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The Independent Florida alligator
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Title: The Independent Florida alligator
Portion of title: Florida allgator
Alligator
Alternate Title: University digest
University of Florida digest
Physical Description: v. : ill. (some col.) ; 36 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Campus Communications, Inc.
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Creation Date: January 27, 2005
Publication Date: 1973-
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Coordinates: 29.665245 x -82.336097 ( Place of Publication )
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Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
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Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 65, no. 75 (Feb. 1, 1973)-
General Note: "Not officially associated with the University of Florida."
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Table of Contents
    Main
        page 1
        page 2
        page 3
        page 4
        page 5
    Main: Opinions
        page 6
    Main continued
        page 7
        page 8
    Main: The Avenue
        page 9
        page 10
        page 11
        page 12
        page 13
        page 14
        page 15
        page 16
    Main: Carrer Showcase Guide
        page 17
        page 18
        page 19
        page 20
        page 21
        page 22
        page 23
        page 24
    Main continued
        page 25
        page 26
        page 27
        page 28
    Main: Classifieds
        page 29
        page 30
        page 31
        page 32
        page 33
        page 34
        page 35
    Main: Sports
        page 36
        page 37
        page 38
        page 39
        page 40
Full Text





the independent florida
,4w, A


Published by Campus Communications, Inc..of Gainesville Florida
We Inform. You Decide.


THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005


Porn star delivers satisfaction in debate


Casey Anderson / Alligator Staff
Porn star Ron Jeremy makes his case for pornography during his opening statements for the
Great Porn Debate on Wednesday at the Stephen C. O'Connell Center.


* RON JEREMY DEBATED MERITS
OF HIS CRAFT ON WEDNESDAY.

By DAVID COHEN
Alligator Writer
dcohen@alligator.org

UF students, brimming with anticipa-
tion, finally got their fill Wednesday when
Ron Jeremy came to debate his racy trade
at the Stephen C. O'Connell Center.
The Great Porn Debate, hosted by
Accent, welcomed approximately 2,800
to witness porn superstar Jeremy and
award-winning author Susan Cole duke
out the pros and cons of pornography.
Cole opened up the debate in a som-
ber tone toward pornography that would
continue throughout the night.
"Women will experience some form
of violence in their lifetime," said Cole, a
Harvard University graduate. "If it hasn't
happened yet it probably will and por-
nography plays a role in that."
Cole believes that women who enter
pornography were probably abused at
home and have no better alternative. Cole
added, however, that she "completely
supports) masturbation."
Jeremy's position on the topic of
masturbation was similar, but he turned
Cole's argument against her.


"When she talks about the mastur-
bation thing, I totally agree with that,"
Jeremy said. "But the thing is if she thinks
masturbation is O.K., what is wrong with
the fantasies people use to masturbate?"
"Women will experience some
form of violence in their life-
time. If it hasn't happened yet
it probably will and pornogra-
phy plays a role in that."
Susan Cole
award-winning author

Jeremy added that in the "very satu-
rated porn industry" where "every taste
can be satisfied," he does not defend the
renegade companies Cole referred to that
promote violence.
He added that "We (the porn industry)
just want to be left alone."
Despite her negative attitude toward
pornography, Cole was encouraging.
"For those who want to change the
world and see women as total equals,
make women's equality, in the economic
sense, very real," she said.
Jeremy, who has starred in more than
1,800 flicks, agreed.

SEE ACCENT, PAGE 27


BOARD OF GOVERNORS

Low-level faculty scarce


By STEPHANIE GARRY
Alligator Staff Writer
smgarry@alligator.org

Though UF beat most other Florida uni-
versities in a report to go before the state's
highest authority on higher education, it
ranked second to last in making professors
available to teach lower-level classes.
Faculty provided only 31 percent of UF's
lower-level instruction 10 percent less
than the State University System average,
according to a report prepared for the Board
of Governors meeting at the Reitz Union
today.
Only FSU performed worse in the cat-
egory.
"I think this stems from our use of other
types of instructors," said Joe Glover, interim
provost and UF's No. 2 administrator. Unlike
New College in Sarasota, where faculty ac-


count for 91 percent of instruction, UF uses
its large graduate program to provide much
of the instruction.
"They (New College) can rely really only
on faculty to teach," he said. "We rely on a
mix of people."
If the Board votes to
approve the report today,
it will go to the Legislature
for its annual review of
university performance
standards.
Moreover, faculty
Machen made up 61 percent of up-
per-level course instruc-
tion and 75 percent of graduate instruction.
UF may need to hire more faculty to
reduce class size, but being a research uni-
versity doesn't mean UF students' education

SEE REPORT, PAGE 26


NOW disputes rape stats


By NEIL HUGHES
Alligator Writer
nhughes@alligator.org

Many would think that lower-than-
average rape statistics at UF would be
good news, but one student organization
believes the numbers don't tell the whole
story.
Based on an assertion that UF's
rape statistics are significantly lower
than the national campus average, the
UF Campus National Organization for
Women has initiated an effort to encour-
age sexually assaulted women to come
forward anonymously.
Pam Pojomovsky, Campus NOW
member and Rape Awareness Committee


co-chair, alleged that the UF rape sta-
tistics released annually by University
Police are inaccurate.
Data from 2001 to 2003 shows 27 total
reported sexual assault cases on UF's
campus, with 24 occurring
Student in residential areas, which
Life includes residence halls and
fraternity or sorority houses,
according to UF and U.S.
Department of Education reports.
"Either they're straight-up lying or
women are not reporting their rapes on
campus," Pojomovsky said of the statis-
tics at a Campus NOW meeting Tuesday.
But national statistics from the DOE
show that the number of reported sexual

SEE NOW, PAGE 27


* Shortstop Justin
Tordi has become a
model of con-
sistency for the
Gators. In 2004, he
ranked second in
the Southeastern
Conference in
fielding percentage
while batting .302.
-See story, pg. 39.


"Copyrighted Material
Syndicated Content
Available from Commercial News Providers"


E The Board of
Governors, the body
that oversees Florida's
university system,
meets today in the
Reitz Union Ballroom
from 10:30 a.m. to
4 p.m. See complete
coverage, pg. 26.


FORECAST
OPINIONS
the AVENUE
CLASSIFIED
CROSSWORD
SPORTS


6 4
9
29 Partly
39 cloudy
S 69/48


visit www.alligator.org


VOLUME 98 ISSUE 87


T.1








2, ALLIGATOR U THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005

News Today


-00 4


%.1111 L e0

ft dpi


"Copyrighted Material


Syndicated Content W

Available from Commercial News Providers"


LOCAL
Dance Marathon registra-
tion ends Friday
The deadline to register for
UF's April 2-3 Dance Marathon.
to support the Children's Miracle
Network is this Friday. Registration
takes place in Turlington Plaza
and the Reitz Union Colonnade
between 10:30 a.m.- 3:00 p.m. To,
register, bring a completed appli-
cation and $30 ca-h' or check made
payable to Children's, Nhiciile
Network. The deadline to Lmrn in
funds raised for the event i ill be
Feb. 22.



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FORECAST
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PARTLY
CLOUDY
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FRIDAY


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SATURDAY


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WHAT'S HAPPEIoING
11 a.m.
Lunih at the [B C
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CORRECTION .
Susan Henricques "Is the.
Prulre's Part\ ciudidate for
trea- urer. \Ve reported otherwise
in \\'c'dnesdai s .Ukigpator
\Ve reret the error

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t the independent florida

alligator
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4, ALLIGATOR N THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005



Parties gather signatures for online SG voting


* MORE THAN 1,000 SIGNA-
TURES WERE COLLECTED.

By BRIDGET CAREY
Alligator Writer
bcarey@alligator.org

In a last-minute effort to imple-
ment online voting in future Student
Government elections, select SG
groups likely garnered the petition
signatures needed to get the issue
on the Spring election ballot.
Representatives from Progress
and Phoenix parties collected sig-
natures from Sorority Row and
outside the doors of the Stephen C.
O'Connell Center before and after


the pornography debate Wednesday
night.
"Technically, you could watch
porn and vote at the same time,"
joked SG Presidential Advisor
Lowell Wong, referring to what
one student said when signing the
petition.
The various SG parties' members
that came out to solicit students
collected about 1,300 signatures,
according to Wong. By 5 p.m. today,
nearly 1,000 signatures are needed
to be approved for the petitioners
to get the issue on the Spring bal-
lot, giving students not senators
- the power to decide if they want
online voting.
"I think personally the more


people you have voting and the
more people that get involved, the
fairer the elections become," said
Sen. MacKenzie Moritz, Progress
Party student body presidential
candidate.
The online program, which SG
already paid $20,000 for and is
ready to go, would allow students
to vote in campus elections using
their GatorLink IDs and passwords.
Getting the idea approved has been
an ongoing battle in Senate cham-
bers since 2001, and it was last shot
down in early Fall.
"It really is too controversial an
issue to be decided on in the Senate
chambers," Moritz said. He added
party division in Senate meetings


was a major reason for the project's
stagnation, in addition to Senators
who were worried about the
possibility of the program being
S hacked.
"It's as se-
cure, if not more
S secure, than
ISIS," said Adam
i. l Roberts, the tech-
nology cabinet
director who
Ngin helped research
the program over
Summer. Roberts' research found
the program to be trustworthy and
effective.
Roberts, who also is a vice presi-
dential candidate with the Progress


Party, said the only flaw is the possi-
bility of students cheating by giving
their UFIDs and passwords to other
people.
If online voting is implemented,
it would cost about $2,000 to run
each election, compared to the
$22,000 it takes to fund Spring elec-
tion polls now, Roberts said.
The Gator Party was not in-
volved with the petitioning because
it was not an issue they'd support,
Hoffman said, who was one of 25
collecting signatures.
The Gator Party spokesman Sen.
Sundeep Rawal said the party has
yet to make any platform decisions
and, "Online voting is definitely an
issue that we're considering."


Students meet to discuss new Asian student institute


By LINDSAY TAULBEE
Alligator Writer
Itaulbee@alligator.org

Almost 40 students met in the Reitz Union
Auditorium Wednesday to discuss the prog-
ress of a proposal for an Institute of Asian and
Asian-American Cultures.
The concept is one that has been discussed
between students and UF administrators for
years. At one point the possibility of a multi-
cultural center and housing space for different
student organizations was discussed.
However, many students were dissatisfied
with the idea, leading those involved to search
for other solutions.


"The topic of the multicultural center was
killed," Student Body President Jamal Sowell
said. "There was a rumor going around that it
will be built. It will not be built, to the best of
my knowledge," he said.
Associate Dean of Students Mary Kay
Schneider affirmed Sowell's assertion.
She clarified that no "grandiose" plans had
ever been made for such a center, but rather
that student input had been sought on the
matter.
Schneider also explained at the gathering
some of the issues preventing an institute from
coming to fruition, namely timing and money:
She commented on the lack of funds for all
aspects of campus life, let alone the institute.


"It's not just a diversity issue, it's an every-
thing issue," she said.
Sowell and Student Government
Multicultural Cabinet Director Lydia
Washington explained to the group that the
funds for such an institute would come from
Capital Improvement Trust Funds, set aside
by the state and only allotted every four or
five years.
Another possibility discussed involved
hiring a director of Asian and Asian-American
Cultures before creating an institute, as a way
of bringing it closer to reality.
Asian Student Union President Mark
Villegas said he hoped the forum would serve
to keep the issues fresh in people's mind.


Many of the people who have been in-
volved in pushing the initiative in the past
few years will be graduating soon, Villegas
said.
"It's notjust a diversity issue, it's
an everything issue."
Mary Kay Schneider
Associate Dean of Students


By educating new students, he said he
hopes the project will stay in the forefront and
people will not have forgotten about the issue
when money finally is available.


Reitz Union forum


examines diversity


Whoops!
Grad student Isaac
Brown lets a fris-
bee slip through
his fingers and into
his face. Brown was
enjoying a cool af-
ternoon tossing the
frisbee with a friend
and laughed off the
accident.


Casey Anderson / Alligator Staff


80 students

attended panel
By KATE STOREY
Alligator Contributing Writer

The term "minority" was dis-
cussed and dissected at Cycles
of Success' first major event as a
reorganized group at a diversity
forum held Wednesday night.
The Forum on Diversity:
Discrimination and Success,
held in Reitz Union Room 282,
featured three "power profes-
sors" and the UF registrar, each
offering different experiences
with discrimination and suc-
cess.
Cycles of Success President
Daniel Villanueva hoped the
forum would be a chance to in-
troduce freshmen to the idea of
diversity seen through the eyes
of the successful speakers.
"I want these students -to
think more deeply about being a
student of diversity," Villanueva
said. "They will be here for four
years, so they have time to make
a difference."
Marilyn Thomas-Houston,
assistant professor of anthropol-
ogy and African American stud-
ies, Vivian Correa, associate dean
of graduate minority programs,
Shelton Davis, the assistant direc-
tor for the Equal Opportunities


Program, and Stephen J. Pritz,
UF registrar, all agreed that "mi-
nority" holds both negative and
positive connotations, depend-
ing on the situation.
The panel agreed the word
takes on a negative connotation
when it makes the individual see
themselves as "less than," and
it is positive when it provides
resources to those categorized as
minorities.
"Historically, 'minority' rep-
resented groups with little or no
power," Thomas-
On Houston said.
:'.;:.'' "Minority does not
mean less than in
any shape, fashion or form."
The forum, which drew about
80 students, was open to every-
one, but invitations were sent out
to students in Cycles of Success.
Minority freshmen are invited
to join when they are awarded
scholarships.
This is the first forum that
Cycles of Success has held, and
they hope it will become an
annual event. This year they
are reorganizing themselves
from primarily a mentoring
program to a club with greater
outreach.
"The meetings are informa-
tive," member Jessica Scott said.
"They tell you how to stay on
track to keep your scholarship
and how to get involved in other
organizations."







THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005 ALLIGATOR, 5


Belle unveils


new platform

By LAUREN MACDONALD
Alligator Contributing Writer

Failed mayoral candidate and UF student Mike
Belle vowed to represent both college students and
Gainesville residents as he presented his platform for
the District 3 City Commission seat race Wednesday
afternoon on the steps of Tigert Hall.
Belle's platform encourages better relations be-
tween Gainesville homeowners and student renters,
unified city development and increased access to local
government, he said to a crowd of 20 over the noise of
Southwest 13th Street traffic.


"I want every person to cherish
this city and think of it as a place
where you want to buy a home,
where you want to start a career,
where you want to start a business
and where you want to raise your
family," Belle, a business econom-
ics senior, said.
Belle serves as a Student
Government senator. He made an


unsuccessful bid for mayor of Gainesville last spring
but dropped out two weeks before the election, citing
inexperience.
Before declaring his candidacy for the Commission,
Belle authored and got passed a bill encouraging stu-
dents to vote as a bloc, a move criticized as self-serv-
ing and ethically questionable by local officials.
Belle's new platform proposes offering incen-
tives, such as class credits or scholarships, for student
involvement in the community, Belle said after his
speech.
District 3 City Conunissioner Tony Domenech
could not be reached for comment.
Jonathan McGowan, a Gainesville political con-
sultant, said he is skeptical of yet another student
running for local government, as he's seen unsuc-
cessful student candidates in nearly every election
cycle.
"He's doomed from the start," McGowan said.
Without the established background of a p'erma-
nent Gainesville resident, Belle lacks a connection
with the community and has unrealistic expectations
of changing the system, McGowan said.


Students show international interest

By IVETTE MENDEZ
Alligator Contributing Writer

Curious UF students at-
tended the Study Abroad Fair on
VWednesday in hopes of departing
from their usual summer stud-
ies to learn about some foreign
cultures.
Lift "The fair, held on the Reitz
Ti-. Union Colonnade, was filled with
more than 60 tables representing
key regions of the world.
"Involvement in study abroad
programs continues to grow each
year," said Lucy DiLeo, events
.- ... coordinator of the UF International
Center. "We expect involvement
to expand beyond last year's
1,000 students and to reach about
1,200."
UF sponsors programs to 14
countries. Independent programs
also offer study abroad opportuni-
ties in places such as Cairo, Egypt.
"I am interested in going to
.2 more Nicolette Oostenbrink said.
"I think it'd be a great life experi-
ence."
Study abroad adviser Leigh
Ann Osborne said students ex-
press the most interest for studying
in England, Italy and Spain.
A i Osborne said- the December
tsunami disaster will not have an
impact on any UF programs, but
there probably will be a reduction
of international students coming
here from that area.
Osborne, who studied in France
for a six-week summer program,
Casey Anderson / Alligator Staff said her experience of living with
Andrea Walgreen of Boston University discusses international study oppor- a host family and studying French
tunities with Adam Engel near the Reitz Union Colonnade. The Study Aboard culture. improved her language
Fair featured more than 60 tables highlighting key world areas, skills substantially.


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6, ALLIGATOR THURSDAY, JANUARY 27; 2005




Access denied

Court case could decide

the future of file-sharing
Kazaa. Grokster. Soulseek. eDonkey.
If a file-sharing case that has just reached the
Supreme Court is decided in favor of the defendant,
the names of these peer-to-peer services likely will top the
next day's obituaries.
Though Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios v. Grokster may
appear to be a simple case regarding copyright violation, it
has the potential to threaten the very existence of P2P ser-
vices.
Essentially, the Supreme Court will decide whether or not
these services are legally responsible when their users trade
copyrighted files.
To opponents of file-sharing, it seems to be a straight-
forward situation: P2P services allow customers to commit
crimes, so they should face the legal repercussions.
But this is akin to saying video-rental stores should be
responsible if their customers make illegal copies of movies.
It's not even any different than saying telephone compa-
nies should be punished when people use phones to set up
drug deals.
Sure, the opportunity for illegal action is there, but the
services in no way condone it nor can they stop it.
Opponents argue there are legal services that, for a fee,
allow users to download music, and some in the works may
allow a limited form of music sharing.
This is not good enough. These services do not allow the
sharing of video and other types of files, nor .will they likely
ever be capable of sharing legal software and noncommercial
files without the-possibility of illegal use.
The fact is, a decision against Grokster would set a prece-
dent with disastrous consequences. None of the P2P services
can stop the sharing of copyrighted files through their pro-
grams, so the day will come when they realize they are one
step away from being in court.
After this realization, they will start falling one-by-one.
Obscure, underground file-sharing programs will still ex-
ist, of course, and so will paid services. The sort of popular,
free services that have caused a revolution in the way we
share information, however, will disappear like dinosaurs
and disco.
This issue hits hard at UF, where file-sharing is practically
a way of life.
We've already seen the danger of file-sharing restrictions
with the trouble that the monitoring-program ICARUS has
caused.
ICARUS itself is proof the sharing of copyrighted files
cannot be regulated at the current state of technology with-
out preventing legal activities.
In fact, you're probably within reach of someone who has
been denied access to an online computer game because of
ICARUS' overenthusiastic hunt for file sharers.
But this case has bigger implications for the sharing of
media on the Internet.
The Supreme Court in past cases has stated a desire to
keep the Internet as a place in which civil rights remain in-
tact. They have granted liberal First Amendment protection
to Web-based speech and have upheld the right for citizens
in general to communicate as they see fit.
Now, it is time for them to take the next step in protecting
the distribution of online media from needless government
interference.


S the independent florida

alligator
Dwayne Robinson Matt Sanchez
EDITOR OPINIONS EDITOR
Mike Gimignani Lauren Flanagan
MANAGING EDITOR Diana Middleton
Craig Singleton
EDITORIAL BOARD
The Alligator encourages comments from readers. Letters to the editor should not exceed 150
words (about one letter-sized page). They must be typed, double-spaced and must include the
author's name, classification and phone number. Names will be withheld if the writer shows
just cause. We reserve the right to edit for length, grammar, style and libel. Send letters to
S. ng them to 1105 W. University Ave., or send them to P.O. Box 14257,
!257. Columns of about 450 wolds about original topics and editorial
cartoons are also welcome. Questions? Call 376-4458.


Opinions


ALLIGATOR
www.alligator.org/opinions


,.Rape revenue hs nsol

Rape revenge has dire social effects


exual assault, like any other type of violence, is pri-
marily an assertion of physical dominance. On this,
there can be little argument.
Nor is there much doubt about the degree of direct
harm to the victim. Let us consider, however specula-
tively, the indirect damage to society.
There is a predictable initial reaction of shock and
anger among those who know the victim. This may lead
to violent retaliation or the advocacy of violence against
rapists, as it has in the case of at least two recent Alligator
readers. Despite a longstanding practice of collective re-
venge pursued in this country via the justice and penal
systems, this is not a solution. Rather, it exacerbates the
decay of the social fabric and is a poor deterrent.
After the initial flush of rage passes, or if the perpetra-
tor is not apprehended, many victims and their associates
may sublimate the urge for vengeance to a general urge
to emasculate men. This urge is then transferred through
guilt onto young males as part of the coercive regime
of socialization that represses their healthy and normal
sexual desires, resulting in untold psychological damage
- thus forming future rapists, misogynists, wife-beaters
and other deviants. The urge also informs the passive-ag-
gressive behavior that drives many females into "butch"
roles and "feminazism," which have parallels to rape as
sexual expressions of power, albeit on a psychological
rather than a physical level. Regardless of the mode of
sublimation, it is a form of damage and must be mini-
mized in any healthy society.
A prominent instance of perpetuating the culture of
victimhood is the sexual objectification of women and,
to a lesser extent, of men a process to which men and
women seem irrationally committed on college campus-
es. Another such instance is the widespread false passiv-


Paul ity adopted by women who acquire
Wagner mates through entrapment, pursu-
Speaking Out ing sexual needs without responsi-
bility and demanding greater pay
for less work along with greater support for the repro-
ductive process. Perhaps the most egregious examples of
such behavior occur in women's advocacy groups, where
all men are seen as potential rapists unless they have been
rendered socially or psychologically submissive.
One solution to the growing menace is to apply the
same standards of conduct to men and women with
regard to displays of power and calls for vengeance,
however disguised. In a truly just and healthy society,
the sexual impulse would be revered and celebrated as
frequently as practical, free from the trammels of psy-
chosocial and physical dominance. This would require
a degree of honor and respect from men towards women
rarely practiced today, as the male is generally more
physically dominant. It also would require willingness
on the part of women to refrain from hurtful narratives
of historical wrongs, which are a kind of hate speech.
Just as we recognize that to recite a litany of past inju-
ries during mediation of conflict destroys the possibility
of establishing agreement, so we must understand that
without equal ground in the present no future equality
can be constructed.
As the typically more'psycho-socially capable gender,
womeri must accept that to label every man a rapist only
encourages negative relations with women, and they
must accept some responsibility for nurturing the well-
being of males instead of wielding the Bobbitt knife.
Until then, we can only plead with the rapists and the
emasculators: Stop the violence.
Paul Wagner is a Liberal Arts and Sciences graduate student.


The views expressed here are not necessarily those of the Alligator.


Today's question: Should file- Wednesday's question: Is Con-
sharing services be liable for doleezza Rice the best choice for
their customers' actions? secretary of state?
Vote or post a message at www.alligator.org


55% YES
45% NO
62 TOTAL VOTES


r 1111' 11 I rl I I







THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005 E ALLIGATOR, 7


Rape more complicated than presented
Editor: Once again, we have seen an incen-
diary piece of sexist propaganda from Campus
NOW, written under the guise of equality for
women and political correctness.
It amazes me the argument is made that "it
is not the responsibility of women to prevent
their being raped." That is like me saying, "I
am burdened by having to lock my car, so
people should just stop stealing cars."
What they fail to point out is that a woman
can be just as at fault for rape as a man. What if
she says "yes," when she means "no"? What if
her provocative clothes or innuendo is misin-
terpreted? What if she feels guilty about sex or
wants to get revenge? What if she was under
the influence of alcohol? She can claim rape in
all of these cases, and rape convictions can be
based on the accuser's testimony alone with-
out corroboration.
Fraternities are implicated as condoning
rape and sexual assaults because 10 to 30
percent of on-campus sexual assaults occur in
fraternities. There's no mention, of course, of
how these women wound up at the fraternity
in the first place. Nor is there any mention of
who was intoxicated at the time, because, after
all, the man should be responsible for the ac-
tions of both himself and the woman, even
though they both might be drunk.
My favorite statement is that Campus
NOW "believes that rape is the result of the


unequal power balance between women and
men." Interestingly, black men are three times
more likely to be reported a rapist than white
men. Do they suddenly have more political
and economic power?
Missing from their discussion of rape is
that false accusations are far more common
than is known. Indeed, a U.S. Air Force study
discovered that around 60 percent of rape ac-
cusations that were investigated in the study
turned out to be false.
What's more, a report from the Journal of
Sex Research found that 63 percent of men
and 46 percent of women said they had ex-
perienced unwanted intercourse by the time
they were in college. Using the definition of
rape as unwanted sex, virtually everyone has
been raped.
The point is that rape isn't just a man's
problem or a woman's problem. It's a problem
of how we've all been socialized. Most impor-
tantly, the solution isn't about blaming one
sex or the other but about a sharing of equal
responsibilities in all aspects of a relationship.
For a woman to hide behind assumed inno-
cence and helplessness and an unwillingness
to be responsible for any and all of her actions
makes a man into a criminal for not taking
responsibility for her. That is not equality, and
that is truly a disservice to women.
David Tarabocchia
7BA


Guns as rape deterrent not a good idea
Editor: Paul Snow ("Gators Must Take
Arms Against Rape") has completely missed
the point of Sexual Assault Awareness
Month. His depiction of women as defense-
less and incapable of protecting themselves
without a pistol in their purse is archaic and
insulting. Rape is not the result of waning
gun sales but rather an issue of power and
abuse. Furthermore, statistics show that us-
ing a handgun in self-defense is incredibly
rare. According to 'ue Violence Policy Center,
for every time a woman used a handgun to
kill a stranger in self-defense, 302 women
were murdered with a handgun.
While I presume Wayne La Pierre ap-
plauds your public plea-encouraging Gators
to arm themselves with concealed weapons,
you are only furthering violence and risks to
women's safety.
Tiahna Larsen
UF Alumna



Board not the way to reform state policy
Editor: Oh, to be young again.
The young and idealistic Gavin Baker
would have the Board of Governors dictate
the policies of higher education to ensure the


absence of "political meddling." If this board
were objective, we would not be facing today
the problems of frivolous tuition increases
- 7.5% in-state and 12.5% out-of-state yet
again and the possibility of block tuition,
which Baker agrees would not work. When
these issues came up at the board meetings,
the only vote' against block tuition was the
chairman of the Florida Student Association.
Funny how that works out.
I have attended several board meetings
along with Student Body President Jamal
Sowell, and consistently he alone votes on
behalf of the students' interest. This happens
because 11 of the board's 14 seats are ap-
pointed by the governor and thus support his
political agenda.
In state government, nothing is free from
political meddling, and we as students have
to realize the only way to ensure our voice is
not only heard but taken into consideration
is by doing all the things the FSA works to-
ward.
We must take action, we must mobilize,
we must lobby and, if we choose not to, we
cannot complain about policies that "trap
families in a cycle of poverty" as Baker puts
it.
John Printy
Student Senator


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8, ALLIGATOR U THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005 .


