat,
clean good quality. Visit www.gatorpads.com
for available units or call 281-0733 or 284-
0316. 8-16-58-2

YOU SHOULD LIVE THIS WELL AFTER
YOU FINISH SCHOOL!! Brand new 3BR/
3BA houses 3 blks. North of O'Dome near
UF. Top quality throughout with every ame-
nity plus location. $2000/mo. 2 Avail. early
July. No pets. K&M Properties. 372-1509
3-31-16-2

3BR/1.5BA HOUSE
Large fenced backyard with screened porch.
W/D. Pets ok. Avail May 1, $900/mo. Call
352-466-7091. 4-6-20-2

5BR/3BA house w/large bedrooms. Located
off SW 34th Street within 1 mile of Butler
Plaza. On RTS Route 12. Biking distance to
UF. $1995/MO. See www.bellaproperties.net
for more. Call 335-5424 3-31-15-2

TOP QUALITY, GREAT LOCATIONS.
Upsale 1 and 2BR apts One block to campus
on north and east side. Year leases avail.
beginning summer or fall. No pets.
K&M Properties. 372-1509 3-31-15-2

Luxurious Victoria Station Condo.
2BR/2.5BA, W/D, alarm, internet, bus route
every 15 mins. 1 mile from UF. Avail for fall.
352-222-4235. $875/MO. Walking distance
to Butler Plaza 4-26-33-2

3bd/1.5ba house. N.W. area. Central AC/HT,
ceiling fans. Extra space for den or home of-
fice. Carpet and tile. W&D hook ups. Fenced
back yard and private drive way. $930 one
year or $870 two year lease. Call (352) 375-
6754. No section 8. 4-7-20-2

2bd/2ba house. N.W. area. Up-scale neigh-
borhood. Well equipped kitchen. Central Ac/
Ht. Ceiling fans. Screened back porch, W&D.
2 car garage. Fenced back yard. New paint
and tile. $890 one year or $850 two years
lease. No section 8. Call (352) 375-6754
4-7-20-2

SAVE $$$, GET MORE!
3BR/2BA for less than $300/person
B-ball, Comp lab, Gym, FREE UF parking
www.SpanishTrace.org 373-1111
4-26-49-2

SAVE YOUR MONEY
at Ventura Apts. Get 1/2 off April rent on our
large 2BR apts. W/S/T/P incl. Pet friendly.
Open Sat. 10-5. Ventura Apartments. 1902
SW42nd Way. 352-376-5065 3-31-14-2

1105 NW 14th Ave. Avail. May 10. 3BR/
2BA. 2000 sq. ft. 1 mi from UF. $1200/mo.
Andree Realty. 352-375-2900 4-10-20-2


1 For Rent
I a ll unfurnished


GREAT HOUSES FOR FALL *
Close to UF. Fenced yards
Email: SBR@JacksonLLC.com
1614 NW 21st Avenue 3/2 $1000
2006 NW 35th St 4/2 $1365
520 NW 52nd Terr 3/2 $975
600 NW 54th Terr 3/2 $1155
4430 NW 16th PI 3/2 $1485
918 NW 39th Ave 3/1 $750
4-26-31-2

**10 BLOCKS TO UF**
Quaint 1BR/1BA apts in historic Victorian
house. High ceilings, wood floors, ceiling
fans, AD/Ht. $475/mo avail Aug 1st. 225 SW
3rd Ave. Some pets ok. 376-2184 4-4-15-2

S3 BLKS FROM TIGERT HALL 2BR/1BA
apt, cent A/C, new paint, $630/mo. Upstairs/
hd wood floors. $610/mo downstairs/carpet.
Incl. water, sewer, trash, pest cont. Laundry
on site. No pets,. Avail 8/1/06 352-316-4474
4-4-13-2

3BR/2BA 1700 sq ft house for rent. Wood
floors, screen porch, jacuzzi, W/D. 1 mi
south of campus. Avail 8/1. $1300/mo. Call
352-258-9116 4-13-20-2

Avail April 1st! Classiest apts in town! 2BR/
ba $974/mo. We'll pay deposit. Pool, sauna,
full gym, tan bed. Please call 561-324-1768
orAIM kdobson22785 4-4-10-2

Avail May-Aug. All units 1/2 mi from UF
campus. Eff $340; 1BR/1BA $475-$445;
2BR/2.5BA $750; 2BR/1BA $715-$550;
3BR/2BA$1000. SD, NS, no pets, 1 yr lease.
Call 904-513-1431 or gvll32601@gmail.com
4-26-26-2

*******AVAILABLE NOW*******
* 2BR w/wood floors & fenced yard. Walk to
UF. 1010 NW 3rd Ave. $500/mo.
* 1BR downtown. 216 SW 3rd Ave. $395/
mo. Call 371-3260 4-4-10-2

KensingtonNictoria Station
Townhouses for rent. 2BR/2.5BA.
Contact Robin
954-802-4499 or 954-433-4339
4-4-10-2

FORGET YOU HAVE ROOMMATES!
Huge 4BR townhomes w/W/D. 1662 sq.ft.
FREE gym membership!
352-332-7401 4-26-26-2

SORORITY ROW AREA *
Live in luxury @ Windsor Hall. 2 Blocks to
UF. Incl everything + pool, gym, sundeck.
Starting at $410/mo. 336-9255.
4-26-26-2

** WALK TO UF **
From any of our studio, 1, 2, 3, or 4BR
classic apts or vintage homes.
Starting at $350/mo.Come by
and pick up one of our availability lists @
821 NW 13th St. or call 375-8256
4-26-26-2

** WALK TO UF **
.4BR/1 BA beautiful brick house.
Hardwood floors, fireplace, centA/C,
$1600/mo. 313 NW 11th St. Call 375-8256
4-26-26-2

** WALK TO UF **
Sorority Row area. 2BR/1 BA apt in historic
stone building. Beautiful hardwood floors,
cent AC/heat, 911 SW 6th Ave.
$750/mo. 375-8256
4-26-26-2

*SORORITY ROW AREA*
Beautiful stone cottage. 3BR/1BA,
hardwood floors. Must see. $1300/m0.
375-8256
4-26-26-2

** 5 BLOCKS TO UF **
Beautiful 2Br/1BA w/hardwood floors &
fireplace. $1200/mo. Call 375-8256.
4-26-26-2
1 BR/1 BA No lease. Sunny courtyard. On bus
line. quiet neighborhood next to park. Free
water. No pets. $395/mo + $395 security
deposit. Call 374-7175. 3-31-8-2

LUXURY CONDOS! GOLF COMM
in Jonesville area 2/2.5 w/garage,
gated, b-ball ct, tennis, pool
gym, carwash, move-in spec avail
MAGNOLIA REALTY 352-200-4992
4-18-20-2


S For Rent
S unfurnished

**1 mo FREE rent*
Spacious 1/1 w/patib $490/mo. W/D, DW, c-
AC, Pets ok. Close to UF & on bus routes 12
& 35. Dan 352-359-3980. 4-4-10-2

AMAZING POOL HOME
SPACIOUS ROOMS IN GREAT LOCATION
You must see this 6BR/4.5BA
Within 2 miles of UF campus.
Call Eric for details 682-7424. 4-4-10-2

Spacious Rooms in Great Location
Great for Students.
You must see this 6BR/3BA
Bike or walk to campus
Call Eric for details 682-7424 4-4-10-2

WANTED: HOUSE
starting Aug. Middle age couple & 2 dogs.
Nice 3BR or more, 2000 sq ft. or larger.
Prefer close to UF & 1-story. 850-485-8989.
3-31-5-2

HISTORIC HOUSES DOWNTOWN.
Studio, 2BR, 1BR $375-750. Wood firs.
vaulted ceilings. Native landscape. Quaint
settings. Must see at::
pleasantstreet.net 4-26-24-2

1 Rm in 4Br/4Ba Countryside
Apt. Close to UF on bus rte. W/D, utils, cable
w/HBO, and DSL incl. $400/mo. No deposit.
F only. NS. ,954-328-2021. 4-6-10-2

HOUSES 1.5 mi to UF forAug. 1st.
630 NW 35th St. 3/2 fam. rm $1200, 611 NW
34th Terr. 3/2 fam rm. $1200, 642 NW 35th
St. 3/2 $1100, 816 NW 37th Dr3/2 fam& gar.
$1300. Please drive by then call 331-0095.
7-27-43-2

Avail May 1st. 1BR/1BA in triplex in quiet
neighborhood. $600/mo. 1st, last, & sec. Call
332-5585 4-6-10-2

2BR/1.5 BA TOWNHOUSE.
New carpet & appliances. DW. 1/2 mile to
campus, on bus route. 318-0964 3-31-5-2

3BR/2BA 1,800 sq. ft. on 1 acre, fenced in
NW close in $1325. 1BR/1BA private patio.
Small pets ok. In NW near Wards. $390
Andree Realty 284-7569 4-7-10-2

One BR apt. for rent. 1 person,, car, no
smoking, no pets, no fleas. It is small but has
it all. All util. pd. $360/MO, unfurnished. Call
Charlie "Whitey" Webb. 375-4373 Stop by
1215 NE 20th Ave. 4-7-10-2

Countryside apartment. Rent 2BR/2BA in a
4BR/4BA 1 room furnished, 1 room unfur-
nished for summer A-C; all utilities included.
Cable, ethernet, W/D, near pool. Info 305-
979-7862 OR 786-412-9337 4-14-15-2

Need one female roommate in new house
with wood floors. Free parking, utilities, and
wireless. Walk to campus. $500/mo. Call
603-231-7798 4-3-5-2

1BR 1BAapts 1 BLK TO UF
1236 SW 4th Ave $485/mo
Carpet, Central H & Air
Laundry Facilities. Call
Merrill Management Inc. 372-1494
3-30-3-2
1 Block to UF! Across from Stadium
Efficiency Apt w/ shared bathroom
$285/mo. Does not have full kitchen.
1834 NW 1stAvenue. Call Merrill
Management Inc 372-1494 3-30-3-2

3 BLKS TO UF!
1BR 1BAApt with xtra room
1029 SW 3rd Avenue $485/mo
Carpet, Central H &Air. Call
Merrill Management Inc 372-1494 3-30-3-2

1BR 1BAApt 1 BLKTO UF!
1218 SW 3rd Ave $435/mo
Carpet, Window A/C, Nat Gas ht
Includes Wtr, Swg, pst control. Call
Merrill Management Inc 372-1494 3-30-3-2

2BR 1BAApt 5 Blks'to UF
840 Sq ft. $550/mo. St. CroixApts
Central H &Air, Inclds Wtr, Swg, Pst Ctrl
& Garbage. 829 SW 5th Avenue
Call Merrill Management Inc 372-1494
3-30-3-2

Classifieds...
Continued on next page.





18, ALLIGATOR 0 THURSDAY, MARCH 30, 2006


I For Rent
a l unfurnished


Union Street Station 2BR/2BA luxury
apartment. W/D, alarm, Berber carpet, bal-
cony, 3rd floor, free parking. $1250/mo. Call
Eric @ 352-870-9453 4-24-20-2
705 NW 10th Ave. Spacious home. 8 rooms
+ 400 sq ft screened porch. 3BR/1BA,
W/D, short bike to UF. $1230/mo + util.
No pets. Lease for fall. 275-1259. Email
ATucker458@aol.com 4-10-10-2
**1 mo FREE RENT**
Spacious,"4/1 w/patio $490/mo
W/D, DW, C-AC, Pets Ok
Close to UF & On bus rts. 12&35
Avail. Now! Dan 352-359-3980 4-4-5-2
CUTE STUDIO APT
Private Entrance, own yard, Lg. living space,
Mexican tile floors, full kitchen, bath, smoke-
free, Veg/egan pref. $475/ mo. Inc. util.
352-337-2723. 3-31-3-2


1 Bedroom/1 Bath
Sundown apts. Avail. Sat, May 6
Prorate May rent $445/465 w/pet
behind Butler'Plaza Bus Route 1
Call Trisha 352-208-4261
4-4-5-2


TIRED OF NOISY NEIGHBORS ABOVE
YOU?
2BR/2BA Flat
FREE Tanning, W/D, Huge 24 hr gym, PC
Ilab,
Gated. Pet Friendly, All anenities, Free
Cable
Leasing for Fall, 377-277
4-26-19-2
Large 4BR/2BA house. Bike to UF! Central
AC/heat, W/D, newish' kitchen, icemaker,
DW, disposal, fenced yard, quiet, huge
garage, no dogs. $1590/mo 665-8166 3-
31-2-2
House 2BR/1BA, 3 blocks to UF/Norman
Hall area. Central AC/heat, wood floors,
fenced yard, pets maybe. $780. 665-8166
3-31-2-2


EU


Subleases


Spacious ~ BR/BA in a 4BR/BA. Apartment
in The Landings on SW 13th ST. $360/mo
plus utils. Call Scott at 352-514-4356. Avail.
immediately. 3-30-51-3
1BR/BA avail, in 4BR apt. Campus Club.
Individual lease, Furnished, priv/BA, $400-
includes EVERYTHING. Avail. starting May.
ContactAlicia 352-246-3302. 4-6-20-3
New site offers solution for subleasers: a
marketplace to match leasers with tenants!
Only national service of its kind. No mat-
ter the need, you can find it here! Free to
register! Visit: www.SubleaseAuction.com
4-6-20-3
Fall Spring Sublease
2BR/1.5BA townhome on SW 13th
Close to UF, on bus route 13,
$699/MO utilities .
Call Emma (904) 887-6118 3-31-15-3
Summer Sublease 1BR/1BA in fully fur-
nished 4BR/4BA at Countryside. $300/mo
utils incl (internet, cable). washer & dryer in
apt. Call 904-705-1689 3-31-10-3
Campus Lodge. 3BR/3BA
3rd fl, furnished, utilities, cable.
Ethernet, tanning bed incl., no dep.
$480/mo. Lease ends Aug. 6
Keith 352-262-6634 4-3-10-3
Countryside at the University
F. 1BR/1BA, $425/mo incl. utilities, cable
& internet. Available now. 352-377-1283 or
561-575-3%21 4-3-10-3
Male @ Oxford Manor. 1BR/1BA In 3BR/
3BA. Furnished, Starting May through
August 7, $450/mo. Great amenities. Call
Alex 786-897-6965. 4-3-10-3
* 2BR/2BA private 2-story townhouse avail-
able May July. Next to Gainesville PI Apts.
$730/mo + utils. 1 BR/I BA option avail ear-
lier. Call Lindsay at 352-318-3385 4-4-10-3
Female for'1 BR/1 BA in 4BR/4BA @ Melrose
Apts. W/D in unit, cable, internet, utilities inc.
Avail May 1 thru Aug 7. $384/mo Call Olivia
386-547-8497 4-4-10-3


SII Subleases


1BR/BA @ Oxford Manor, furnished, starting
May, 1 mi from campus, $719/mo w/o utilities
+ internet, price negotiable. Call 305-815-
2456 4-4-10-3

The Estates. 1BR/1BA in 2/2. Pool view.
Pets welcome. All util. incl. Cable + ethernet.
Female roommate. May-Aug. $545/mo. 512-
695-5144. 4-3-10-3

Summer Sublease May-Aug. @ G'ville
Place. 1BR/1BA in 4BR/4BA, all util. incl.,
furnished, wash/dry/net/gym/pool. Females
only..$480/mo obo. 813-610-0797 4-4-10-3

Female 1BR/1BA in 2BR/2BA in the Estates.
Avail. May-Aug. Lease Renewal Option. On
bus rte. Pool View. Discounted Rate. Call
954-559-7022. 3-31-8-3


***Female Sublet 1BR/1BA of 3/3 apt. in.
the Laurels. Large walk-in closet, upstairs
with balcony in bedroom. $413/mo, leasee
will pay assignment fee. Please call 352-476-
3860 or email smonroe@tampabay.rr.com.4-
26-26-3


1BR/BA in 2BR/2.5BA NEW townhouse.
W/D, internet included. $600/mo + utilities.
3 blocks to campus. Avail May-Aug. email
witgator@ufl.edu 3-31-8-3


LEXINGTON CROSSING
Bedroom w/ private bathroom
May thru August $400/month
Everything is included
GREAT DEAL 954-610-4120. David
10-3


Subleases
-)
Summer Sublease Windsor Hall. Girls bldg.
Behind sorority row! Furnished, deluxe single
suite w/refrigerator, microwave, 2 Ig closets
& pvt bath. All utils incl. $625/mo. Avail 5/8/06
Contact Lauren for details! 407-616-9070
4-5-10-3
1 BR/1BA in 4/4 apartment
Gainesville Place, poolside furniture/
utilities included. May-August $400/MO
Call 954-224-8140 or email:
cruzanlova@aol.com 3-31-5-3
1BR for female in 4BR/2BA @University
Commons. May thru August $295/MO +utils.
Short bus ride to UF Pool, gym, wireless in-
ternet. Call Polly 919-824-0201 3-31-7-3
SUBLEASE! May-Aug. 1/1 in a 4/4 for $450/
OBO. Everything included! Call Lisa 850-
803-0790 3-31-7-3
Summer sublease 05/14 08/05. $600/mo.
1BR/1BA fully furnished. Regency Oaks. Util,
hi speed, dig cable incl. Call Stephanie 804-
381-8072 3-31-5-3
Walk to campus. Sublease for summer
Windsor Hall furn., pvt bath, kitchenette 1 or
2 students. M/F. We pay $625/mo will sub for
$425/mo. Call 239-571-5789. 4-13-15-3
Countryside @ University Condo 2 bedroom
avail, in 4BR/4BA for $425/ea. Cable, water,
elec. incl. except phone. Call Irvin (904)610-
0967 or email icheng@bellsouth.net. 3-
30-5-3


WALK/BIKE to UF! 1BR/BA avail. May-Aug.
in 2BR/BA apt fully fum. all utils + internet.
4-4- W/D, DW incl. $450 OBO. 352-262-6824,
mferro14@ufl.edu. 3-30-5-3


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Be a Part of _


Something -


Important -


Informing the UF community



the independent florida 2001

alligator

is seeking applicants for the positions of
1. Editor
2. Managing Editor/Print
3. Managing Editor/New Media
Summer B and Fall Semesters


You can pick up an application at The Alligator
Administrative Office on the second floor of The
Alligator Building at 1105 W. University Ave. each
weekday between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. from now
until April 4, 2006.