Aging expert hired


E NEW DIRECTOR PLANNING
FOR ENHANCED RESEARCH.

By JEFF SIRMONS
Alligator Writer
Jsirmons@alligator.org

UF's new geriatric research pro-
gram will be "reinvigorated" with
the addition of one leader in this
field.
Marco Pahor soon will bring his
international recognition to UF as
director of the Institute on Aging.
Pahor is world renowned for his
research at Wake Forest University
and as principal investigator at the
Claude D, Pepper Older Americans
Independence Center.
"It was a difficult decision be-
cause we have a productive and
well-established program at Wake
Forest, but the opportunities at UF
put its program at a higher level,"
he said.
UF's Brooks Center for
Rehabilitation Studies director
Pamela Duncan said the Pepper
Center is "the crown jewel of geriat-


ric research grants."
"With his leadership and the tal-
ent from the multiple colleges at UF,
we're poised to create world-class
research programs on aging and
rehabilitation," she said.
"We will primarily try to find
out what mechanisms lead
to disabilities, and then
with that information, find
ways to prevent or hinder
the process."
Marco Pahor
UF Institute on Aging director

Pahor said he plans to build a
stronger clinical research program
that will combine other departments
in the College of Medicine to work
toward preventing age-related dis-
abilities.
"We will primarily try to find out
what mechanisms lead to disabili-
ties, and then with that information,
find ways to prevent or hinder the
process," he said.


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Division of Student Affairs: Helping Students Be Successful


Car damage prompts arrests


By MEGAN V. WINSLOW
Alligator Writer
mwinslow@alligator.org

Gainesville Police arrested three men
Wednesday morning in connection with ap-
proximately $2,000 in damage to two GPD patrol
vehicles, reports show.
Police say the suspects, Thierry Delisle, 20,
Steven Aldo Newman, 17, and Emanuel de Jesus
Blanco, 20, were at a party when they decided to
take a field trip to a nearby GPD patrol vehicle
parking lot Tuesday at about 2 a.m. Once inside
the lot, located on the south side of GPD head-
quarters, 721 NW Sixth St., the defendants pro-
ceeded to throw beer bottles at and kick vehicle
2482, police reported. Ultimately, one of the al-
leged vandals used a bottle to smash the driver's
side window and removed a flashlight, two jour-
nals and a pair of handcuffs, reports state.
But the culprit reportedly left fingerprints.
"There's a difference between bold and stu-
pid, and they border more toward dumb," GPD
spokesman Sgt. Keith Kameg said.


The three suspects later stumbled back to
Newman and Blanco's shared residence, where a
party was underway, and began bragging about
their escapade to guests, GPD reported. Then, po-
lice say, they tried handcuffing a few guests.
"The thing is, they didn't have the handcuff
key so it would have been pretty funny, or some-
body would have been pretty annoyed," Kameg
said.
Through tips from party guests, the residence,
which Kameg said was "literally a stone's throw
from the police department," was located with
ease by investigators.
The three suspects were taken to GPD head-
quarters, where they later implicated themselves,
police say.
"The sad thing, I think, for them is now they'll
have a felony record trailing them their entire
life," Kameg said. "Nobody thinks about when
they have to go get a job and employers want
to know about your maturity and you tell them,
'Oh, I beat up a police car and then I stole hand-
cuffs because I thought it would be funny.'"


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the


Avenue
THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005


ALLIGATOR
www.alligator.org/avenue


The librarians danced
like they had just
finished watching
Si "Coyote Ugly." Every
girl in attendance
also got to tap into her inner
crazy-bar-top-dancing self, with
promises of free tank tops for
those branded with an 'X' on their
hands and shots for the rest.
Check out Jose's review, pg. 15.

I played four
missions of "Finest
Hour" in this state
of blindness, until
finally the complete
darkness of Nazi-filled sewers
made it impossible to continue.
And honestly, it was a hysterical,
terrifying party the whole time.
See Brett's critique, pg. 12.


S. ,: .


Today

Common Groubnds
Cacper Van Beethoven,
Hackensaw Boys
Eddie C's The Better
Gimp
Thke Side Bar- Brotkers
past



Friday

Eddie C's Monoe
Brown, Hollow Days,
Jabberwocky
Faces Buildllag the
State, In Passiny, EL, My
Favorite Dancer


Saturday

Common Grounds -
The Know How, AgainstALL
Authority, Led Astroa
Faces- Undvertke Inftit-
ence, 17 .ayss
The Side Bar -
Terrap ane



Tuesday
CoLmvon Grovundts
Nervous Systekm, HarrLsov
.Fjorg
Ecatie C's The Toasters
The Ustals, SupervlilaAns


By CHER PHILLIPS
Avenue Writer

C) i" h-n Cheri- I Krauth bought WVild
,/ rt. B ,o 'k- last fall % ith her bu:-.i-
ne-5 s palther L\il, RodnLuez
tihev had n(l idea the .eie joiLnuimg i dwin-
dlAnlg club ot oa\ner, acito.-, the coLLntTv
faced with the daunting tak ot rederming
the concept othe teminist bookstore.
When the Ftminit Bookstore Ne-tr. orl
closed ul 1LI0', it,, lo-ter liS'ted 1211 member
bookstores in the L S Roughly 301 feminist
book- tores remain
VWhen St Petersbiurg'i Bri'itt'- Biooks
closed last vear. Flinda i. aes left with only
one tem inist and lesbian book-.tore- \%ild
In-r BooIk- on Lirun errity\ A'venue.
kiaurh and R'(driu.-iez participated in
a totum spoLnsored by the U I;',s omen s
-tudiei department last week di-scussing the
role ot a feminist bookstore in a conmminit:-
and some of theil plan. for Wild I is. Books.


rhc-e .ne _- -onic o.i eii in I, 'o alIe Ei V
conmfl table ithl tihe terLc.T olog l\ temiui t
aid then air- .onic \ .(,ni-r-n ho are not
comfortable \ ith the tcrniunoloc' ot temi-
nin,. Krauth s-aid
When the', uutiiii boLught the- -tort,
R o drig u c 7
puilliedi 3 t'onderif there
banner ., ith in today's soc
the words s a man's
mnIt llwoman
b uok- torE andr me. t the nem
from the .- maybe not sc
front ndow Cheryl Krauth, co-ov
wuhle inr-
hl1and i.ing. 13oih \i'ien:n
iwe-re ,LirpriL.d iwhe pei'pli- walked in and
a.ked then haow. lhng the ibus.in.ej had been
there.
I %.onder if there i, a need ui tnoda's
scriet, to be still a woman o bookstore and
meet tlhe needL' of ivwolln and ma\be not
scare people off, K' rauth -aid


Morgan Petroski / Alligator Starl
Lylly Rodriguez and Cheryl Krauth bought Wild Iris Books in September. The store
houses books, CDs, movies, work by local artists and an array of spiritual items
for sale.


~ ~LLd~~P~LIIL~ '--~a~r~ ~ --s I Ic ~sd ~l)------e -~ I~ --e~- 1F-I Is -r


Tr'i -h Tra '.is, a-ciat prot-esot ot
iiomen'. -tudcld .at UF -.;id tor a lot of
people the iord "femnni-t' ha- become a
dirt:, woid. and those misnconceptlclns scare
peoipl'- awia',. She .cnid omnic are trightcnid
b'i a 'tenlii'st' bu.okstore but noit b\ a
e-. men's" bookstore
is a need Tia a. said thi-. kind
iety to be :o anti-teminist climate is
bookstore part o ,hat encouraged
the decline ui ternimst
idS f oWi'Tan bookstores acros-
are people off." the coirnhy
ner of Wild Iris Books According to
Trav'i-. the us-e-
fullie'-s ot a fte'cminist
boik-tore i slniill tb -whi at it iv. a in the
1l70s -,%hen the ,concept i':as borne from
\\omen pulcllm, tll etlher for rtesourcI-i a.nd
comlnitinl,
Tioda\', teminist bookstoeI'-, servc:. as
businesses stuppl ing bo'ioks -till considered
too sibvr-i r-ie for the chaim -tores. The s-ec-
ond ii.re ot a .oi'tlnHLLiirt hub, a gathering
place fo r \women, al-o hasn't changed
"When '.'e decided to buy the boik-.tore
tron Dortie [Faibiv], people in the com-
munity came up and said 'than yoi'u.'
Rodriguez said. "But the feedback doesn't
match the financial reality of just selling
books.
For thi- reason, Wild Iris. like other stores
across the coLuInv I ill branch out and sell
s.idclmes like fair-ttade coffee and trn to
build other sections -- uch as -.piritu-hait
"Even spilitualht, is ver, temrinine.
Kra.utih said '"\'omen ttruggile with -spiriu-
alih. and region '
Other sideline itms such as catdi jew-.
tlri and music *tron;gl feature the work
ot local authors, aatist- and musicians
Rod-rguez .wourk-. the front ol the store .nd
coordinates buying trom local artists
"Somehow. the feeling of knowing Nyou.
are providing food tor that person ..." She
trailed off. 'If we can surviveL that wa',, \we
i dl." Kodriguez aid
lMthci Kah's in Eugene region will
celebrate its li- ear anni-ersarv this spring
and could be an older -ister to Wild Iris
Books.
Employee Tiffan\ I-Iaggmark said the
business has been touchy for the last tive
years. but their sale-s ar: increasn g because
the\-''. added nei items very similar lo
Wild Iris' -idrlinth \-entures brou.lght in more
author events and incoipoiated wo'i'men ,
ipirituJdait\ into the-ir -tore
H1 agg mark said they'd been reaching
out t tlthe LUmI ersitv of Oiregon ind selling
textbo.i.k-.
\\ild h is Book-. has main tairind a cli_-L
working relationship pro'inmg tetbook-.
for women's studied. and othei related s-Lib-
jects at LUF.
Though -till in thereseatch phase Kiauth
said she wants to add a non-profit side
to Wild Iri- Se eral feminist bookstores
acos-. the country are communiti-based
collecnlties d instead o md idvidual busme-s
like Sisterspirit Bookstore in San lose, Cal.,
and Herland Si ter ReLuirces in Oklahoma
Krauth said as a non-profit the store
could qualify fo_ grants and donations fi:r
coni~unity projects.






10, ALLIGATOR U THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005

PLAYLIST

Camper Van Beethoven brings unique style to town


By NATHANIEL DEAS
Avenue Writer


Camper Van Beethoven has overcome its
fair share of adversity. Drugs. Alcohol. A de-
cade-long hiatus.
They've even had their equipment stolen
during their current tour ... twice.
After being vandalized in Montreal, the band
again was targeted in Dallas, where thieves by-
passed a security guard and cut through the
side of a trailer, helping themselves to amps,
guitars and other instruments.
"It's hard to believe that people can act so


cruelly as to steal our tools of our trade," violin-
ist Jonathan Segel said. "It also means we end
up touring to afford to buy new instruments
and not to feed ourselves. That sucks."
Despite the setbacks, 1980s underground
icons Camper Van Beethoven, along with
the Hackensaw Boys, will play the Common
Grounds tonight.
Described by Segel as "a rock band that
throws anything it finds into the mix," Camper
Van Beethoven is hard to define. Sometimes
alt-country, sometimes psychedelic, sometimes
ska, Camper Van Beethoven saw a boost in
popularity after parting ways in 1990.
As record sales reached new heights, bands


such as Phish and moe. regularly covered
Camper Van Beethoven tunes.
"Maybe people started being bored with
what they were being presented with and
looked back to find better music," Segel ex-
plained. "Also, people are always looking to be
the cool kid, so any underground thing that is
obscure becomes cooler in retrospect. Post-facto
attention is better than none at all."
During the hiatus, singer David Lowery
found success as the frontman for Cracker,
whose 1993 hit "Low" still is a radio regular.
Hackensaw Boy Jesse Siske is excited about
touring with Camper Van Beethoven.
"They're putting on a pretty terrific show ev-


ery night," he said. "They rock out pretty good,
they've got some really good melodic sensibili-
ties, and just everybody's been in the band so
long, they got it down."
Described as alt-country, bluegrass and folk,
the Hackensaw Boys, who previously toured
with Modest Mouse, put on a high-energy,
acoustic show, Siske said.
Tickets for the show are $15 and are available
at the door or at Smoke. Doors open at 9 p.m.,
and Siske encourages a large crowd to attend.
"Come out and shake your ass and have a
good time," he said. "It's pretty unpretentious
and laid back, and it's just good old-fashioned
fun."


THE GUll
111 111 1111







(( (K ?\ LA A ( j AI


Barbecue

David's Real Pit BBQ
Voted #1 in Gainesville and listed
in "Where the Locals Eat" as best
place in Gainesville for Ribs &
BBQ. David's says come on in
for breakfast, lunch or dinner.
Adult size portions for adult size
appetites. David's caters to the
Gators. Open 7am-9pm Mon-Sat,
8am-9pm Sun. We are located
at 5121-A NW 39th Ave. (352)
373-2002. David's BBQ delivers
the best BBQ anywhere in
Gainesville with Gatorfood.com


Bistro

Bistro 1245
Gourmet food at student prices!
Large selection of wines starting
at $9.99. Wine tasting Wed &
Fri 4-8pm. 3 tastes only $4.95.
Open llam-llpm Sun-Thurs
and til midnight Fri & Sat.

Mildred's Big City Food
"The restaurant to take Mom
and Dad." Gainesville's most
awarded. Fresh food menu
changes nitely: Seafood, steak,
duck, chicken, lamb, rabbit, crab
cakes, etc. See our chef on TV20-
ABC Fri. 5:30pm. Reservations


Bistro

recommended.
University 377-1711.


Casua


Casual


3445 W. Lunch meetings catered. Daily
Lunch & Drink Specials. -Live
Music Nightly Call 376-2233
1643 NW 1st Ave.
I .


706
Serving California Mediter-
ranean Cuisine. Live Jazz
on Thursdays starting at
7:30pm. Sunday International
Brunch Buffet with never-
ending Mimosas starts at
11:00am. Open at 5pm daily.
706. W. University Ave.
Call for takeout 378-2001.

Bennigan's
Happy Hour specials all day
everyday. Great food and
attentive service. 3208 SW Archer
Road 373-2800. Open Monday-
Saturday 11am-2am Sun 11-11.

Cafe Gardens
Caf6 Gardens has been just
across from the UF Campus
since 1976. This quaint landmark
establishment with award
winning courtyard dining is
perfect for any date or gathering.
Don't miss the Friday wine
tasting 6-8pm. Open 7 days.


Po' Boys
Discover a genuine taste of
New Orleans at Po' Boys Creole
Cafe' at 3275 SW 34th Street
by Carraba's! Choose from 25
different Po' Boys sandwiches
or from our many wraps, salads,
gumbos, jumbalaya, and dinners!
See us at poboysgainesville.com.
Ladies Night Every Tues w/ Live
Music & Free Beer for ladies! Call
372-1155 for more info!

Rafferty's
Specials: Happy Hour everyday
4pm-10pm. Dollar drafts, 2 for
1 single liquor drinks & house
wines. Lunch & dinner specials
Mon-Fri. 11 TV's, 2 Big Screen
Outside Seating. Behind Eckerd's
in Butler Plaza. 374-0675.

The Swamp
Serving wide array of appetizers,
burgers, wings, steaks, salads
and seafood, The Swamp offers
something for everyone. Come
and relax on the front lawn or on


Casual

one of our intimate decks while
enjoying our daily lunch, dinner
or drink specials. Don't miss our
famous Happy Hour, Monday
thru Friday 4pm-8pm. Located
across from University of Florida,
it's the perfect place to unwind
and experience that great Gator
flavor they call The Swamp.
Delivering lunch and dinner
Mon-Sun 1lam-lOpm. 1642 W.
Univ. Ave. 37-SWAMP (377-9267)
For catering information call 380-
9291.


Chinese

Golden Buddha
Where eating well means eating
healthfully. Gainesville's best
Chinese food, according to
many of our customers. Family
run, expert chef, now with more
vegetables. Generous portions,
fast service & super lunch/dinner
combos. FREE DELIVERY
613 NW 16th Ave. 372-4282.
Full menu and specials @
GainesvilleGoldenBuddha.com


Comfort Food

New Deal Cafe
Fresh burgers 3/. pound, pot
pie, flatbread pizza, panninis,
fresh fish, pork chops. Bargain
Martinis. 3443 W. University
Ave. 371-4418.


Ice Cream

Cold Stone Creamery
Gold -Stone Creamery shouts,
"Happy Birthday!" and "Happy
Anniversary Gainesville's most
popular ice cream shops also
create great CAKES for birthdays
and anniversaries. Stop in today
for premium ice creams and
order a Signature Cake. You can
buy a fresh-made daily cake or
a custom-order cake. Newberry
Road: 271-7437 Archer- Road:
377-7520. V/AX/MC/D. Please
visit GatorFood.com for fresh-
made deep-frozen deliveries.


Japanese

Miya Sushi
3222 SW 35th Blvd. (Butler Plaza
next to Publix). Enjoy Authentic
Japanese food in a Casual &
Comfortable environment. Our


..-iIs)






THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, zuUo m ALLI'"i o'.IX, i


DiFranco ages like fine wine with newest release


K uckle Down, Ani DiFranco's
new LP released Tuesday, of-
ers an honest glimpse into a
weathered soul.
From the first play to the 20th
round on repeat, DiFranco's album
is a journey through years of pain,
lessons and life.
On the surface, "Knuckle Down"
is bittersweet.
DiFranco's voice is audibly
aged, rough in all the right places
but never off-key. Though she was
born in Buffalo, N.Y., I swear she
has some kind of Southern accent.
Most tracks have a folksy feel, with


sharp plucks of acoustic strings, a
style familiar to DiFranco fans.
Each track blends almost unno-
ticeably into the next, comparable to
the seamless sound of Radiohead's
"Hail to the Thief." As the CD
progresses, tempos slow, and
DiFranco's voice mellows, and the
majority of "Knuckle Down" flows
by before you fully can appreciate
it. It's only after more deliberate at-
tention that the album's true magic
is revealed.
DiFranco's words are perfect.
Each one fits another piece into her
life's mosaic and intensifies the


mood of the
song. Her
intended
m e a n -
ings aren't
alwa y s
Keeley McCarty perfectly
Playlist defined,
theavenue@alligator.org but the
gray area
is just hazy
enough that any listener can slip in
his or her own ideas.
She sings mostly of broken hearts
and learning to he happy. Women
might identify a .little more easily


with her messages, but men equally
could enjoy the album musically.
In "Parameters," an entirely spo-
ken piece, DiFranco tells the story of
a woman who is surprised one night
by an intruder in her bedroom. It's
not clear whether the man is real or a
personification of fear, but the articu-
lation of this is irrelevant. I fell asleep
listening to the song one night and
had pretty creepy dreams.
Almost as notable as the qual-
ity of her words is the quantity.
"Knuckle Down" is chock-full of
original lyrics, and DiFranco has 16
other full-length albums, two EPs


and two live albums under her belt.
DiFranco went solo for her last al-
bum, "Educated Guess" (2004). For
the new release, however, she in-
vited Joe Henry to co-produce with
her. The album also features guest
musicians, like Todd Sickafoose on
bass and former band member Julie
Wolf on the melodica.
Unfortunately, DiFranco won't
be touring Florida any time in the
near future, but "Knuckle Down"
definitely is worth checking out. You
can listen to it once, but you won't be
satisfied until it has run on repeat in
your stereo for a week.


N
/f







) )
(I ^'%) \

00'"


CG





KTO ~


Japanese
extensive SUSHI BAR provides
the best portions in town. All
sushi made-to-order. Try our new
menu with new rolls, appetizers,
lunch specials, & unique rice
wines. Open every day 11:30am-
10pm. To Go orders available on
everything. 335-3030. Delivery
available through Gatorfood.com

Mediterranean
HooLah lounge
Farah's On the Avenue
Gainesville's Premiere Hookah
Lounge! One of Farah's best
hidden treasures are its hookah
tobacco pipes also known
as Argilleh, these flavorful,
aromatic concoctions of taste
and smell offer a relaxing
mood either before, after, or
perhaps even while dining at
Farah's. We use only the finest
brand of premium hookah
tobacco and natural charcoal,
imported directly from the
Mediterranean Gulf. For your
dining pleasure we offer meze,
traditional small plates of food,
such as hummus, kibbie, falafel,
spinach & artichoke dip, baba
ghanoush, and kifta. Famous


Mediterranean
for our wings, gyros, burgers
and steaks. Large vegetarian
selection. All service in a casual
atmosphere. Saturday nights
BELLY DANCING beginning at
8pm. 1120W. Univ. Ave. 378-5179.

Gyros Plus
1011 W. University Ave.
11-10 Mon-Sun 336-5323. We
have the best Falafel, Tabouli,
Hummus, Baba, Grape Leaves
& Gyros-beef or chicken. Fresh
smoothie bar & Baklava. Pita
Bread Bakery at 2401 SW
13th St., 372-4995. We sell
hookahs, parts, charcoals,
fine tobacco, and halal meat.


Mexican

Burrito Brothers
Serving Gainesville since 1976.
Made to order, made from scratch
Many vegetarian & vegan items
available. Open 7 days, 11am-
10pm. 16 NW 13th St. 378-5948.
www.burritobros.com

El Toro
You've had the rest, now try the
BEST Mexican food in Gainesville.


Mexican


We have great fajitas & vegetarian
cuisine. Loved by Gators past
and present since 1990. Best
homemade salsa in town. Open
7 days a week for lunch and
dinner. 1723 SW 13th St. Take out
and catering available 376-6989.

La Fiesta
Catering Gainesville for 16 years
now! Come and enjoy authentic
Mexican food at reasonable
prices. Try one of our fajita
entrees or choose from several
vegetarian selections. Also try
our special grilled pork chops
with black beans and rice. Don't
forget about our tasty margaritas
on special Mon-Thurs at $2.25 &
2-4-1 Mich Lite & Bud Lite drafts,
$1.95Mon & Tues. Locatedbehind
Red Lobster across from Oaks
Mall. *Carry out also available*
332-0878. Closed Sunday.

Pizza

Leonardo's
Pizza legend since 1973. Whole
pizzas & slices. Open 7 days a
week 9am 11pm Sun-Thurs.
Fri & Sat till 12am. Call ahead
for pickup 375-2007. For delivery


Pizza


call 379-FOOD. Located next
to Bistro 1245. Leo's Cafe open
daily 9am. Flavored coffees,
espressos & fresh baked pastries.

Mellow Mushroom
Take a trip to
mellowmushroom.com. Since
1974, we've been dishing out
high-quality ingredients in all of
our specialty pizzas, monumental
hoagies, and scrumptious salads.
And yes, we deliver. 1209 W.
University Ave. 367-0012.


Vegetarian


Book Lover's Cafe
Vegetarian and Vegan cuisine
prepared with all natural
ingredients. Organic food,
smoothies and juices. Amex/
Visa/ATM. 10am-9pm 505 NW
13th St.


Vietnamese


Saigon Legend
Delicious traditional Vietnamese
cuisine with popular Asian
favorites as well. Pho, Bahn-
Cuon, Bahn Xeo, Banh Tom Ha-
Noi. Enjoy great food at great


Vietnamese


prices. Big new room! Family
owned restaurant. Next to
Holiday Inn downtown. Dine in
or take out. Catering available.
Mon-Sat 10:30am-9:30pm, Sun
11:30-9pm, 374-0934.


For information on



The


Guide


to


Dining


Out


Contact
Hilary Jenkins
376-4478


1~




'9


f fi( ifl


mmagems


/







12, ALLIGATOR U THURSDAY, JANUARY 27,2005


Gettin' lucky: the




the vvour selx sit:ttLos yo' describe
in oglo thiLe veI tOsexgt the stories of people
LY, go r arttcLes. 1t togt t e onty rMvnors.
adoltng t iv the Lvoiry roowt we ov U I'too
Maybe Lt's because I'rw a gg oQr recuse I't toost
shk. bl t 1Jfil that t's Mu'vch hraer thett wost
s p, le t hivk to ook ,up here at UF, or vna be I'Ms
peopg I soetkhi t wrovtn. f yo ave v.y teals,
Slet vve kvow. -I




Ho c set lp threesome with wy oo0k-
How ca I set L her Jled? I tovt't wvant to oj'
SSfen h ,er to the poLhtt where she wants to stop
h ookLt sp, bUft erJrtenc is reRLOL hot, lu' I
think thl'tee both be LVto iLt -M.O
IO






MY boyfrier1. zvwI I both live vin sevlrls. M
r oomwavte is always aroAvtth arw we never get
wvuch privacy in his roovn either. WeV he sleeps
over, we usl.ly don't have sex becrtse she's vi t.
room, a' I feet ,&ad kicking her owt at ns t. Hie.
fiervus are always around w n were at iLs pace.
I- dov't think I can go the rest ofthoe gear with so
little sex. How can we get v ore alove ti -? L.D.


desperate, the stifled, the greedy


Dear Hard Up for a Hard On,
This one's easy: make more money, become better looking
or lower your standards (preferably all three).
Ok, no one wants to hear that. Even the above options aren't
surefire ways to get laid.
I can, however, give you a handy list of don'tt" when it
comes to luring unsuspecting females into your bed.
Don't appear desperate. This is the equivalent to a dog
humping a stranger's leg: pathetic, creepy and sometimes a
little messy.
Don't tell a girl she has a nice rack; instead compliment her
personality (unless she has implants ... she paid good money
for some praise.)
Don't talk about the weather. Ask about her interests, her,


Dear Three's Not a Crowd,
As of press time, there are no invi-
tations made for such an occasion. So
you'll have to use that other head of
yours.
Threesomes usually just happen; they
aren't really something for which you
can plan, because unfortunately, there
isn't a smooth way to propose an orgy.
After your next sack session, tell'
your friend with benefits how much


family or anything slightly personal.
This will make her feel like she's con-
necting with you, even if you would
rather be attacked by rabid dogs than
hold a conversation with her.
Don't be unrealistic. If she's a 10
Jump Your .and you're a three, don't waste your
Bones Jones time unless you have the confi-
Undercovers dence to back up your ambition.
undercovers2005@yahoo.com Don't give up. Even the greatest
players have far from perfect batting
averages.
Your time will come, and so will you. And if all else fails,
just go tor the drunkest girl in thebar.


you enjoy her eroti: etpertlie and how
much she turns you on Mlake her feel
like a sex goddess this will assure her
you think she's adventurous enough to
explore new things (such as her friend's
nakedbody). :
Don't outright tell her you want her
and her girl to tag team you. Instead,
casually ask if she'd ever experiment
with any of her friends (maybe she al-
ready has.)


Dear Desperately Seeking Dorm Sex,
It's not easy to play hide the salami while your roommate is
only five feet away (unless, of course, she's into watching).
The beauty of dorm life is it forces you to be creative. You
probably make most of your meals in the microwave, but
you're telling me you can't find a place to do the nasty?
I'll start with the obvious. Unless you're on the exact same
class schedule as your roomie, I'm sure she's not around for
part of the day.
They don't call it an afternoon delight for nothing.
Lock the door, and if you haven't gotten off by the time
she's back from physics, just say you were napping (she'll
never know you were bent over her desk.)


Tell her you fantasize about having
two girls at once. Leave it at that, but
then mention it several times in the near
future. There are small steps you can take
to introduce her to the thrills of a sexual
triumvirate. Talk her into a three-way
kiss or watch a group porn together. If
she's game for a full-fledged female en-
counter, she'll let you know. Otherwise,
don't push your luck. You might end up
with no girl, let alone two.


How about turning the dorm into your own sexual play-
ground?
-As unappealing as communal showers are, you'll hardly
notice the mildew if your boy's loofahing you in all the.right
places. You always can blame your moaning on Herbal
Essences.
Visit your dorm's study lounge and start fondling one an-
other. Watch how fast the room clears out (hey, you never said
you wanted to win a popularity contest.)
Once you experience the rush brought on by new sex spots
and the risk of getting caught, you'll never want to do it on a
twin size bed again.
Actually, you may never want to move off campus.


'Finest Hour' lacks punch, leaves gamer apathtic


irhe first time I played "Call of
SDuty: Finest Hour," it was on a
Broken TV. The brightness was
stuck all the way down, and I had no
way to fix it.
So as I bobbed into Staligrad,
I knew I was on a boat, but only
because I could hear the water. And
I knew I was part of a squadron,
because as -the bombs drew nearer,
their white-flashes revealed the
huddled silhouettes of army-men
freezing in a Russian downpour.
But that was all I knew.
I couldn't really see my allies.









Hooka Louge 01
Gra edtrana


I couldn't ever see my enemies. I
couldn't tell I didn't have a gun.
And so, in my first moments in
the war zone, I ran through trenches
blindly chasing my ballsy sergeant's
glowing nametag and no-nonsense
Russian accent, head ducked and
passing ammo to enemies when I
thought I was firing at them.
Proudly, I survived. I learned to
meet any movement or noise with
a burst from my trusty Thompson
machine gun because most often it
was... (surprise!) Nazis.
I played four missions of "Finest


Brett Kelman-
Don't Hate the Play
bkelman@alligator.org


to continue.


Hour" in
this state
of blind-
ness, until
finally the
complete
darkness of
a Nazi-filled
sewers
made it
impossible


And honestly, it was a hysterical,
terrifying and paranoid party the
whole time.


Daily flights from Gainesville Regional Airport


V is

flygainesville.com


G ES. LLE EGhV:IJNAP
AT Continental
AIRPORT Connection.
Operated by Gulfstream International Ariri"es
-^w^ -


So when the TV unexpectedly got
fixed, cranked up "Finest Hour" so I
could see the levels I had stumbled
through and the ones beyond the
impossible underground.
And you know what? Eh. The
game was more exciting in the dark.
I mean, it's not a bad.game. The
graphics are pretty clean, and the
explosions, gunfire- and overhead
planes soundedgreat, but for some
reason, "Finest Hour" just isn't that
much fun. Without the added chal-
lenge of blindness, I wasn't really
compelled tokeep playing..


Really, "Finest Hour" has noth-
ing to make it stand out from other
"Call of Duty" or even "Medal
of Honor" titles except tank com-
bat, which is fun but dampened by
clunky controls.
And with competition from
superb shooters like "Halo 2" and
"Half-life 2," new releases need to
either excel in every aspect or give
its gamers something new. Finest
Hour d'oes neither And I don't par-
ticularly recommend it.
You know, unless you've got a
broken TV.


Wellness is the highest quality of life possible. Living a

"Helping students explore and create ,
a wellness lifestyle."


8
-
----
I


AUUkk I


0
i-
i


0
n>_

41

^sa


If it isyour first time or not, be firm in the
Decisions you make about sex.


Isn't that what you want?

asodjnd pue ulueaW uE 'sdjisuoiaj p .iuinwo tu poq
^.K. ~na .'.r. .'B. Bt fr-^ ^ A' -* K *- n. C.l hi^ i






THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005 0 ALLIGATOR, 13


CURTAIN CALL

Technicians on toes for tours


By BRETT KELMAN
Avenue Writer

While the Curtis M. Phillips Center's massive
stage curtain will not rise on David Copperfield un-
til 5:30 p.m. Sunday, the magic will have been going
on for two days.
Beginning at sunrise, empty audience seats will
witness an urgent construct of set and scene with
no time for intermission until something on stage
slowly takes shape into what will bewilder audience
members that night.
From the bottom of the orchestra pit to the
heights of the rigger's grid 80 feet above the stage
floor, specialists will work with a rapidity out-
weighed only by safety.
Overhead, riggers will work pulleys until every
line of lights is in perfect position. Backstage, stage-
hands must haul every prop and piece until four
jam-packed semi-trailers are bare.
And somewhere, "spot brothers" will just pray
they don't screw up.
Lights. Props. Scenery. Speakers. Stage crew.
Musicians. Costumes. Electronics. Make-up.
Instruments. Performers. Technicians.
All scripted to enter stage right, through either
the backstage door or the loading dock.
By midnight, they will vanish the same way.
This stressful scene is common to the "bus and
truck" shows that frequent the Phillips Center's
stage, but rarely stay a whole day.
Most of the Phillips Center's larger productions
are touring show on a tight schedule.
The amount of manpower, skill and organiza-
tion necessary to unpack and repack a fanfare like
Copperfield's show is a performance in itself.
This week the theater will present three.
On Friday the Soweto Gospel Choir will perform
an exotic blend of cultural music from South Africa.
The Phillips Center must hang lights and bal-


ance acoustics accordingly for the 26 singers and
five band members, Operations Manager Matt
Koropeckyj-Cox said.
"Normally traveling performances rehearse be-
fore they ever go on tour. Most can do their shows
cold," Koropeckyj-Cox said, but because Gainesville
is Soweto's first performance on their American
tour, they will spend Friday practicing in their new
venue.
And these rehearsals will allow audio supervisor
David Michael and assistant supervisor Eric Ross to
tweak the show's sound, while others wander the
center, ears perked, testing acous-
tics .in every nook or cranny that
houses a seat.
The "load-in" should require
about 20 stagehands working all
day. On Saturday, the center will
come together with the Samuel
P. Ham Museum of Art and
Copperfleld the Florida Museum of Natural
History' for a fundraiser called
the "British Invasion."
It will present "The Fab Four," a Beatles tribute
band that will require a new light hang and replica
set of the Ed Sullivan Show constructed on stage.
A technical crew will be sent to the other facilities
to help prep, while 15 stagehands will work all day
unloading the sound equipment and instruments.
But after the invasion ends, not everyone will
make it home.
A night shift of 10 workers will work hard day's
night to strip the stage in preparation for Sunday's
"huge great big" load-in of Copperfield's show.
"Well will run around the clock to make these
shows happen," Koropeckyj-Cox said, "It takes
such a large team to make this work."
The magic show will require about 40 stagehands
to set up, he said, and everyone involved must sign
a secrecy oath protecting the mysterious ingredients
to Copperfield's magic.-


Forefather of ska


to play Eddie C's

By CHAD SMITH
Avenue Writer

One of ska's most storied bands will return to Gainesville on
Tuesday. New York City's The Toasters, among the first to introduce
the modem ska mix of punk rock and reggae, at least in the U.S., have
stood the test of time and several line-up changes, boasting a 23-year
career with more than 40 members.
Robert "Bucket" Hingley, the band's lead guitarist and vocalist,
immigrated to America from London in the early 1980s and formed
The Toasters a few years after his arrival. The ska music he was so
fond of in England had not yet made such a splash across the pond,
but he was not deterred from his passion.
Little did he know that in two decades he would be one of ska's
forefathers as both the lead singer of a prominent band and owner
of the now-defunct indie label Moon Ska Records, which was a vital
source of underground ska for nearly 20 years. Hingley now runs
Megalith Records with the same general mission in mind: making
sure ska music still has a pulse.
After the brief ska explosion of the late '90s imploded, The Toasters
were at the forefront of a genre chock-full of passionate bands left with
a major label market that had shut the door.
While the intention never has been obtaining fame and fortune,
calling it a career after the ska wave crashed certainly would not have
been censurable. But The Toasters just love playing ska that much.
The Toasters are fond of Florida, too. "There's a pretty good scene
down,there. It's a little like California but even more laid back,"
Hingley said.
The Toasters will play six shows in the Sunshine State on their Ska
Brawl Tour with Orlando's The Supervillians. Hometown favorites
The Usuals also will be on the bill for the Gainesville date at Eddie C's
on South Main Street.


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14, ALLIGATOR U THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005


Grey Goose aims to keep it alive as CD goes national


By JUNE CAPPIELLO
Avenue Writer

I'm not going to lie. I was a little confused
as I watched Kaleb Stewart light his cigarette
and drink his beer in the dimly lit bar of
Jewell's.
He's the singer of a band named Grey
Goose. So where's the tea with honey?
Where's the vodka?
Despite what one might think, the band is
named after "Grey Goose," a song by blues
artist Leadbelly, not the vodka, explained
Stewart, whose father loves the blues.
And the smoking?
"I quit a month before recording," he said
as his "therapist," Rich the bartender, refilled
his glass.
With the band's new album, "'Til the
Medicine Takes," ready to be released nation-
wide, it seems Stewart may not have to worry


about recording for a while.
The band will be holding its CD release
party Friday at the Atlantic with Odlaw and
Morivivi. The show starts at 10:30 p.m., and
the cover is $5.
It's hard to stand out in the local scene,
Stewart said. "You're always going to be
compared to your friend's band."
No one knows that better than


Europe in the summer, Grey Goose's simple,
catchy and raw sound is sure to garner its
own attention.
Grey Goose formed in 2002, when
Stewart ended his acoustic solo act and
persuaded friend Sean Atwater to quit the
guitar and pick up the bass.
Drummer Bill. Clower of Stewart and
Wollard's side project, Cro(w)s, joined


Stewart, whose best friend We I 0ve a connection. Grey Goose at about the
and former We're realy adamant abo0t it being same time.
roommate is .. .After a few guitar
Chris Wollard '. i .' .. lineup changes, John
of Gainesville's admired Kcleb Stewart "The Rookie" is the
Hot Water Music, a staple band's newest member.
in the city's music arena. Like any other band, Grey Goose has had
Wollard co-produced and mixed the al- its ups and downs, Atwater said.
bum. He even played lead guitar on one of But longevity is the band's ultimate goal.
the tracks. "We have a connection," Stewart said.
"He's our godfather," Stewart said. "We're really adamant about it being friends
With the CD release, a tour along the playing together."
East coast in the spring and another tour in Early in 2004, the band was "signed" with


Sounds of Subterrania, a German record label
which funds and promotes bands but doesn't
use traditional contracts.
"No strings attached," Stewart said with
a grin.
The new album, which already has been
released in Europe, took more than a year
to write.
"Sean and I write the most," Stewart
said.
"Kaleb writes the most," Atwater cor-
rected.
Stewart said writing the album was a
crazy, yet creative time that was marked by
"a lot of whisky drinks and writing" with
Wollard, who also was writing for his own
band.
Though the songs turned out darker
than expected, the band is happy with the
way it turned out.
"Now we.just want to tour the s*** out of
it," Stewart said.


TREOS tries Florida again


By JACQUELINE DAVISON
Avenue Writer

"We have some people that we let down
last time when we didn't make it, so I'd like
to make it up to everybody," The Receiving
End of Sirens vocalist/guitarist, Alex Bars
said of their upcoming tour.
"The first time we ran out of money, and
the last attempt was hurricane out."
TREOS, along with Triple Crown
Records label-mates As Tall As Lions and
The Militia Group's Cartel, finally will hit
Florida in their east coast "Lions, Sirens and
Bears" tour.
Since signing with Triple Crown in
November, TREOS has been busy record-
ing a slew of new songs for their debut
disc, "Between the Heart and the Synapse,"
slated to drop this spring.
"It will be about 65 minutes long with
transitions between most of the songs,"
Bars said.
"Our goal as a band has always been to
challenge ourselves, challenge the listener
and create something different."
Concert-goers can expect lots of "good
old fashioned rock," Bars said.
Atlanta's pop-rockers, Cartel, also are
looking forward to the winter tour.
"It should be a lot of fun," lead vocalist
Will Pugh said.


"As Tall As Lions are good guys and
a good band because they don't sound
anything like us, and we don't sound like
them. It should be fun for the kids."
Cartel's signing to The Militia Group
this past August actually was spawned
from a rumor circulated saying they were
signed to the label.
Though untrue at the time, TMG de-
cided to scope out Cartel and signed them.
The biggest change for Cartel since ink-
ing the deal has been upgrading to a 2003
15-passenger van from their '96 Dodge
Conversion, Pugh said.
"And seeing yourself where you
shouldn't be considering how long we've
been a band," he adds, in reference to their
recent attention in Alternative Press.
He also is fond of being able to concen-
trate on music instead of paying the bills.
As far as Cartel's style goes, Pugh pre-
fers to avoid the term "pop-punk."
"People can say it is, but it's not," he
said. "None of us listened to Fall Out Boy or
Yellowcard. We don't draw anything from
them. We all grew up on Atlanta hardcore,
then New Found Glory when we were 15.
Then we all grew up and listened to differ-
ent stuff."
The Lions, Sirens and Bears tour will
stop in Orlando at Screamer's Jan. 30 and
in Tallahassee at Big Daddy's Feb. 1.


'Corduroy' gets personal


By GORDON OWEN
Avenue Writer

While his wit supersedes his works, cel-
ebrated gay author David Sedaris draws
from his experiences with family, friends
and relationships to make his works worth
reading.
From his first major work, "Naked,"
to his most recent book of essays "Dress
Your Family in Corduroy and Denim,"
Sedaris' humor reflects the comical events
he satirizes.
"My writing is just a desperate attempt
to get laughs," Sedaris said. "If you get
anything else out of it, it's.an accident."
The essays in "Corduroy" tell of his
exploits with his family and adventures in
rural France with his partner Hugh. Many
of the 27 essays have been printed in maga-
zines such as G.Q. and the New Yorker.
The book explores the divide that often
exists among members of the same family
or same nation.
Throughout the book, Sedaris satirizes
his family's odd behavior. Sedaris tells of
his father's overbearing nature, his sister's


humor and his mother's eccentric behavior
- she locked the children out of the house
after one snowy day too many.
"Corduroy" propels his mother as one
of the foremost females in modem litera-
ture. She, more than any family member,
reflects Sedaris' life; essentially he does
what she says.
Sedaris describes the difficult birth of his
sister's child and his other sister's gripes
about his writing being too personal..
In his most intimate collection of writ-
ings yet, Sedaris indirectly reveals his own
insecurities as well as his awkward devel-
opment from child to man.
Much like the rest of his work,
"Corduroy" explores the interrelationships
of family, friends and partnerships. Sedaris
writes from his internal self and the deliv-
ery of the stories is timeless.
Comedy and humor aside, "Corduroy"
marks Sedaris' transition from humorist to
a writer of memory.
Sedaris will speak at the Phillips Center
for Performing Arts on Saturday, April 9.
In preparation for his April 9 speech at
the Phillips Center for the Performing Arts,
I recommended picking up "Corduroy."


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THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005 E ALLIGATOR, 15


Writer grooved from 'upscale' to down and dirty


Did I say in my last column scantily
clad women didn't impress me? The
Library Fridays and official grand
opening definitely proved me wrong. The
Pub, Grub and Club definitely has a lot of un-
tapped potential to be a nightlife Gainesville
staple.
Making good of the promise Gator City
never kept, the librarians (is that what you'd
call the bar girls?) danced like they had just
finished watching "Coyote Ugly." Every girl
in attendance also got to tap into her inner
crazy-bar-top-dancing self, with promises of
free tank tops for those branded with an 'X'
on their hands and shots for the rest.
Bar-top dancing ain't your thing? Well
the Library has ways for your inner stripper
to come out too, with multiple poles littering
the dance floor area of the venue. I had so
much fun I lost count of how many drinks I
had, but fear not, I managed to remember the
whole night. My tab, surprisingly, only came
out to $26, and my two friends, and I drank
a lot. Get this! You don't even have to go to
the bar to get a drink. If asked politely, any
of the girls adorning a Library tank top will
take your order. Service like that deserves to
be commended.
Music-wise, there is a lot of room for im-
provement. Top 40 hits played in the main bar


area, while the DJ in the dance area
spun current and old school hip--
hop along side Kid Rock white-boy
anthems and '80s dance. For those
underage who have always won-
dered what that great place called '~
Market Street on ladies' night is like, J. Dar
the Library definitely will give you a N ig
clue. Much like its Downtown com- heaven'
petitor, it offers pool tables, a big bar
area and music.
The Library is a new club, so I set my stan-
dards low as to not disappoint myself, and
trust me. Did the bar live up to the hype? No.
Was I disappointed? No. There aren't books
covering every single inch of wall space,
which I would have like to have seen for the
sake of atmosphere. The Library still has to
find its niche. We already have a Market Street
and imitators such as Slims and Jewell's. I'd
hate to see the place stuck in conformity.
Owner Frank Morello should look to expand
the image and invite promoters to make use of
the Library's name to come up with interest-
ing club nights and make every night at the
Library different.
Still as the Library sits now, I'd definitely
return and know I'm going to enjoy it. Drinks
were good, the people were great and music
was hot for the most part.


liel
ht W
ue@al


e clubbing didn't stop on
Friday. Nope, I'm so dedi-
I cated to you, my readers, I felt
I owed it you to go dubbing two
nights in a row. (The truth is my
friends put me on "The List," and I
Duran didn't have anything else to do.)
writer The List happened to be for
ligator.org Arkadia's Upscale Saturdays. The
restaurant-by-day, club-by-night
locale finally started taking advan-
tage of the Saturday night slot and the hoards
of lazy students who don't want to trek all the
way Downtown.
Don't let "The List" fool you, it is anything
but VIP treatment. It guarantees you get in
free but takes about 30 minutes to get in be-
cause everyone else there is on the list, too.
Once inside, tables are pushed aside and
carpet is duct-taped down to the floor. The
place is enormous, both inside and in the
courtyard area. It would have been nice to
have had a DJ outside playing some lounge
music at a level where everyone still could
talk, or at least for the sake of hearing some-
thing different than the Top 40 hip-hop being
played inside. (Inside, the DJ played it safe by
playing current hits by Snoop Dogg, Ciara
and oddly enough, Linkin Park/Jay-Z.)
No complaints about the DJ not being able


to keep people on the dance floor. What does
bother me about Gainesville DJs, however is
they always play-it-safe. Playing songs that
are popular is fine, but don't play the record
straight-forward; It's your job to mix.
Before going out, I'd lad a drink at my
apartment of course, I was with a desig-
nated driver so it didn't take much money
to keep me buzzing in the club. However,
this reviewer's favorite drink, Red Bull and
vodka, happened to be unavailable thanks to
the promotion of a new energy drink called
Liquid Ice. I always like to start out the night
with a Red Bull and vodka, so I get a little
frustrated when it seems like everywhere I
go Liquid Ice is buying out a night in a cub
to promote their product. Thanks Liquid Ice,
but I'll stick to my Red Bull.
In the end it all comes down to that one
all-important question: Is Arkadia a worth-
while romp?
Yes, but don't set your standards very
high. If unique is what you seek, stay home,
because it's just like every other place in
Gainesville. Don't let the name Upscale
Saturday fool you there is nothing upscale
about this place. I'm not saying it needs to go
all South Beach on us, but if you promote it as
upscale, pushing the tables aside and taping
carpet to the floor just doesn't cut it.


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16, ALLIGATOR N THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005

AROUND TOWN

Monthly art exhibit promises a walk to remember


BY ALICIA PEREZ
Avenue Writer

A tradition that has existed for many
years recently has been reinstated for ev-
eryone to enjoy.
Gainesville's Art Walk, held on the last
Friday of every month, is an opportunity
for the people of Gainesville to enjoy the


Friday January28, 2005 7-10pm


waiF


6th street


main
street


first
street


artwork of many local artists free of
charge.
What had gone on for many years
seemed to had met its end when Gerald
Benceri, the owner of Still Life in G and
establisher of Art Walk, decided to move
to England, said Jacquelyne Collett, a local
glass construction artist.
"When he left, I was afraid Art Walk
would be no more," the 52-year-old said.
"So one night,. while I was in Eleanor
Blair's Studio, the idea was br'.-,ulit, up
that I should, t i' over thei c' cilt
"I spent many years traveling .ir.-u. Li
the country, and this opportunity gave me
a chance to be more connected to the local
artists."
In collaboration with Harold Martin of
Harold's Frames, Collett, a Miami native,
aspired to make Art Walk bigger and in-
corporate more n-.rn-rt spaces.
This month's art walk proves she'was
successful.
Along with galleries such as Eleanor
Blair's Studio, Harold's Frame Shop
and Gallery 15, non-art spaces such as
Gainesville Eyeworks, Wild Iris Books,
Terranova Catering Company and
Leonardo's 706 are included in the walk.
Art Walk is from 7 to 10 p.m., and in-
cludesg 13 -differint -places around down-
town to view and purchase art. Collett
said.
"It is a package evening," she said.
"You can have an early dinner then stroll
downtown, and that is what I personally


believe to be the best part of Art Walk."
The easiest place to begin is at Harold's
Frame Shop and Gallery, across the street
from Gainesville's Eyeworks on Southeast
Second Place, where parking can be vali-
dated.
From there, follow the map given at the
Frame Shop, as well as the other partici-
pating galleries, Collett said.
Art. Walk also includes refreshments
and is one of the few times that drinks
are accepted inside all the studios, Collett
said, laughing-


Performer plucks at political ironies


By COLIN MCCANDLESS
Avenue Writer

If you think Wal-Mart is the face of evil, and Clear
Channel Communications is its voice, then catch the sa-.
tiric stylings of musician/comedian Dave Lippman (aka
George Shrub, the Singing CIA Agent), Saturday night.
Lippman's incisive lyrics parody everything wrong
with America from uniform trends in consumer culture
and the government's denial of global warming to repeti-
tive pop radio and the transplanting of jobs overseas.
His words foretell the decline of individualism as mo-
nopolies contribute to the develop-


billboard" because it the interior is stocked with litera-
ture and n:'\ l' while the exterior displays messages of
peace.
Nearly 50 different speakers who have visited Palestine
or Iraq are participating in the tour, hoping to inspire au-
diences and relate first-hand experiencesof the conflict.
Lippman has visited Palestine and Israel, and his per-
formance of "Song of Goliath" is a combination music/
slide show chronicling his impressions of the visit.
Lippman says his musical influences are varied and
include jazz, western swing and a calypso sound that he
jokes is almost "Trinidadian," remind-


ment of a sprawling urban jungle "Peo p e wre u IAS llJ ppy
of conformity where humans
heed the ring of Taco Bell's mes- tkLey cave anc most Of the
merizing call like the Pavlonian haC. < k s beevi, pOSitive."
Chihuahua dogs advertisers have D ave LipbenMa*
bred us to become. Dve Lippm M


The close-minded need not apply, because
no stone of hypocrisy is left unturned when Lippman's
stage persona Shrub picks up his guitar and holds mega
conglomerates and political bigshots accountable for their
actions.
His witty anti-chain number entitled "I Hate Wal-
Mart" bashes Walton's wonderland while eulogizing
Mom and Pop stores.
Lippman vents on the bland music scene and laments
the end of originality, singing, "Turn on my radio dial/
Like to hear something new once in a while/ Same old
crap in a brand new style/ It's audio rape."
Lippman rides into town via the Wheels of Justice bus
tour, which aims to teach nonviolent action against war
and occupation in Iraq and Palestine.
Lippman called the bus a "rolling 40-foot library and


ing his listeners at all times that
although his songs address some
serious issues, they are light at
heart and really a form of "info-
tainment."
Occasionally, the Wheels of


Justice tour and Lippman's act have en-
countered demonstrations or passionate .skeptics with
strong opposing perspectives on America's role- in the
Iraqi and Palestinian conflicts.
However, Lippman has this to say ...
"People are usually happy they came and most of the
experience has been positive."
Whether you agree with his strong cynical views or
not, one thing is for sure, Lippman's amusing, provocative
songs will stimulate your.funny bone and your thoughts.
Lippman and Shrub will appear together at Matheson
Museum 513 E University Ave. .at 8 p.m. Saturday.
Tickets ire $7 in advance at Wild Iris and Goerings
Book Store or $10 at the door.
Call 378-5655 for more info or go to justicewheels.org/
or www.davelippman.com.