Part of the application consists of you writing short
essays in answer to specific questions. You should
pick up your application far enough in advance to
allow enough time to complete it by the deadline at
3 p.m. on April 11, 2006. This is an absolute dead-
line. When you pick up an application, you need to
allow yourself 15 to 20 minutes to read through some
important information in regards to the application
and selection process.


Interviews and selections by the

Board of Directors will be held at

The Alligator offices in a meeting

open to the public, beginning at

10 a.m. on Friday, April 21.

To be considered, you must be a currently enrolled,
degree-seeking college or university student. Prefer-
ence will be given those who have had experience at
The Alligator.


Campus Communications, Inc. is an Equal Opportunity Employer


1994


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I_







THURSDAY, MARCH 30, 2006 N ALLIGATOR, 19


Subleases


University Commons Very close to campus.
Gym, pool, spa, utils, dig. cable, hi spd. in-
temet. All included $365/OBO. Avail. May to
Aug. 386-334-3400. 3-30-5-3

Female Sublet 1 BR/1 BA in 3/3 apt. in Oxford
Manor. W/D, gym, & pool. April-August or
summer lease. $350 +1/3 util. treis@ufl.edu
or 919-357-3070. 3-30-5-3

2BR/2.5BA (each room for sep. lease) town-
house @ Parkside 2 across from Sorority
Row. Avail May- Aug. W/D, Cable, Internt,
pets allowed. Price negotiable. Call Claire
352-871-2313 3-31-5-3

Summer Sublet May- August $325/MO
Roomate needed for Master bedroom in fully
furnished 2BR/2BA apt. Near campus, pool &
gym. Pets are welcome. Call 786-543-9418
OR nia1787@ufl.edu 4-7-10-3

Summer Deal @ Lexington Crossing Two
1 BR/1 BA in 4BR/4BA Summer A or Summer
C. Furnished, all until incl. W/D, bus 9 & 34,
$450/MO each. OBO Call 305-773-3761 OR
786-253-6798 3-31-5-3

1BR/1BA-in 2BR/2BA Treehouse Village
condo. W/D, DW, ceiling fans, pets welcome.
On bus route. $310/MO +$200 deposit.
Available March 11th thru Aug. Call 352-682-
6504 3-31-5-3

Summer sublease May FREE 2BR in fur-
nished 4BR/2BA University Commons $395/
covers all per room. Girls only. Call 772-215-
4445 3-31-5-3

SUMMER SUBLEASE SPYGLASS APTS.
One bedroom with own bathroom available
as of May 6 until July 31. Rent $352/mo, plus
GRU and Cox. Fully furnished, gets-lots of
sunlight, pet friendly, 20 bus route, email
Paula at: pangel03@ufl.edu 3-31-5-3


SSubleases


1BR/1BA in 4BR/4BA available May 6-
.August 6 in Lexington $325/mo OBO?
Includes everything. Best deal! Call Taylor
321-890-6199 4-7-10-3


Sublease apartment April-July.
Female roommate wanted.
Walk to campus $300/MO +1/2 util.
954-258-8485 4-7-10-3


Summer Sublease @ Campus Lodge. 1BR/
1BA in 2BR/2BA. Third i -,, furnished, util,
cable, ethernet, and much more all incl.
Great view. $510/mo. Matt 954-591-2349
4-3-5-3

* Windsor Hall female sublet May, June,
July. Single room. Footsteps 2 campus.
$430/mo or best offer. All-inclusive! Call
Morgan 772-559-3521 3-30-3-3

Studio Apt $460/mo incl utils. Located 1 blk
behind Swamp Restaurant
Call Kristin 404-934-0978 4-10-10-3

Sublease @ The Laurels
2BR/2BA in 3BR/3BA. Upstairs w/ balcony,
walk-in closet. $350/mo; Downstairs $335/
mo. Avail May thru Aug. 352-328-4210
4-3-5-3

$639 SPANISH TRACE
2BR/1BA. $320/per room; avail May 1 -Aug.
Pets ok, Walk to UF & Butler Plaza, parking
on campus, cheap util. Call ASAP 786-301-
5239 4-4-5-3

SUMMER TERM
Oakbrook Walk Condos. Male for furn
1BR/1BA in 2BR/2BA. Full kitchen & W/D.
Walk to UF. $550/mo. Call 301-643-0093 or
bmw2009@ufl.edu. 4-5-6-3


"Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content


Available from Commercial News Providers"
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Subleases


** 2 BLKS from UF! e
Summer C. 2BR in 3BR/1.5BA. On NW 2nd
Ave behind Swamp. Hdwd firs, big rms, furn.
M/F. $300/mo + utils/OBO. 941-380-1783
4-3-43

Female for 1BR/1 BA in 2BR/2BA in BLDG A
at LOOKING GLASS APTS. 30 seconds to
UF. Floor Plan B $505/month plus utilities.
Availalbe May 8th August 12th. Call 407-
808-1814 4-26-21-3

1 BR in 2BR/2BA townhouse for sublease. W/
D availalbe. 20 & 21 bus passing by. Walk to
supermarket & UF gym. 3640 SW 20th Ave.
Ask for $270 + 1/2 util. Free deposit. Call
352-262-6912 after 5pm. 4-4-5-3

Female summer sublease May to Aug.
1BR/1BA in 3BR/3BA @ University Glades.
$470/mo everything incl. Call Jennifer @
321-287-6590 4-4-5-3 ;
Female subleaser needed for 1/1 in a 2/2.
W/D in unit all util incl in rent. 2 pools & nice
workout room. Needed by May. Please call if
interested. 386-937-2860 4-4-5-3

All inclusive sublease. May-Aug. Dates are
flexible. $400/mo. Stoneridge Apt. 1/1 in 4/4.
Female only. W/D & Cable, wireless. Huge
bedroom & walk-in closet. Call (832) 512-
8252. 4-4-5-3

DOWNTOWN GAINESVILLE
1BR in 3BR Arlington Sq. Next to Starbucks,
Dragonfly, & Hippodrome May 12-Aug 12. No
dep. Pets ok. Call 352-262-1687. 4-4-5-3

** 1 Mile From UF! **
3BR apartment/private bath. Gated com-
munity. Lg pool/ hi spd. int. $504/mo Call
904-542-6969 (day), 904-563-3825 (eve).
4-11-10-3

$325/mo 3921 SW 34th St. University
Terrace 1 BR/1 BA in 4BR/4BA. Call 617-910-
5400. 3-31-3-3

1st MONTH FREE
Pvt. BR/BA in 2BR/2BA apt. The Estates.
Fully furn. Hispd inet. pool, 24 hr. Fitness ctr.
$400/mo. Female only. Call Jessica 352-551-
7776 4-6-7-3

Summer sublease. 1BR/1BA. 1236 SW 4th
Ave. #7. Rent is $470/ mo but will take best
offer. Call Megan @ 514-5590. 4-4-5-3
Furnished room in great location on NW 10th
Ave. May' 15-Aug. 15. $325 + 1/3 bills. No
pets/smoke. Possible renew for fall year.
Ph. 871-5633. Hurry! 4-11-10-3

WALK TO SCHOOL/SWAMP summer sub-
lease 1,2, or 3 BR Avail., in house. W/D,
wireless internet, parking, fum./unfurn.
$335/385 mo. w/o util. OBO Call 352-246-
1379. 4-4-5-3
Female summer sublease May-Aug. In 4/4
@ Lexington Crossing $450/mo. incl. utili-
ties, cable, internet, phone. Price negotiable
786-253-9656. 44-5-3

The Polos
2BR/2BA. Unfurnished. W/D
May June July. $600/mo + util.
Call 239-888-1342
email sylviar484@gmail.com 4-5-5-3
Summer sublease avail, to female for
1BR/1BA in 2/2.5 townhouse. 2 blocks from
campus, W/D, balcony, porch. Furnished if
wanted. $490/mo + cable. Electricity paid for.
Call 321-508-9413 4-4-5-3

May-Aug sublese for female; 1bed/lbath
in 3bed/2bath; May free; $350/month incl
electric, internet, cable; close to campus;
furnished; call Sara 281-0567 4-5-5-3
Male to sublease 1BR/1BA in 4BR/4BA @
Gainesville Place. May Aug. $400/mo.
Furnished, all included. Call Juan 850-339-
6007 or email matanga@ufl.edu. 4-5-5-3

$376 1BR/share 1BA in 4BR/3BA Campus
Club Apts. Poolside building. May, June,
July lease. Call 352-870-3234 or email
prsper@gmail.com for further information .
Ask for Jay. 4-5-5-3


$350 for everything!
1BR/1BA in 4BR/4BA apt in Countryside. All
until incl. Water, elec, cable, hi spd i-net. Near
S pool. Great roommmates & living room furn.
Avail starting May. Call Bing 352-275-4296
S4-5-5-3


j Subleases


WALK TO CAMPUS
1BR/1BA in a 2BR/2BA apt 3 blocks N of
campus. Female only avail May-Aug. Aug
rent paid! W/D, DW incl. $450 OBO month +
1/2 util. Call Jessica 772-475-5369 4-5-5-3 -



all Roommates I


Roommate Matching HERE
Oxford Manor 377-2777
The Landings 336-3838
The Laurels 335-4455
Cobblestone 377-2801
Hidden Lake 374-3866
4-26-72-4


Female roommate for one/two female UF
students. Quiet. Responsible. 60 second
walk to UF. Old house charm with all ameni-
ties. Avail Now. $400 up. 352-538-2181.Lv
message. Private Owner 4-26-72-4

Need roommates for my huge home! Choose
master BR or reg. room. Fun home w/ W/D,
bar, hi-spd, cable, big porch! Near UF, 2 bus
rts. -$400+ utils. 335-4533 davem@ufl.edu
4-12-60-4

Female roommate wanted 2BR/2.5BA $465
+1/2 util./mo Cable/phone/HS int., AC, alarm,
DW, W/D, parking, pool, gym, bus stop, near
campus. Non-smoking 407-782-2105 4-
6-36-4

Female roommate wanted
in 3/3 in rockwood Villas. $500/MO Available
now! Call Jen 954-295-9211 4-26-48-4

**ROOMMATES NEEDED ASAP**
To share w/grad student. 3BR/2BA new
townhome. Bus to UF, pool, gym volleyball,
tennis courts, gated $350/mo + util. Call
727-729-1561 or celtic67@ufl.edu
4-10-30-4

"FEMALE ROOMMATE SEEKING SAME
ASAP* Private Bed/Bath in a 2BR/2BA apt.
Fully furnished in Unversity Commons West.
Avail. now through August $375.00/ mo.
352-258-1184. 4-11-25-4

1 BR/1 BA in 3BP,'3BA The Polos.
$270/MO +1/3 utilities. Call Terry @ 352-262-
7778. Available March 25th 3-31-12-4

FEMALE ROOMMATES WANTED. Fully
fum. new home. Close to UF, bus stops
nearby, huge pool & backyard. Wireless in-
temet, HBO cable, sec. aim, util. incl. $500/
mo. Jacqueline 395-7462 or 941-780-3526
4-26-22-4

$250 room for rent. Close to UF. Cool house,
great student roommates, flexible lease.
Easy move in costs. 941-870-3425 4-4-10-4

Avail May 2 rooms in large house, 1 blk from
13th & University. $300 + split util:'Sec dep,
NS, no pets. Contact gvll32601@gmail.com
or leave message at 904-513-1431 4-26-
26-4

4BR/3BA brand new home, W/D, cable and
high speed internet, $380 + shared utilities. 8
min from UF Law School, prefer profession-
als, SFCC/UF postdoctors & students. Call
333-7521 after 6pm or 858-243-8886 (cell)
4-4-10-4

College-aged roommate needed to share
410 sq.ft. upstairs master suite in newly-
remodeled 4/3 2200 sq. ft. house. DirecTV,
wireless DSL, parking, security, near Bus
Rte 2. $375/mo all inc. Relaxed atmosphere,
great study environment. Chris 283-3464.
4-4-10-4

Available June 1. Large room. Hardwood firs.
w/pri BA. M/F, 5 mins. to UF; Sparkling home
in Kirkwood. 6-12 mo lease. W/D, nicely dec-
orated-new paint, furn./unfur. $425/mo +util.
352-375-6996 or 352-284-0979. 4-18-20-4

Summer lease. 2 rooms in 4BR/4BA condo.
W/D, pool, full kitchen, bus lines. Avail May
1-July 31. $325. John 786-436-1657
4-5-10-4

1 Rm in 4 BR/ 4 BA Countryside
Apt. Close to UF on bus rt. W/D, utils., cable
w/HBO, and DSL incl. $400/mo. No deposit.
F only NS. Call 954-328-2021. 4-6-10-4


J *B Roommates


Two females looking for tidy female.
Casablanca West. Two miles from UF. Close
to bus stop $500/mo includes utilities. No
smoking or pets. 352-846-8168 or 5,r1-329-
7231 4-4-7-4

Roommate needed to share 2BR/2BA
Vintage View condo w/grad student. Quiet
and clean community. $495/mo includes all
utils., wireless internet & cable Call Matt
407-702-8019 4-21-20-4

Need roommate to share 2BR/1BA condo
with yard & deck in nice residential area with
male grad student $400/MO- all util. incl.-
cable/int Ineal67@yahoo.com 309-868-2234
3-31-5-4

Two roommates needed! 4BR/2BA house
w/fun & clean UF students. Furnished house
(.8 miles from campus.) $375/MO & 1/4
utilities. To contact please call 941-650-7164
4-7-10-4

Room for rent, W/D, phone, satellite TV, big
yard. Safe neighborhood $300/mo Call Mike
352-372-7387 4-7-10-4

Avail immediately! M/F needed for spacious
BR in 3BR/2BA house located seconds to
Butler Plaza. #12 bus rte. Pet friendly. Giant,
fenced-in pvt backyard. $300/mo + 1/3 utils.
- No sec dep! Meghan 352-871-6922. 4-
7-10-4

Room w/private bath for rent in 3BR/2BA
house. Close to campus. Available immedi-
ately. $525/mo incl. internet, util, cable. No
smoking, no pets. 352-871-6562 4-3-5-4

ENJOY A ROMANTIC OLD. HOUSE
near library downtown. $285- $360/rm + until.
Free intemet access. Short term. No pets.
No smoking. 378-1304 4-26-22-4

All Inclusive
1BR/priv bath in house off Tower Rd. $650
incl util, cbl/phone/internet, garage w/opener,
W/D, pet friendly, quiet. Avail 4/22. Call 359-
5554 4-4-5-4

Sublets and Rooms Available
All Florida Areas: All Major US Cities
Browse available Rooms FREE!
www.MetroRoommates.com
1-(877)-For-Rent (367-7368) 3-30-1-4

* PRIVATE AND LUXURIOUS -
2BR avail in 3/.25 spacious north Gainesville
home. $400 + 1/3 util each. Avail summer/
fall. 954-649-2690 4-26-20-4

UF male to share 2BR/2.5BA townhouse.
Walking distance to campus. W/D. $425/mo
+ 1/2 utils. Call 1-877-833-2865 4-54-4


Real Estate


Sell your house, condo, acreage, mobile
home and much more in the ALLIGATOR
CLASSIFIEDS! Reach over 24,000 possible
buyers! Mastercard and Visa accepted over
the phone. Please Call 373-Find

Quad-, Tri-, or Duplex w/pvt parking, extra
land, 60 sec walk to UF. Exc cond. House
3/4BR, 2BA, wd firs, covered prch, concrete
patio, garage/work-shop. Pvt Owner. 352-
538-2181 Iv mssg 4-26-72-5

NEW PRE-CONSTRUCTION AND
EXISTING CONDOS NEAR UF
AT AFFORDABLE PRICES Visit
www.mattpricerealtor.com or call Today
Matt Price 352-281-3551 Campus Realty
4-26-115-5

*NEW JACKSON SQUARE*
Spectacular university views. Walk to UF &
the stadium. Classic New Orleans apeal
with state-of-the-art luxury. Reserve today.
52 units available. Starting in mid-200's.
Call Eric Wild 870-9453
4-26-72-5

Great homes close to UF
STOP Renting. Buy now.
FREE LIST OF HOMES
www.Homes-Near-UF.com
Campus Realty Group 4-26-72-5


Classifieds...
Continued on next page.