Art Walk an ideal date and provides
many emerging artists to have the chance
to display their work, she said.
"Most of the spaces included in Art
Walk are looking for new artists to feature,
and this is the perfect opportunity to talk
to owners and artists about your work,"
Collett said.
So if you find yourself with nothing to
do on a Friday night, find a friend or a per-
son to share that ideal night with and take
them for a walk under the stars while ad-
miring the hidden beauty of Gainesville.



String band


plays for free

Student Government Productions brings
the Yonder Mountain String Band to head-
line Gator Nights on Feb. 11. Student tickets
are free and available for pick up starting
Friday at the student box office.
The acoustic jam band's mix of man-
dolin, upright bass, banjo, acoustic guitar
and vocals will grace the Rion Ball Room
stage courtesy of SG Productions and Gator
Nights.
"We have short attention spans," guitar-
ist Adam Aijala said in an interview with
Acoustic Guitar magazine. "Keeping things
spontaneous is the solution to that. It keeps
us interested, and I think it might be the main
reason our fans come out to see us."
Though only six years old, YMSB boasts
a track record-that includes a recent ap-
pearance on CNN Headline News, shows
at The Grand Old Opry and Bonnaroo, as
well as sharing the stage with Bela Fleck, Del
McCoury and Tim O'Brien.
The band released volume three of their
Mountain Tracks in. September, a live two-disc
set.
YMSB is well-known for unusual live
covers, from the Beatles to Ozzy Osbourne,
and Willy Nelson to The Talking Heads.
Based in Nederland, Colo., YMSB will play
with The Del McCoury Band, reigning holders
of the title the International Bluegrass Music
Association Entertainer of the Year.
For more information, check
www.yondermountain.com
and www.delmccouryband.com.


-JACQUELINE DAVISON


- 1 121 n 1.n

S university
avenue

9 southeast
first
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P garage
southeast
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qisn math isarlt.art*ak? call 3'5-0260 5 4 u i place


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Catec 5he~ovctS Gaide
Spring Zoo0



New format makes career search easier


By Nadene Francis
Thousands of students will don suits
instead of sweatshirts and sneakers
February 1 and 2 to attend the new
Career Showcase, 9 a.m. 3p.m., in the
Stephen C. O'Connell Center.
Career Showcase, the two-day job
fair for internship, co-op and full-time
opportunities, has a new industry-
focused format to help students identify
employers.
The first day of Showcase will
feature employers seeking candidates
for technical positions in fields such
as computer science, construction,
information systems, engineering
scientific research and other areas of
technical expertise.
The second day will feature employers
with opportunities for candidates
in accounting, banking, consulting,
government, retail, sales and other non-
technical fields.
Students are excited about the new
format.
"I heard that the technical non-
technical day is new, and I think it's
great," said UF junior Anthony Cheney.
Cheney hopes to secure an internship
in South Florida as he prepares for his
first Showcase experience.
The new technical/non-technical
format was adopted to make it easier for
students and'employers to know when
to attend, said Tom Halasz, associate
director for employer relations at the
Career Resource Center.
Student and employer feedback from
Showcase evaluations encouraged the
change.
"Students and employers voiced
concerns that the previous format
was confusing. Students didn't know
what day to attend, which sometimes
resulted in disappointment," said Halasz.
"Students and employers have a clearer
sense of when to attend [with the new
format] and we anticipate that they will
be happier."
Employer responses have also been
positive.
There are more employers
compared to last semester and
students will see more employers
each day, said Halasz.
Students in all majors and
classifications are encouraged to attend
Career Showcase.
"All students should attend showcase
whether they are looking for an


internship, co-op or full time job," said
Halasz. "It's not just for juniors, seniors
or graduate students."
First year students and sophomores
should attend the event to reduce the
anxiety they may feel when they're
ready to look for jobs in the future.
Halasz outlined the following points
for students as they prepare for Career
Showcase:
Determine why
you are attending the fair
Are you going to Career Showcase
as a part of your job search process
or do you want to learn about the fair
and employers? If you're attending
the fair as a part of your job search
process, research employers
thoroughly. .


Read company profiles on the
showcase website, job descriptions
in Gator CareerLink and visit the
company's website.
Polish your resume
Take the time to make your resume
the best it can be. Attend pre-showcase
events like Showcase Essentials to
learn how to create a resume and have it
critiqued at Extreme Resume Makeover
or Employer Resume Critique. Talk
to employers at the Cultural Diversity
Reception and the Internship Form
for resume tips.


Have a plan
With nearly 250 employers it's
impossible to meet with all of them, so
decide who you want to see.
Students can attend pre-showcase
events or visit the website at
www.crc.ufl.edu/showcase to prepare
for the fair. Additional information about
CRC programs and services can be found
at www.crc.ufl.edu.


Published by a llig t o Not officially associated with the University of Florida


1% .





2, ALLIGATOR E CAREER SHOWCASE GUIDE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005


The Career Resource Center would like to



Than&


the following students for making
the Spring 2005 Career Showcase
a success.


Meredith Brown

Kevin Barrett

Amalie Barrocas

Ashley Brownlee


Leah Carter

Lia Givens

Barrington Guthrie, Jr.

Lisa Martin

Danielle Rourke


www.crc.ufl.edu 392-1601
first floor J. Wayne Reitz Union


TIME
10:40 am
11:45 am
12:50 pm
1:55 pm
3:00 pm
4:05 pm
5:10 pm


WORKSHOP
Resume Preparation
Preparing for Showcase
1-Minute Interview
Getting ON-Campus Interviews
Resume Preparation
Preparing for Showcase
1-Minute Interviews


Extreme Resume f IAleover
What: Brief one-on-one critique sessions.
Where: Career Resource Center
When: Today Jan. 28, 10 am 3:00 pm

Emploger Resume Critique
Where: Career Resource Center
When: Jan. 31, 10:00am- 2:00pm
Students planning on attending Career Showcase will
get a chance to have attending employers critque their
resumes before Showcase.
Participants must reserve a time in Gator CareerLink
prior to the event. Walk-ins will be seen as time
permits.

Internship Porum
Where: Reitz Union Grand Ballroom
When: Feb. 1, 5:30pm 7:30pm
Get tips on finding internship, researching companies,
marketing yourself and becoming a successful intern.

Cultural Diversity Reception
Feb 1, 3:30pm 5:30pm
Network with employers and learn about diverse UF
student organizations at this informal reception.


Specidl7 Adverttiing SSection

The following Pre-Showcase Events are special events
held before Career Showcase in order to to help students
prepare.
Students can also attend general Career Resource
Center workshops throughout the semester to prepare for
future career events.

3SbovcQse Essentials
A series of workshops teaches students how to: research
and engage employers, what to expect during the event,
and how to secure on-campus interviews through the
Career Resource Center.
On Jan. 27 the workshops will be held in the Reitz
Union, Room 282. On Jan. 28, they will be held in the
Reitz Union, Room 284.







THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005, CAREER SHOWCASE GUIDE N ALLIGATOR, 3



SpeciQl Advrtuising t ct ion




Graduate students should attend Showcase too


By Lauren Pasquarella Daley,, M.S.,
NCC, IMH
Assistant Director of Graduate Services


Graduation is looming in the near
distant horizon. You might know more
than you ever wanted to about the
effects of underwater basket weaving
on the ancient Minoan culture... but will
employers outside your discipline care?
If-you're lamenting your specialized
degree/thesis/dissertation and are asking
yourself "what can I do with my master's
or Ph.D.?" ... you can do MANY things! In
fact, you might get an internship or job by
coming to Career Showcase!
Graduate students often mistakenly
believe that recruiters only want people
in specific disciplines without advanced
degrees.
I have heard students say "Oh, those
recruiters are just looking for business
and engineering undergraduates." Well,
yes, some are.
However, many recruiters are seeking
well-rounded, skilled individuals whom
they train to learn job specifics.
Graduate students are usually well-
rounded, highly-skilled, and have many
desirable abilities employers seek. Help
employers see your skills (outside your
knowledge of underwater basket weaving
and the Minoans) by placing them into


different contexts.
The key to finding employment
outside your. discipline is to focus on
your transferable skills, those skills you
developed during grad school that are
useful in a variety of settings.
What transferable skills do you have?
In graduate school, many students teach
classes, write papers, and conduct
research. What skills were involved in
those activities?
For example, some skills necessary for
teaching are: public speaking, organizing/
managing people, developing lectures/
learning activities, keeping accurate
records, and providing feedback to
people. Those skills sound similar to those
required in consulting, management,
sales, or human resources. Do this process
with your skills from grad school and
watch the possibilities of potential job
options grow.
One word of caution, though: Do not
try to make more of something than it
is, such as "sitting in boring 3-hr lecture
class" becomes 'created atmospheres of
patience in unstimulating environments."
Employers can see straight through that
kind of resume padding, and it doesn't
help chances of getting an internship or
job.
However, if you stay truthful and
focus on how your graduate education
gave you desirable skills in addition to a
specialized knowledge, you can increase


...... U/mF !
your chances of finding and securing "overqualified" or "we're only looking for
gainful employment outside your selected undergraduates."
discipline. Hearing this kind of feedback can
At events, like Career Showcase, you be particularly frustrating for graduate
might have to specifically point out how students who have worked hard on their
you fit the employers' needs. education and might be switching career
Sometimes recruiters will see the see GRADUATE, page 4
graduate degree on your resume and think


;:;;:-; .*' *

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With mentors available to support, guide, and introduce you to exciting opportunities, the Franklin
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a cross-functional learning program and uncover your future career pathway.

Visit us at the Spring Career Showcase
February 2, 2005 from 9am-3pm
Stephen C. O'Connell Center
.From generous benefits that include stock investment options to an array of employee incentive
programs, Franklin Templeton Investments believes in recognizing and rewarding superior
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- i ~


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4, ALLIGATOR N CAREER SHOWCASE GUIDE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005


Special Advertising Section



Graduate students also benefit from pre-Showcase events


from page 3, GRADUATE
directions.
However, try to remember that you are
probably qualified to do many jobs outside
your academic training; it is a good idea
to explain your transferable skills to the
Showcase recruiters and explain how you
will be a good fit for an open position in
their company.
If all else fails, getting some practical
experience in the field you're hoping to
enter can be very helpful in securing your
perfect job.
Use the networking opportunities at
Career Showcase to make contacts and
look for internships.
Although an internship might not be
paid at first, they frequently Lead to full-
time work either inside the same company
or in a different organization because you
will gain valuable, relevant professional
experience from interning. Even if you
aren't ready to graduate yet, consider
perhaps getting an internship while still in
school. This will make you more marketable
when you are looking for a job.
We encourage graduate students
looking for opportunities outside academia
to attend Career Showcase on February 1
and 2 from 9am 3pm in the Stephen C.
O'Connell Center.
The first day, Feb. 1, will feature
opportunities in technical fields,
including computer science, construction,
engineering, information systems/
technology, scientific research, and other


technical or scientific areas.
The second day, Feb. 2, is for non-
technical fields such as accounting,
banking, consulting, government, human
services, management, retail, sales, and
other fields that do not include a scientific
or technical focus. More information on
how to prepare for Career Showcase is


available at www.crc.ufl.edu.
To make the most of your Career
Showcase experience, attend pre-
Showcase events like Showcase Essentials,
Extreme R6sum6 Makeover, The Cultural
Diversity Reception and the Internship
Forum. Also, open a Gator CareerLink
account at www.ufl.edu/careerlink


,,
,\-`-
-:;i


A company that has
as many opportunities
as I have ambition!
A $6 billion company with 600,000 vehicles in our rental and leasing fleet
and more than 50,000 employees across the globe, Enterprise Rent-A-Car
offers an outstanding career track for bright, motivated individuals. Here,
you'll learn everything you need to know about managing one of our busy
branches, and the speed of your success is entirely up to you. Make your
future count when you join us as a:

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Positions available nationwide
You'd be perfect for this position if you have a 4-year degree, an outgoing
personality, a clean driving record, and a head for business. You'll learn
problem-solving and conflict management and how to make the most
productive use of your time, manage and deploy a fleet of vehicles, and
generate profits.
You'll receive an awesome benefits package that includes medical/dental/
vision programs, 401(k), profit sharing, flexible spending, an Employee
Assistance Program, employee discounts, and the chance to double and
triple your salary within just a few short years. For consideration, please
apply online at www.enterprise.com.
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ft .


rent-a-car


jipe' c e, wwwfenterprisiecom


to access potential interviewing
opportunities from employers in various
industries.
After Showcase, the CRC will also
present two career workshop series for
graduate students considering going into
academia and/or leaving it.
The "So You Want to Work in Academia"
workshop series consists of five workshops,
all held in the Career Resource Center
Workshop room at 5:10pm.
Individual topics include: Preparing Your
CV on Feb. 10, Cover Letters in Academia
on Feb. 17, The Academic Job Search
on Feb. 24, The Academic Interview on
March 10, and Creating Your Teaching and
Research Portfolio on March 17-
The "So You Don't Want to Work in
Academia" workshop series consists of
three workshops, also held in the Career
Resource Center workshop room at 5:
10pm.
Individual topics include: Where Can
I Work with my Grad Degree E What
Would I Enjoy Doing? on March 24, Finding
Opportunities Et Networking Outside
Academia on March 31, and How to Market
Yourself t Approach the Non-Academic
Job Search on April 7.
For additional information about any of
the services the Career Resource Center
has to offer for graduate students, feel
free to contact the Assistant Director for
Graduate Services Lauren' Pasquarella
Daley via e-mail, laurendaley@crc.ufl.e
du.


Ah, %Aft. ..Am 1






THURSDAY, JANUA L2A- zoo5, cAfAEtP SOWVCASE GIIDE ALLIGATOR; 5



Special Advertising section


Myendein: Combpanile

Dw One: d chnical DnG


Company
Agilis Engineering
AIM Engineering E Surveying, Inc.
ALSTOM Turbine Technology
Amazon.com
Anheuser-Busch, Inc.
Arcadis
AVID Engineering, Inc
Avionyx, Inc
Baskerville-Donovan, Inc.
Beckman Coulter Inc
*Bed Bath and Beyond
BIT Systems
Boeing Company
Bowyer Singleton E Associates
BRPH Architects Engineers. Inc.
Buxton
BWXT Y-12
C3TS
CAE
CDI
CDM
*Central Intelligence Agency
*Cerner Corporation
Chen and Associates
Chick-fil-A, Inc. Information Technology


Division


Campus Recruiting

BHR Jacksonville



Human Resources Department

Florida

Survey & Mapping


Human Resources

CAE USA
Aerospace Technologies

Human Resources


Company
Citrix Systems, Inc.
Civilian Careers with the Air Force
CPH Engineers, Inc
*Department of Veterans Affairs
Dyer, Riddle, Mills & Precourt
Ellis a Associates, Inc
Entergy Corporation
Enviro-Logical Solutions, Inc.
*Everbank
Exxon Mobil Corporation
Federal Energy Regulatory Commission
Florida Department of Transportation
Foresite Group, Inc.
FPL Group
*GE
Georgia Department of Tr ansportation
*Gleim Publications
Golder Associates Inc.
H.W. Lochner, Inc.
*Harris Corporation
HDR, Inc.
Heidt t Associates, Inc.
Hewitt Associates
HNTB Corporation Honeywell


Division


HQAFPC/DPKR
Sarasota, FL
Human Resources Management Service
Engineering

Nuclear


Global Information Services (GIS)
Human Resources
District V Maintenance


Corporate






Ft. Myers


'notes a company attending both days


^'*-.A'' ,/ rlur C iui rnhties Ontlliinlr Jo Oppuitunitrei^^ ^a,*;, i'''^^K-y'
: _- -i----: :_. --: -.--:.:- :--(< --. --.:--.- -.- ------:i ;_-_- -
-- --: .: -o, ,c: -... ;.. -.: ::-.- .....--- = --_ -::. ---:. o :-- -:-: = -. --= -_-_

: ,,:4 .,,. 4 ,. .... :...i_ ;
/:,,,,.,,.


PRO Real Estate Management, Inc. is a J,i..jn..: i..- .- a, i m-,r, .:.:., l ,,.:.
..Lj. i], rll r.r,... and aggressively 1..ir..].i l:.rm ,.-r,i :.:.n,n,.iriTi- in the M id-Atlantic
.'r,.J ..:.n]d...s i r.i.:.r We rely upon a very precise, calculated formula for success:
acquire assets in excellent locations which under-perform due to either physical or managerial
deficiencies, substantially improve the product, and hire the best and brightest personnel
available to manage lhem to peak performance. To.date, PRG owns and manages over 1i)
,r,i: .ii 4 a::XT: from Pennsylvania to Florida. Over the pastfive years, the value of our equity
has increased by 550'1

What do you see yourself doing within tlhe nextiwo years? Most of those in The fields of
marketing, management and finance may be confronted wilh paper-pushing for several years
following graduation. However, -'jF '. *:*' 111,. -I the opportunity to run your own business
within two years! This is a position, which is heavily based upon your skills in sales and marketing,
but also enables you to become heavily involved in budgeting, personnel and capital renovations
under h e direction of a highly rI lld i're.ai.. l .J111.:T..i

A "Write your own ticket opportunity In what odier business do you have the chance to run a
multi-million dollar business, and therefore have the opportunity to demonstrate superior financial
performance, otier Than at PRG? How far do you want to go? How much do you want to earn?
This is a company widh an entire corporate culture, dwhicl is '..j i-.*J i:.:.ri, I;.h .,.:l.i:.i- : having
dhe opportunity to make The most of their abilities! i ,.- i I..- i r..: ,I- di.].i skills and the desire
to become a part of our team of superstars airJ .*,- .i j .)ji,. i,.i id, ] degree in Marketing,
Management, Housing or Finance, we want to hear from you!

Post your resume and secure your on campus interview today!

For more information, please refer to www.prgrealestate.com.

/e suggest That you-review our newsletter section to learn more about our style of management!


IC


I' ,


^ t^~~!&i'2






6, ALLIGATOR CAREER SHOWCASE GUIDE, THURSDAYJ.ANrT pv A -nr W



$peciol Advertising section


Attending Companies, continued

Day One: Tcbnical Day

Company Division

IBM HR
Info Tech, Inc.
"INROADS, Inc. SRC Recruitment Services
Intel Corporation
Intermagnetics General Corp. Invivo Diagnostic Imaging
Jacksonville Regional Chamber of Commerce Cornerstone
Jones, Edmunds E Associates, Inc.
Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc.
Kraft Foods
Kraft Foods Manufacturing
LBFH Engineering, Inc.
Lochrane Engineering, Inc.
*Lockheed Martin
MACTEC Engineering Et Consulting, Inc. South
Microsoft Corporation
MIT Lincoln Laboratory
Mosaic formerly Caigill Fertilizer
*National Geospatial-lntelligence Agency
National Instruments
Navy Recruiting Districk Jacksonville Officer Programs
*Northrop Grumman Corporation
"Northwestern Mutual Financial Network Florida
'Office Depot Corporate/Stores
Parsons Transportation Group
Patent Er Trademark Office Human Resource Dept. Outreach
Portsmouth Naval Shipyard Human Resources Office
*PricewaterhouseCoopers
Prosser Hallock, Inc.
Protean Design Group
*Pulte Homes Fort Myers/South Florida
Quincy Joist Company


Company

*Raymond James Financial, Inc.
Raytheon Company
Redstone Technical Test Center
"Regeneration Technologies, Inc.
REP Associates, Inc.
*Rinker Materials
Rockwell Collins Melbourne
RWA Incorporated
Ryland Homes
SEME, Inc.
*Sandvik Inc.
Sarasota County public Works
Schlumberger Technology Corp.
SRD Engineers
St. Johns River Water Management Distrii
TH Hill Associates, Inc.
"Target Corporation
Tetra Tech. Inc.
Texas Instruments Inc.
The Crom Corporation
*The Pepsi Bottling Group
"ThyssenKrupp Elevator Corporation
'U.S. Department of State
United Space Alliance
United Technologies Corporation
"University of Florida
URS Corporation
US Air Force
"UTC/Otis Elevator Company
Verizon
Wantman Group, Inc.
Washington Group International
WebMD (Medical Manager R&DI
WilsonMiller, Inc.
York International Corporation


Division


Information Technology Department









Driltech Mission, LLC

OFS
Civil/Roadway
ct
Engineering
Distribution

High Performance Analog


New Installation
HR/REE/REC
Florida Operations
Pratth.Whitney
Office of Audit and Compliance Review

Ofhcer Accessions Recruiting

SSADP



Engineering & Landscape Architecture


*denotes a company attending both days


Day Tvo: Non-T cynical Dag
Division Company


Company


7-Eleven, Inc.
Abercrombie & Fitch
AFLAC
Aidman, Piser E Company, P.A.
Allegis Group
American Express Financial Advisors
AmeriCorps *NCCC
Ameriquest Mortgage Company
AmSouth Bank
Averett, Warmus, Durkee, Bauder E Thompson, PA.
Bankers Life and Casualty
Bealls, Inc. B
Becker Conviser Professional Review
Black E Decker / DEWALT Power Tools
Bridgestone/ Firestone
Retail Et Commercial Operations, LLC
Brown Et Brown, Inc
,_rown Shoe Human R
Buckle
Build-A-Bear Workshop
Burdines-Macy's
C.H. Robinson Worldwide, Inc.
Cast-Crete Cor portion
CBIZ
Cendant Mortgage
/ Center for Retailing
Chico's FAS, Inc.Human Resources


Florida


Talent Sourcing
MA Program


ealls Department Stores


esources-Employment Services

Florida


Cintas Corporation Rental Division
City Furniture
City of Gainesville
Contiki Holidays
Cox Tampa Sales
CSX Transportation
Customs and Border Protection
Deloitte Et Touche, LLP
Dietrich Industries
Dillards Southeast
EERJ Gallo Winery
Eckerd Youth Alternatives
Enterprise Rent a Car
Ernst & Young
Fairfield Resorts Inc. Sales Et Marketing
Farm Credit of Central Florida AgrlBusiness Lending Group
Fastenal
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Division of Administration
Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Human Resources
Ferguson A Wolseley Company
Florida Auditor General
Franklin Templeton Investments
Gap Inc. Old Navy
Graham, Cottrill, Jackson, Batts E Hostetter. LLP
Grant Thornton LLP
Helzberg Diamonds Corporate Office
Herff Jones, Inc.


Division






THURSDAY, JANUARY 27 005; CAREER SfHOWCASE GtUIDErALIGATR, 7
N,


The Largest College


Market in Florida


I I


The Largest


College Paper

in the Nation


t 11n4" i.. ln iiaIIo .i" a

Alligator

S Write or call today for
. more information
1: P.O. Box 14257
SGainesville. FL 32604
., .M 1352 ) 376-4482
Au' ''i


Gap Inc.


Special Advertising Section


Attending Companies, continued

Day Tvo: Non-Th)cnical Day
Company Division


.yc


Hertz Local Edition
Hope Lumber
Internal Revenue Service
James Moore t Co., CPA's and Consultants
JCPenney Company. Inc.
Kohl's Department Stores
KPMG, LLP
LBA Certified Public Accountants, PA
Lehman Brothers
Linens N Things
Macy's East
Macy's-Central Department Stores
Masco Contractor Services
Maxim Healthcare Services
McGladrey Et Pullen
Merck And Co., Inc.
Merrill Lynch
Moore Wallace
Morgan Stanley
Naylor Publications, Inc.
Nestle Waters North America
Nordstrom
Office of the Chief of Transportation Ci
OMNI Financial Services
Performance Matters Associates
PETsMART
Philip Morris USA
Polk County Board of County Commissioners
PremiereTrade LLC
Prentice Hall
Prog essive Insurance
Protriiti
Rachlin Cohen Et Holtz
Randstad
Rendina Companies
Reznick Group
Ruggiero. Martinez & Co.
Ryder System, Inc
Sandestin Golf and Beach Resort
Save-A-Lot
Scott McRae Group
SCP Pool Cor po ation
Sears, Roebuck and Co
Sherwin Williams
Smoak, Davis t Nixon LLP
St. Joe Towns E. Resorts
State Farm Insurance
Stock Building Supply A Wolseley Company
Stryker
SunTrust Bank
Takeda Pharmaceuticals Nor th America
Talbots
Target Stores
Teach for America
The. Hertz Corporation
The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company, L.L.C.
The Steak n Shake Company
The Washington Center for Internships
and Academic Seminars
The Zimmerman Agency
TransWestern Publishing
U.S. Marine Officer Programs C
United Rentals
University Directories
University of Florida
USAA Insurance Company
Vestal Et Wiler, CPA
Wal-Mart Stoies, Inc.
Walgreens
Wells Fargo Financial


Sales





Operations
Gainesville Store
Federated Department Stores

Home Office


US Human Health

Southeast- Sales


Zephyrhills Natural Spring Water

vilian Personnel Proponency Office

Worksite Marketing


Personnel














Southeast

WaterColoi Resort
Florida Zone

Micro Implants

Sales

Retail

Equipment Rental

Central'North Florida



officerr Selection Station Gainesville
General Rental

Division of Human Resources
Human Resources


p.
'C'


d
-r*


Consumer


<=D111,







8, ALLIGATOR E CA REER SHOWCASE GLIDE, THU RSD1A', JANUARY 27, 2005


Forum prepares students for a range of internships


Nadene Francis
If you're thinking about getting an
internship but feet like you might not
have have time for one because you are
taking summer classes or you're not sure
how or when to get one because of your
major, go to the Internship Forum!
More than 200 students are expected
to attend the event on Feb. 1 in the J.
Wayne Reitz Union Grand Ballroom from
5:30 pm 7:30 pm.
Students are realizing that
internships are the key to success,
said Heather White assistant director
for experiential education, Career
Resource Center.
"Internships give you a chance to
apply your academic knowledge in
the workplace, gain career-related
experience, increase your marketability
upon graduation and create a professional
network," said White.
Students usually have a number
of questions about internships so this
informal panel format is a comfortable
way for them to meet employers and
learn how to start their search, said
White.
Representatives from a variety of
industries will be on hand to answer
students' questions and share pointers
about securing internships.
"We invited different types of
employers to represent the variety of
internship opportunities students can
have," said Amelie Romelus, graduate
assistant for experiential education and
coordinator of the forum.
'We hope students will leave the
forum with a better understanding of


what it takes to be a successful intern,"
said Romelus.
The forum will feature employers in
management, public service, journalism
and broadcast, retail and engineering.
Forum attendees are encouraged
to formulate questions they wish to


ask employers in preparation for the
event.
The Career Resource Center offers
internship search assistance throughout
the year through a number of programs.
Students can visit the Center to speak
to an advisor, research opportunities


through the CRC web site, or sign up
for Gator CareerLink to search national
listings.
For more information on internships
opportunities contact the Career
Resource Center at 392-1601 or visit
www.crc.ufl.edu.


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PERSONAL SONGS HE
RITTK ANiD RECORDED
1,Z T- ...... ',b. '\Il~ ~ ~n~


twrr







THURSDAY, JANUARY 27; 2005 I ALLIGATOR; 25


A call to action
John Hayman de-
livers a discourse
on the causes of
abuse between the
sexes to students
in Turlington Plaza.
Hayman also pro- : -
motes environmen-
tal conservation
through means
such as organic
farming and educa-
tion through travel,
as well as par-
ticipating in activist
bike trips around
the world.
Casey Anderson / Alligator Staff


ON CAMPUS

Law school gets $2M to


focus on children's law.


By JEFF SIRMONS
Alligator Writer
Jsirmons@alligator.org

Future UF law school graduates
may have a distinct advantage over
graduates from all but two other law
programs representing children in
family law.
UF's Levin College of Law is
one of three prestigious law schools
selected by First Star, a Washington,
D.C.-based foundation dedicated to
improving the lives of children, to
receive a multidisciplinary center of
excellence.
"When First Star checked us
out, they developed ideas for how
children's advocacy should be, and
they saw that we already upheld
those standards," Levin College of
Law Dean Robert Jerry said. "They
were looking for the best places, and
they chose us."
UF's Center on Children and
Families focuses on making sure the
interest of the child does not get lost
in the workings of the legal system,
and the new center would facilitate
that goal, said director Barbara
Bennett Woodhouse.


"When children become involved
in the courts, they come in contact
with a number of different agen-
cies, each with a different goal,"
Woodhouse said. "It's not uncom-
mon for a single child to be caught
up in a divorce case, a domesticIio-
lence case and a child abuse case. Our
goal is to make sure each case is built
around the needs of the child."
"When First Star checked us
out, they developed ideas
for how children's advocacy
should be, and they saw that
we already upheld those
standards. They were looking
for the best places, and they
chose us."
Robert Jerry
Levin College of Law Dean

First Star will raise $2 million for
each facility The other centers will be
located at Columbia University and
the University of San Diego.
When the program will be estab-
lished has yet to be determined.


County offers vaccine at brunt of yearly flu season


By MEDHA RAVAL
Alligator Contributing Writer

There is now hope for getting a flu shot for
those denied one earlier this flu season.
Flu shots are available on a first-come-first-
served basis at the Alachua County Health
Department Main Clinic, 224 SE 24th St.


The shots became available Monday
morning and have been going fast, said
Sherry Windham, Alachua County Health
Department immunization manager.
"We really don't have much left," Windham
said of their 388 doses as of Wednesday.
The health department received 1,000
doses last week in a statewide allocation of the


vaccine. The number of doses was based on
county population and need, Windham said.
The vaccine is available Monday through
Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Pjabpt Shots are $15. The only insur-
ance taken is Medicare Part B,
Windham said.
"They can try to bill their insurance them-


selves and collect later," Windham said about
those not covered by Medicare Part B.
Shands at UF offers the vaccine for$20,
while North Florida Regional Medical Center
does not offer flu shots to patients.
Sheri Martin, program assistant for the
nursing director, said the Student Health Care
Center does.not have a supply of the flu shot.


AlcoIhol


Use & Academic Performance


This table below describes the relationship
between the average number of drnn.s consumed
per week and grade point average


Average number of drinks per week listed by grade average-(Natc/drugstud41,845)
SI ..www.siu.edu
mrommnim^"^ip~;,,g


I --- -- ,- I~ ~ ~-








26, ALLIGATOR 0 THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005

HIGHER EDUCATION

Board of Governors converges upon Reitz Union


Funds don't mirror UF quality
L* BY EMILY YEHLE Ballroom from 10:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., the
Alligator Writer issue of funding will be discussed from
eyehle@alligator.org several angles.
The board took its first step
UF students and the Florida Wednesday, when it pledged, along
Legislature aren't doling out enough with the State University Presidents
cash for the university's quality and Association, that it' will petition the
size, according to UF officials. .- -"' Legislature for full
1!th a low undergraduate tuition funding for new
and a recent budget proposal by Gov. students, money to
Jeb Bush that cuts higher education match private dona-
funding by almost 8 percent, UF is tions -and the means
floundering for funds. for increased faculty
"We are dead last in the Association and staff salaries, ac-
of American Universities in terms of our cording to a release.
tuition and fees," said Joe Glover, UF's Poppell "Our faculty and
interim provost and No. 2 administra- staff compensation
tor. packages are lower than any com-
When the Board of Governors, the prisons you want to make," said Ed
body that oversees the State University .Poppell, vice president for finance and
System, meets today in the Reitz Unioni administration.


But today the board will lead a dis-
cussion on the amount and control of
tuition and fees, based on its report,
which addresses how other states han-
dle the process of setting tuition.
Previously, the Legislature set a limit
to how much tuition could be raised for
all undergraduates and graduates. In
Bush's proposed budget for the 2005-
2006 fiscal year, however, a limit, only
is set for in-state undergraduates, while
the-tuition for out-of-state undergradu-
ate and graduate students is left to each
university's Board of Trustees, a univer-
sity's highest governing power.
UF receives $100 million to $200 mil-
lion less in tuition than other universi-
ties of the same caliber, Glover said.-
But the governors haven't made up
their mind on this issue, he said.
"I think that the Board of Governors
is interested in exploring the issue and
developing a philosophy," he said.


Member exits post
By JAMES VANLANDINGHAM
Alligator Staff Writer
vanl@alligator.org

When the Board of Governors meets this morning in
the Reitz Union, it will be one man short.
Board member Miguel De Grandy, a Miami lawyer
and lobbyist, resigned Wednesday citing a proposed pol-
icy change by state Senate President Tom Lee that would
ban lobbyists from serving on the Board of Governors or
on individual universities' boards of trustees.
"The proposal currently under consideration by the
Senate would restrict my ability to effectively represent
my clients, contrary to the oath I took 23 years ago when
I became a member of the Florida Bar," De Grandy wrote
in a letter to Gov. Jeb Bush.
De Grandy, who attended UF both as anundergradu-
ate and as a law student, represents clients before state
agencies.
He is the first lobbyist to resign from such a position
since Sen. Lee floated his proposal Jan. 11.


FSU school to be debated


* THE UNIVERSITY SOON MAY END
UP WITH A CHIROPRACTIC SCHOOL
ITS TRUSTEES DID NOT ASK FOR.

By JAMES VANLANDINGHAM
Alligator Staff Writer
jvanl@alligator.org

The yearlong saga of the embattled
proposal to build a chiropractic school
at Florida State University could finally
come to an end today.
Or not.
The Board of Governors, which over-
see~iFlorida's public universities, will
take up the matter today at UF.
The meeting comes two weeks after
the FSU Board of Trustees ducked the is-
sue and sent a proposal to "investigate"
the chiropractic program straight to the
governors without making a recommen-
dation.
Calls to the Ocala office of Board
of Governors Chairwoman Carolyn K.
Roberts were not returned Tuesday or
Wednesday, but Roberts told The Palm
Beach Post on Monday that she is still
unsure whether to vote the chiropractic
school up or down, or simply to send the
proposal back to FSU for its trustees to
make a decision.
"The Board of Trustees is to take re-
sponsibility for programs at FSU and


the board did not do that," she told the
paper.
FSU President T.K. Wetherell sent a let-
ter to Roberts Thursday saying that, "It is
clear the Board of Governors should act
on the proposal before meaningful explo-
ration and implementation planning can
begin."
The letter closely echoed a similar mes-
sage that Roberts sent FSU Trustees chair-
man John Thrasher
UF in the days before
Administration the FSU meeting.
Roberts had
said it would be "inappropriate" for FSU
to forward the proposal to the Board of
Governors without first making a ruling
themselves.
The trustees did it anyway.
In sidestepping the issue, the FSU
trustees were irresponsible, said E.T. York,
a former UF interim president and plain-
tiff in a lawsuit seeking more autonomy
for the Board of Governors.
Nevertheless, Roberts shouldn't follow
that bad example, he said.
"I'll be very disappointed if the Board
of Governors doesn't vote the issue up
or down," York said. "There's little to be
gained by sending it back to FSU for fur-
ther consideration. That would just keep
the issue alive and keep the pot boiling for
months or even years to come."


UF leads in master's degrees


REPORT, from page 1


suffers, Glover said.
"We believe that the best quality edu-
cation is provided by a faculty that is en-
gaged in cutting-edge research," he said.
The report supports UF's research
prowess in several areas. UF leads the
state system in master's degrees, pro-
ducing almost 1,000 more than second-
ranked USF and dominates its coun-
terparts in awarding professional and
doctoral degrees. It also surpasses other
state institutions in faculty publishing;.
UF students trail their peers at other


state universities, where a higher per-
centage graduate within 115 percent of
their degree requirements, but Glover
said the comparison attests to the
stature, not the sloth, of UF students.
UF students come in with many dual
enrollment, Advanced Placement and
International Baccalaureate credits and
often graduate with two majors or de-
grees, he said. More importantly, UF
stands above other institutions in four-
year graduation rate.
"Students move through University
of Florida in a very efficient and produc-
tive manner," he said. "It think that's the
important matter."


100 Professors a rarity in low-level classes
Feer than one-third of inlroduciorC courses at UF are
S- taught b\ actual prolessors, paling compared lo most 74.-
3 other state schools. Tne gaps narrow at higher leIels. --- /


92.3%


Mike Gimignanl / Alligator Staff


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THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005 E ALLIGATOR27_



Students use poetry to dismiss racial stereotypes


* THE EVENT WAS PART OF
UF BLACK HISTORY MONTH.

By LINDSAY TAULBEE
Alligator Writer
Itaulbee@alligator.org

Students gathered at the
Institute of Black Culture
Wednesday evening with the
goal of dispelling stereotypes,
while expressing themselves cre-
atively through poetry.
The forum, called "Black on
Black Prejudice: You Don't Know
Me!" was part of Black History
Month, and was designed to
coincide with the IBC's semi-
weekly poetry nights.


"It was awesome, just the
fire everybody left with," said
Stephen Roberts, director of the
institute. "Everyone left here
tonight feeling motivated," he
said.
The forum focused on expos-
ing prejudices that exist among
the black community and ways of
recognizing and rect& ,ring them.
"There's a culture that existed
during slavery that we still act off
of today," Roberts told the stand-
ing-room-only crowd of more
than 60 people.
The conversation's tone
swayed between light-hearted
and serious as students dis-
cussed issues including relations


between the genders, the image
people put forth, prejudices be-
tween light- and dark-skinned
people and the importance of
reaching out to younger genera-
tions.
One student talked about be-
ing teased as a child for being
smart and for having "black" fa-
cial features. The teasing, he said,
came not from white people but
from people within his own race.
He later read a poem entitled
"All Eyes On Me."
He prefaced the poem by
saying, "No matter what contri-
bution I make, there's still little
things about me that make me a
minority within a minority."
Students also talked about


prejudices associated with the
idea of "good hair" and its con-
notations.
UF student Erin Claridy told
the group the term bothered her
because it implied there was such
a thing as "bad
hair."
Multicultural She said this
Affairs displayed an in-
ternalization of
Western standards of beauty.
"There is notlning wrong with my
hair," she said.
Claridy later drew loud applause
from the audience with a poem ex-
pressing frustration at black people
who look down on other blacks for
coming from a different place.


Students also spent time discuss-
ing relations between black men
and women, and the responsibilities
each sex has to each other and tc
themselves.
Later, Roberts encouraged stu-
dents to be mindful of the images
they project.
How people spend their money
shows what they are vested in, he
said, comparing a house full of.
books to one with a nice stereo.:
The evening ended with a read-
ing of a collaborative poem, written
on a pad that was passed around the
room.
"Let's take what we talked about
here tonight into tomorrow," said
Roberts, in closing.


UPD says sexual assault case numbers are accurate


Winner of porn


debate unclear

PORN, from page 1

"Very few women in porn have gone to
college." But he added that women such
as Jenna Jameson own multimillion-dollar
corporations.
UF professor Diana K. Nagy attended
the debate.
"I don't think anyone really won," she
said. "Both of them are com-
On ing from the same direction.
-, i.,,;; They both agree that S&M
and child pornography are
unacceptable."
Ben Plank, a UF industrial engineering
senior echoed Professor Nagy's view, but
leaned more toward Jeremy's angle.
"I think they both stated good points, but
I think Ron Jeremy had a stronger argument.
I think Susan Cole overstated a lot of things,
but I think it was pretty fair," he said.
At the debate's end, Cole reiterated her
point that porn "perpetuates violence"
against women.
As attendees left the center, one student
said, "Let's go watch some porn."


NOW from page 1

assaults at UF are not significantly lower
than the average.
A comparison of UF and seven other
public colleges, each with more than
40,000 students, shows their annual av-
erage of reported rape cases from 2001
to 2003 is approximately 9.8. During the
same time frame, UF had an average of 9
cases per year.
UPD spokesman Joe Sharkey said
UF's statistics show every sexual assault
case reported to the department, as well
as anonymously reported cases from
university officials or other law enforce-
ment agencies. Law requires UF officials
to anonymously report when a student
who's been sexually assaulted approaches
them.
Sharkey said this system makes UF's
sexual assault statistics more accurate.
"Many victims of sexual battery do not
choose to report," Sharkey said. "We wish
they would; it would give us an opportu-
nity to investigate the crime."
Campus NOW's focus, according to
membership director Camille West, is to
pressure UF to do more at Preview by
telling incoming male students the conse-
quences of rape.
"These things are still happening and
the university doesn't want to talk about
them, but we want to force them," West
said.


.West referenced a 1999 Delta Chi fra-
ternity initiation party that resulted in a
female stripper's rape claim.
She cited the night's videotaped
evidence as an example of a mishandled
campus rape case.
But ultimately the stripper was
charged with filing a false report based on
the videotape. The rape charges later were
dropped after she pleaded guilty to oper-
ating an escort service without a license.
"[Sexual assault] is some-
thing that Campus NOW and
the National Organization for
Women have been fighting for
40 years, and we will continue
to fight."
Camille West
Campus NOW membership director

Delta Chi was put on disciplinary pro-
bation for their actions, but Wesf said more
action should have been taken against the
fraternity and that the stripper was treated
unfairly in the case.
"[Sexual assault] is something
that Campus NOW and the National
Organization for Women have been fight-
ing for 40 years, and we will continue to
fight," she said.
Sharkey noted this is not the first time


the university or its police have been ac-
cused of recording false statistics.
Security on Campus Inc., a nonprofit
campus crime-reporting watchdog orga-
nization, was contacted in the late '90s by
an individual who disputed the statistics,
Sharkey said, adding that UF proved its
numbers were accurate.
"It was stated by them in a letter that
we are actually a national model for others
to emulate," Sharkey said. *
In attendance at the Tuesday meet-
ing was former Interfratemity Council
President Jared Hernandez. His appear-
ance came on the heels of a guest column
by Campus NOW members in Tuesday's
Alligator.
IFC Administrative Vice President
Jeremy Martin, who could not attend the
meeting, disputed statistics in the column
which stated an estimated "10 to 30 per-
cent of on-campus sexual assaults occ~yin
fraternities."
"It was good that editorial was writ-
ten to raise awareness on the number of
sexual assault cases that have occurred or
campus," Martin said, "but I just wish that
the part specifically about fraternities was
researched a little bit more accurately."
But Hemandez would not dispute the.
column, instead acknowledging ."more
could be done" to stop rape on campus.
UPD statistics do not differentiate be-
tween sexual assault cases at fraternities
and other residences on campus.


Shands at Vista

Mental Health Tech Job Fair
Tuesday, February 1st
Vista Atrium
4100 NW 89th Blvd (off 39th Ave)
(Located in the Health Park)
3:00pm 6:00 pm
ce required if student in an Allied Health or I
ck or previous CNA or Psych Tech experience
*e will be interviews, tours, and refreshmei
Please apply on-line at www.shands.org
Call to confirm
Interested or unable to attend?
itact Human Resources at (352) 265-0441 ex


yschology
e.

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--







8, ALLIGATOR N THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005


Progress of Library West renovation moving quickly


I THE COMPLEX IS SCHED-
)LED TO REOPEN ABOUT
)%E YEAR FROM NOW.

By JUSTIN RICHARDS
Alligator Writer

If all goes as smoothly as it has so
ar, UF students should have a new
library West by Feb. 1, 2006.
J'm Hendon, general superinten-
lent of construction on the library,
,aid about 100 men are on the site
ive days a week, 12 hours a day, oc-
:asionally working Saturdays.
"Progress is really going fast,"
;aid Steve Shorb, director of sup-
Sport services for UF's
On libraries.
CaimpuS He said that by
October the library
will reach "substantial
completion, which means it will
)e ready for bookshelves and other
interior furnishings.
At this point the fire sprinkler
system air conditioning infrastruc-
ure and interior framing are done,
and the drywall is about 50 percent
complete .
To save space the new library
will feature shelves that slide to-
gether along rails in the floor.
Workers will begin installing the
rails Feb. 22 and should be done be-
fore April 22.
Window installation is set to be-
gin in about two weeks and will take
i couple of months, Shorb said.
Mike Bowen, president of the
Graduate Student Council, said the
library's closing hinders students'
spontaneous research.


F *- -- -...---.


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L
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~~~'`~----


tr


Casey Anderson / Alligator Staff
Construction workers weld strips of galvanized steel on the new roof of Library West as part of its renova-
tion. Contractors expect the project will be finished by January 2006.


"Today, as I was preparing for
my class on urbanization, I thought
of a book I'd read that would've
helped, but I couldn't get it in time,"
said Bowen, who also teaches. "It
was nothing career-threatening, just
a matter of inconvenience."


He also said the inability to
browse shelves has been a huge fac-
tor, and graduate students, particu-
larly in the humanities, have been
hit especially hard.
UF education junior Kim Altman
agreed the renovation is inconve-


nient, but also saw the necessity of
the process.
"It sucks," Altman said, "but they
have to update it at some point."
Altman said she would use the
library's planned 24-hour study
room, adding that there's currently


nothing like it on campus, "which is
kind of annoying."
LeiLani Freund, chairwoman
of the Public Services Information
Technology Coordinators Group,
conducted a focus group with 10
undergraduates Monday to get in-
put on the technology they would
like to see in Library West. The area
the group centered on was the third
floor, which will be the library's me-
dia and technology center.
"The students care a lot about
what goes into the library," Freund
said.
The focus group, tired of what it
considered sterile on-campus study
environments, requested a relaxed,
comfortable place.
One student said a Starbucks-like
environment would be nice.
Current plans include 1,600 seats
for patrons and study lounges with
picture windows.
Other features students re-
quested were universal access to
CD-ROM burners, Microsoft Office,
e-mail, easy printing and the ability
to save files onto a server, an oppor-
tunity most faculty have, but most
students don't.
Freund couldn't promise results
for any of the recommendations but
said her group would pass them on
to the implementation team, who
will try to make them a reality.
Many members of Freund's com-
mittee are also on the implementa-
tion team good news for the
students' requests.
Freund will hold a graduate fo-
cus group Jan. 28. She said she plans
to follow up on the sessions and
"keep the dialogue open."


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THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005


ALLIGATOR
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mobile 213-3901. 4-20-71-2


. F.Ren ~Fit .rle. t F& 'Ret Ret For'Rent.
.':-urifuirn hed furnisleid .) -. unfurnished ) unfurnished


AVAILABLE NOW
Walk IC. UF SludicO and3 1BP s
From ..505. Frre part ,rn
Open VWEEEI.JDS :" 1- 777
ww.i, urome :r om
4.20.71.2-


LYONS SPECIAL
$89 1st rrntr. rerT
37 -8 97 : .
4-20-71-2

Need a Rental Home or Condo?
Need ATenant?
CALLTHE.BEST!





a.i !',) e R -.dli. 1nin. P! "v il i1 1
www.watsonrent.com
Property Mgmt/Rentals 352-335-0440
Full Service Sales 352-377-8899
gvillepm@watsonrealtycorp.com
4-20-71-2

CAN'T FIND PARKING? BUS FULL?
Studios & 1/1s from $459 at UF
Pool *We Pay Most Utilities Pets OK
Residents get FREE parking...guaranteed
You can't live any closer! 372-7111
4-20-71-2


QUALITY YOU CAN AFFORD!
* Avail NOW or AUGUST!
* 1BR $530/2BR $580/3BR $735
* HUGE floor plans! 2 Pools!
* Pets Welcome! ** 335-7275
4-20-71-2


BIG CITY LIVING DOWNTOWN
Stylish Studios, 1/1's, 2/2's, 3/3's
Pool*Alarm*Pets Welcome.
Avail. Now/Fall: 338-0002
4-20-71-2


*SUN BAY APTS@
*Grad students $99 Deposit*
**Walk or Bike to Campus 00
1-1 $460/moO*2-1 $520/mo
www.sunisland.info 0**376-6720
4-20-71-2

1 & 2BR apts. convenient to shopping, bus
line, and just a few miles from UF. Located
off SW 20th Ave. $410 $515, incl water,
sewer, pest control &.garbage. Sorry no pets
allowed. Call 335-7066 335-7066. 4-20-71-2

Quiet! Convenience Location!
* 1BR $460 2BR $530
* Beautiful pools/courtyards!
* Walk to UF! Pets Welcome!
* Now or August! 372-7555
4-20-71-2

SEPARATE FROM THE COMMON PLACE
Luxury 2BR/2BA & 3BR/3BA
W/D incl. *FREE Cable*Alarm*
24hr. Gym* FREE Tan* Close to UF
Museum Walk 379-9255
4-20-71-2

Deluxe, Large 3 or 4BR apt/house, 60
second walk to;-UF. Remodeled, Oul House
charm. Central AC, washer/dryer included.
Wood floors. With Parking. By Private
Owner. 538-2181 Iv message 4-20-71-2

Free for -II
Huge 3jER'2?B-. 685
Alarm cool pool tennis b-ball
Free UF parking Perfect for pets
Amazing specials -.376-4002
4-20-71-2

Deluxe, large one or two bedroom, 60
second walk to UF. Wood firs, washer dryer
included, fireplace, patio deck. Can furnish.
Short term available. Private Owner. $495-
up. 352-538-2181. Lv mssg 4-20-71-2
__- - I


Perfect for 1 BEg enough lot 2'
7501 Sq Ft, Paltoi We love pels'
*larm'F'o.jl"uF Parng'CI'V.rGvy
ove-..,, now 1 mn.rih free' 332-7401
4-2 .1-71.2

LIVE EVERY DAY A VACATION!!!
EIBR 1E-.*2BP'2B L*3BFP3P TH
FREE cable wvHBO SHOWCVTIME',larri
G.alecd24rrr iyrni'Tra FREE'CIo- e Io JF
SPRING SPECIALS377772777
4-20-71-2

1,2 & 3BR with GATED ENTRY!
HUGE apts w/screened porches
FREE Alarm FREE.Tanning
24-hour Gym Quiet NWArea
Move-in Specials 372-0400
4-20-71-2

-Beautiful and New***
2BR/2BA & 3BR/3BA LUXURY
FREE High-Speed Internet
FREE Monitored Alarm
FREE Cable w/HBO/Showtime
FREE Tanning & 24 hr Gym
W/D plus TVs in every kitchen
Now & Fall 374-FUNN (3866)
4-20-71-2

** ELLIE'S HOUSES **
Quality single family homes. Walk or bike to
UF. www.ellieshouses.com 352-215-4991 or
352-215-4990 4-20-71-2

SUN ISLAND
1.1 from $460.00 2.1 $520.00
$99 deposit for Grad students
999 SW 16th Ave phone # 376-6720
www.sunisland.info
4-20-71-2

Make Them Green With Envy!
.Luxury 2&3 Bedrooms from $850
Cable*W/D*Newly Remodeled
Pool*Hot Tub*Tennis*Gym*PC Lab
Reserve now for fall 372-8100
24-20-71-2

HOUSES and CONDOS
All locations and price ranges
If you are tired of apt life
Go to www.maximumre.com or call 374
6905. 8-24-170-2

Leasing Now & Fall
Large 2BR/1BA $629, 3BR/2BA $855
Alarms, pets welcome, free UF parking
Call 373-1111 or visit www.spanishtrace.org
4-20-71-2

1 BLOCK FROM UF
Luxury 2BR/2BA townhomes.
W/D, private balconies.
Open until 8pm and WEEKENDS
Leasing for Fall 371-7777
4-20-71-2


S4BR/4BA at UF
Luxury twonhomes 3 blks
W/D, Alarm, Pets ok.
C.W\. Avail.Fall. 371-7777
www.ufhome.com
4-20-71-2

Rooftop Luxury Overlooking UF
Private 3/2 with HUGE'deck
W/D*Free Parir,Jg*Ele.salo'r "c.:e s
One ofa r.nd lu..ury' 3-.2-7 111
4-20-71-2

Summer rates
plus'July FREE
on a 15 month.lease
Sun Island Properties
376-6720 www.sunisland.info
4. 20.71-2


*LIVE A RESORT LIFESTYLE*
1,1 & 2'2 flai.s 3;' lowr.r. rrmes.
Free Tanrnig -eOt,':. 24 hr .,'m
PC lab Gatld Trahn Svc AI amnlltie
Leasing Now & Fall. 335-4455
4.20. 1.2