~


- ,r


- 41


o *








20, ALLIGATOR E THURSDAY, MARCH 30, 2006


* 1 Real Estate

Hot Student Condos Near UF
Save Thousands When You Buy Now
FREFiLIST OF UF CONDOS
www.Condos-Near-UF.com
Campus Realty Group 4-26-52-5

2 4BR/4BA's FOR SALE BY OWNER.
Countryside and University Terrace.
Near pool. Great location. On bus line.
S2 miles from campus 407-620-1555
4-26-45-5

"I" 2BR/2BA CONDO
in beautiful Treehouse Village.
Less than 2 mi from campus. Will sell.
furnished. $115,900. Call Scott Hancock,
Campus Realty for more info. 352-359-1678
4-5-25-5

Bike to UF Only $268,000
New construction, near campus
3BR/2BA 1701 sq ft. 2 car garage.
Peartree Realty, Inc.
Realtor (352)335-3802 4-5-20-5

LOOKING TO BUY A CONDO?
Do your homework; check out:
www.CollegeCondominiums.com.
One stop shop with direct links to sites.
Fast, Free, & Easy. LOOK HERE FIRST.
,4-26-34-5

2BR/1 BA condo located close to UF, Shands,
and VA. A must see starting at $89,000. Two
different complexes to choose from. Call
Kenny Gibbs with Campus Realty at 352-
494-0012 4-10-20-5

Many homes and condominiums near UF
available. --Please call Kenny Gibbs with
Campus Realty at 352-494-0012.
4-10-20-5

Great 4BR/3BA home with in-law suite just
off NW 34th St. A must see at only $229,
900. Call Kenny Gibbs with Campus Realty
at 352-494-0012 4-10-20-5

Nice 3BR/2BA home close to UF and Shands
just off of Williston Rd. in SW Gainesville. A
great neighborhood for only $215,000. Call
Kenny Gibbs with Campus Realty at 352-
494-0012 4-10-20-5

2BR/2BA condo in Treehouse Village, 111
SE 16th Ave, close to UF, new carpet,
furnished, very well maintained, 874 sq ft,
$114,900. Call Nirav Patel 561-506-4155 or
271-7055 4-3-15-5

JUST WHAT YOU'VE BEEN LOOKING
FOR. 4BR/3BA, 1500 sq ft home only 10
min to UF. Priced @ $182,000. Count On
Compean for ALL your real estate needs.
ERATrend Realty 352-745-6118 4-11-20-5







INCREDIBLE LOCATION! Summit House
Condos, newly renovated 1 and 2 BR units
starting at $99,900 (as-is at $86,900). Steps
away from Shands, VA, Dental, Vet. Med,
Health Sci., etc. & heart of UF. $3,000
Closing Cost Credit w/ Preferred Lenders.
Call Coldwell Banker M.M. Parrish Realtors
at 352-372-5375 or at onsite office 352-376-
2410. 4-26-28-5


Magnolia Place: 1,2 & 3 bedroom luxury
townhi6nes. Within a gated community in
the heart of NW Gainesville. Bordered by
wild wetlands and nature preserve. Variety
of floor plans and sizes available priced
from $149,700 to the low $200,000's. Seller
pays $8000 in Closing Costs, Upgrades and
Bonuses! Contact Coldwell Banker M.M.
Parrish Realtors at 352-372-5375 or at onsite
office 352-377-4977. 4-26-28-5

3/2 home in NW Gainesville neighborhood.
Great condition w/1 car garage and fenced
yard. Convenient to UF/Shands. $171,900.
Please call for Appt. 352-373-8176. 4-18-
20-5


U Real Estate


View 50+ DIFFERENT CONDOS NEAR UF
Online at www.ufcondominiums.com.
1 new listing 3 blocks from UF at
835 SW 9th St. Call Eric Leightman
with Action Real Estate 352-219-2879
4-18-20-5

2BR/2BA CONDO for JUST **$135k**
Right off Archer Road at University
Commons West. View TODAY. Call
Eric Leightman with Action Real Estate
352-219-2879. 4-18-30-5
CASABLANCA WEST CONDO for sale.
3BR/2.5BA, DW, ref, W/D, parking. Bus
@ entrance, pool, Call 201-213-3619.
$163,000. 3-30-7-5

Graduating? Need to sell your h6use or
condo? Call Kate today! Recent UF grad,
student housing specialist. Kate Wallis, ERA
Trend Realty, 359-1112. 4-26-26-5 -

Malore Gardens
5506 SW 17th Ct.
4/2, FL Rm w/Wet Bar
New Septic System $259,900
386-462-5653 or 386-462-5400 4-21-20-5

NEED HELP
BUYING A HOUSE NEAR UF??
Call Jeff Osgard at 352-262-9119
Campus Realty. 4-3-5-5


ALEANI-PKA
-1 ,j T k '. I lr ll H -..1

2508 SW 35th Place
A gated community located minutes
from the University of Florida Campus,
Shands and downtown Gainesville
Currently under construction
2 bedroom 2.5 bath town home floor plans,
Units Starting at $174,900.00
Contact Venture Realty of N. Florida Inc.
Agent Maria "Birdie" Pla Mumane, Realtor
Office (352) 331-1111; Cell.(352) 222-8888
www.venture-realty.com,
email: venturegnv@msn.com
4-3-5-5







Enjoy your own private patio in a Completely
Renovated 1, 2, or 3 bedroom Cazabella
condo across 34th St from UF campus. Walk,
bike or bus to any part of campus within min-
utes. Prices starting in the low $100,000's.
-For more info visit www.Cazabella.com
or contact Coldwell Banker M.M. Parrish
Realtors (352-373-3583), Becky Cato (352-
264-3121) or Cindy Birk (352-264-3141).
4-26-21-5

INCOME PRODUCING
4/4 Condo @ Countryside. Fully furnished,
rented, & appliances. POOL VIEW in $190s.
Call SIDNEY 770-851-1292. 4-26-21-5

ENJOY DOWNTOWN LIVING in adorable
2BR/1BA condo. 2 condos available. 4 blks
E of Hippodrome 5min to UF 923 sq ft
w/gorgeous Italian tile throughout. $94,900.
Call Liberty Phoenix w/Pridential Preferred
Properties of Gainesville 224-1243 4-5-5-5


SFurnishings


BED-Queen, orthopedic, extra thick, pillow-
top, mattress & box. Name brand, new, still
in plastic. Sacrifice $110. Call 352-372-7490
will deliver. 4-26-72-6

BED FULL SIZE ORTHOPEDIC Pillow-top
mattress & box. New, unused, still in plastic
w/warran'ty. Can deliver. Sacrifice $75. Call
352-377-9846 4-26-72-6

MICROFIBER SOFA& LOVESEAT
Brand new still packaged w/warranty. Must
sell. Can deliver. Retail $2300. Sacrifice
$550 352-372-7490 4-26-72-6

BED King Pillowtop mattress & box springs.
Orthopedic rated. Name brand, new, never
been used, in plastic with warranty. Sell
$170. Call 352-372-8588 Can deliver. 4-
26-72-6


uJ Furnishings


CHERRY SLEIGH BED solid with Pillowtop
Mattress & Box. All new still boxed: Cost
$1500, sacrifice $550 352-333-7516

Sofa $175 Brand new in pkg 333-7516
4-26-72-6

BEDROOM SET. 7pc Cherry, Queen/ king
bed, dresser w/mirror, 2 nightstands, chests
avail. Dovetail const. New, in boxes. Can de-
liver. Retail $6500, must sell, sacrifice $1400
(352) 372-7490 4-26-72-6

SOFA & LOVESEAT 100% Italian leather.
Brand new in plastic w/warranty. Retail
$2650. Sacrifice $750. Call 352-377-9846
4-26-72-6

DINING ROOM Beautiful cherry set w/table,
6 Chippendale chairs, hutch & buffet. New,
still in boxes. Retail $5200, sacrifice $1100.
Must sell. Can deliver. 352-372-8588 4-26-
72-6

FUTON Solid oak mission-style frame w/
mattress. New, in box. $140 332-9899

DINETTE SET 5pc $85 Brand new in box.
Never used. 352-377-9846 4-26-72-6

Beds, Futons, Furniture, King Sealy sets
$299; new sofas for $299; oak futons $169;
sofa & loveseat $399; dinettes, desks, all
on sale *New Location* 140 NW 6th St
Morrells Furniture Outlet. 352-378-3400
4-26-72-6

BRAND NEW FURNITURE
OOO*Shop On-lineS*SO
Mattress Sets $169
5pc. Bedroom Sets $495
And Much More! Delivered to your door!
www.gowfb.com Check it out!
Or call (352) 376-1600 4-26-72-6

Bed All New Queen orthopedic pillow-top
mattress & box set. Still in plastic with war-
ranty. Can Deliver. $130 (352) 264-9799
4-26-72-6

Bed $100 All New Full size orthopedic mat-
tress set. Brand new, still in plastic, w/ war-
ranty. Can Deliver.352-376-1600 4-26-72-6

BEDROOM SET $395 BRAND NEW! Still
in boxes! HB, 2NS, Dresser, Mirror...chest
avail. Must see to appreciate! Can Deliver
352-264-9799 4-26-72-6

Dinette Set $125 Brand New 5 pc set in
box, never used! Can Deliver 494-0333

Sofa $225 BRAND NEW! MICROFIBER!
Still in package! Will sell with loveseat $395
for set! Can Del. 376-1600

FUTON-$80- BRAND NEW Futon mattress,
still in package! Sold with oak Futon, both
for $160. Can Deliver 352-494-0333 4-
26-72-6

Pool Table Gorgeous 8' All wood table.
Leather pockets, Italian 1" slate, carved
legs. Br. New still in crate. Cost $4,500. Sell
$1,350. Can Deliver. 264-9799 4-26-72-6

Hot Tub/Spa $1795.00 Brand New Loaded!
Waterfall, LED lights, cup-holders, 110v en-
ergy efficient with warranty. Free Delivery.
264-9799 4-26-72-6

**BEDS -ALL BRAND NEW**
"Full $80 Queen $100 King $170"
Orthopedic pillow-top sets. Brand name
matching sets not used or refurbished. Still
in plastic, direct from factory! 352-333-7516.
4-26-72-6

BED- QUEEN New orthopedic pillowtop mat-
tress and boxspring set. Brand name, brand
new, still in plastic with warranty. Can deliver.
$100 352-377-9846. 4-26-72-6

Bed-All New King! 3pc Orthopedic pillowtop
mattress set. Brand NEW, still in plastic with
warranty. Can deliver. $170 352-333-7516.
4-26-72-6

Bedroom Set- $300 BRAND NEW. Still
in boxes! 6 pieces include: Headboard, 2
Nightstands, Dresser, Mirror, Chest. Must
sell, can deliver. 352-377-9846. 4-26-72-6

FUTON $60 Solid Oak Mission Style. With
plush mattress $140. All brand NEW still in
box. Can deliver. 352-333-7516 4-26-72-6


* 1 Furnishings

Pool Table Gorgeous 8" All wood table.
Leather pockets, Italian 1" slate, carved legs.
Brand new still in crate. MUST SELL Retail
$5500. Sell $950. Can deliver 352-377-9846
4-26-72-6

Hot Tub/Spa $1295 Brand New Loaded!
Waterfall, LED lights, cupholders, 110-v
energy efficient with warranty. Free delivery,
MUST SELL 352-372-8588 4-26-72-6

Bed-FULL size pillowtop mattress & box.
New, in plastic, warr. Can del. $80 317-4031

Sofa $185 Brand new! Love seat $150 still in
pkg. Can del 352-333-7516
4-26-72-6

FUTONS BEDS FURNITURE
LOW PRICES & LARGE SELECTION
Dumas Discount 371-4422 1201 E. Univ. Av.
New Used @ Buy Sell 4-26-72-6

BED SETS CLOSEOUTS
Sealed in plastic Twin sets $89. Full sets
$129. Queen sets $149. King sets $189. 352-
376-0953 or 352-378-6005 4-26-63-6

MEMORY FOAM- Same as Temperpedic
Save 50% & more. Other- closeouts. Twin
sets $89. Full sets $129. Queen sets $149.
King sets $189. Student discounts apply.
4370 SW 20th Ave. 376-0953 We. Deliver!
4-26-63-6

*Beds *Full mattress & boxspring sets $49
Queen sets $89 *Single sets$39 *King
sets $99 *from estate sale. 376-0939/378-
6005 Call-A-Mattress 4370 SW 20th Ave.
4-26-63-6
1 couch, 1 loveseat, 1 cocktail table, 1 otto-
man. All blue coushions, excellent condition.
ALSO Skytech walker. Call 352-373-9709.
$200 for all. 4-3-4-6


Computers






*=McOP r"_
4-26-68-7

GATORNERD.COM
-Computer/ laptop repair
-Virus, spyware, hardware
-Fix it for $44!!
-Home/ dorm 352-219-2980 4-26-68-7



$L A+r mputEr LEk



8-16-89-7

Computer Help FastA+ Computer Geek
House/Dorm 59 min response. No waiting/
unplugging/hassels. $30 Gator discount w/
ID. Certified MCSE Technicians. 333-8404.
www.AComputerGeek.com 8-16-89-7
"COMPUTER & LAPTOP REPAIRS"
Network specialists
We buy computers and laptops
Working and Non-working
378-4009, 607 NW 13th Street
4-26-56-7

(I1 DI I


Computers


Easy, Inexpensive, Guaranteed
Computer Solutions Inc
352-371-2230
www.gainesvillecsi.com
Refer to this ad for 10% off 12-6-118-7


5a Electronics


Pioneer 12" Subwoofers
1000 watts. Mounted in dark grey boxes.
Mint cond. $175 Call 376-3970 Cash only.
4-3-6-8



*a Bicycles


In the market for a new set of wheels or just
looking to add a second to that collection?
Want personalized handlebars or a fitted
seat? Check in the Alligator Classifieds


5 For Sale


PARKING:
Private, Secure, Guaranteed. 60 sec to UF.
Reserve now! Reasonable rates. 352-538-
2181. Can leave mssg. 4-26-72-10

Thank You Baby
Deja Vu
Calls from Beyond
NYC Village Halloween Parade
montecristorecords.com/dvdsforsale.html
3-31-5-10


Motorcycles, Mopeds)


-** SCOOTERS**
RPM MOTORCYCLES INC
SALES, SERVICE, PARTS
Many Brands Available 518 SE 2nd St.
www.RPMmotorcycles.com 377-6974
4-26-72-11

Swamp Cycles
534 SW 4th Ave. Largest Selection of
E-bikes, Scooters, Accessories and more!!
Best Prices and Customer Service!!
www.swampcycles.com
4-26-72-11

***SOLANO CYCLE***
Scooters from $699. Largest selection
KYMCO, Vento, Hyosung, Keen & many
others. Financing avail. 3550 SW 34th St.
338-8450 solanocycle.com 4-26-72-11

*NEW SCOOTERS 4 LESS*
Owned by Gator grads. 1901 NW 67 PI
352-336-1271 www.newscooters4less.com
Best prices in Gainesville. Will beat all Gville
competitor's prices on similar models. 4-
26-72-11

***GatorMoto*** Our new state of the
art facility is now open! We will repair any
brand of scooter and we have some of the
cheapest labor rates around! Pick up/dropoff
available. 6921 NW 22nd St. 376-6275
4-26-35-11

'05 SUZUKI GSXR 600
2900 miles. Never laid down. Black & white.
Good condition. $7400 OBO. Call 305-333-
0958. 4-4-10-11


S"Copyrighted Material *


Syndicated Content a

Available from Commercial News Providers"


* *

e e


1s9







THURSDAY, MARCH 30, 2006 I ALLIGATOR, 21


In Motorcycles, Mopeds] l


**CASH PAID for MOTORCYCLES **
SCOOTERS, in ANY condition new or used.
Running or not. Titles or not. Prompt pick up
Call ANYTIME: 352-441-0442
Please leave a message.
4-26-26-11

SCOOTER 2006 VERUCCI
Suzuki powered 50cc. Lots of storage com-
partments. Perfect condition. Runs excellent.
Only $675. Call 641-6018. 4-7-13-11


0Autos


*FAST CASH PAID FORANY CAR*
ORunning or not!l
*NEED HONDA, TOYOTA, PICKUPS
*Over 10 yr svc to UF students
*Call Don @ 215-7987 4-26-72-12


CARS -CARS Buy*SelleTrade
Clean BMW, Volvo, Mercedes
Toyota, Honda, Nissan cars
3432 N Main St. www.carrsmith.com
CARRSMITH AUTO SALES 373-1150
4-26-72-12

**QUICK CASH**
For CARS, TRUCKS & MOTORCYCLES
Buy, Sell or Trade 1992 & up only
Call Ray 352-284-8619
4-26-72-12,

OVER 50 IMPORTS UNDER $10,000
SELECT MOTOR CAR
THE YELLOW BUILDING
2715 N MAIN 377-1616
www.selectmotorcar.us
4-26-72-12

$500! POLICE IMPOUNDS!
HONDAS, CHEVYS, TOYOTAS, ETC.
For listings 800-749-8116 ext 4622 4-26-
72-12

Sun City Auto
No Credit Check "O" Down & Up
www.suncityautosales.com 338-1999 3-31-
53-12




MOST WANTED






S1











Erica Jean

Flick

S White Female
(DOB 01/19/65); 5'06",
150 Ibs, Blonde Hair,
Blue Eyes

Wanted for:
Possession of a
controlled substance
and possession use
etc of drug
paraphernalia.
ALACHUA COU TY

CRIME
STOPPERS

SCall (352) 372-STOP


This newspaper assumes no responsibil-
ity for injury or loss arising from contacts
made through advertising. We suggest that
any reader who responds to advertising use
caution and investigate the sincerity of the
advertiser before giving out personal infor-
mation or arranging meetings





"Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"











4


Autos


Sun City Auto
Bring W-2 File Here Drive TODAY
www.suncityautosales.com 338-1999 3-31-
53-12


BEST CARS LOWEST PRICES
WE BUY CARS

www.39thaveimports.com
4-26-70-12.