Want more? Freeeven!
4BR 2.5 $1020 Only 1 left
Sp acious fi.,oi plan alar, ltennis-
'wvvi' plnelr-eegaraens c.:oni
Free LIF parking 3'76-402
4-20-71-2


BIG VALUE, SMALL PRICE
2BR TH $639 inc W/D, alarm, park free@UF
Pets welcome, Daily Specials!
Avail NOW or Fall 373-1111
4-20-71-2

Pine Rush Apartments
1&2 BR apt homes
starting @ $429/mo
$150 deposit. Aug & Sept Free!
375-1519
4-20-71-2

"HOUSE Walk to UF!
Spacious 3BR house avail now!
Wood floors, huge screen porch
MUST SEE! "
Great Value! Open wkends 372-7111
4-20-71-2

More for less, FREE even!
2BR/2BA- Only $680
Pool bus route alarm tennis
Pet perfect- Free
Stop by and see us 376-4002
4-20-71-2

1BR/1BA $420, 2BR/1BA $495, 2BR/2BA
$525, 3BR/2BA $695. New carpet, Italian
tile, cent AC/H, covered patio, DW, verticals,
W/D hkups, pool. Some utils, walk to UF.
332-7700. 4-20-71-2

1BR & 2BR/1BA with W/D, central re itiair.
dishwasher,ceramic tile, private patio, pets
arranged. Off SW 34th St. Near bus rt. From
$499 377-1633 2-25-38-2

ALREADY SICK OF YOUR ROOMMATE?
SPECIAL DEALS AT
SUN KEY
376-6720 4-20-71-2

***LIVE IN LUXURY***
HUGE TVj/JHr.tlS 2'2 & :'?
Free .:.able, w'HBi Srhooln-.re
W/D*alarm*free tanning*comp lab
Pets welcome*Private dog park
Leasing NOW & FALL 377-2801
4-20-71-2


Free. Extended Basic Cable! Pets Welcome!
1000 sq ft Split Floor Plan, W/D Hook-ups
& DW, 1BR/1BA & 2BR/2BA Available, Call
Now 372-9913 4-20-71-2

Amazingly Affordable! HUGE 650sq ft
1BR 1000,sq ft 2BR Townhouses & Flats!
Discounted Rates Starting @ $380 & $480.
Close to Santa Fe, UF & 1-75, 332-5070.
4-20-71-2

HOUSES Close to UF, schools, shopping,
630 NW 35th St. 3/2, family room, carport,
Ig screened porch, fenced backyard $1200
331-0095 OTHER HOUSES AVAILABLE.
4-20-71-2

Total Elec, 2 & 3 Bedroom, $395-$550, cent
A/C, pool; tennis, B-ball!, waste, pest, lawn
mowing. 251b pet $15/mo. M-F 10-6.or by
appt: Alamar Gardens 4400 SW 20th Ave.
373-4244 UF bus line #20 4-20-71-2


Need space for a 2,3 or 4-some? One BR apt for rent. 1 person, 1 car,'no
TH; W/D & DW We love ALL pets! smoking, no pets, no fleas. It is small, but
Pool*Park @ UF *Free Gym*Alarm has it all. All util. pa. $360/mo, unfurnished.
Move-in now, 1 month fee! 332-7401 Call Charlie "Whitey" Webb. 375-4373. Stop
4-20-71-2 "by 1215 NE 20th Ave: 1-29-25-2,' ,


SUPER CUTEI 2BP 2 5BA TH firepla.:e
omring room, w*arh'erlrver
iJ.70.rnl 2"2"i SVV "7Trd Terrace
Carl Turlinglon Real Estate, Inc. 372-9525
wvww.TurlingtonRealEstate.com 1-2S 1 9.2

1 MONTH FREE RENT!
20 steps to class! 1&2 BR apts avail Aug
on special from $310/person. Lofts, ig
closets & TONS of amenities! Call 376-6223
TrimarkProperties.com 4-21-71-2

Apartments Available Now .
All Florida Areas; All Major US Cities
Browse our listing FREE
WWW.SUBLET.COM
1-(877)-For-Rent (367-7368) 4-21-71-2

*8 BLOCKS TO UF*
Large 2BR/1BA apt. Carpet, cent H/AC,
$500/mo 375-8256.
4-20-70-2

Have Roommates?
3BR/2BA House $950
Only You?
1 BR/1BA House $450
Mitchell Realty 374-8579 x 1 4-20-70-2

So Close to Campus
Avail now, 2BR/1 & 2 BA apts.
$400, $450, $695 Mitchell Realty
374-8579 x 1 4-20-70-2

1/2 PRICE APTS! Close to UF/Downtown.
2BR & 3BR starting @ $525/mo Call 373-
4423 or online at www.maximumre.com
8-15-95-2

PET'S PARADISE, no app/pet fee.
twnhm.2BR/1.5BA privacy fence, modem
appliances/fans, WD hkups, 1000 SW 59th
Terr. Pvt owner, please leave detailed mes-
sage. Other units avail. $425/mo 331-1%9
2-3-20-2

SHORT LEASE NEGOTIABLE on some
units SEE PET'S PARADISE AD 352-331-
2099 2-3-20-2

LOOKING FOR AN APARTMENT?

The Leasing Connection
1608 NW 1st Ave
Located right behind Florida Bookstore
Plenty of FREE PARKING!

FREE Apartment & Housing
Locator Service

Call 352-376-4493 or visit
wwvw.theleasingconnection.com
3-31-56-2.

2BR/1BA Duckpond area house. Cent H/A,
W/D, DW, large yard, prefer grad students.
Pets OK $780/mo 850-529-7069 2-3-20-2 -

***CASABLANCAEAST***
BR/2.5BATownhouse, close to UF, Student's
dream. $750/mo, low dep, W/D incl. Call Phil
at 352-235-0600 1-31-17-2

DOWNTOWN Avail immediately., month-
to-month ok. 2BR/1BA apt. Newly remod-
eled, quiet neighborhood, pets OK, close
to Shands, UF & library. $6E50--'15''m Call
262-1351 1-31-17-2

3BR across from-UF
Avail Fall, From $385 per BR.
Vaulted ceilings, laundry,
Breakfast bar, pets ok.
Open WEEKENDS 371-7777
4-20-69-2

WOOD FLOORS at UF
1&2 BRs avail Fall -
Pets ok, some w/ W/D
OPEN WEEKENDS 371-7777
www.ufhome.com
4-20-69-2


Classifieds,.,.
Qsntwjiwd ,pD sAQct pasQe. e s.-$al


?:;a;ii~n~:r;~~:~~-~g~B~.~~i;~-~3 l'''t"1~3~9~t~e~.~~ c'i~",~:~i~~;~:~'~Cligstili8R~d~;;'i~~.~








30, ALLIGATOR 0 THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005


1 For Rent
0 1| unfurnished


115 STEPS FROM CAMPUS!!!
Luxury Opposite Library West!
Beautiful 2BR/2BA...all amenities
LOOKING GLASS APTS
Call 376-1111 or Come by
111 NW 16th St. #1
4-20-69-2

Immaculate 3BR brick home easy walk north
from UF library with large fenced yard in
quiet, safe, NW neighborhood. Cent H&A,
fireplace, Ig Fla rm, wood floors, W&D, ADT
secur, nice kitchen, dishwasher. 1617 NW
7 gl. $1450/mo. Call Tom @ 215-4990 or
Bill @ 561-307-3690 1-31-16-2

2BR/1.5BA 5-10 min bike ride to med or UF.
All new carpet, W/D, DW, stove. No smk,
pets, 239-898-9317 1038 B off SW 6 St on
10th Ln. $600/mo 3-7-38-2

6 MONTH LEASE! 2BR/1.5BA
Duplex, walk to UF, CH/AC,
$495/rent, 805 NW 3rd Avenue
Carl Turlington Real Estate, Inc. 372-9525
www.TurlingtonRealEstate.com 1-28-14-2

DOWNTOWN LOCATION! 3BR/2BA
Wood floors, fireplace, living & dining rooms,
Den, $625/rent, 223 SW 4th Avenue
Carl Turlington Real Estate, Inc. 372-9525
www.TurlingtonRealEstate.com 1-28-14-2

CHEAP RENT! 2BR/1.5BA
W/d hookups, CH/AC, dishwasher, $475/mo
5320 NW 20th Court
Carl Turlington Real Estate, Inc. 372-9525
www.TurlngtonRealEstate.com 1-28-14-2

WALK TO UF
Studio $335/mo
1BR $400/mo
2BR $695/mo
Gore-Rabell Real Estate, Inc. 378-1387
www.gore-rabell.com
4-20-68-2

*AVAILABLE NOW*
2BR/1BA HAILE HOUSE
3BR/2BA HAILE HOUSE
2BR/1BA BRANDYWINE
6654106 CHARLENE
1-26-10-2'

**1BR & 2BR BEAUTIFUL**
NEW kitchen, tile, carpet, pain
2BR- over 1100 sq ft 00 $650/ mo
1 BR-over 800 sq ft 0* $550/mo
Close to UF, beautiful, quiet
High-speed wireless internet
$30 off deposit 376-2507
4-20-63-2

** 3BR/4BR LIKE A HOUSE **
Huge townhouse, fireplace,
SW/D hook-ups, patio,
New carpet & tile, fitness & basketball
high speed wireless internet
3BR/2.5BA only $850
4BR/3BA only $1099
Close to UF in SW
Beautiful/quiet 0 376-2507
4-20-63-2

3BR/2BA HOUSE. Close to UF & Santa Fe.
Tile floors, Berber carpet, all appliances incl.
Privacy fenced-in yard. $1050/mo. Call 215-
9987 2-14-21-2

SEROIUS STUDENTS ONLY. New 3BR/2BA
house, 2 car garage in brand new subdivi-
sion close to UF & SFCC. All appliances
$1300/mo Negotiable based on length of
lease. Call 215-9987 2-14-21-2

WOODLAND VILLAS
1 MONTH FREE on 2BR Units
Starting at $760/mo Gated community.
n thru Fri 1 to 5pm, Sat 10am to 2pm
5950 SW 20th Ave 332-3022
1-24-5-2

1BR w/pvt gated courtyard. Small quiet com-
plex located at 3320 SW 23rd St. Starting
@ $380/mo. Pets arranged. Call 377-2150.
Please leave a message. 2-2-11-2

Threesomes Welcome!
All the space you need only $1050
""Pool*Hot Tub* Tennis*Gym*PC Lab
W/D*Cable with HBO*Extra Storage
The perfect three-bedroom! 372-8100
4-20-60-2


1 w For Rent
a l unfurnished


2 people to sublet a 2BR/2BA 1st floor apt in
Hidden Lakes. $860/mo incl cable & internet.
No lease transfer fee! Avail Immed July 30.
Sign by Feb 1st to get 1BR of furn free! 954-
234-7678 1-28-7-2

Studio Apt. Walk to campus. Refrigerator,
W/D provided. Avail Immed. $540/mo. Water
included. Call Nancy 904-824-8192 1-27-5-2

Female roommate to move in ASAP 2BR/
1BA apt. at Picadilly. $325/mo + 1/2 utilities.
$0 sec dep. Move in now, Jan freely! 352-377-
2706 Denisse. 1-31-7-2

Haile Plantation Laurel Park. 3BR/2BA
Beautiful home. Quiet neighborhood. Great
running trails. $1200/mo Avail 3/1. Bruce
246-3690 2-25-26-2

**Great 2BR/1 BA Condo**
1000 sq ft, 2 story, open floor plan. Fenced
backyard for pets. W/D, DW. Short & sep
leases avail! $600/mo 352-258-8481 1-27-
5-2

DUCK POND! Cute 1BR/1BA, wood floors,
eat-in kitchen, ceiling fans, $475/rent
305-C NE 6th Street
Carl Turlington Real Estate, Inc. 372-9525
www.TurlingtonRealEstate.com 1-28-5-2

SOUTHFORK OAKS! 2BR/1.5BA
Townhouse, living/dining combo,
Breakfast bar, pool, W/D hookups, $595/rent
2300 SW 43rd Street #1-3
Carl Turlington Real Estate.com
www.TurlingtonRealEstate.com 1-28-5-2

STUDIO APT BIKE TO SHANDS &
VET SCHOOL! Spacious studio,washer/
dryer, fenced yard, lawn svc, $450/rent
3811 SW 20th Street
Carl Turlington Real Estate, Inc. 372-9525
www.TurlintonRealEstate.com 1-28-5-2

GREAT LOCATION! 2BR/1BA,
Ceramic tile, screen porch, w/d hookups,
$750/rent, 4234 NW 26th Srive
Carl Turlington Real Estate, Inc. 372-9525
www.TurlingtonRealEstate.com 1-28-5-2


ROCKWOOD VILLAS
3BR/3 full baths. End unit. W/D. Recently
renovated. $795/mo. Call 407-578-2721
1-28-5-2

*NOW PRE-LEASING*
1BR $699 2BR $839 3BR $999
$99 dep. Full size W/D,
Direct Campus Access,
Pool, Fitness Center!
Open M-F 8:30 5:30, Sat 11-4
Pebble Creek Apts 376-9607
4-20-59-2

2BR/1BA Apts. $500-525/mo
5 BIks to UF! 840 sq ft
829 SW 5th Avenue, St. Croix Apts.
Cent H &Air, Inclds Wtr, Swg, Pst Ctrl,
Garbage. Merrill Management Inc. 372-1494
1-28-4-2

1BR/1BA 1 Blkto UF!
Carpet, Central H & Air, Laundry
On site. $515/mo includes utilities
Call Merrill Management Inc. 372-1494
1-28-4-2

2BR/2BA in WOODSIDE VILLAS
7200 SW 8th Avenue $620/mo
Pool, Clubhouse, etc.
Call Merrill Management Inc. 372-1494
1-28-4-2

2BR/1BAApt, 1 Block to UF.
Central H & Air. Tile Floors
1236 SW 1st AVe. $575/mo
Call Merrill Management Inc. 372-1494
1-28-4-2

2BR/1BAApts 1 Block to UF
New Carpet, Window A/C, Nat Gas Ht
1216 SW 3rd Avenue, $540/mo
Call Merrill Management Inc. 372-1494
1-28-4-2

2BR/1BA Apts. Terazzo Floors
Window A/C, Nat Gas Ht
2 Blks to UF. $510/mo
1508 NW 4th Ave.
Call Merrill Management Inc. 372-1494
1-28-4-2


11 For Rent
Sunfurnished

* NW 39 Ave 2/2, patio, loft, new w/d ptn fir,
Ig open, good area $580-610 2/2, pation,
gate $510-515 0 SW fancy 2BR near UF, Ig
kit, sc pch, fenced, trees $545-560 0 Share
2BR $300-450 373-8310 1-31-5-2

****ANTIQUE APT****
2BR/1BA in old house downtown. Hardwood
floors, high ceilings, pets arranged, avail Jan
15th $475/mo lst/last/dep. Call Greg 214-
3291 1-31-5-2

Historic Apartments. Ceiling fans, hardwood
floors, high ceilings, some w/fireplaces. 1BR
$470 w/water & sewer. First, last, security.
SE historic district. No dogs please. 378-
3704 2-8-10-2

WALK TO SFCC
New 1700 sq ft 3BR/2BA home
Rent $1250/mo or by indiv BR
Avail 2/1 Call 283-6279 2-8-10-2

DON'T MISS OUT ON
THIS GREAT DEAL!
NAPIER GRANT
Spacious 2BR, 1Ba apts
Close to UF
Starting @ $599/mo
+ Discount Sec Dep
377-5221
Contemporary Mgmt. Concepts, Inc.
Licensed R.E. Broker
4-20-53-2

A cozy stone cottage. Bike to UF. 2BR/1BA
w/office & large yard $695/mo. Drive by
1st, 303 SE 8th St. then call 352-638-1310
2-4-2-2

AVAILAUG 1 4bed/2bath house, wood floors,
dishwasher, fireplace, wash/dry, fenced yard,
all beds large. 1375/m 830 NW 16 Ave. Call
339-2342 Other houses avail. 2-2-5-1

AVAIL AUG 1. 3bed/1bath very nice house
wood floors, garage, very private backyard,
wash/dry 924 NW 9th Ave. Call 339-2342
for directions 1075/m. Other houses avail.
2-2-5-2

AVAIL AUG 1. 5bed house 3 bath 7 blocks
from campus, fireplace, dishwash, wash/dry,
screen porch, large & nice 1700/m 1605
NW 7 Ave Other houses available 339-2342
2-2-5-2

1 BR/1 BA HUGE single apt. 2 blocks from
UF $525/mo. avail ASAP, Feb free. Sam
870-6698 2-2-5-2


0 1 Subleases


2BR avail in 4BR/4BA condo in Countryside
@ University. Includes cable, utilities, W/D.
Living rm furn. Call Irvin (352)379-2926
email- icheng@bellsouth.net $450/month
1-27-20-3

Apartments Sublets & Roommates
All areas. Stu, 1 & 2 Bdrm; $400-1500
Short-Long & Furn-Unfurn
1-(877) FOR-RENT (367-7368)
WWW.SUBLETCOM 4-20-71-3

BEST DEAL IN GAINESVILLE
$350 for 1BR in a 2BR/2BA apt. Call 352-
318-5438 2-22-30-3

Cheap & 2 min to UF
Avail May. $350/mo inc utils. Call 514-5733.
1-28-10-3

Awesome apt 1BR/1BA in 3BR/3BA @
Hidden Lake. enjoy your own, private room
w/your own private bath & huge walk-in clos-
et. Only min to UF. LET'S DEAL! Call Angie
352-213-8572 or 352-331-44013 1-28-10-3

Take over lease by 2/1 & I'll give you $100!'
1BR/1BA in 2BR/2BA Hidden Lake w/male
roommate. 1-story villa w/small fenced yard.
fully furn except BR. $449/mo. Avail imme-
diately. Lease ends Aug. Call 352-685-3332
1-31-10-3

CLOSEST TO UF & CHEAPEST
Studio apt, 2 blks N of stadium $335/
mo. Incl water & trash, perfect location!
Avail 2/1. 352-335-0694, 772-332-3526
ufmystic@yahoo.com 1-28-9-3

1BR DOWNTOWN! Wysteria Downs. Full
amenities, quiet, overlooks creek, will pay
sec. dep. $770/mo. Call 514-9262 1-31-15-3


a Subleases


Sublease 1BR/1BA in 2BR/2BA apt.
Furnished. Females only. 4 blks to UF. Utils,
cable & internet included. $450/mo OBO.
941-320-9385, 941-378-1977 1-27-7-3

$650/1BR/Rent reduction on spacious
downtown Apt. Perfect location. Vaulted
ceilings, fireplace, balcony overlooking park,
W/D. 2 min to campus. Pets welcome 514-
9262 2-1-10-3

1BR apt for $350/mo OBO. Was $450/mo but
need to move out of Florida to take job up
north. Call Ty 514-2981 2-3-12-3

WINDMEADOWS sublease $500/mo neg.
1BR/1BA behind Butler Plaza. JAN FREE!
Feb 1-July 30, 2005. Work-out room, laundry.
Call 352-375-6381 2-1-10-3

1BR/1BA. Large BR w/walk-in closet. Free
parking across from UF. Rent incl water,
sewer, garbage, pest control. $450/mo.
Lease until 7/05. Please call 352-598-5481
2-16-20-3

2 people to sublet 2B2BA 1st floor apt in
Hidden Lakes. $860/mo inci cable & internet.
No lease transfer fee! Avail immed July 30.
Sign by Feb 1st get 1BR of furn free! 954-
234-7678 1-28-7-3

**ROOMMATE NEEDED***
1BR/1BA in 3BR/3BA close to campus and
restaurants. $343/mo + 1/3 util. Call Leah at
352-514-4428 anytime! 1-31-7-3

1 or both rooms in 2BR Downtown Apt.
Quiet neighborhood. Close to Shands, UF
& Library. $350/mo. Pets ok. Call 262-1351
1-31-7-3

Large 2BR/1BAAvail now until May. Keep
sec dep. $560/mo. Right next to University.
Call Amanda or Chris 352-246-4708 or 352-
454-0839 1-27-5-3
SPACIOUS 1BR/1BA apt with study. Avail
3/1-7/31. Only $499/mo. Option to renew
lease. Located SW 35th PI. Call 352-256-
0501 1-27-5-3

Sublease Now-July 31, 2005
Sunday Apts 2Br/1 BA
$550/month $200 deposit included
Close to UF/On bus route 16
352-256-7831 or 305-467-5255 2-3-10-3

Sublease needed for 1Br in 3BR/2.5Ba town-
house at Stoneridge. $305/mo + utils. Call
352-271-1124 1-28-5-3

HUGE 1BR in amazing 5BR house. Has
BBQ, pooltable, pool and beautiful view. See
it to-believe it! $360 a month. Call Ryan @
352-219-8677 1-28-5-3

ACROSS FROM NORMAN HALL'
Huge 2/1, wd firs, cent, A/C sublet til end of
Apr. $900 dep can work deal, $695 month
352-264-3523 or 352-378-1387 2-7-11-3

COLLEGE STUDIOS Across from UF!
Spring/Summer $459/mo. Util incl.. Call 561-
329-5695 or kribi529@gmail.com 2-4-10-3


WALK TO CLASS! $250/mo
Now til Aug. Courtyards 352-328-6967 all
included! 2-27-3-3

MAGNOLIA PLACE APTS on NW 39th St.
1BR/2Ba, garage, luxury twonhome. Brand
new. $768/mo ($950 original price) Call
Linda 866-730-6152 or evenings 377-0289
1-31-5-3

Female sublease at Courtyards.
1 bedroom in 4/2 townhouse
furniture & util included; $399/mo
NO sec dep, 1st mo rent free
514-6408 or murraymd@ufl.edu 2-7-10-3

Two bedroom/two full bath
Sublease available immediately
Seven month sublease
Homestead Apartments.
Call 338-1588/283-3885 add'l info 2-1-5-3

AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY 1BR/1BA apt for
sublease. $414/mo w/or w/o furn. Call Brian
@ 352-283-1629 1-31-4-3


U3 Subleases


SUMMER sublease @ Campus Club!
Everything incl: maid svc, all utils, cable,
ethernet & more. NO FEES! $400/mo. May
1-Aug 5. Female only. Please call 352-262-
5995 2-8-10-3

3 blocks from UF 2BR/1 BAw/screened proch
& ample parking. $575/mo, no dep & 1st mo
1/2 off. Call 352-373-3203 2-2-5-3

Sublease til July 31. 1BR in 3BR/2BA apt at
Pebble Creek. On campus, $330/mo, call
Micah at 772-215-0145 2-2-5-3

SUBLEASE Available NOW! 1BR/1BA in
4BR/4BA, Lexington Crossing. Furnished,
all utils incl, cable incl. 5 HBOs, personal.
phone line. $450/mo neg. Call 813-391-0528
2-2-5-3

1 BR/1 BA HUGE single apt. 2 blocks from
UF $525/mo. avail ASAP, Feb free. Sam
870-6698 2-2-5-3


* Roommates I


Roommate Matching HERE
Oxford Manor 377-2777
The Landings 336-3838
The Laurels 335-4455
Cobblestone 377-2801
Hidden Lake 374-3866
4-20-71-4

Female roommate for one/two female UF
students. Quiet. Resposible. 60 second walk
to UF. Old house charm with all amenities.
Avail Now. $400 up. 352-538-2181.Lv mes-
sage. Private Owner 4-20-71-4

Female roommates wanted brand new 2100
sq ft home. Huge pool, pvt fence, minutes to
UF Internet, HBO cable, sec alarm & utils
incl $525/mo.Aval Fall. Call Jacqueline 352-
395-7462 or 941-780-3526 4-20-71-4

2BR avail to NS, F. Quiet 1600 sq ft home.
Gated Plantation Oaks Country Club. W/D,
furn living area, garage avail, wireless inet &
cable. $400/BR + 1/3 utils. No pets. 954-649-
2690 1-31-22-4

GIRLS ONLY 2 rooms each w/prvt baths.
cent AC, W/D, cable incl. Interenet ready.
$375/mo each. 1 mo FREE. Call 352-472-
9778 2-2-20-4

WALK to UF
2 grad students seek NS roommate in luxury
home. $400/mo Avail 1/5. Call 283-6279
2-2-20-4

Sublets and Rooms Available
All Florida Areas; All Major Cities
Browse available Rooms FREE!
www.METROROOMMATES.com
1-(877)-For-Rent (367-7368) 4-20-71-4

ROOMMATE WANTED IN BIG HOUSE
CLOSE TO CAMPUS. $350-$450/mo. Call
Jerry 352-745-1877 1-31-17-4

Walk to UF 1939 NW 5th Ave. Private BA,
W/D, CHA, Dig, cable, wireless internet, flex-
ible lease, 352-682-9342 1-27-20-4

Roommate Clean. 3/2 house Near UF/SFCC.
Pool, big yard, W/D, cable ethernet, garage,
NS. $380/mo share utils. Call Jake 352-376-
8099 or 239-564-0069 2-7-20-4

M/F NS Grad student/professional wanted to
rent furn room in gorgeous new house 1.5 mi
to Shands. Kitchen, LR, laundry $425+ utils
336-5450 or 954-646-1341 2-1-10-4

Avail NOW Great location 1BR/1BA in 3BR/
3BA, washer and dryer, high speed internet,
$308/mo + util. Females only, please call
Lauren @ 352-799-3726 Lv message. 2-
11-22-4

1BR in charming 2BR apt. Wood floors, walk
to UF, female. $350/mo incl utils. ASAP 305-
781-0244 1-27-10-4

M or F roommate wanted to share 2BR/2BA
Colonial Village apt. Must like pets, very nice,
serious student $450/mo Mike 213-3340 1-
27-10-4

Looking for quiet clean person. 3Br/3BA
furnished townhouse. Wood floors, washer/
dryer. $400/mo utils incl. $200 deposit. Call
352-745-1552 1-31-11-4







THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005M ALLIGATOR, 31


il Roommates


M/F responsible student to share 3BR/2BA
home in quiet NW area. $300/mo + 1/3
utils. Call 352-303-6128 or 727-458-2737
2-7-15-4

Roommate needed to share beautiful 3/2
house in NW Gainesville. Fully furn, pets
welcome, huge fenced yard, W/D, DW.
Available immediately. Vicky at 386-734-
3080 1-31-10-4

1BR in 2BR/1 BA apt. Pine Rush on SW 20th
Ave. $250/mo + 1/2 utils. Common area furn
w/TV, DVD player & cable. Room avail ASAP.
Call 352-871-6456 2-1-10-4

STUDENT ROOMMATE NEEDED in 3BR/
2BA condo. Pvt patio w/room. $350/mo. Call
Tina @ 352-331-1151 2-2-10-4

2 ROOMMATES NEEDED in spacious 4/2
HOUSE by law school. Master BR $450 or
other BR $350 + utils. AD, W/D. Call 850-
510-4063 or 352-328-4633 2-2-10-4

***FREE Jan rent***
ROOM in HOUSE on 2nd Ave by LAW
SCHOOL! Waher/dryer, wireless internet
fireplace, etc. Call 352-598-8118 1-31-7-4

Share 2BR Downtown apt. Newly remod-
eled. Close to Shands, UF & Library. $350/
mo. Month to month or longer lease okay.
Pets okay. Call 262-1351 1-31-7-4

Female roommate needed. 2BR/2BA condo
in Sparrow., Tower Rd. Private bath & bal-
cony. Flat rate, month to month $375 incl util.
352-359-2382 1-31-7-4

F roommate needed for 3BR/2BA town-
house available now. Close to UF and bus.
Newly painted & renovated. $300/mo +
1/3 utils. Great deal! Call 561-762-6117


J ll Roommates


Female roommate needed for 2 female
students in 3/2 apt near law school.
$315/mo (neg), pvt bath 1/3 utils/free in-
ternet, no dep, furn avail. Call 372-3531
gux99@hotmail.com 2-1-5-4

1BR available now in 3BR/1BA house in NW
area. $296/mo + 1/3 utils. W/D, cent A/C,
hi-spd internet. 1st & last to move in No
sec dep. Pets ok. Call Jason 352-745-6464
2-1-5-4

ROOM FOR RENT 2BR/1BA DOWNTOWN
Available now! $412.50/mo. Call 321-228-
7468 2-2-5-4

1 Male roommate wanted to share 4BR
house w/3guys. Only .7 mi from-campus @
2 NW 29th St. Pets ok. $275/mo + utils. No
lease or dep. 745-6017 2-9-10-4

WANTED: SLEEPING ROOM 2 nights per
week only, for "retired" male student com-
muter. (352) 750-2683 eves/wknds 1-28-2-4


S Real Estate


Sell your house, condo, acreage, mobile
home and much more in the ALLIGATOR
CLASSIFIEDS! Reach over 24,000 possible
buyers! Mastercard and Visa accepted over
the phone. Please Call 373-Find

Quad-, Tri-, or Duplex w/pvt parking, extra
land, 60 sec walk to UF. Exc cond. House
3/4BR, 2BA, wd firs, covered prch, concrete
patio, garage/work-shop. Pvt Owner. 352-
538-2181 Iv mssg 4-20-71-5

NEW COMPANY IN GAINESVILLE
looking to buy or lease houses in this area.
Any size, price or condition. Call Ed & Diane
352-373-2728 4-20-71-5


~I


8 1 Real Estate


The Flavor of New Orleans comes to cam-
pus. Luxurious St. Charles Condominiums.
1 block to UF. Choose from 2BR/2BA flats,
or view the University from your 3BR/3BA
townhouse. Prices starting in the $180's 375-
8256 4-20-71-5
ATTENTION INVESTORS/STUDENTS
Almost new 2BR/2.5BA townhome for sale.
$134,900. www.gatorhometours.com/40903
or call 352-219-9551 1-31-61-5

0**$$$ FAST CASH 4 HOUSE $$$*00
.0* Holiday-broke blues? Sell me 0**
O*OOquickly any house or refer 00O0
000* motivated sellers for fee! 0***
00** Call Buyers pm 219-0859. 00**
1-31-19-5
Townhome 2BR 1.5 BA fenced. Side-by-side
refrigerator/smooth-top range/washer/dryer/
newer bus and UF/Shands. $94,900. Call
Randy. 352-543-9598 or 543-6758 1-31-
19-5
ARE YOU INTERESTED IN PURCHASING
A-HOUSE OR CONDO NEAR UF?
Plenty of properties are available.
Call Marc J. Nakleh at Campus Realty
352-235-1576 2-25-25-5
WANT ALL OF YOUR FRIENDS TO BE
JEALOUS OF YOU NEXT YEAR? Own +
live in a new luxury campus-area condo.
Over 10 new projects to choose from.
Visit www.mattpricerealtor.com or call
today 352-281-3551 Matt Price, Campus
Realty Group 1-28-5-5


0 1 Furnishings

BED-Queen, orthopedic, firm, extra thick,
pillow-top, mattress & box. Name brand,
new, still in plastic. Sacrifice $150. Call 352-
372-7490 will deliver. 4-20-71-6


S Furnishings


BED FULL SIZE ORTHOPEDIC Pillow-top
mattress & box. New, unused, still in plastic
w/warranty. Can deliver. Sacrifice $140. Call
352-377-9846 4-20-71-6
SOFA & LOVESEAT
Brand new still packaged w/warranty. Must
sell. Can deliver. Retail $1400. Sacrifice
$399 352-372-7490 4-20-71-6
BED King Pillowtop mattress & box springs.
Orthopedic rated. Name brand, new, never
been used, in plastic with warranty. Sell
$230. Call 352-372-8588 Can deliver. 4-
20-71-6
CHERRY SLEIGH BED solid with Pillowtop
Mattress & Box. All new still boxed. Cost
$1500, sacrifice $550 352-271-5119 4-20-
71-6
BEDROOM SET. 7pc Cherry, Queen/ king
bed, dresser w/mirror, 2 nightstands, chests
avail. Dovetail const. New, in boxes. Can del
liver. Retail $6500, must sell, sacrifice $1400
(352) 372-7490 4-20-71-6
SOFA, LOVESEAT, & CHAIR 100% Italian
leather. Still new in boxes w/warranty. Cost
$5000. Sacrifice $1,500. Call 352-372-8588
4-20-71-6
DINING ROOM Beautiful cherry set w/table,
6 Chippendale chairs, hutch & buffet. New,
still in boxes. Retail $5200, sacrifice $1100.
Must sell. Can deliver. 352-372-8588 4-20-
71-6
FUTON Solid oak mission-style frame w/
mattress. Brand new, all unused in box. Sell
$199 can deliver. 352-377-9846 4-20-71-6

Beds*Full mattress & boxspring sets
$490Qn sets $89OSingle sets $39OKing
sets $990From estate sale: Safe pine
bunk bed $109. 376-0939/378-0497. Call a
Mattress 4370 SW 20th Ave 4-20-71-6


or


all














by


Opportunities are available in the follo.viinqg are.


Computer Science

Computer Engineering

Electrical Engineering

Mechanical Engineering

Math

Physics

Systems Engineering

Aeronautical Engineering

Optics



Checl. oi i our i.'.eb:Le at rayjobs.com/campus lfor lI.ilh:r

intf.irii..ani in-l.hii'iig o i Campus Recruiting Events.

'lart your lob ..e.rch b1./:,i:l inrg Find a Job.





The power of applied intelligence.

One ot the rrn:,'.:t ,id'm red :letterr,-e aI d .ae-i'l:j p :ry:e3rr
'suppliers through v'orld-.:1.':. people ar,,J t-e.:hr.l:.l-i,
C, ur fi:_-u: i:. de,;I,,l- ,,r ,,.q ,_:Lr t tai.-int


Ray heon

Customer Success Is Our Mission


2005 Raytheon Company. All rights reserved. Raytheon is an equal opportunity and affirmative
action employer and welcomes a wide diversity of applicants. U.S. Citizenship and security
clearance may be required


0 1 Furnishings


Bedding close-outsOAII wrapped in
plasticOtwin sets $790full sets $119nQn
sets $139OKing sets $189Ostudent dis-
counts applyO4370 SW 20th Ave. 376-0953.
We deliver. 4-20-71-6

REMODELING SALE!
Double beds, kigng beds, computer desk,
chairs & lamps! Call 332-2346 1-27-5-6

DINING SET FOR SALE
For more info & pics see:
http://plaza.ufl.edulsanchezc/diningset.html
2-2-6-6 ,;


POOLTABLE
Best offer Call 745-6017
2-2-5-6

Full size bed $60; like new sofa $85; col
TV 19" $35; large dorm fridge $40; ent.
center, large real wood $140; portable
sewing machine $45; small desk $35. C
335-5326 1-28-2-6

88 Whirlpool Elec. dryer,
90 Maytag Gas dryer,
70's Maytag Washer
All work great, $50 each.
Evenings 352-331-7239 2-4-7-6

97 Maytag Refridge,
Almond glass shelves, ice maker,
Approx. 26 cu. ft. Excel cond.
$300
Evenings 352-331-7239 2-4-7-6

Friends don't let friends be driven home
drunk drivers


Classifieds...
Continued on next page.








12, ALLIGATOR N THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005
1~ ~ I 4 I I


*A Furnishings


For Sale


).1


Autos


I M Help Wanted


1 mil Help Wanted


)8 Kenmore Coldspot Refridge
Nhite, glass shelves, side by side,
n door ice, water. Approx. 25 cu. ft.
xcel cond. $300
Evenings: 352-331-7239 2-4-7-6


UW Computers



S. W& A4k& keHous, Ca !
3-23-170-7

computer HELP fast! A+ Computer Geek
-louse/dorm 59 min response. No waiting/
inplugging/hassels. $10 Gator Discount.
vlIF Cert MCSE technicians. 333-8404.
Nww.AComputerGeek.com 8-23-170-7

kG'ville Computer Repair Inc*
Service on all PC MAC and Networks 1204
'W 13th St Ste #10 352-337-2500. 4-20-
71-7

COMPUTER SOLUTIONS, INC.
Complete residential & commercial support,
networking & website development. $45/hr
Nww.gainesvillecsi.com 371-2230 4-20-71-7

LAPTOP REPAIR
3uy & sell. Looking for quantity for parts.
Nww.pcrecycle.biz 336-0075 4-20-71-7.

COMPUTER & LAPTOP REPAIRS"
network specialists
,Ve buy computers and laptops
Working and Non-working
378-4009, 607 NW 13th Street
1-20-71-7




Computer/Internet 352.219.2980
1-20-66-7

3ATORNERD.COM
Scomputer/laptop repair
Networks, wireless, virus
we BEAT all prices!
hote/dorm 352-219-2980 4-20-66-7

HP 5555 PDA
I-owner, excellent condition. Bluetooth en-
abled: Call 352-494-1817 1-28-5-7


El Electronics

DISCOUNT HI-FI
722 S. Main I The Red Bldg
WE ARE CHEAPER
1-20-71-8


Bicycles


n the market for a new set of wheels or just
cooking to add a second to that collection?
Nant personalized handlebars or a fitted
seat? Check in the Alligator Classifieds.

\EW & USED BIKES FOR SALE
vlany to choose from
Best Prices in Townl
SPIN CYCLE 373-3355
124 W University Ave 4-20-69-9


0 1 For Sale

PARKING:
Drhi te, Secure, Guaranteed. 60 sec to UF.
Reserve now! Reasonable rates. 352-538-
?181. Can leave mssg. 4-20-71-10

:ARTY SUPPLIES; Complete line of bar
supplies, glassware, beer taps, draft beer
equipment. Professional cooking utensils.
R.W.Beaty Co. 4322 NW 13th St, Gville
RWBEATY.COM 376-5939.4-20-71-10

GET CHEAP TEXTBOOKS
Search 24 bookstores in 1 click S&H
and taxes automatically calculated. Try it
today http://www.bookhq.com 2-15-35-10


STRESS? OVERLOAD? NEED TO RELAX?
OR LOOKING FOR LOVE? Try Aphrodisia
Beverage. 0 calories, 0 sugar w/relaxing
aphrodiciac herbs. Students using it nation-
wide. Buy/sell it. www.aphrodisiabeverage.c
om or dary333@yahoo.com 2-25-20-10
OHONEYWELL HEPA air purifier- exc cond.
medium to large room. $400 negotiable.
ODELL PRINTER N-0N5819 used for test-
ing only. Like new $65 negotiable
Call 376-4061
DISCOUNT Inkjet, Toner, Fax, Copier
Cartridges. Guaranteed Lowest Prices!
Email ink4less_ocala@yahoo.com include
printer make, model, or cartridge numbers.
2-2-5-10


12l Motorcycles, Mopeds)

** SCOOTERS **
RPM MOTORCYCLES INC
SALES, SERVICE, PARTS
Many Brands Available 518 SE 2nd St.
www.RPMmotorcycles.com 377-6974
4-20-71-11
Swamp Cycles -
Electric Bikes, Scooters, and more!
Pricesfrom $450 with lyr warranty
534 SW 4th Ave. 373-8823
www.swampcycles.com 4-20-70-11
Avoid parking problems. 1996 black Yamaha
Virago 250cc, 5400 mi, good condition,
$1600 OBO. Tony 352-219-4401 2-1-6-11



*f|| Autos

FAST CASH PAID FOR ANY CAROL
ORunning or not!O
*NEED HONDA, TOYOTA, PICKUPS
*Over 10 yr svc to UF students
OCall Don @ 215-7987 4-20-71-12
CARS -CARS Buy@SellTrade
Clean BMW, Volvo, Mercedes
Toyota, Honda, Nissan cars
3432 N Main St. www.carrsmith.com
CARRSMITH AUTO SALES 373-1150
4-20-71-12
**FAST CASH PAID**
For: CARS, TRUCKS, MOTORCYCLES
Running or Not 1990 & up only
.Call Ray 352-284-8619
4-20-71-12
OVER 50 IMPORTS UNDER $10,000
SELECT MOTOR CAR
STHE YELLOW BUILDING
2715 N MAIN 377-1616
www.selectmotorcar.us
4-20-71-12

Best Cars Lowest Prices
www.39thaveimports.com
4-20-71-1212
94 Del Sol Civic 5sp $3995
96 Accord LX 4dr $4495
97 Civic 2dr AT $4995
99 Civic 4dr AT $5995
GATORIDES 318-0813
4-20-71-12

*HEADLINERS SAGGING?*
**Power windows don't work?**
On site available
Call Steve 338-5142.
4-20-71-12

$500! Police Impounds!
Hondas, Chevys, Toyotas, etc.
For listings 800-749-8116 ext 4622 1-31-
19-12

SUN CITY AUTO SALES
Bring your W2 & drive home today. Cash
cars as low as $1000. No credit check. Call
now 338-1999 4-20-63-12

SUN CITY AUTO SALES
We finance anyone! $2000 discount off fi-
nance price. More than 150 vehicles in stock.
Call 338-1999 Drive today! 4-20-63-12

SUN CITY AUTO SALES
All vehicles $0 down & up! Plus +++ 30 day
warranty eng & trans. No credit check. Call
338-1999 4-20-63-12


SUZUKI GRAN VITARA '01
67k miles, 6 cyl, silver, runs great $6950. Call
352-335-6337 1-28-10-12

Acura Integra LS, 1995, 2dr, blk, good cond,
120k, 5 spd-man, no AC, w/pwr everything,
moon roof, CD. Asking $3580 Call 332-7158
or email moretexture@cox.net 1-27-6-12
1996 Honda Accord EX sedan V-6 automat-
ic, leather, A/C, power everything, 86k, very
clean, white, $6600 or best offer, #352-335-
3852 frankiev@bellsouth.net 2-4-9-12
GATORMAX USED CARS
Buy, Sell, Trade.
We Finance. 495-9500
gatormax.net
2-18-20-12

CAN'T AFFORD
TO FIX YOUR CAR?
Call me, I can help. Chris 271-4339 2-1-5-12
1987 4-Runner Deluxe 4WD standard.
Needs "tiny" bit of work. Great car you can't
find anymore! $1000 OBO 219-1644 Iv. msg.
2-1-5-12

1992 HONDA ACCORD
White, 4 door, automatic, 135k miles, good
condition, $2500 neg. Call 352-371-4506
after 5pm. 2-1-5-12

FORD FOCUS ZX3 2001
Auto, air, CD, cruise, keyless entry, sports
pkg, new tires & brakes, 55kmi, dark blue.
$7800 352-275-1029 2-1-5-12
Ford Thunderbird 1996 V8
107K mi blue/gree
well kept, drives well
all power. REDUCED $3600 215-2039
2-2-5-12

1987 HONDA ACCORD Lxi, 150k miles, 5-
speed manual shift, runs great, excellent gas
mileage. $900 OBO. Call 352-392-4653 or
692-5653 (Jurgen) 1-28-2-12


5 Wanted

LOCAL ARTIST NEEDS: GOLD,
DIAMONDS, GEMS, CLASS RINGS, ETC
TOP CASH $ OR TRADE. OZZIE'S FINE
JEWELRY. 373-9243 4-20-71-13
On-going VOLUNTEER needed: Blind lady
needs trans on Sundays only to Mass @
Queen of Peace Catholic Church or St.
Augustine Catholic. Church. For more info
call 219-6948. J live in the Tower Rd area.
2-8-60-13
WANTED: LOCAL ARTISTS TO DONATE
ARTWORK FOR CHARITY AUCTION.
Theme should celebrate women. Email Erin:
ufmcdonough@msn.com 1-28-10-13


Help Wanted

This newspaper assumes no responsibil-
ity for injury or loss arising from contacts
made through advertising. We suggest that
any reader who responds to advertising use
caution and -investigate the sincerity of the
advertiser before giving out personal infor-
mation or arranging meetings
LIKE TO WORK WITH LUXURY CARS?
Bright? Enthusiastic? Like people? Must be
over 22, stable work history, clean driving re-
cord, drug-free, pers ref. www.carrsmith.com
for details. 4-20-71-14

Animal Care Tech looking for hard working
person to work w/ reptiles & rodents. Will
train, PT to start with more hrs possible. Start
at $5.50/hr. Flex hrs. Please call 495-9024
between 9-4 M-F. 4-20-71-4

Certified Nursing Assistant class. Home
schooling, learn @ your own pace, time, &
convenience, fast or slow. $200. 19 yr. exp
RN Lic #2523562 Call free 4 more info 1-
800-566-4913 4-20-71-14

Phone survey interviewers wanted. Start
work today! No sales, opinion research
only! Flexible Schedule! Perceptive Market
Research 336-6760 ex 4081 Call now!
4-20-71-14


J


AUDITORS for local growing inventory
service. FT/PT, DFWP. Paid training. Call
352-367-4608. www.aicscompanies.com
4-20-83-14


"


0

* (


*0


0



mc



* U-

* .L.


-fO.
-.0


p
p


Students in Accounting, Aviation, Business/
Sales and IT needed for various positions.
Flexible schedules and competitive pay. Join
our team! Learn more at www.gleim.com/
employment 4-20-68-14

University of Florida
Survey Research Center
392-2908 ext. 105
$7/hr + BONUS + Paid Training
Nights + Weekends
Telephone Interviewing NO SALES
Must work spring break.
408 W. University Ave Suite #106
4-20-71-14

$$ STUDENTS GET CASH $$
For gently used brand name
Clothing/accessories & furniture
$Cash on the Spot$ SANDY'S No appt
necessary! 2906 NW 13th St 372-1226 4-
20-71-14

HIRING KITCHEN STAFF & DRIVERS
FT or PT, flexible schedules. Call 2-5pm 378-
2442 or come in and fill out an application
@ California Chicken Grill 2124 SW 34th St
Mon-Fri 4-20-71-14

BARTENDING
$250 A DAY POTENTIAL
No experience necessary, training provided.
800-965-6520 ext 138 4-20-71-14
SECRET SHOPPERS
Needed for evaluations of
Local Stores, Restaurants and Theaters
Flexible Hours, E-mail required
Call 1-800-585-9024 ext 6254
4-20-71-14


& w
bac
res
19-


PART TIME WORK
Great pay, ideal for students & second in-
comes, flex scheds, sales/svc, all ages 18+,
conditions apply 375-1422 1-28-16-14
Spend your summer in a lakefront cabin in
Maine. If you're looking to spend this sum-
mer outdoors, have fun while you work and
make life long friends, then look no further.
Camp Mataponi, a residential girls camp in
Maine has male/female summertime open-
ings for Land Sports, Waterfront .(small
crafts, skiing, life guarding, WSI, boat driv-
ers), Ropes Course, Tennis, HB Riding, Arts
& Crafts, Theater, Cooking, Gymnastics,
Dance, Photography, Group Leaders &
more. Top salaries plus room/board & travel
provided. ON CAMPUS INTERVIEWS WILL
BE CONDUCTED 1/27. Call us today toll
free at 1-888-684-2267 or apply online at
www.campmataponi.com 1-27-17-14

EARN $9/HR
Nationwide mortgage lender has immediate
sales positions avail for college students
seeking professional work exp. No exp re-
quired, flexible hours. Apply in person btwn
5-9pm Mon-Fri at 1900 SW 34th St Suite 206
(2nd floor above credit union)



American


FINANCIAL
2-11-2-14


)wing company needs PT help.
okkeeper Quickbooks exp only. Delivery
warehouse website administrator, clean
groundd check only need apply. Fax
ume with salary req to 377-5595 2-10-
14


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THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005 U ALLIGATOR, 33


Help Wanted


GREAT PAY FOR PEOPLE WHO STAY! Park
Place Car Wash is looking for hard workers
for all positions. Cashiers (must have full day
avail) & lineworkers. (AM 8:30-1 & PM 12-6
shifts avail) 15-40 hrs your choice. Great
work environment. Apply in person 7404
NW 4th Blvd. Across from Home Depot. No
phone calls please. 1-31-19-14

Swim Instructor/Office Staff
Seal Swim School now hiring energetic, fun,
responsible individuals. PT/FT positions
available. Competitive pay. WSI certifica-
tion Feb. Lutz 813-948-7134; Tampa 813-
932-5455; North Pinellas 727-943-8782.
www.sealswimschool.com 2-10-20-14


DOMINO'S PIZZA
World's largest pizza delivery company now
hiring
* Delivery Drivers
* Pizza makers
* Phone order takers

$9- $14/hr
All you need is a reliable car & a very positive
attitude. Apply @ any of the 5 Domino's loca-
tions in Gainesville. 4-20-70-14

Summer/Fall 2005 graduate opportunities
for Graduate Hall Directors, Staff Resource
Assistants and Judicial Assistant in the
Department of Housing and Residence
Education. Graduate Hall Directors reside in
his/her area of responsibility, and supervise,
develop, and direct the staff under his/her
responsibility. The number of staff varies by
area, as well as the number of residents liv-
ing in the hall. The Staff Resource Assistants
develop and facilitates programming and
resources for residence life staff. The
Judicial Assistant works with various aspects
of the judicial program. Applicants must be
admitted to graduate school., enrolled for
9-12 hours, and have some organized group
living experience. The beginning salary is
$3,420 each semester based on 9.5 months'
of work. An on-campus apartment, fully fur-
nished with all utilities, local telephone, and
basic cable service is provided. Application
deadline (for priority consideration): Friday,
February 18, 2005. Contact Kathy Smith
at the Housing Office, 392-2171 ext 10139


Wil Help Wanted


Attention Smokers!
Earn about $6/hr. Smokers are needed to
participate in a study on decision making &
smoking. If interested come to the psychol-
ogy bldg room 397 or call 392-0601 ext 297
4-20-63-14

NEW YEAR, NEW WORK
EXCELLENT PAY
Flex schedules, sales/svc, great for students,
all ages 18+, conditions apply. 335-1422 1-
28-16-14

WANTED
Energetic, serious, hard-working individuals
to assist customers with high quality sporting
goods merchandise. We're looking for the
best. Full and part time opportunities. No
phone calls. Min 1 yr commitment. Lloyd
Clarke Sports 1504 NW 13th St. 1-28-15-14

COLLEGE STUDENTS
HS, SENIORS/GRADS
Good pay, flexible schedules, customer
sales/svc, all ages 18+, conditions apply.
Call 335-1577 1-28-16-14

FREELANCE ONLINE TUTORS
Instruct 3rd thru 12th grade students from
any location; internet connection required;
send resume jobs@brainfuse.com 2-2-15-
14

DANCERS WANTED Are you pretty?
Dancers needed for private company. Great
pay, flexible hours. Open 24 hrs. 352-376-
2800 1-28-12-14

EDUCATION RETAIL STORE
Needs part time help. Flexible weekday
hours plus 2-3 Saturdays a month. Please
bring in a resume to 2020 NW 6th St. 1-
29-12-14

GREEN SPARROW Chinese Restaurant
(Haile Plantation Village Center) now
hiring FT/PT cooks, (Chinese special-
ity), kitchen helpers, cashiers, servers,
delivery drivers. Call 871-5771 for appt.
1-27-11-14

Bright, enthusiastic, industrious workers
wanted for toy/gift store. FT/PT. Must be
able to work weekends, breaks and holidays.
Stop by for an application @ 1510 NW 13th
St. 2-2-15-14


DRIVERS NEEDED
gatorfood.com. Can earn anywhere between
$8-$20/hr. Set your own schedule.
Call Dave for info: 379-9600 1-28-10-14

OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR needed.
Gatorfood.com is looking for responsible,
enthusiastic people. City geography knowl-
edge, customer svc. exp helpful. For more
.info call David 379-3663 1-28-10-14


Full time or part time sales agent needed.
Flexible schedule, great job for student and
recent grads! Earn an average $300 per day.
First Horizon Merchant Services a Fortune
500 Company is looking or 3 sales agents in
Gainesville area. Call 866-882-9600 or email
gtrenfioe@fhms.com 1-28-10-14

CUSTOMER SERVICE rep wanted
MS OFfice Experience required.
Contact: Jackson Industries,
4001 Newberry Rd., E4, GVL or
info@jacksonllc.com 1-28-10-14

5 STAR Pizza is now hiring pizza makers,
phone personnel & delivery drivers. Great
pay, flexible hours. Closing drivers average
over $100 per shift. Apply in person at 600
NW 75th St. 352-333-7979 1-28-10-14

SALES CLERK
$6/hr part-time. Call Sandy's Consignment
Boutique. 372-1226 1-31-10-14

02B Kids searching for energetic and en-
thusiastic pre-school teachers for all 02B
locations. Experience preferred, will train.
FT/PT positions. Avail. Apply at any location.
2-8-15-14

Office Manager Trainee for small medi-
cal office. Bachelor or Master's Degree in
business/accounting or health care manage-
ment to learn all aspects of medical office
management including accounts payable/
receivable, insurance and personnel.
Experience desirable. Full time w/.excellent
salary and benefits. Will consider part time
until 5/05. Fax resume to 352-332-2966,
Attn: Julia. 2-2-10-14

CASH
Tired of sitting around w/out it? Sit here &
make it! UF FLORIDA REPDIALS seeks UF
students to raise funds. Earn up to $8.00/hr
with a FLEXIBLE schedule. Apply at 105
NW 16th St. 4th Floor. Academic Classroom
Building 105, or call 392-7754 for more info.
4-20-63-14

MARY POPPINS: Where are you?
FT NANNY NEEDED 30-45 hrs/wk
4 jobs avail TODAY: Great $$$ for exp.
Noah's Ark Nanny: 352-376-5008 2-25-37-
14

PT/FT NANNIES NEEDED
Good $ for exp: grad stud. welcomed bkgd
ck: 12 REAL $$ jobs avail NOW
Noah's Ark Nanny 352-376-5008 2-25-27-14

NANNIES MORNING SHIFT
Several positions availabel for
Part Time, good $$$$$ MNOW
Noah's Ark Nanny 352-376-5008 2-25-27-14

PT warehouse & event supervisors. Nights
& weekends. Great for students. Apply
in person football stadium, concession
office next to Sportship, South Endzone.