SUN CITY AUTO
Test drive any vehicle and
*GETA3 DAY, 2 NIGHT VACATION*
Ask for details 338-1999 4-26-62-12


1994 Nissan Quest GXE V6 Mini-van 88k
rear A/C, 7-passenger w/Captain's Chairs,
power everything, blue with cloth interior,
very clean $4900 OBO, quest@nfmllc.com
352-514-1800 3-31-8-12


Wanted



THE AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY
NEEDS VOLUNTEER DRIVERS
Transport patients to/from treatments
Must have valid driver's license,
safe driving record & attend training session.
Call 352-376-6866 ext 114 for more info.


Gardening Companion, wanted for blind lady
on Saturday mornings would need transpor-
tation to go to Angel Gardens hopefully living
in the Tower Road area. Call 352-219-6948
3-31-49-13


On going volunteer needed: Blind lady need
trans on Sundays only to Mass @ Queen
of Peace Catholic Church or St. Augustine
Catholic Church. For more info. call 219-6948
I live in the Tower Rd. area 3-31-49-13


LOCAL ARTIST NEEDS:
* Gold Diamonds Gems Class Rings
* ETC Top Cash $$$ or Trade *
OZZIE'S FINE JEWELRY 373-9243. 4-26-
57-13


Help Wanted


the independent florida

alligator

What's black and white and
"read" all over???
The Independent Florida Alligator
and you can be part of the sales team of
the largest college newspaper in the
country by applying to be come an
ADVERTISING INTERN
(this is a non-paid spring position
requiring 10-12 hours per week)
possibly leading to a paid sales position)
If you are a UF or SFCC student available to
work both spring & summer and are eager to
gain valuable sales experience, stop by the
Alligator. 1105 W University Avenue, to fill
out an application and a class schedule by
March 31, 2006. We will contact you for an
interview opportunity to get your career jump
started! EEO/AA. 3-31-8-14

LIKE TO WORK WITH LUXURY CARS?
Bright? Enthusiastic? Like people? Must be
over 22, stable work history, clean driving re-
cord, drug-free, pers ref. www.carrsmith.com
for details. 4-26-72-14


Animal Care Tech looking for hard working
person to work w/ reptiles & rodents. Will
train, PTto start with more hrs possible. Start
at $6.50/hr. Flex hrs. Please call 495-9024
between 9-4 M-F. 4-26-72-14

CNA CLASS: Learn @ your own time and
pace. Everything you need to be a CNA and
pass the state exam is on VCR tape. 95%
pass the state exam the 1st time! $250. Call
800-566-4913 Hrs: 12N to 5PM 4-26-72-14

Phone survey interviewers wanted. Start
work today! No sales, opinion research
only! Flexible Schedule! Perceptive Market
Research 336-6760 ex 4081 Call now! 4-
26-72-14

Students in Accounting, Aviation, Business/
Sales and IT needed for various positions.
Flexible schedules and competitive pay. Join
our team! Learn more at www.gleim.com/
employment 4-26-72-14

$$ STUDENTS GET CASH $$
For gently used brand name
Clothing/accessories & furniture
$Cash on the Spot$ SANDY'S No appt
necessary! 2906 NW 13th St 372-1226 4-
26-72-14

BARTENDING
$250 A DAY POTENTIAL
No experience necessary, training provided.
800-965-6520 ext 138 4-26-72-14


EARN $60 THIS WEEK!
Donate Plasma & Save a Life
$$$$$$$$$$$$
Best part-time job you'll ever have.
NEW DONORS
Bring this Ad and Earn an
Extra $5 on Your 2nd Donation.
DCI Biologicals 150 NW 6th St.
352-378-9204
4-26-72-14 .

GATORSNEEDJOBS.COM
We need Paid Survey Takers in Gainesville.
100% FREE to join. Click on Surveys.
4-26-72-14

Telephone Interviewing
NO SALES
$7.50/hr ($8 Bi-lingual) + BONUS
Apply @ UF Survey Research Center
M-F 9am-9pm 408 W University Ave.
Suite 106, Tel. 392-2908 x105
Must work eve/wknd
4-26-72-14

GATOR DOMINOS
$10 15/Hour DRIVERS
$6.15 $7.15/Hour INSIDERS
$35K-$50K/year MANAGERS
Apply online at www.gatordominos.com
Or at any of the 6 locations. 4-26-72-14


Help Wanted


GatorHospitalityJobs.com
Apply online to restaurants, hotels &
clubs in the Gainesville area. We need
servers, cooks, drivers and more. 3-31-
55-14

GATOR DOMINO'S is now hiring delivery ex-
perts & outgoing, friendly customer svc reps.
Apply online or at our Jonesville location at
14300 W. Newberry Rd. No exp necessary.
Will train the right people 333-3333 4-
26-72-14

$100 EACH NIGHT Guaranteed
13th St. or University Ave Domino's now hir-
ing 10 drivers. Closing drivers earn $100 to
$125 each night. Apply @ 3311 W.University.
377-4992. or 2106 SW 13th St. 373-2337
4-26-72-14

Summer Jobs
*$2100
*Co-Ed Camp
OSeven weeks
ORoom and Board Included

Get Paid to Play!
The Florida Elks Youth Camp (FEYC) needs
male and female Summer'Camp Counselors
ages 18 and up. FEYC is an overnight camp
located off of Highway 450 in Umatilla, FL
The camp runs June 5-July22 Please contact
Krys Ragland at 1-800-523-1673 ext 251 or
352-669-9443 ext 251 4-26-72-14

DRIVER OPPORTUNITY
Earn between $12-$20/hrl Gatorfood.com.
Great Opportuntiy. For info contact Jason
379-3663 4-13-64-14

MARIO & LUIGI'S PIZZA Now hiring
Flyer Distributors $7.50/hr, Drivers' $10-
12/hr, Pizzamakers $7/hr Apply at 3458 W.
University Ave. Call 376-6433 or 871-3368
4-26-72-14

Call center needs experienced telephone
agents for all shifts 24 hours 1830 NE 2nd St.
Apply in person M-F 9am-4pm 4-26-71-14
Wanted:
Gators, Almost Gators, Ex-Gators,
Wannabe Gators &
Even NeverWannabeGators
For Part Time Inside Sales at
Infinite Energy.
Salary and Commission.
Flexible daytime hours.
Call Brad at 331-8837, ext 3125 between
5pm and 7pm on Tuesdays & Thursdays,
or send resume to
wehavejobs@infiniteenergy.com
Immediate need.
Earn money for the beach this summer.
EOE/AA/MFDV
2-28-22-14

FREELANCE ONLINE TUTORS WANTED
Work from the convenience of your loca-
tion. Brainfuse is provider of supplemental
services to US students grade 3-12. Send
resumes to jobs@brainfuse.com *Bilingual
preferred. 4-26-56-14





PA APGM
Nfir' eoveowh.ew y wain bo v
Leasing Consultant, PT
Sales & customer service exp.
Flexible hours, Great pay
Growing
& Dynamic Co.
Career Advancement!
EOE, DFWP
352-375-2152 X301
email: employment@teamparadigm.com
www.teamparadigm.com
4-26-55-14

400 counselors & instuctors needed!
Co-ed summer camps in Poconos, PA.
Top salary, travel paid, best staff.
Apply @ www.lohikan.com or call
1-800-488-4321 4-26-55-14
SUMMER COUNSELORS
YMCA CAMP MCCONNELL is looking for
male/female counselors for coed, over-ngiht
summer camp. Must live on-site. Salary +
room and board. Call 352-466-3587 3-16-
15-14


W Help Wanted 3

COUNSELORS Camp Wekiza, Wekiza
Springs State Park, Apopka, FL Residential
Environmental Summer Camp. Orientation
6/6-9. Boys' camp 6/10-24. Girls' camp 6/24-
7/22. Contact mj.meherg@worldnet.att.net
4-26-41-14

UPBEAT, OUTGOING HOSTESS to invite
& greet guests at Jewell's. 4 positions
avail, $7/hr ALSO BARTENDERS &
WAITRESSES. Apply in person M-F, 2-
5pm, 108 S. Main St. 4-14-30-14

PINCH-A-PENNEY
Customer Service Sales Stock. Apply in
Person 7100 W. University Ave. or 5010 NW
34th St 4-4-20-14

$ DANCERS $
Apply in person only Thur. thru Sat. 8:30 PM,
2212 SW 13th St. TRADERS. 4-4-20-14

Brand Protection Agency
Intemet Researchers needed
for our Gainesville office.
Pay starts at 8.00/hr.
Exp. in MS Office, and Internet.
FT 9AM-6PM (M-F) PT Negotiable.
Resumes@NetEnforcers.com 4-4-20-14

ARC ofAlachua County, Inc.
Apply at: 3303 NW 83rd St., or fax
resume to: 352-334-4030, or email
alapage@arcalachua.org EOE, Drug Free

Residentail Habilitation Tech: Looking for
caring, honest & energetic persons to as-
sist developmentally disabled adults and
children. 2yr. education or 2yrs. exp. work-
ing w/developmentally disabled, children
or elderly. Flexible scheduling/job sharing
opportunities 4-7-22-14

DELIVERY DRIVERS
Earn up to $12/hr. 0 ALSO KITCHEN HELP
$6.50/hr. Call California Chicken Grill 378-
2442 4-26-34-14

Experienced SHIFT RUNNERS needed.
Apply after 5pm at 3458 W University Ave.
MARIO & LUIGI'S PIZZA
871-3368 4-7-20-14

GREAT PAY FOR THOSE WHO STAY! Park
Place Car Wash is looking for hard b6rkers
for all positions. Cashiers (fullday availability)
& line workers (AM 8:30-1 & PM 12-6 shifts
avail) 15-40hrs-your choice. Great work envi-
ronment. Apply in person. 7404 NW4th Blvd.
Across from Home Depot. No calls please
6-1-37-14

$800 Weekly guaranteed. Stuffing enve-
lopes. Send a self addressed stamped enve-
lope to SCARAB Marketing 28 East Jackson
10th Floor Suite 938 Chicago IL 60604
3-31-12-14

HELP WANTED- Valid driver's license re-
quired. Local moving and storage company.
Apply at 505 NW 53rd Ave. Gainesville 374-
4791 5-30-34-14

TCG Phone Reps needed ASAP
evenings and Sat. Must be articulate and reli-'
able 371-5888 ext 111 or 4112 NW 22nd Dr.
4-18-20-14

PT CLEANERS
No experience necessary. No weekends.
Excellent pay. Call 378-8252 4-3-10-14

Childcare provider starting May. Afterschool
pick-up. Full time from June to Aug. Must be
energetic, great attitude & enjoy children.
Required: non-smoker, swimmer & outdoor
activities. Please call 317-0625 to discuss
details. Job location near Haile Plantation.
4-4-10-14

Cashiers, photographers & Easter bunnies to
work photo promotion at the Oaks Mall. Call
800-285-6783 4-4-10-14

Web Programming Contractor -
ASP, ASP.net, VB Script, C#, SQL knowl-
edge. $25+ per hour. Email resume to:
jobs@352media.com 4-26-26-14


Classifieds...
Continued on next page.


SECRET SHOPPERS
Needed for evaluations of
Help Wanted Local Stores, Restaurants and Theaters
Flexible Hours, E-mail required
Call 1-800-585-9024 ext 6254
4-26-72-14









22, ALLIGATOR 0 THURSDAY, MARCH 30,2006
,r.-


SHelp Wanted


Camp Counselors needed for great over-
night camps in the Pocono Mtns. of PA.
Gain valuable experience while working with
children in the outdoors. Teach/assist with
athletics, swimming, A&C, drama, pilates,
archery, gymnastics, scrapbooking, ropes
course, nature, and much more. Office &
Nanny positions also available. Apply on -line
at www.pineforestcamp.com. 4-26-26-14



HIRING LIFEGUARDS at $7.25/hr,
SWIM.ANSTRUCTORS at $7.60/hr.
Call 352-393-8358 for more information and
training schedule. 8-10-49-14



LANDSCAPERS NEEDED FT/PT
* VALID DRIVER'S LICENSE A MUST S
Call 352-222-1904. 4-26-26-14



Learn to earn executive level pay. Work from
your location. Call now 352-380-7085.
a lifeofabundance.com. 4-4-10-14



DELIVERY DRIVERS & EXPERIENCED
PIZZA MAKERS. Must be available to work
late nights & weekends. Apply in person @ 5
STAR PIZZA, 2300 NW39th Ave. 4-4-10-14



G8RBAY.com
* Get Paid & Have Fun Flexible Hrs &
Competitive $ HTML Java Flash Exp.
* Transportation Required 0 Resume To
g8rbay@bellsouth.net 4-4-10-14



Nanny wanted for 1.5 year old boy. Mon
-Fri 7:30am-5:30pm. FT/PT. Experience
preferred. Non-smoking. Email resume and
references to mickinflorida@cox.net. 4-4-
10-14



Oak Hammock at the University of Florida
Hire Great Attitudes Only!!!

Environmental Services is currently recruit-
ing for the following positions:

Maintenance Assistant-FT
Drywall repair, paint, light electrical and
plumbing experience.

Maintenance Technician-FT
Strong electrical background and
experience working in all phases of general
building maintenance.

Maintenance Technician-FT
Strong mechanical background; experience
with heat pumps, plumbing and light
electrical boilers and cooling towers.

Lawn Equipment Operators FT
3- Full-time Openings
Familiar with all aspects of landscaping
including use of equipment; 2 years land-
scaping exp. preferred. Willing to train those
with the right attitude and willing to learn.
Hourly Wage $8.00 -$10.00;
based on yrs of exp.

Floor Technician (weekends included
and weekly day shifts) -FT :
Maintains all hard surface floor finish by dust
mopping; damp or wet mopping; scrubbing;
spray buffing; top coating; stripping and
refinishing. Maintains carpet appearance.
by vackuming, spotting and shampooing by
either bonnet or extraction method.

Oak Hammock at the University offers
competitive wages, uniforms, excellent work
environment, and benefits
(health, dental, LTD, life, paid time off, paid
holidays & 401K match).

5100 SW 25th Blvd Gainesville, FL 32608
Oak Hammock is a DFWP/EOE!
..careers@oakhammock.org
Jobline: 352-548-1180
4-4-10-14


Mil Help Wanted


Oak Hammock at the University of Florida
Hire Great Attitudes Only!!!

Dining Services is currently recruiting
for the following position:

Waitstaff
Full-time
Must be able to work various shifts.
Hiring smiles and great attitudes to wait
tables in our resort style retirement
community. No experience necessary; will-
ing to train those with the right attitude and
commitment to providing excellent
customer service. Flexible schedules of-
fered and guaranteed hourly rate of pay.

Apply in person:
5100 SW 25th Blvd
Gainesville, Florida 32608
Oak Hammock is a DFWP/EOEI
Fax:352-548-1049
4-4-10-14

HORSE FARM- ALACHUA 8AM to noon. 5
mornings incl. Sat & Sun. Clean paddocks &
stalls. Handle horses, use chainsaw & trac-
tor. $6.75 start. 352-871-2523 or 386-462-
9943 leave a clear message 3-31-7-14

NOW HIRING. ALL POSITIONS.
ZAXBY'S ON 43RD STREET.
Contact Boris or Emil Phone 376-8700
4-12-15-14

Attention All Majors: Summer Internship
still avail. Bus & Mgmt training. Aug profit
- $8484, 3hrs credit. Call for info session,
Dahnell Clervil 352-258-5807 South
Western. 4-5-10-14

Need bright, energetic person to handle tasks
in psychologist's office relating to scheduling,
working coordination, book publication and
sales, and correspondence. Computer skills
required. Job location is in Alachua. 28 hrs/
wk. Salary contingent on skills. Email resume
to scliett@acceleration.net. 3-30-5-14

FRONT OFFICE WORKER- FT
Medical office. $10/hr. Fax resume & hand
written coverletter to Pam Hall, RN 352-331--
0413 4-6-10-14

Pharmacy courier/cashier PT for large med.
practice. No driving req. but must be able to
work Wed. and Fri. Flexible hrs. Pharmacy
student or exp. preferred. Email resumes
to simedpa@yahoo.com or fax 224-2216
3-31-5-14

VALET PARKING
FT and PT. Flexible hours, will work around
schedule. Must be customer oriented and
dependable. Call or leave message for
Andy 1-888-463-1954 ext. 205- Good pay!
4-26-23-14


LIFEGUARDS NEEDED
Gainesville Cuntry Club seeking Lifeguards
& Swim Instructors May- Sept. Apply in
person at 7300 SW 35th Way. Experience
preferred 4-7-10-14


Oak Hall School is seeking energetic, cre-
ative, and enthusiastic'individuals with a love
for children to staff its summer day camp
program. Positions in the camp are available
in our Preschool day camp, our Kindergarten
day camp, and our elementary school age
day camp. Individuals for the day camp
should be available to work daily from June
5-July 28. Interested applicants should sub-
mit a resume to Jeff Malloy, Oak Hall School-
8009 SW 14th Avenue Gainesville, FL
32607 or via e-mail at jmalloy@oakhall.org
by April 13, 2006. Interview information re-
garding group interview on April 15 will be
sent out upon receipt. 4-12-13-14

Are you energetic and motivated? Are
you looking for a flexible job? LifeSouth
Community Blood Centers, Inc. is cur-
rently seeking part-time Donor Scheduling
Representatives to help maintain the com-
munity blood supply. Evening and weekend
shifts are available. To apply, please call
(352) 224-1741 after 5pm Monday through
Thursday and leave a message. EOE/DFWP.
4-21-19-14


S Help Wanted


CONTROLLER
Controller needed to manage financial
aspects of business functions at World
Class Cement Manufacturing Plant. Will be
required to -measure manufacturing perfor-
mances and report financial results to Plant
Manager, Owners and Executive group.
Will oversee general ledger journal entries,
accounts payable, accounts receiveable,
asset management budgeting and financial
reporting.
Excellent communication and computer skills
a must Great Plains software experience a
plus. Prefer 2 years of related experience.
Salary Range $40,000 $45,000

Fax or mail resume and cover letter to:

Fax: (386) 935-5071
Suwannee American Cement HR
PO Box 410
Branford, FL 32008
EOE 4-3-5-14

TENNIS STAFF NEEDED

The 30th Annual GATOR TENNIS CAMP is
now hiring good tennis players for the four
weeks in June. Only quality players need
Supply. Excellent Pay, working approx 9 hrs
per day. Camp is held on UF Campus, us-
ing Ring Complex & the Flavet Courts. If
interested, please call M.B. Chafin, Camp
Director, at 392-3538, or in the evenings
376-8030. If no answer, please leave a mes-
-sage. 4-11-10-14


Professional Waitstaff:
Gator Dining Services, located on the UF
Campus, is looking for experienced, profes-
sional Waitstaff and bartenders for a new
bistro. Must have exceptional customer
service skills and a knowledge of wines. Pay
is based on experience, we offer competitive
benefits and a great working environment.
Apply online at www.gatordining.com. 4-
11-10-14

COFFEE BARISTAS:
Gator Dining Services, located on the UF
Campus, is looking for Coffee Baristas.
Positions are open for early morning and
daytime hours. We offer competitive pay,
benefits and a great working environ-
ment.. Apply at -Gator Dining Services,
B73 Reitz Union, Museum Rd or online at
www.gatordiiing.com 4-11-10-14

**EARN $150**
Patients needed to sit for dental board exam.
If you qualify you'll get $150 + free cleaning
or filling. Call 392-2465 4-18-15-14

Spanish-speaking professional with excel-
lent phone skills for online jewelry sales. Call
224-1857 between 1:00-3:00, M-F only. Or
fax resume to 377-0488 4-11-10-14

COLD STONE CREAMERY will soon
audition happy, energetic Scoopers for its
Newberry Road and Archer Road stores.
Earn $8.50+ while having fun! Positions be-
gin immediately. Choose either Gainesville
location when you apply on our web site.
Visit ColdStoneCreamery.com, then go
to Creamery and choose Job Center (ap-
plications only; include email address. NO
RESUMES.). Nights and weekends a must.
18+ only. 3-31-3-14.

BABYSITTER NEEDED
College of Education major preferred. Part
time afternoon hours. 1 child. Call 336-1614
for more info. 3-31-3-14

AUTOCAD PT Mon thru Fri daily 15+hrs/wkly.
$9/hr. Opt FT for summer. Must be depend-
able & good knowledge of basic AutoCAD.
1mi from UF. Email wells@ridgwaytruss.com
or call Wells 219-1183 4-7-5-14

Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches is hiring
summer camp Group Leaders to work with
disadvantaged youth. Career opportunities
are available at the two camps programs and
on the mobile camp teams At the residential
camps, Group Leaders stay in the cabins
overnight with the campers and lead the
youth through activities during the day. The
mobile day camp teams travel the state
providing day camp at community parks and
urban areas. Employment dates are May 20
- Aug 4. Salaries are $230/week + room and
board. Call the Caruth Camp 352-447-2259
or Youth Camp at 386-749-9999. EOE/
DFWP. 3-30-2-14


I Help Wanted )a


SEARS, OAKS MALL
Now Hiring! Sales & stock positions. See
store for inquiries. May apply online. AA/
EOE. 4-7-8-14

Project Manager/Office Administrator to han-
dle psychologists Training Instutute, Private
Practice and Small Publishing Business in
Alachua. Skilled in epople interaction, com-
puters, software, data bases, office work.
Excellent opportunity for individual to learn
professional practice. B/.A. required. $10.00
to start. 28 hrs/wk. M-Thrus. Email resume to
scliett@acceleration.net. 4-4-4-14

DISHWASHER & BUSSER
Only apply in person @ the Sovereign
Restaurant after 2pm service entrance 12
SE 2nd Ave. 4-4-3-14

Lakeside Grill now hiring F/T & P/T serv-
ers & banquet personnel. Apply in person
Paramount Plaza Hotel 2900 SW 13th St.
377-4000 3-31-2-14

DELIVERY DRIVER Own car, no late nights.
PIZZA MAKERS.
Apply in person between 2 & 5pm.
NAPOLATANO'S 606 NW 75th St.
4-4-4-14

*DANCERS NEEDED*
Private dance co. Great for students. Great
pay, fast cash & flexible hours. Call to start
today! 378-3312 4-26-20-14

WANTED
Energetic, serious, hard-working individuals
to assist customers with high quality sport-
ing goods merchandise. We're looking for
the best. Full and part time opportunities. No
phone calls. Min 1 year commitment. Lloyd
Clarke Sports 1504 NW 13th St. 4-5-5-14

HIRING COOKS & SERVERS
Apply between 2 & 4 pm Mon-Fri, CALICO
JACK'S 3501 SW 2nd Ave. Creekside Mall
4-12-10-14

SALES AGENT
Growing real estate company seeking new
agents with license. Please fax resume to
352-338-7077 4-7-7-14

MOMMMY'S HELPER
Busy professional woman needs help with
life's details: kids, errands, household
chores, etc. $8/hr to start + gas money. Must
have reliable trans. Call 379-0619 Iv msg
4-12-10-14

5 STAR PIZZA ON TOWER RD
Now hirng delivery drivers.Great pay, flex-
ible hours.Apply in person 600 NW 75th St.
4-12-10-14

Loving, dependable, exp sitter needed for
infant daughter our home/yours. Tues-Fri.
Email details of exp and references. Contact
info: babygatorgrace@yahoo.com 4-5-5-14


U| Services

AAA STORAGE
Close To UF, Convenient
4x4x4 $20/mo
4x8x8 $35/mo
533 SW 2nd Ave. 377-1771
4-26-72-15

IMPORT AUTO REPAIR.BMW, Mercedes,'
Porsche, Volvo, VW, Honda, Toyota, Nissan,
Mazda. Quality craftsmanship, reasonable
prices, near UF, AAA approved 378-7830
www.carrsmith.com 4-26-72-15

HYPNOTIST-Stop smoking. Improve mem-
ory & concentration. Eliminate bad habits.
Past life regression. Learn self-hypnosis.
Low Student Rates. Leonard Umans AAPH,
NGH certified 379-1079. 4-26-72-15

** BELLY DANCE **
Ethnic Dance Expressions Studio
For Fun & Fitness 384-9200
www.ethnicdanceexpressions.com
4-26-72-15

EVERGLADE EQUESTRIAN CENTER
The countryclub for horses & owners.
Customer lounge w/full kitchen & bath. 250'
x 160' riding ring, round pen & jump pad-
dock. Lessons. 30 acres, 40 matted stalls, 19
separate paddocks. 24-hr security, 352-591-
3175 everglade-eqestrian.com 4-26-72-15


Services


FINANCE TUTOR
Individuals or small groups.
Experienced, excellent.
375-6641 Harold Nobles
4-26-72-15

Want to be a CNA? Don't want to wait?
Express Training Services can get you certi-
fied under 3 wks! Hands-on exp, no videos.
Day/eve classes avail. Next class 4/17/06.
Class sizes limited. 338-1193 for details.
4-26-72-15

PERSONAL TRAINING 300
Personal and Group Training
Flexible Scheduling Exclusive Facility
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*n| Health Services D


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THURSDAY, MARCH 30, 2006 E ALLIGATOtR, 23


M1 Health Services I M Typing Services ] 10


Personals


)0 11 Event Notices ) 0 l Event Notices


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Alachua County Health Dept. Call
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Over 500 handguns in stock
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I For Rent: Frnished 14. Help Wanted
2. For Rent: Unfumished 15. Services
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Local travel agency offers cruise specials,
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-r-







24, ALLIGATOR N THURSDAY, MARCH 30, 2006


Horford's skills help Gators advance in Big Dance


Alligator
While UF center Joakim Noah has gained national media attention,
power forward Al Horford has quietly led the Gators.


* THE POWER FORWARD
HAS BECOME UF'S WORK-
HORSE IN THE PAINT.

By DAN TREAT
Alligator Staff Writer
dtreat@alligator.org

While the mass of cameras and
microphones was shoved in his
roommate's face, Al Horford sat
quietly, holding court on a chair
in the corner of the room.
Joakim Noah has become the
media darling and a national fig-
ure since the NCAA Tournament
kicked off, but Horford has been
just as much a factor in UF's run
to the Final Four as Noah has.
In the four tournament games,
Horford is averaging 12.8 points
and 10 rebounds per game, in-
cluding double-doubles against
South Alabama and Villanova.
But with the hype machine
kicking into full gear, Horford
just wants the Gators to be able
to keep an even keel heading
into Saturday's national semifinal
against George Mason.
"Just do what we've been do-
ing all year, same routine, same
everything," Horford said. "We
really don't have to change any-
thing."
Except answer endless ques-
tions about one of your teammates
and closest friends, likely the same
questions that you have been an-
swering since the preseason. Add
to it that Noah himself isn't really
at ease with the amount of praise
he has received, especially at the
expense of his teammates.


"It bothers me when I'm get-
ting so much attention, because
I know how good Al is and how
much easier he makes the game
for me," Noah said. "People say
'Look at Noah dribble down the
court.' Al's doing the same thing
and not getting the love he de-
serves."
While Noah is the flashy one,
Horford is the workhorse, doing
the dirty work on the interior,
perhaps best exemplified by the
eight. offensive rebounds he
snatched against Villanova.
"There's no other player I'd
rather have by my side," Noah
said. "It's crazy to have someone
like that on your. side. I'm just
glad he's on our team, because
he's a beast."
By nature, Horford has a calm-
er demeanor than his fiery team-
mate, which may be a reason why
he is sometimes overlooked:
"I think that's what it is,"
Noah said. "I think it's because
hp't mnr I111ipt ,but th1 cfat.


speak for themselves. When he's
on top of his game and he's play-
ing like the warrior I know he is,
it's great."
But given time, Horford will
let his guard down to reveal a
quick-witted personality.
The story has been out -there
since he got to Gainesville that
his father, Tito, a former NBA
player, refuses to play his son
one-on-one.
After the Villanova game, Tito
said that a game is scheduled for
July, first to 21, win by two.
"I'm going to see what he's
got," Tito said. "I just wanted to
see where he was at so I could get
ready."
The son, however, doesn't
think that pops will actually
show up for the showdown.
"He's not going to play; he's
faking it," Horford said. "I'll
believe it when I see him on the
court. He knows I'd bust his head
up."


Horford's Tournament Stats


Nin. Pct. Reb. A Blk. Pts.


S.Ala. 25 750 13 5 0 14


UWM 23 .750 6 2 0 13


G'town2S .500 6 0 2 12


'Nova 33 .500 15 1 2 1


Assistant gives


UF motivation


SHYATT, from page 28

know one or two of the plays, but it's
all defense. The only thing he cares
about on offense is setting screens."
But the defensive guru does have
a soft spot for scoring. After the
Gators completed their quest from an
unranked preseason to a Final Four
S~s postseason, Shyatt said
that UF didn't deserve
any preseason accolades
S because of the team's
Slack of offensive experi-
ence.
Noah "I think that was the
perception early, and
rightfully so, we hadn't put anything
in tke books offensively," Shyatt said.
"In the truest sense of the word team,
all nine scholarship players partici-
pated on a daily basis and a game to
game basis."
As the Gators enter the Final Four,
they have many motivations: them-
selves, their families, their friends
and their school.
But they also have a basketball lifer
on their minds.
"It's a great feeling, but we want
to do more than get him to the Final


Tagliabue to appoint panel to search for successor


N FL, from page 28


On the other hand, his "Riverdance"
routine, one of last season's highlight film
bests, will be OK because he stayed on his
feet. That kind of thing is still allowed, as is
spiking, dunking or spinning the ball after a
TD. Still, there will have to be some innova-
tion by the celebrators.
"I'm looking forward to seeing what
Chad will come to celebrate with now,"
Indianapolis coach Tony Dungy said after
the vote.


Owners and league officials acknowl-
edge the entertainment value of touchdown
celebrations, many featuring Johnson,
Owens or Carolina's Steve Smith, three of
the league's top wide receivers.
But they also had had numerous com-
munications from officials of youth foot-
ball leagues, saying that more and more
youngsters were imitating NFL players.
And they said a group of players, most of
them defenders, who talked to them during
meetings in Indianapolis last month agreed
the demonstrations were a bit over the top
and should be modified.


"I think it's needed," said San Diego
coach Marty Schottenheimer, who is enter-
ing his 21st season, most of any current head
coach. "The game is about the team, not the
individual."
The meetings adjourned with little action
on finding a successor to commissioner Paul
Tagliabue, who announced his retirement a
week ago. Tagliabue, who said he still thinks
the next commissioner willbe in place by his
target date of July, will appoint a committee
next week of six to eight owners. It will hire
a search firm that will interview all owners
on what theywant in a new commissioner.


Meyer: My team could learn from the UF basketball squad


FOOTBALL, from page 28


season started.
"It crossed my mind a couple times, but I
kind of wanted to focus in on football right now,
especially with the new position," Ingram said.
"I really wanted to get in and watch film and
take my time and really learn the position."
Ingram is still friends with the basketball
players, he said. And even though he didn't
think a Final Four run was possible before the


season, he's now predicting that the Gators will
win it all Monday night.
Coach Urban Meyer is also impressed with
the basketball team's accomplishments.
"I just keep hearing 'great team,'" Meyer said.
"There are good players there, probably some
great players, but that's not important right now.
It's a great team. I just love the way they care
about each other. I think that team really cares
about each other. I couldn't say that about our
team last year near the end [of the season]."
Meyer doesn't know if he'll be able to at-


tend the basketball game Saturday night in
Indianapolis because of practice, but said he will
be there if the Gators advance to the champion-
ship game Monday.
Meyer and his players believe there is a lot
to be learned from the basketball team. Meyer
hinted at having the basketball team speak to his
players when they return.
"One of the main things our team could
learn from them is to stay together," Siler said.
"All of them, they stay together. ... They can
feel each other; they have the same heartbeat."


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Available from Commercial News Providers"


Gators end losing streak, edge USF


* CLOSER O'DAY PICKED UP
HIS FIFTH SAVE OF THE YEAR.

By BRYAN JONES
Alligator Writer

Coming into Wednesday night's
game, the UF baseball team had
dropped its last four games and five
of its last six, while in-state rival South
Florida came in riding a five-game win-
ning streak and had won 10 of their last


12 outings.
That momentum didn't seem to mat-
ter much.
Despite its recent struggles, No. 15
UF (18-11, 2-4 Southeastern Conference)
was able to overcome some bad luck
to hold off South Florida (14-12, 5-1
Big East) for a 6-5 win at McKethan
Stadium. With runners on second and
third in the top of the fourth inning, and
the Gators leading 2-1, UF reliever Matt
Hightower struck out the Bulls' Brandin
Daniel swinging on a ball in the dirt.


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Casey Lawson / Alligator
UF shortstop Adam Davis hits a home run to right field during the first inning
of the Gators' 6-5 win against South Florida on Wednesday night.


UF catcher Brian Jeroloman blocked
the ball, keeping it in front of him. As
Daniel headed for first base, he ap-
peared to drop the bat onto the ball,
forcing it to carom towards the visitors'
dugout. Daniel was able to reach first
base safely and a run scored. USF's Kris
Howell, who moved to third on the
play, later scored on a groundout to give
the Bulls the lead.
S UF coach Pat McMahon argued, but
the umpires ruled that the batter unin-
tentionally hit the ball, and therefore
there were no grounds for an interfer-
ence call. Surprisingly, McMahon not
only agreed with the call, but he had
plenty of praise for home plate umpire
John Magnusson.
Magnusson, a Gainesville resident
and one of the founders of the Collegiate
Baseball Association, will soon retire
after 29 years as an umpire and called
his final game at McKethan Stadium on
Wednesday.
"If he would have on purpose in
some way hit the ball, then the ruling
would be different," McMahon said.
"But it is one of those bad breaks that
happened against the Gators. It was the
right call."
The Gators battled back in the bot-
tom of the inning, however, taking the
lead for good on a two-run single from
second baseman Adam Davis.
Davis went 2 for 3 with a home run
and three runs batted in the game.
"That's what we try to do," Davis
said. "We try to answer every time they
put a number up and kill their momen-
tum. ... It was big for us."
Despite some trouble in the ninth, UF
closer Darren O' Day picked up his fifth
save in as many chances. He struck but
USF pinch hitter Brian Baisley with two
runners on base to end the ball game.
"That's why Darren was out there,"
Davis said. "He is the guy that we want
out there [in pressure situations], and he
wanted to be out there himself."
While O'Day struggled a little, al-
lowing 6 hits in his 2 2/3 innings, he
said he was happy with the way he
played through adversity.
"All the innings I was in there were
pretty exciting," O'Day said. "I seemed
to like putting guys on base tonight."
UF right-hander Josh Edmondson
(3-0) picked up the win in relief, while
starter Kris Gawriluk. lasted three in-
nings, allowing two earned runs.
"It's kind of like getting the monkey
off our back, so to speak," second base-
man Matt Gaski said. "We really needed
that win. Nobody wants to drop five
straight."


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26, ALLIGATOR l THURSDAY, MARCH 30, 2006


UF shuts out Auburn, takes series


By BRIAN STEELE
Alligator Writer


When a coach gets tossed, it usually motivates a team.
Apparently Auburn didn't get that memo.
Tigers softball coach Tina Deese was ejected in the
fourth inning for arguing that one of her batters was hit
%y a pitch.
The UF softball team responded, piling on four runs
in the bottom half of the inning to secure a 5-0 win, as the
Gators (28-12, 7-5 Southeastern Conference) took a series
against the No.18 Tigers, 2-1.
"[Seeing Deese get ejected] pushed the momentum
our way," said freshman Kim Waleszonia, who was 3 for
4 with two runs and two RBIs. "We just came out and we
had the confidence. We weren't going down. We wanted it
more than them."
After three consecutive one-run games,
/ > the Gators were glad to finally earn a con-
Gators vincing victory.
Softball UF coach Tim Walton has tried boosting
the confidence of his team since getting
swept by No. 4 Alabama three weeks ago.
With three consecutive SEC series wins, his team may fi-
nally be getting the point.
"We got no-hit yesterday, and you really wouldn't have
felt that in our dugout," Walton said. "Ultimately last
night getting that many-hits off that kind of pitcher, that
really bode well for our confidence.
"We came back today with the carryover in confidence.
Look at Brooke Johnson and Kim Waleszonia. They're just
getting on it and making it happen and that's trickling
down to everybody."
While Waleszonia led the way offensively, it was junior
pitcher Stacey Stevens who made the difference on the
mound.
Even though Stevens led the team in nearly every
pitching category last year, she has had to share time with
.-freshmen Lindsay Littlejohn and Stacey Nelson this year.
However, with her performances against Auburn,
Walton may be forced to give Stevens more time. Through
12 1/3 total innings pitched in the series against the
Tigers, Stevens never allowed a run.


"Arguably [this series] was one of her best career
performances," Walton said. "I've said it all along, she's
maturing herself to be a good pitcher."
Stevens said he now feels her confidence growing.
"My confidence is high right now," she said. "These
two wins we had were quality wins against a really qual-
ity team. They're pitchers are great."


Andrea Morales / Alligator Staff
UF pitcher Stacey Stevens pitches during the Gators'
5-0 victory against Auburn on Wednesday afternoon.
Stevens struck out five batters for her second shutout of
the season.


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THURSDAY, MARCH 30, 2006 U ALLIGATOR, 27


STebow makes UF spring debut


-- "-.. .. .. .. "
7a 4


Tom McCarthy/ Alligator
Freshman quarterback Tim Tebow throws a pass at his first UF
practice on Wednesday afternoon.


* THE HIGHLY TOUTED FRESHMAN QUARTER-
BACK PRACTICED AS LEAK'S BACKUP.

By NICK ZACCARDI
Alligator Staff Writer
nzaccardi@alligator.org

In some ways it was just like high school, but mostly, it
was a totally different environment.
As pregame music blared through the loudspeakers at
nearby McKethan Stadium, incoming freshman quarter-
back Tim Tebow participated in his first practice at UF.
He threw more than 100 passes in three hours, han-
dling the No. 2 quarterback duties behind senior Chris
Leak.
But the day started out with some freshman gaffes.
When Tebow first went to huddle up, he walked to the
wrong side of the huddle and quickly had to backtrack
to his spot.
Lining up mostly in the shotgun, he connected with
receiver Kenneth Tookes on his first pass, but overthrew
his second receiver by five yards.
"Tim Tebow looked OK," UF coach Urban Meyer
said. "He's got to get comfortable. I thought he would be
a little bit more comfortable because he ran some similar
stuff in high school. But I think he's out here wanting to
set the world on fire instead of just completing passes."
Added tight end Tate Casey: "He's good, a young
guy with a strong arm. He's going to progress into a
great player. We've got to get him working."
Though Tebow wasn't available to comment, the
football practice fields next to the UF baseball stadium
must have felt like home for the reigning Florida Mr.
Football.


His high school coach, St. Augustine Nease High's
Craig Howard, and receivers coach Ken Fasnacht, Jr.,
attended the Wednesday practice in addition to Tebow's
father, Bob, and brother, Robby.
"He doesn't look like a high school player out there,"
Howard said. "He looks like an old veteran out here. The
more he understands the offense, the more he gets into
it, the better he'll do. But he looked good."
But it didn't look like the same quarterback who
rewrote the FHSAA record books and finished his prep
career with 12,960 yards of total offense.
For starters, Tebow was wearing No. 15, not his high
school No. 5, which belongs to receiver Andre Caidwell,
who practiced for the first time since he broke his leg
against Tennessee on Sept. 17.
"I think he's out here wanting to set the
world on fire instead of just completing
passes."
Urban Meyer
UF football coach

He also had to play second fiddle to Leak, taking the
backup role for the first time since he was an underclass-
man in high school.
Howard noticed another difference right away.
"It was kind of funny seeing him in an orange helmet
rather than a [Nease] gold helmet," he said. "That was
new. But he looks real good in it."
The Gators begin full-pad workouts on
Saturday, but Wednesday's practice was
special and not just for the chosen successor to Leak.
"Timmy's first practice at Florida, I had to be here,"
Howard said. "He knew I'd be here."


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'Sports
THURSDAY, MARCH 30,2006



UF assistant Shyatt


ready for first dance


ALLIGATOR
www.alligatorSports.org


* THE 54-YEAR-OLD COACH
WILL EXPERIENCE HIS FIRST
FINAL FOUR.

By DAN TREAT
Alligator Staff Writer
dtreat@alligator.org

When the clock struck zero and the
horn sounded, Larry Shyatt finally
reached a place that had been but a
dream his entire life.
The 54-year-old had'been involved
with college basketball since a two-
season stint playing at The College of
Wooster before becoming a student
assistant there.
And in all those years, bouncing be-
tween eight different programs, Shyatt
had never been to the Final Four.
But after all the-waiting, hard work
and heartache, the Gators delivered
for him, sending him to the end of the
tournament road for the first time in
his life.
"No one would have imagined this
kind of run," Shyatt said. "They just
matured a little faster than any group
I've ever been around.."
And around Shyatt has been during
his 31-year coaching career. He served
as an assistant at Utah, Cleveland
State, New Mexico, Providence,
Clemson and head coach at Wyoming
and Clemson before landing an assis-


tant gig at UF
He had won the Big East as an as-
sistant, been named Mountain West
Coach of the Year and took Clemson to
the finals of the NIT, becoming just the
fourth coach in ACC history to win 20
games in his first year at the school.
Still the ultimate prize eluded him,
until Sunday night.
"I was talking to Coach Shyatt, and
he had tears in his eyes," UF center
Joakim Noah said. "And he's been
doing this for [31] years. Coaching [31]
years, and this is his first
trip to the Final Four.
Men's That's beautiful right
: ; '.-: . ,' there.
"I'm 21 years old; he
was coaching, and my
parents hadn't even met yet."
In his second season in Gainesville,
Shyatt arrived preaching a new defen-
sive philosophy, one that the Gators
had lacked in previous seasons.
UF's scoring defense jumped from
No.11 to No. 3 in the. Southeastern
Conference during his first season
on the bench. This season, the Gators
improved to No.2, behind only South
Carolina.
"He's all defense," UF forward
Chris Richard said. "He doesn't care
anything about offense. I don't even
know if he knows the plays. He may

SEE SHYATT, PAGE 24


Andy Apicella / Alligator Staff


Copyrighted Material

Syndicated Content

Available from Commercial News Providers"


March Madness hits Gators


By IAN FISHER
Alligator Staff Writer
ifisher@alligator.org

Tim Tebow and Chris Leak. Coach
Urban Meyer's second spring. Andre
Caldwell's road to recovery. Everything
took a backseat to the buzz surrounding the
UF men's basketball team's run to the Final
Four, as the Gators kicked off their first
practice of the spring on Wednesday.
And even the football players are capti-
vated by the Gators' run to the Final Four.
While no official team event is planned
to watch the basketball team's national
semifinal game against George Mason on
Saturday, members of the football team do
plan on watching.
"Probably a bunch of us guys will get
together and watch it," linebacker Brandon
Siler said. "I'll be watching the whole thing.
I've got to support my boys."


One football player, however, could've
been heading to Indianapolis right about
now, instead of running blocking drills and
windsprints. Tight end Cornelius Ingram
played as a guard on the basketball team
last season, but decided against returning
this season because he wanted to foqus
solely on football.
"I really wanted to get in and
watch film and take my time
and really learn the position."
Cornelius Ingram
UF tight end

Ingrain switched from quarterback to
tight end at the end of last season and is
still adjusting to the position, but still con-
sidered playing basketball when the hoops
SEE FOOTBALL, PAGE 24


NBA
Heat
Raptors

Magic
Timberwolves


* UF senior golfer Matt Every was
named a semifinalist for the Ben
Hogan Award. He joined nine other
golfers on the list for the nations'
top male collegiate golfer.


* 1962: Tom Moore steals a UF record six
bases against Georgia, including a record
three in the seventh inning alone. Moore
finished his career with 46 steals, a record
that stood for 17 years.


* Check out Fridiy's-Alligator for
complete preview coverage of the UF
men's basketball team at the Final Four in
Indianapolis.


UF power forward
Chris Richard isn't
even sure if assis-
tant coach knows
anything about the
Gators' offense.
But he admits that
the defensive guru
has toughened up
the Gators.































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2, SCALING,, THE IVORY TOWEk, ALLIGATOR U THURSDAY, MARCH 30, 2006



Libraries, benchmarks of prestige, lag behind


. i


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.. ....... ............ ....... ....... ... _..
Hannah Reichel / Alligator
Dale Canelas leads UP Provost Janie Fouke on a tour of the
renovated Library West building Sunday.


By JUSTIN RICHARDS
Alligator Writer
jrichards@alligator.org

Behind UF's bluster about be-
coming a Top 10 public research
institution is a library system without
enough space or material to accom-
modate researchers, some adminis-
trators and faculty say.
A premier university library
enables professors and graduate
students to reach deep and wide in
their research. Such an opportunity
lures the talented researchers that
universities want. It also scores big
points in the university rankings.
But according .to library admin-
istrators and top UF officials, UF's
library system sags below its com-
petition and shortchanges graduate
students and faculty.
Library West, UF's primary library,
shut down in 2004 for a then-ambi-
tious renovationn.
The made-over building is visu-
ally impressive, but underestimated
costs shrunk the planned addition by
50,000 square feet, and the library's
collection will still not rival those of
UF's competitors, Libraries Director
Dale Canelas said.
UF's libraries ranked 33rd among
public universities' in the Association
of Research Libraries' evaluation of
the 2003-2004 academic year.
The UF libraries carried 94 vol-
umes per student that year. The
University of Minnesota's, ranked
11th by the association, carried 161.
"UF is not remotely near Top 10
status." Canelas said.
Library administrators expressed
dismay at their limited inclusion in
the "Work Plan for the University of
Florida," a new document mapping
UF's route to the Top 10.


"Everyone else got raising and
improving and continuing to expand
and all what we got was finish
off what we planned to do with last
year's money," UF library administra-
tor Bill Covey said.
UF President Bernie Machen
- who has told the Alligator that the
library lags behind UF's rivals said
the plan-in-progress is open to input.
The library trouble, like most of
UF's problems, is essentially money
trouble.

"With our benchmark as
trying to be a Top 10 uni-
versity, it doesn't seem like
cutting journals is something
that we should be doing."
James Klausner
UF engineering professor

State funding for Florida universi-
ties is scarce, and UFs low tuition is
an unmoving obstacle.
Canelas said UF last increased the
library's budget in 2000. Meanwhile,
book costs have risen.
Anticipating another stagnant
budget in 2007. Canelas recently sent
a memo to all faculty members be-
moaning the dearth of library funds
and announcing her proposal to cut
$750,000 in journal subscriptions.
At last Thursday's Faculty Senate
meeting, engineering professor James
Klausner questioned the cuts.
"With our benchmark as trying to
be a Top 10 univ.-, i i It I. '! :-.: '
like cutting journals is something that
we should be doing,'" he said.
Canelas was reluctant to make
the cuts, but she acknowledges the
university's constricting budget.
UF Provost Janie Fouke said a dis-
organized UF bureaucracy might be


the root of the library problems. With
so many departments clamoring for
scarce resources, the library may
simply have been overlooked.
"Maybe the way we distribute
money doesn't weight the library's
need," she said.
When it reopens this Summer, the
library will suffice for undergraduate
students. But graduate students have
a bigger appetite for research.
Mitchell Hart, associate professor
of history, said his graduate students
avoid some projects because they
know the library will not accommo-
date them.
"Many of them I've seen often-
times get stymied in their research
projects simply because the univer-
sity doesn't own the books," he said.
"So they'll very quickly get to know
what the strengths and weaknesses
of the library are, and they'll choose
their projects accordingly, and that's
very unfortunate because it limits the
students' ambitions."
Hart said the libraries' deficien-
cies might stifle his department's
attempts at recruiting top faculty, an
endeavor UF officials deem essential
to rising in rank.
The history department is seeking
a professor of Islamic studies, Hart
said, but UF's Arabic-language book
selection is discouraging.
"Someone who's looking to apply
to the job may very well go to the
library and say, 'I can't do my work
there,"' Hart said.
But Hart, knowing that university
money is tight, does not blame UF
administrators.
"I can't imagine anybody at the
university not wanting a library," he
said. "Maybe they could play basket-
ball in the library and then it could be
really big."


On list of beer lovers, UF meets its Top 10 calling


By KYLIE CRAIG
Alligator Writer
kcraig@alligator.org

It looks as if UF students drink enough beer
to force UF President Bernie Machen to give
up the fight to curb binge and underage drink-
ing. The problem? There aren't enough parties
where they can drink it.
The Princeton Review ranked UF seventh in
schools with "Lots of Beer" for its annual college
rankings, which came out in August.
However, UF is.close to slipping off the Top 20
party schools it ranked at a sober No. 18.
UF, which was once top in the rankings, is
now falling behind schools like the University of
Iowa and University of Georgia.
And in May, when Playboy magazine releases'
its list of the country's Top 10 party schools, UF
won't see its name but archrival Florida State
University will. Maybe that's because one of its
fine students, Jenn Sterger. the FSU cowgirl and
Y cebook phenomenon, will be featured in its
pages.
It also may have something to do with UF's
lhigh admission standards. The average SAT
score of UF freshmen in Fail 2005 was between
1210 and 1380. At FSU, the average was 1169.
If UF students are brainier, does that mean
they drink less?
UF sophomore Bo Offenhauer said he thinks
this is the reason the Gators aren't the party
school they once were.


"It keeps getting harder to get into [UF]. I
think that works against us," Offenhauer said.
"People that are getting in are douche bags."
UF's Student Health Care Center also con-
ducts its own type of party survey for students,
though the questions are more serious than the
Princeton and Playboy rankings.
The anonymous survey asks students how
often they drink and use drugs, and, if they do,
which kinds they use.
The SHCC, which has conducted the survey
each-Spring since the mid-1990s, recently began
surveying students during the Fall semester as
well.
Maureen Miller, health educator for the
SHCC, said results from the Fall 2005 survey will
be released soon.
The statistics help form campaigns to con-
vince students that social norms involve less
drinking than they might have though. For ex-
ample, the "Sober is Sexy" campaign advertises
that 7 out of 10 UF students find a drunk person
less attractive.
Miller said although the .school is informed
of the rankings from The Princeton Review on
partying and drinking, it's not something they
spend much time on.
"We- don't place that much I. ;l ...-i on
those rankings given the fact that I don't know
if there's any scientific merit in how Princeton
Review and Playboy conduct their surveys,"
Miller said. "I would hope more students would
realize it's not something to take seriously."


Michelle Stewart / Alligator Staff


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THURSDAY, ,I. \ '._ H 30,2006 ALLIGATOR, SCAL1N7 THE 1VORY TOWE., 3


UF's competitors plan to stay put


By LINDSEY FRANCO
Alligator Writer
ifranco@alligator.org

To break into the ranks of the
nation's best public research
universities, UF would have to
leapfrog past at least six other
institutions some of which
have more cash on hand and
better-paid professors.
UF ranked No. 16 on U.S.
News & World Report's annual
list of top public universities,
desperately wants to join
the ranks of the University
of California-Berkeley, the
University of Virginia and the
:L _.-1 of '.In, 1 1 1. I Nos.
1,2 and 3 on the list.
"What UF ultimately needs
to become a Top 10 university
is to focus on the weak points,"
said Robert Morse, the director


of data research at U.S. News &
World Report.
These improvable areas in-
clude a high student to :, 'iil.
ratio and comparatively low
faculty pay
The University of Illinois-
Urbana-Champaign, which
rounds out the bottom of the
list at No. 10, confronts similar
issues in its upward n,, I ,li :
Decreased funding from the
Illinois Legislature has created
a faculty retention problem
- part of a trend ,1 ,.', ir pub-
lic universities nationwide.
"Public institutions like
ours have to do a better and
more thorough job of convinc-
ing legislatures of the value of
higher education and why we
need to support it,"said Kristine
Campbell, UI's coordinator of
research and public affairs.


" A spokesman from the
University of Michigan, tied
for the No. 3 position with the
.i, ,.,ir., of California-Los
Angeles, said state funding con-
tinues to decline year after year.
Michigan has supplemented
state funding with increased
fundraising, Michigan spokes-
man Joe Serwach said.
"You get to a level where
you've got the cake but you
want to put the frosting and the
nuts on top to do even better,"
he added.
Moreover, '".I..i, i' '' tuition
rate is more than three times
that of UE Tuition, along with
state money and private dona-
tions, is one of the three major
sources of funding for public
universities.
To scale the rankings, the
Georgia Institute of Technology


at No. 8, capitalized on its
strengths in engineering and
science.
Georgia Tech has hovered
around the bottom three Top 10
spots for about five years, said
Amelia Gambino, the interim
assistant vice president of com-
munications.
That school also has much
higher tuition than UF, with
fewer students among whom it
distributes resources.
Morse, of U.S. News & Wold
Report, said typically, once a
university reaches a'Top 10 posi-
tion, it usually maintains stabil-
ity relative to other universities
- making it that much harder
for UF to get into the Top 10.
"For Florida to get in,. it
would have to rise," Morse said.
"It's not that four or five other
schools are going to fall."


To excel, schools must represent all


Tops schools report positive climate


By JACQUELINE DAVISON
Alligator Writer
jdavison@alligator.org

Though UF has recently expanded its
programs for diversity and multicultural
affairs to compete with the Top 10 public
universities, it may be necessary to further
improve those programs.
UF Associate Vice President for Student
Affairs Mike Rollo said UF does a great deal
to reach out to ,,ii I .ii, students:
"We believe the more diverse the cam-
pus, the more it is international," Rollo said.
UF recently promoted Tamara Cohen to
the new position of director of Multicultural
Affairs.
Rollo admitted there are challenges to
creating a diverse campus.
"I think it's a little bit hard to address
because [UF's programs are in] so many
Sd-ll 11 areas;' he said.
The No. 3-ranked t'i ',.iii. of
Michigan-Ann Arbor is focusing on serv-
ing two specific groups more, according to
Angela Mufioz, its associate director at the
office of Multi-Ethnic Student Affairs. The
two groups are multiracial students and
Arab students.


Many college students whose heritage
comprises more than one culture tend to
choose to identify with one, Mufioz said.
"[Being] biracial/multiracial is kind of a
new phenomenon among the population in
general that is being recognized;,she said.
When Arab students fill out applica-
tion materials, they must choose between
"white" or "other" to identify their race be-
cause there is no Arab option.
"They're kind of a silent minority," Mufioz
said."Even more silent because -i: can't
even identify their identity."
Michigan also boasts a Spanish-lan-
guage portal on its Web site, cti', i,nr news
and admissions information.
In 2003, the U.S. Supreme Court case
Grutter v. Bollinger ruled in favor of the
iun -,i -ii, deciding that it is constitutional
for the law school to use race in admission
decisions to promote a diverse educational
environment.
"The university does a good job of
i..illi ..i''" Munoz said. "The Uii ,.-i.. ,
of Michigan is very good in some ways of
listening to those new ideas and being in a
position to act upon those ideas.'
Mufloz added that having a global per-
spective is important because of the cur-


Southern Hospitality

UF President Bernie Machen has said that UF must be a diverse university if it hopes to be
a great one. Top 10 schools aim to match their student body's demographics with those of the state.


UF TOTAL
ENROLLMENT

Asian
6.8 percent Black
J 7.4 percent


- I ii .hnd

Ame'r(, mn Inrd,3n
(0 _J n-f, .:r!


- While
74.5 p.i: n


FLORIDA
POPULATION
Asian
1.7 percent Black
Black
14.6 percent



Hispanic
16.8 percent


American Indian
0.3 percent
65.4 percent
Michelle Stewart / Alligator Staff


rent global economy
"If we don't have an understanding for
anything outside our borders, we're not
going to succeed," she said. "Not just for
economic sake, but for a personal aware-
ness and appreciation for others that are
different than ourselves."
In 2004, the University of North
Carolina-Chapel liiI organized a task
force to research the status of diversity and
multicultural affairs and assess goals for the
future.
"In general, people feel included and
respected with what they're doing at the
university," said Lynne K. Degitz, com-
munications specialist for Diversity and
Multicultural Affairs at UNC."So, the overall
sort of feel of Carolina is something we're
proud of, that we're not taking for granted.
We're proud of where we're at."
The No.5-ranked public university's task
force has outlined eight goals for future
(di .:i;1. and multicultural affairs. Through
this, they are looking where to apply more
resources and efforts.
"We're establishing a systematic plan for
assessing the state of diversity at [1Il' j so
that we have information from across the
university that's gathered on an annual ba-
sis" Degitz said.
UNC realizes there are specific chal-
lenges' that need to be faced in regards
to diversity, and these challenges may not
be the same as those of other universities,.
Degitz said.
"[UNC] is really seeking to be a leading
public institution" she said. "What we need
to respond to might not be the same as
what UCLA needs to respond to."
While the university may be doing well
in terms of the numbers of black and Native
American enrollees 11 percent ard 1
percent, respectively according to U.S.
News & World Report, Degitz noted that
these numbers do not .-l.l-.'i the state's
Illin' i. il. percentages. For instance, North
Carolina has one of the highest populations
of Native Americans east of the Mississippi
River.
UNC's percentages of e-. IIn_..I minori-
ties mirror UF's, and Degitz said UNC is
aware of the work required to combat a
strong Southern history
"We've had tremendous changes in our
state and in our country" she said. "There
are still facts of that history that we have to
be aware of."


















UF wants to be ranked among the
Top 10 public universities by US. News
& World Report and other rankings.
It's all UF administrators talk about -
at meetings, in Interview,
even on vacation.
in a series .i interviews, uwiiverity
administrators cmted intercon'ecte!d
problems with students, faculty and
funding that keep UF in a holding pattern
at No. 16:
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Students are

Some hard-working students come to UF
with good grade point averages and test scores,
but when they arrive, they take easy classes and
just hang out, said Kim Tanzer, chairwoman of
the Faculty Senate and the sole faculty member
on the Board of Trustees.
"Students think, 'OK, they've made it to UF
and they can reduce-tI -Ir IIiio- i shesaid.
Students need to push themselves harder
than in high school if the university is going to
move up in the rankings, she said.
UF Provost Janie Fouke wondered, what is
this group of people doing with their time?
A:. .rdirn. to the 2003 National Survey of
Student Engagement, freshmen at UF spend
less time preparing for class and working at
jobs than the average freshmen pool from
peer institutions. While they spend more time
!-I;.-:',i.-'lti-, in co-curricular activities such as
campus organizations, Greek I _'-,n I.. '. ji
sports, they also spend more time relaxing and
socializing.
Though the uni... :rsit, has an excellent stu-
dent body, Tanzer said; a large chunk does not
spend its time contributing to the university's
educational, cultural, scientific or other pur-
suits. Nationally recognized student work can
help UF's reputation..


UF i
Low tuition, government restric-. contrary
tions, scholarship !.,'.r.r.i; and wants," s
alumni giving rates prevent students A forn
and faculty from getting and giving a Universit,
Top 10 education. term pre:
UF charges less than $3,000 a year in securing
for undergraduate in-state tuition of Goverr
- thousands below the average. At 1'
"I think we could double it, and it of Michi
would still be low," said UF Provost Bernie M
Janie Fouke. the unive
The Top 10 public universities have raise
charge about $6,500 for undergradu- past there
ate in-state tuition. The University of lower sta
North Carolina-Chapel Hill, ranked UF's in
No. 5. sets its tuition closest to UFs isn't the c
at $4,613. Two s
One reason UF's tuition remains Bright F
low is that UF does not set it for un- -Florida P
dergraduates. Tuition was controlled connect
by the Florida Legislature until a Sen. Rod
recent court decision handed that running f
power to the Board of Governors, Becau:
which oversees the State University percentage
System. is wary
"The Board of Governors has been strain on
reluctant to do anything that may be Bright


Sapat ic t e U


(too apathetic) to make UF a Top


Both Tanzer and Fouke recognized pock-
ets of student involvement, such as the ap-
proximately 533,000 hours of service students
registered with the UF Center for Service &
Leadership last year. i i II-I expressed a wish
that it was more pervasive throughout the rest
of the student body.
Instead, UF's student culture asks why
students would want to rush
through college.
"I think there is kind of the
idea that college is the place to let
loose and relax before you go into
ht1 > l d, I f- M I hF l+f I9 S


classes also prevent individual attention.
According to UFs Office of Institutional
Research, there were 305 class sections with
100 or more students in them last Fall. Eleven of
those classes had at I. ..i.r i niI -.r ...tii -
With such large classes, students who ap-
ply for pi .stipi: 1- scholarships and jobs after
college often have a hard time getting letters of
recommendation from their professors.
V ., kin ,.- i,.l..r. iii:,'. fird tIl i lf r:. I- ';t s


t0 ejt 100os


11<


eirc l wcu ovrtu lJtl elre ICOL oyour ei :t C
said psychology sophomore Keely I to the p.eal world for ti'e O u0l life"
O'Malley. -- ('. OplO al
But some think that culture is hold-
ing UF back. ............. .. ..................... ...............................:
ing UP back.
"Students sometimes see I-, -,,] hold them less responsible for attendance than
as something to be proud of," ,i it.. Rollo, their jobs, said E. Jane Luzar, a provost fellow.
associate vicr- o. -;-.. ,,it of Student Affairs. But Attendance is not the only way UF students
the fact that they go to a party school is not go- affect the university's rankings.
ing to be important to their future I- I ,i,!, ... ,-, 1
tie important to their future Even though they enter UF with Advanced
ouke is working to improve courses to keep Placement, community college or Internationa
Foukeisworngtoimprovcoursestokeep Baccalaureate credits, many students do nol
students engaged and challenged, she said. graduate within four years, Tanzer said. Thes
Classes are so big that many students feelcredits should allow them to graduate on time
they do not have to show up, 'anzer said. Large if not earlier
0 if not earlier.


is (too cheap) to be a Top 10 univer


to what the Legislature
aid E.T. York.
ner chancellor of the State
y System and former UF in-
sident, York has been active
ig more power for the Board
ors.
lo. 3-ranked University
gan, where UF President
[achen was once provost,
ersity sets tuition. Officials
ed tuition each year for the
e years to compensate for a
te budget.
ability to set its own tuition
)nly reason it remains low.
tate programs, the Florida
Futures Scholarship and
repaid Tuition, are plainly
d with tuition, said State
Smith, D-Alachua, who is
r governor
se Bright Futures pays a
ge of tuition, the Legislature
of tuition hikes that put a
funds.
Futures pays the tuition


of 78 percent of UF undergraduates,
so it is in UFs best interest to keep
tuition low and the program sol-
vent, wrote UF Director of Student
Financial Affairs Karen Fooks.
With Bright Futures, most un-
dergraduate students are minimally
impacted by tuition increases, she
wrote.
Fouke proposed a hypothetical
solution: If a cap is placed on Bright
Futures, the university could set the
tuition level above the amount cov-
ered by the state-sponsored scholar-
ship without requiring the program
to provide more funds.
In addition, Florida Prepaid, an
investment plan that helps pay for
a student's college education at
locked-in tuition rates, will work only
if tuition goes up at the same rate as
the program's investments, wrote
Fooks, the financial aid director.
The program planned for certain
tuition increases over time, but if
tuition rises faster than the interest,
the government would have to pro-


vide funds, she wrote.
'"I think raising tuition i
tion, not necessarily the opti
Smith said.
The state could give mor
to UF he said.
But in state funding, UF
receives more than some T
versities.
For 2003-2004, the stat,
priated more than $549 m
UF, while the Uni; i- r-, of I
received $314 million in stat
for 2006. But less state fu
offset by the University of M
higher tuition.
Bright Futures and
Prepaid are popular with
legislators' constituents,
causing UF tuition rates
to become subject to
politics rather than
-th I tll ii policy discus-
sion, Fooks wrote.
The university is
also investigating other
ways to raise funds. The


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university.

The average course load for UF students
13.6 credits in Spring 2005, Fouke said. At
rate, students will not graduate within four
rs. UF's four-, five- and six-year graduation
;s, a factor in the rankings, are lower than
ie of Top 10 public universities.
:,n t_' i i,,,fil'., r. ,,:rju December as "
th-year building construction major. At least
of the students in his major take more than .
- years to graduate because of academic l.
lirements, he said.
'It's one more football season," he said.
I'he UF administration has investigated
:k tuition as an incentive for students to
more classes each semester. Under that
.em, students would pay the same amount
.ition if they took 12,15 or 18 credits, giving .
itious students more i, i.f; ,, i 1 1 .i buck. .
)ue to a nationwide trend of grade inflation,
ie students complain if they don't get A's,
expect more for less, Tanzer said. Faculty
nbers are afraid to give low grades because
/ could receive poor evaluations and stu-
ts could lose their scholarships.
\ "-;i. n is eioht orut nf 1(0 tfrrulpntse workr-


their butts off to get C's or B's in courses
are so great we're preparing future Nobel
Pulitzer Prize winners," Tanzer said.



Y.
university's alunmi giving rate is sur-
)p- .ri:-riii, low, Tanzer said. She said
!n. the alumni gi, inl' rate, at 18 percent,
is a smaller percentage than you
ey would think.
At other universities, the endow-
Ily ment level is higher as well, allowing
ni- donations to provide annual income
for a variety of areas, including pro-
ro- fessorships and fellowships. Last
or year, Michigan's endowment was
an $4.9 billion, while UF's endowment
ey was $861 million.
is To catch up to its Top 10 peers,
a's the university's fundraising arm, the
UF Foundation, recently began a$1.2
da billion capital campaign.

Bright"
tion of 78 periewt of
-- s.- oit is In

best interests to'
ion low


[ By ETIZABETH HTIJAKRR ]


S"Andrea Morales / Alligator Staff
Professor Steven Detweiler uses props to ir '.i t,r- tension during a lecture for his Physics I with Calculus class
Wednesday morning in the New Physics Building. To accommodate the more than 500 students enrolled, Detwei-
ler teaches two consecutively scheduled periods of the same course in the 350-seat auditorium.




Faculty is (tOo overworked) to make UF a Top. 10.
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6, SCA.LIN7 TH-1E IVORY TOWER, ALLIGATOR N THURSDAY, MARCH 30, 2006



Focus on sciences pushes humanities aside


By MARIA LAVERGHETTA
Alligator Writer--

Mozart and Michelangelo are
struggling to keep up with UE
', il, the UF pursuit toward the
Top 10 research finish line leaving
these artsy geniuses in the dust,
the humanities and liberal arts col-
leges at UF wonder if their heroes
can- rompete with Mendel and
Marconi not only on the track,
but also in their wallets.
The arts and humanities are far
from "frivolous,'said Robin Poynor,
UF professor and assistant director
of the College of Fine Arts.
"There are not that many people
saying,'Oh, we :. 11i. need to have
more studies done on the work of
Rembrandt, i'.., ,. said.
Because funding for arts and
humanities is scarcer than it is in
the sciences and medicine, corpo-
rations do not seek out someone
to create or research a painting,
iie said.
Even though UF's improvement
plans do not mention the arts, the
C' .11 of Fine Arts wants to see
them as more central, said Kevin
i.' i :, IUF professor and chair-
man of the School of Theatre and
Dance..
-I of the universities that we
like to compare ourselves to the
Michigans, the Texases, the UCLAs
- all have stellar arts programs
across the board', i., i ..said.
"For Florida to compete :i n;. ,iii.1.
they will have to have the same
arts I.- ,,, ,
And the Urni L .:ir of Michigan


- the third-best public research
n,: .--1i.; according to U.S. News
& World Report echoes his sen-
timent.
IL. !'.. I Schoenfeldt, associate
dean of humanities in the College
of Literature, Science and the Arts
at the University of Michigan,wrote
in an e-mail that it is critical for re-
search to be evenly distributed.

"All of the universities that
we like to compare ourselves
to the Michigans, the
Texases, the UCLAs all
have stellar arts programs
across the board. For
Florida to compete nation-
ally, they will have to have
the same arts programs."
Kevin Marshall
UP professor,
School of Theatre and Dance
chairman
He concedes that the humani-
ties do not have the same funds
available and that they must be
supported fror'within.
"In my time as associate dean
for the humanities at Michigan,
we have seen the research money
for the humanities increase 10
percent, even as state revenues
have fallen," Schoenfeldt wrote in
the e-mail.
Because the primary need of
humanities scholars is time off
work to travel in order to have
access to obscure materials, tech-
nological endeavors such as Early
English Books Online, based in
Michigan, have made travel less


necessary Schoenfeldt said.
UF .,ii-l. .' .', assistant profes-
sor Jennifer Thomas said she feels
the lack of adequate ii .i... .. and
struggle for research material hurt
UF's potential.
If the iIi i, wants to be in
the Top 10, money for the humani-
ties, specifically music, needs to
im prove greatly, she said.
"If they don't pay for it, we will
not be in the Top I0;"she said.
The I iii- i of North
Carolina-Chapel Hill, the fifth-
best public research '-; ..r:; in
the nation, has held honor and
prestige because of its strong
sense of "c.ii.: i "said William
Andrews, professor of English and
senior associate dean of fine arts
and humanities for the College of
Arts and Sciences at UNC, in a tele-
phone interview.
To gain this ( .i,--i ,iii, funding
for humanities research is impor-
tant, but i i.i.' ., ]-. i: it against oth-
er research is not right because it is
not as expensive, Andrews said.
He added,however,that in order
for humanities to be. as elite, i -
must be funded sufficiently
"If you want to get the best
people to raise the prestige of
your university ... you have to offer
those people -the kind of support
they need, or someone else will:'
Andrews said.
W ill .:i- IJF I,.:ii:., .: of cho-
ral activities and School of Music
professor, agreed with Andrews.
"How can we be afTop 10 school
if we donT have the same funding

inthe I..-i0,lA asked.


lom Ivicarrny/ Anllgalor
Robert Wendell conducts the choir in singing "Oh Rejoice, Ye
Christians, Loudly" as part of his UF Graduate Choral Conduct-
ing Recital at Holy Faith Catholic Church on Tuesday.


For UF to flourish, city must join university's efforts


To Move


or Not to Move


Faculty consider these things

before moving to Gainesville:



F Cost of housing



D Time spent commuting



D community arts and entertainment



-] Quality of public school system /


D Job opportunities for spouse $


Michelle Stewart / Alligator Staff


By JESSICA RIFFEL
Alligator Staff Writer


UF (oiii- ij- may pour their efforts into becoming a Top
10 public research university but they will never reach that
status without the city's help, UP and city officials agreed.
For prospective UF professors and their spouses,
Gainesvillea city of about 109,000, has much to offer,includ-
ing world-class health care.
But CG ,-.1 il- a suburban island in the : -. i rural
North Central Florida, lacks other assets such as a major
airport and cultural opportunities.
For UF to attract i. j r I -:-.,.. I ..i ,i. professors it
needs to be a top -. -.* r. i'-- city of Gainesville must be
--iili. ':I11 t i Kyle Cavanaugh, UFs vice president of human
resources.
"Gainesville has a lot of things that are incredibly attrac-
tive and a lot of things that are ciji -.i';ri._" Cavanaugh
said.
For instance, Gainesville has less traffic than larger
college cities, such as Atlanta or Boston, but C..,in:- il I-
" :.- 1- ii p' ii is not ideal for UF faculty who traveloften.
Cavanaugh said.
"They often have to fly out of Jacksonville or Orlando
instead;'he said.
Before accepting jobs and ;, ii, h. to C,.,ii- il, Gi -
tial 1[ F ,. li often look at the cost of housing, commute
times to and from campus, arts and entertainment, quality
of the public school system and jobs for their spouses in
Gainesville, Cavanaugh said.
Florida `'.1;. r.,- i ,, 1 UFs director of community
relations, agreed that UF needs Gainesville to aid in its climb
totheTop 10.
"You can't have the University of Florida without
Gainesville, and you can't have the city of (. i n.- .. .,- with-
out UF Bridgewater-Alford said.


The university's partnership with C I.,'I- i11 is strong,
and she especially appreciates Mayor Pgeen' Hanrahan's
goal for the city to be a Top 10 college town,she said.
"Gainesville is our host cir. .,n ri we need to be collabo-
rating with them at all times,"Bridgewater-Alford said.
Hanrahan,who was elected in 2004 on a student-friendly
platform,did not respond to interview requests.
Despite the university-city partnership, UF and city of-
ficialssometimes iiiu i U'.1. -, .' .l:- ,- li j ," d .:,,1
Earlier this month, UF administrators said they will not
adopt all of the city's suggestions for the UF Campus Master
Plan for 2005-2015,such as .-pI. int r'ii, freshmen from hav-
ing cars on campus and creating on-campus housing for at
least 5 percent more students, Bridgewater-Alford said.
Despite the occasional squabble, city officials support'
UFs goal to be a Top 10 public research university and they
have been working to make the city vibrant and attractive,
City Commissioner Warren Nielsen said.
"But to do this we'have to do a lot of unsexy things',
Nielsen said. referring to the small improvements the city
would have to make for Gainesville to become a great col-
lege town,one in the ranks of New Haven,Conn.,or Norfolk,
Va.- cities Gainesville commissioners hope to emulate.
The city makes decisions regarding .i.J. .:i... lights,
storm water systems and other seemingly mundane items
that can add up to big improvements. Nielsen said.
But he said all of this is done with a larger picture in
mind: creating a "vibrant urbanism" that will attract people
to Gainesville.
Nielsen.whose term ends in Maysaid there is still much
that needs to be dbne, and he would like to see more h 1.
cafes, bookstores, alternative shops, retail and entertain-
ment"near campus.
I r1;;;i- I,, strong partnership between the city and UF
makes the university's climb to the Top 10 inevitable, Nielsen
said.
"We have huge potential', he said."But we're not there yet:







"tI Hi1 il.'. :.',. M 1'. I1H 30,2006 I ALLIGATOR, SCALING THE IVORY TOWER, 7



UF's stellar athletics bring in bucks, publicity


By ANTONIO GONZALEZ
Alligator. Writer

The UF men's basketball team
has made a run to the Final Four,
doing wonders on the court.
They're doing just as much off


the court.
National exposure for the bas-
ketball team means national ex-
posure for the university some-
thing that can make boosters and
alumni happy when it's time to
write a check.
Yalma Johnson, president of


Kristin Nichols / Alligator Staff
Joakim Noah's drive to the Final Four has raised interest in
the university, and could help raise funds.


Gator Boosters Inc., said a con-
sistent Top 10 athletics program
can help rack in money not just
for university athletics, but also
for education.
"It's a proven fact that a high-
quality, high-integrity [athletics]
program helps bring in money for
education," Johnson said. "The to-
tal endowment, not just for athlet-
ics, rose tremendously once Steve
Spurrier came here.
"That just shows what athletics
can do for academics."
Gator Booster Inc. is the fund-
raising arm of the UF Athletics
Department and raises more than
$25 million annually with a mem-
bership of 13,000.
Johnson said he did not know
exactly how much in contribu-
tions the Final Four will bring in
for the Gators because unlike bowl
games in football, finances aren't
budgeted.
"Obviously, there are monetary
benefits," he said.
"How much yet, we don't
know."
The University Athletic
Association has an operating
budget of more than $62 million
for 2005-2006, which includes
donations from Gator Boosters
Inc. and revenues from licensing
agreements that totaled $2.5 mil-
lion in 2005-2006.
But UF athletics wasn't always
as profitable as it is today.
During the early '80s, current
UF Athletics Director Jeremy
Foley helped eliminate a $750,000
deficit as the UAA's chief financial
officer.
Now financially stable, the UAA
has contributed more than $32.2
million to academic endeavors
since 1990.
Doug Brown, director of UF's
Bull-Gator booster program, said
athletics and education benefit
each other.
"Athletics can provide a win-
dow to increase exposure of the


BY THE



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Michelle Stewart/ Alligator Staff
will help increase those contribu-
tions. "
Season-tickets sales should
increase, which should lead to
booster donations from season
tickets in the booster sections in
the Stephen C. O'Connell Center,
Brown said.
"The overall impact of the Final
Four is an extremely positive, en-
thusiastic feeling." he said. "This
translates into bringing money in
for the school."


school," Brown said. "In order to
continue to have a. winning [ath-
letics] program, you need to have
money, and in order to have mon-
ey, you need a winning [athletics]
program."
Brown said the free exposure
that UF is getting from its NC.AA
Tournament run is priceless.
And while he maintains that
Gators fans are consistent every
year in their donations, there's no
doubt in his mind the Final Four


To Tigert Hall's chagrin, SG opposes higher tuition


By LYNDSEY LEWIS
Alligator Writer-
-1, ., O h r ,,


Last year, Student Government officials
poured almost $90,000 in student money into
lobbying state and federal legislators most
of it directed at one goal: keeping tuition low.
To launch UF into the ranks of the nation's
Top 10 public research universities, UF ad-
ministrators have said repeatedly that the
university's tuition needs to rise.
These tuition hikes are necessary to in-
crease university revenue, which, officials
say, would be used to hire new faculty.
However, SG has historically opposed
the proposed tuition increases, arguing that
the needed funding could come from other
sources, though UF gets by on $150 million
to $200 million less than many of its peer
institutions.
"It's not just tuition that's a problem," said
Student Body President Joe Goldberg, who
has fought against tuition hikes at the state


and university level. "I think it's important
that we look in other places before we start
raising tuition."
Aside from tuition, UF pulls in money from
four other sources: the federal government,
state ..'!, .q:,i til.ir,, private donations and
research funding.
Mike Fischer, director of the Florida
Student Association, said the Legislature
could easily provide UF with more funding,
especially because the university is the
state's "I ,- -ii.. institution,
"[The state has] a $71 billion budget,"
Fischer said. "It's just a matter of the
Legislature prioritizing their issues."
FSA is a statewide lobbying group made
up of the SG presidents from Florida's 11
public universities. Goldberg serves as
president.
Compared to its Top 10 counterparts, UF
already takes in $41 to $94 ',il,,, more in
state appropriations.
Goldberg said UF should consider the
possible repercussions of tuition increases.


For instance, he said, the popular Florida
Bright Futures Scholarship program would
also be adversely affected by higher tuition.
If students found themselves unable to
obtain a scholarship, they could enroll at


a more prestigious or i.:u-ic'iijl, beneficial
university, counteracting UF's aim to attract
Florida's top students, Goldberg said.
"We might lose some of the brightest to
other institutions," he said.


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Michelle Stewart / Alligator Staff


i '


. I ,, .. h ,, I ,







8, SC .-' R G THE IVO R Y TOW ER, ALLIGATOR THURSDAY, MARCH 30, 2006


Editorial


Big Talk

Sacrifices must be

Made to get to Top 10

yet's face it: College is not for everyone.
And neither is UF.
SWith every mention of UFs goal to be a Top 10 pub-
lic res-Ich university, opponents assert that our school is
public and should serve the needs of everyone in Florida, not
just the elite. How can UF achieve the coveted Top 10 status
without becoming selective, expensive and difficult in a
word, elite?
S It can't. And more importantly, it shouldn't. We have 11
public universities in Florida; it is only natural that they all
serve different students. It should be expected that some
provide a better education. It must be realized that UF has
become the best.
But to get better, we're going to have to make major sac-
rifices.
UF has reached its full potential under the state's current
system. The Florida Bright Futures Scholarship Program
keeps tuition ridiculously low by handing out "merit" schol-
arships to students who haven't shown much merit. To re-
ceive funding for 75 percent of tuition, students only have to
score a 970 on their SAT.
' No one with that score is accepted into UF, and they
shouldn't be rewarded for such a below-average perfor-
mance. Instead, we should be giving some of that money to
Slow-income students.
i About 78 percent of UF students receive Bright Futures
Scholarships. That means the state is paying most of the
tuition for most UF students. To raise tuition would mean a
more expensive bill for the state and for taxpayers.
But in order for UF to improve, it must raise its tuition.
And to raise its tuition, the state needs to drastically cut
Bright Futures.
S Both must be done.
UF should get more selective. It should spend more mon-
ey on faculty, construction and educational resources.
And hey maybe officials could finally throw some
Money the library's way.
UF can't be dragged down by politics. And yet, UF
Presids-i Bernie Machen needs to play politics in order to
reach his lofty goals.
Sometimes his campaigns are useful Machen is talented
at schmoozing for fundraisers but too often our president
focuses on the unimportant and the unattainable.
Machen's alcohol crusade is perhaps the most notorious.
In every pointless meeting and every hokey public service
announcement, we are told that alcoholism among college
students is linked to our environment and culture.
S Sure, UF and city officials can try to regulate Gainesville
and can spawn hundreds of "Sober is Sexy" campaigns,
but they can't control television and they can't censor the
Internet.
Not many actually believe all these efforts have made a
dent in student drinking. Instead, Machen comes off as dis-
honest and a little bit of a party pooper.
Is he honestly saying that he doesn't drink? Is he going
to stop alumni from lining the street on game days, beer in
hand?
No.
So let's put our efforts toward academics. As the school
Accepts more and more exemplary students, perhaps it will
also accept fewer and fewer party-oriented alcoholics. That's
the only way UF can affect Gainesville's culture. -
Along with this unattainable crusade, UF officials have
also focused a great deal of money and effort toward the
unimportant goal of "branding" the university.
It seems as though Machen and friends have decided that
the easiest way to Top 10 status is to talk as if we're already
Top 10 material.
We're not.
Thesoint of this self-promotion is, ostensibly, to convince
alumni to donate much-needed money. There's no doubt that
this is important. However, a raise in tuition will help us far
more.
We have to prove we're worth the extra cash.
Before we spend tens of thousands to toot our horn, we
need to improve our school. But that goal seems to have
been lost underneath a steady stream of deluded chatter.
Yes, let's become a Top 10 university. Let's be selective.
Let's rTa tuition. Let's make a UF degree more valuable.
But we must reach Top 10 status by becoming a better
university, not just by talking like one.


Commentary


Can UF become a nationally recognized university?
Should officials be able to increase undergraduate tuition?
Do good athletics help academics?
The Alligator editorial board takes a stance on UF's goal to become a Top 10 public research university.


Column

Gators athletics always top tier


ast May, I caught a firsthand
glimpse of just how much UF
hletics Director Jeremy Foley
cares about every sport at UF.
I had to cover the Gators softball
team hosting an NCAA Regional, which
was about as fun as it sounds. Not sur-
prisingly, the Gators lost their first two
games in the double-elimination tour-
nament and were done for the season.
Days later, head coach Karen Johns
was done with the Gators for good.
She had taken UF to four NCAA
Tournaments during her five years in
Gainesville, but the Gators' inability to
reach a Super Regional was enough for
Foley to cut her loose.
"We're not as much of a player
in the softball [scene] as much
as I'd like us to be and think we
can be," Foley said at the time.
This is exactly why UF has placed in
the Top 10 of the national All-Sports
rankings for 22 consecutive years a
streak that spans my entire life.
It's an impressive run that I feel goes
unappreciated. The average Gators fan
cares about football, basketball and
now maybe baseball after last year's
trip to the College World Series.
But it's mostly the smaller sports
that give the Gators this consistent


success.
Last year, 11
UF teams fin-
ished in the Top
10 of their re-
spective sports.
lan Fisher How many fans.
tra innings even knew that?
ra leaning I'd say less than
ifisher@alligator.org 10 percent.
I'm not fault-
ing Gators fans;
it takes something special to voluntari-
ly sit through a daylong meet, regard-
less of the sport.
But Foley certainly deserves credit
for keeping the bar so high, regardless
of a sport's popularity. While you're
busy celebrating the men's basketball
team's Final Four berth, I should re-
mind you that this is almost a yearly oc-
currence for some of UF's other teams.
So while UF President Bernie
Machen is pushing and pushing for a
-Top 10 ranking among public schools,
he need only look past his backyard
to see a legitimate Top 10 institution
in action.
I admire Machen for his goal, but ac-
cording to U.S. News & World Report,
UF is already No. 16 in the country.
What kind of difference would six spots


on a list make?
What is interesting is that three of
last year's Top 10 All-Sports schools
- UCLA, North Carolina and Michigan
- also rank among U.S. News' Top 10
public schools. There's no reason why
UF cannot rival those institutions aca-
demically.
It's probably no coincidence that
these three schools are both athletic
and academic powerhouses. With ath-
letic success comes name recognition,
which I believe is important in being a
top public university.
It's a safe bet that those three
schools reap some of the athletic ben-
efits academically, too. For example,
the University Athletic Association has
given more than $30 million to UF for
academics since 1990.
Good athletics help academics.
In a way, Foley and Machen are in
similar spots. The average Gators fan
couldn't care any less how the softball
team does it's all about football and
basketball. Likewise, the average stu-
dent doesn't care if UF is ranked No: 10
or No. 16 among public universities.
If the plan falters, maybe Machen
could ask Foley for some advice.
Ian Fisher is an Alligator sports writer
and columnist.


,. The views expressed here are not necessarily those of the Alligator.