WANTED: Energetic student likes to help
others. High school or college track & field
exp. to help coach little league track & field.
Excellent opportunity for community service
hours + you get to help children. Please con-
tact me 332-5626 1-27-5-14

WANTED: INTERNET PROGRAMMER
- Any or all of the following ASP/database/
web/Winsock API for short-term project in
G'ville. Call Jun Consulting Group. 336-9607
2-3-10-14

$1380 weekly stuffing envelopes FT/PT No
experience necessary. For more info call
386-462-9301 2-3-10-14

Looking to make easy $$? Sell book that
sells itself. Flexible schedule. Unlimited $$
potential. Contact: fpollack2@comcast.net
1-27-5-14

CRUISE LINE
Entry level on-board positions available.
Great benefits. Seasonal or year-round. 941-
329-6434 2-17-20-14

Art, Art Ed, Graphics, Arch
Hand-lettering, PT a few hrs/wk. Close to
UF. Short resume. Reply P 0 Box 286,
Gainesville, 32602 1-28-6-14

Finance company needing office assistant
& collections associate. Young, progressive
company w/advancement & bonuses. 25
hrs/wk. Start immediately. Fax resume to
352-378-4156 2-17-20-14

BODY PIERCER NEEDED @ WAVES
TATTOO & BODY PIERCING. Must have
your own equipment 374-2966 or 375-2252.
Ask for Mike. 1-28-5-14

All Levels Tutor Wanted
Use your time wisely
Good Pay, Flexible Hours
Sell your knowledge!
www.GainesvilleTutor.com 1-28-5-14

Officials&

Scorekeepers
for UF Intramural Sports.
No experience necessary
$6.75 $7.25/hr for officials
$5.50/hr for scorekeepers
Evenings and weekends only
For more info, stop by room 120
Southwest Rec or 846-1.081 x278
UF Students only.
1-28-5-14

Leasing Consultant

PT Position with local
Apt. Community Energetic
Attitude & Cust. Service Exp.
Apply Paradigm Properties
220 N Main St. 375-2152 1-28-5-14


B Help Wanted


Earn between $2500 & $3000 before end
of semester. On-campus promotions. Work
your.own hrs assisting fellow students. No
sales. Call Al or Bobbi for phone interview
between 2 & 9pm 800-449-8680 x11D Or
122 1-28-5-14


Join us at Camp Laurel South a" emier
coed summer camp in the beautiful state of
Maine. Our Winter Office is in Gainesville.
We're looking for spirited GATORS to be
Counselors/Instructors in land/water sports,
adventure, theater, riding, the arts and much
more. Top instruction/facilities in a family at-
mosphere. Excellent salaries/amenities. We
support internships! Call 331-4600 or visit
www.camplaurelsouth.com 1-28-5-14

SUMMER JOBS
* $2100
* Co-Ed Camp
* Seven Weeks
* Room and Board Included

GET PAID TO PLAY!
The Florida Elks Youth Camp (FEYC) needs
male and female Summer Camp Counselors
ages 18 and up. FEYC is an overnight camp
located off of Highway 450 in Umatilla, FL
The camp runs June 6 July 23. Please
contact Krys Ragland at 1-800-523-1673 ext.
250 or 352-669-9443 ext 250. 4-20-58-14

SECRETARY needed. Gatorfood.com is
looking for responsible, enthusiastic people.
City geography knowledge, customer service
exp helpful. For more info call David 379-
36631-28-4-14

TECH SUPPORT HELP DESK local soft-
ward company with national product seeks
technical staff with excellent communica-
tion skills to assist customers. Knowledge
of Windows 9x/2000/NT/XP, TCP/IP and
Networking required. Team atmosphere.
Smoke-free environment. Email resume to
jobs@elitesoftwarde.com 2-4-9-14
-i*-
GET PAID for YOUR OPINIONS!
Earn $15-$125 and more per survey!
www.moneyforsurveys.com 2-7-10-14

Looking for part time/full time hire to fill
an accounting/sales mgmt position. Good
starting pay, flexible hours, modem work
environment. Must be motivated, have good
communication skills, knowledge of comput-
ers be familiar with-business accounting.
Call Abram Huber 386-867-1463 or email
resume to abh@endureed.com 2-1-5-14


Classifieds...
Continued on next page.


Student Go wn'ea
b4 ~ ki


Join us in exploring the Music Industry, and the ins-and-outs of getting into the business.


Showcase of bands at the Purple Porpoise beginning at 7pm


- 0 0c


[l Help Wanted ) [ Help Wanted


MOST WANTED




















Thomas Anand

Washburn


White Male
(DOB 12/17184); 6'00",
170 Ibs, Brown Hair,
Brown Eyes


Wanted for:
Aggravated Battery with a
Deadly Weapon.


ALACtHUA COUNTY


CRIME

STOPPERS

Call (352) 372-STOP
sum- -- aaxo"Rafi


$30 fo o0117Suet
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t, ALLIGATOR ElTHURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005


aIl Help Wanted

\NNY after-school Tues/Thurs. Psych/OT,
experience w/autism desired. Must be
id & fun. englishfamily@bellsouth.net
28-3-14

ilAZING SUMMER at PA coed children's
ernight camp. Men & Women wanted
- all activities and counselor positions.
Jrsing positions available too. Good salary.
:ernships available. We provide campers
th safe quality experience that will stay with
em forever. Let us do the same for you.
sit website, www.campnockamixon.com to
:hedule on-campus interview for February
'. .7-2-14

(CITING INTERNSHIPS NOW!
)ost your resume and job skills!
iven students wanting to achieve
id succeed. All majors and years.
idyless@cox.net email now. 2-4-8-14

anny/Personal Assistant
children 1-7 years at our home
-30 hours per week, ref req'd
,reers@bytheplanet.com or 352-367-8600
1-5-14

ood Service Worker
itor Dining Services is looking for food
rvice workers with experience in food
ep and hot line serving. Day or night shift.
competitive pay, flex hours. Apply at Gator
ning Services business office. 2-1-5-14

-ISURE COURSE INSTRUCTORS. Got
i idea for a noncredit, interesting and fun
,urse? Want to teach one? We are looking
r teachers and ideas. www.union.ufl.edu/
sure for course offerings and instructor
Implication. 352-392-2378, Bree or Faith,
mm 1-5pm. 1-28-2-14

LEISURE COURSE INSTRUCTORS. We
e looking for instructors for the following
nurses: GRE Verbal, Guitar and Tai Chi.
ease visit www.union.ufl.edu/leisure for
;tructor application or call Bree or Faith at
,2-392-2378 from 1-5 for more information.
28-2-14

JMMER JOBS starting at $200 per week
th room and board included. Work at one
the University of Florida's four recreational
r- nc3atcd in Lake Placid, Ocala National
,- .l,:on or Niceville. Staff have no
'bin responsibilities and most weekends
. University of Florida 4-H Summer Staff
e involved in teaching canoeing, team
>orts, arts/crafts, swimming and outdoor
location. We're looking for ENERGETIC,
REATIVE and MATURE persons to help
ad youth at these facilities EOE/AA. Visit
ir website at: http://4-H.ifas.ufl.edu. Then
ck on 4-H Centers to apply online. For
are information call 352-846-0996 and ask
r the Camping Office. 1-27-1-14

\RT TIME INVENTORY CLERK. Every af-
moon. Some lifting required. Fax resume
377-9577 2-2-5-14

4NNY to care for 4 year old in my home
days a week. 6:30-9:00 am and 3:00-8:00
n. Ref required, background check. Call
1-0840 Iv msg. 2-2-10-14

weekend work for student. Yard work, chain-
'w, carpentry, electrical, plumbing + some
Savvy lifting. From S6-8/hr depends on skill
id experience. Call 376-6183 1-31-3-14

MARKETING ASSISTANT needed at Ben &
'rry's to sell catering events. Email resume
gwilson@352media.com 1-31-3-14

DURMET SANDWICH & COFFEE SHOP
sed PT Cashier & Sandwich maker
)cated 16 miles east of UF
all between 3PM to 7PM only
sk for Mike 352-475-9577 2-2-5-14

'EB DESIGNER
ourly pay. Experience with eBay & PayPal
HTML. Call 352-284-0690 1-31-3-14


8* Services


AAA STORAGE
Close To UF, Convenient
S4x4x4 $20/mo
4x8x8 $35/mo
533 SW 2nd Ave. 377-1771
20-71-15


*l1 Services 9


IMPORT AUTO REPAIR.BMW, Mercedes,
Porsche, Volvo, VW, Honda, Toyota, Nissan,
Mazda. Quality craftsmanship, reasonable
prices, near UF, AAA approved 378-7830
www.carrsmith.com 4-20-71-15

HYPNOTIST-Stop smoking. Improve mem-
ory & concentration. Eliminate bad habits.
Past life regression. Learn self-hypnosis.
Low Student Rates. Leonard Umans AAPH,
NGH certified 379-1079. 4-20-67-15

** GATOR MOVING & STORAGE **
Local and long distance moving.
Free Estimates
One item or a housefull. FL Reg # IM19
Call Now! (352)374-4791 800-797-6766.
4-20-71-15

PERSONAL TRAINING 300
Personal and Group Training
Flexible Scheduling Exclusive Facility
Call for a free workout
339-2199
4-20-71-15

** BELLY DANCE **
Ethnic Dance Expressions Studio
For Fun & Fitness 384-9200
www.ethnicdanceexpressions.com
4-20-71-15

HORSE BOARDING peaceful spacious
30 acres ring-arena round pens experi-
enced help 12x12 stalls 1-352-472-2627.
Owner on premises 35+ yrs exp. Lessons
avail. 4-20-71-15

MOSSWOOD FARM
Come ride with us! Great Farm
Awesome Horses &Top Notch Instruction.
Hunters & Natural Horsemanship.
466-0465 mwfarm@attglobal.net
4-20-67-15

TRAFFIC SCHOOL ONLINE
Take Points Off Your Driver's License
And Dismiss Traffic Tickets
With Online Driver Improvement Courses
onlinedrivingschool.idrivesafely.com
4-20-71-15

Whipoorwill Farm: Stall and/or pasture board.
10 min W of UF off Archer Rd. CBS Barn
12x12 stalls on 27 shaded acres. Lighted
arena, round pen, trails, tackroom. Owner on
premises. 376-8792 4-20-71-15

SLEEPY HOLLOW HORSE FARM
Quality Boarding 0 Lessons/English *
Parties Alachua County's oldest & finest
horse farm 466-4060 4-20-71-15

***YOGA***
Classes & Workshops .,
at Sanctuary
www.yogagainesville.com
352-336-5656
4-20-71-15

PAPER-WRITING ASSISTANCE
I can help you to complete your paper.
Learn to write. Outline, research, grammar,
coherent thought application, typing... Sliding
scale. 24-hr svc. 374-7038 2-2-21-15

Guitar, Mandolin, Fiddle Lessons.
Popular, Blues, Bluegrass, Weddings,
Receptions, Parties. Call Alan Stowell @
352-372-9248 2-1-19-15

TERM PAPER HELP: Frustrated? Need
Assistance? Help with research and
writing? TOLL FREE 1-888-345-8295
www.customessay.com 4-8-60-15

FINANCE TUTOR
Individuals or small groups.
Experienced, excellent.
375-6641 Harold Nobles
1-31-15-15

STEVE'S QUALITY HOUSE CLEANING
House &Apt. Delivery Service
I Will Clean Your House & Apt.
Room Size S. $25 M. $30 L. $35
Call 1-866-405-7275 Ext 912170 1-31-15-15


MUSIC STUDIES
Guitar, Bass, Piano. All ages all styles
taught. At University Music. 30 yrs exp. $65
per month. Call Andy 256-2168 2-2-11-15


WlI Services

**First Responder*
Learn emergency medical care.
Prerequisite for EMT/Paramedic
Includes healthcare provider CPR
392-1161x4283 www.shcc.ufl.edu 3-24-
42-15

**Lifeguard Training**
Red Cross certification includes
CPR professional rescuer/first aid
Classes start now 392-1161x4283
www.shcc.ufl.edu/cpr 4-4-49-15.

EVERGLADE EQUESTRIAN CENTER
The countryclub for horses & owners
Customer lounge w/full kitchen & bath.
12x12 airy, bright & matted stalls. 250'x160'
riding ring, round pen & jump paddock.
Lessons available 30 manicured acres, 40
stalls, 19 separate paddocks. 24-hr security.
everglade-equestrian.com 352-591-3175
1-28-5-15


***-TAEKWONDO**
30 Day Trial Membership Free
Men Women Children
352-375-0700 www.protkd.com
40-20-59-15

MOST IMPORTANT SKILL
FOR LAW SCHOOL SUCCESS?
Check out:
lawschoolprepcourse.com
4-20-58-15


, UUgi lflI U ..


376-4482


afli th t fi


*B 1 Services


WAVES TATTOO & BODY PIERCING
Wed night 1/2 price on all tattoos w/ student
ID. With exception of minimum. 1-28-5-15

Do you want to speak German?
Need a tutor or just want to learn German?
Real German native speaker available
Ca11384-0708 1-31-5-15

**AUTO MALL SERVICE DEPT**
Complete Auto Service
Imports & Domestics Cars & Trucks
Discount for students. Call 352-380-0033
www.automallgainesville.com
4-20-56-15



0* Health Services 9


All Women's Health Center
ABORTION
Free Pregnancy Test
RU-486 Available
378-9191
www.abortiongainesville.com
4-20-71-16

THE TRUE YOU!
Lose 8-15 pounds in 4 weeks
Only $99!
Gain muscle while you lose fat
Groups forming now. 339-2199.
4-20-71-16


3,000 tranfrsuet




"DEADCILINE: f~/


12I Health Services

URGENT CARE/WALK-IN MEDICAL
Students No Appointment Needed!
FIRST CARE OF GAINESVILLE
4881 NW 8th Ave #2, 373-2340
Most Ins Accepted, Hours M-F 8a-6p 4-20-
71-16

TAKE CONTROL OF YOUR ACNE with
Blue Light Treatments for moderate acne.
Call Dermatology Associates 352-332-4051
4-20-67-16

ABORTION/ABORTION by PILL (RU-486)
IV sedation, Student Discount.
Well Woman Care & Birth Control
Bread & Roses Women's Health Ctr
352-372-1664.
4-20-71-16

NOW AVAILABLE: Well-child & illness
medical care for children of registered UF
students, aged 2 months to 18 years located
at Student Health @ Corry Village. Clinic
hours limited to Friday a.m. 8:30 12:30.
Fee for service. Call 392-1161 Ext 4444 for
an appointment. Visit www.shcc.ufl.edu for
more information. 1-28-10-16


U Typing Services 9

SAME. DAY SERVICE: transcription, typing,
apps. Desktop pub: brochures, newsletters,
flyers, ads, logos. Resume service 17 yrs
exp. 24 hr turnaround. New phone #Connie
271-2677 2-8-15-17


SHOWCASE YOUR APARTMENT PROPERTY IN


1~11~4CIA~----------


-v


IRL







THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 20051 ALLIGATOR,


i i Personals Personals ) Event Notices ) ] Entertainment Lost & Found


VEGETARIAN?
Try BOOK LOVER'S CAFE
Inside Books, Inc..505 NW 13 St.
10-9 384-0090
4-20-71-18


Anonymous HIV Antibody Testing
Alachua County Health Dept. Call
334-7960 for app't (optional $20 fee)

SAVE ON RAYBAN/SUNGLASSES
University Opticians
300 SW 4th Ave. 378-4480.
4-20-71-18

GUNS! GUNS! GUNS!
1800 Gun Inventory
Over 500-handguns in stock
Buy, Sell, Trade or Repair.
Reloading Supplies 466-3340
Harry Beckwith, Gun Dealer
8mi. South of G'ville on 441
4-20-71-18

*Family Chiropractic*
Since 1977. Two blocks from U.F.
373-7070
4-20-71-18

FLASHBACKS PAYS CASH FOR CLOTHES.
We buy 10-5, M-Sat. Open to shop til 6. WE
ALSO BUY HOUSEHOLD ITEM. 211 W Univ
Ave 375-3752. 4-20-71-18

Save $$ with coupons from the Alligator.


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S1. For Rent: Furnished 14. Help Wanted
S2. For Rent: Unfurnished 15. Services
S3. Sublease: House/Apt 16. Health Services
S4. Roommates 17. Resumesfyping Services
U 5. Real Estate 18. Personals
6. Furniture/Household Items 19, Connections


GUN SHOW! #1 Spring Break Vacations! Everybody knows how awful if feels to lose
January 29th & 30th. 9-4 @ Paramont Cancun, Jamaica, Acapulco, Bahamas & something. If you find something, call the
Resort 2900 SW 13th St. Admission $6. Info Florida! Best Parties, Best Hotels, Best Alligator at 373-FIND and we'll place a free
@ 904-461-0273 1-28-9-20 Prices! Limited Space! 1-800-234-7007 "Found" ad for you in this section (Offer
www.endlesssummertours.comARC Exempt does not apply to "Lost" ad.) Be kind t,


$600 Group Fundraiser 2-18-24-21
GIANT CD CLEARANCE SALE Most CDs Scheduling Bonus THE SHERATON AT OUR LUCAYA
MUST GO $5.99, ten for $50! Making room 4 hours of your group's time PLUS our Grand Bahama Island is the place to be & the
for more DVDs. Cash for DVDs HEAR free (yes, free) fundraising solutions Sheraton is the best Spring Break Resort on
AGAIN CDs & DVD 818 W. University AVe. EQUALS $1000-$2000 in earnings for the island! Party with us for 4-nights/5-days,
-1 1-3-1-1 your group. Call TODAY for a $600 bonus from $337. Breakaway Vacations (serving
when you schedule-your non-sales fund- UF students for 24 years!) 377-2401. FL
MODELS NEEDED raiser with CampusFundraiser. Contact Seller of Travel Reg No #12618
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36, ALLIGATOR 0 THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005


Donovan stresses balance is best for Roberson


MEN, from page 40


the game, perhaps now the Gators just
migh be capable of that. And keeping
in mind. the youth of his squad, the win
made Donovan proud.
"You know what? We're not too far
off from where [Georgia is] at," Donovan
said. "The only difference is that we have
three older guys."


PREMIUM BLEND: Following UF's loss to
Tennessee, Donovan had a primary mes-
sage for point guard Anthony Roberson:
balance.
The Gators came into that game rid-
ing Roberson's monster performances to
a 3-0 SEC record.
Roberson proved that his shooting
could only carry UF so far, as he convert-
ed five of a school-record 18 three-point
attempts in the loss.
While Roberson's difficult three-
pointer over two Volunteer defenders


sent the game into overtime, other at-
tempts by him in the extra period may
have allowed Tennessee to escape with
a win. Against Georgia, Roberson went
4 for 7 from three-point territory while
attempting more drives toward the bas-
ket.
And while Roberson finished with 18
points, Donovan said his field-goal per-
centage is what matters most.
"I don't care if Roberson takes 30
shots," Donovan said. "If he's 25 for 30,
that's great."


Upcoming road games greet Gators with challenges


WOMEN, from page 40

games. The Bulldogs are anchored by freshman sensation
Tasha Humphrey. The 6-foot-3 forward is hitting 58 percent
of her shots from the field and recording 18.6 points and 8.8
rebounds per game.
Humphrey is not playing like a freshman, Peck said.
"I don't think she has the mentality of a freshman," Peck
said. "She can do a number of different things, from scoring
on the block to facing up. She has a strong body [which helps]
with rebounding."
Following Sunday's loss, UF dropped into a three-way


tie for fourth place in the East. With another loss, the Gators
would fall to .500 and enter a precarious position as the SEC
season nears the halfway point.
"I think coming off of a loss, of course you have the mind-
set that you need a big win," senior Tamia Williams said. "I
think we know we have a long road ahead of us, so we're just
working on getting better."
Thursday begins a week-long stretch in which UF plays
three ranked teams: Georgia, No. 23 Vanderbilt on the road
Sunday, and No. 5 Tennessee at home.
"We've got Georgia, and the biggest thing I want our team
to be concerned with is that every other team in our confer-
ence has to be worried about us," Peck said. .


GIRV BALLS, from page 40

it.
Does this imply that Meyer just
has to sit in the same room with a re-
cruit and say "come to UF," with said
recruit obliging? Of course not.
Recruiting is a tough business,
where you roll out the red carpet for
each. recruit (with some new restric-
tions), tell every recruit that you,
would love to have them and then
hope you get a percentage of them.
It involves flights across the country
for in-home visits, wining and dining
with parents and looonnnggg hours.
But if you're a recruit even mildly
interested in UF, doesn't the name
Urban Meyer pique your interest?
Isn't UF worth a look?
If this week is any indication,
many who committed to other teams
early on certainly think so.


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THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005 E ALLIGATOR 37


Saints suffer loss


I, .


* NO. 4 SANTA FE LOSES
FIRST GAME OF THE YEAR.

By RYAN MOSS
Alligator Contributing Writer

It was supposed to be the
game that Santa Fe made his-
tory. With a win against Daytona
Beach Community College, the
Saints basketball team would
have earned its place in the re-
cord books by tying the SFCC
record of 21 consecutive wins.
Things weren't meant to be, how-
ever, as the Saints suffered their
first loss of the season, 75-71.
"I never thought we would

Santa Fe
, .- ..

go undefeated," Coach Chris
Mowry said. "Normally, every-.
one gets beat at some point and
getting beat is just something
that happens."
The Saints entered the
game ranked No. 4 in the
National Junior College Athletic
Association poll, but struggled
in front of a record home crowd.
Santa Fe shot just 39 percent from
the field nearly 10 percent
below its season average, which
Mowry attributed to the intense
defensive pressure Daytona
Beach applied.
Some argued that there was
extra pressure on the Saints
because of the record-book fac-
tor, but freshman guard Devin
Harden didn't buy into that
theory.
"It's not something we
thought about," Harden said.
"We have just been trying to go
game by game."
Santa-Fe trailed DBCC by 4 at
halftime, putting doubts in the
minds of Saints fans. However,
the Saints opened the second half
with a 13-3 run, and regained the


momentum.
"We started making a run and
I thought the game was over,"
sophomore guard Brandon
Kelley said. "But they played
well and kept their composure
and came back."
The game became a seesaw
battle, as it seemed whenever one
team would make a run, the other
would quickly counter. Neither
team was able to take a double-
digit lead.
For most of the game, Daytona
Beach had little trouble beating
the Saints' full-court pressure.
Santa Fe, who used easy buckets
off of turnovers early, didn't cre-
ate nearly as many as they had
grown accustomed to in previous
games.
Five Saints scored in double
figures, with Kelley's 15 points
leading the way.
On tap for the Saints is a game
at St. Johns River Community
College on Saturday. It will prove
interesting to see how the Saints
respond after suffering their first
loss of the season.
"We weren't even looking
to go undefeated, so the loss
brought us back to reality,"
Kelley said.
Although the Saints went 18-
0- in nonconference play, they do
not have an automatic bid to the
conference tournament.
"Winning those first 18 didn't
mean anything, if we don't win
conference games," Mowry said.
In the first game of the dou-
bleheader, the Santa Fe women's
team overcame a double-digit
second-half deficit to force
overtime. The extra period went
down to the wire, as Daytona
Beach guard Marchele Campbell
hit a game-winning three-pointer
with 5.6 seconds remaining, giv-
ing her team the 69-66 victory.
The Santa Fe women's team fell
to 5-13. -


._ ,.e '*"~-.. ....'..
5'


Casey Anderson / Alligator Staff
All-American junior Jennifer Magley looks to lead the Gators in singles play against Central
Florida today. Matches are slated to start at 5 p.m.


No. 2 Gators host Knights


STAFF REPORT

The No. 2 UF women's tennis team enters
its second match of the season against Central
Florida today.
The Gators were unable to finish their
opening match against Baylor on Saturday
due to inclement weather.
The game will not count in the Gators'
record even though they recorded a doubles
victory, leading the match 1-0 before it had to
be canceled.
In UCF, UF faces an opponent that finished
2004 with a 12-9 record and was the runner
up to Troy at the Atlantic Sun Conference


championships.
In their only dual meet this season, the
Golden Knights won an exhibition match
against Flagler 7-0. The match against the
Gators marks their season opener.
UF junior Jennifer Magley, a singles and
doubles All-American, leads the Gators.
UCF seniors Kristina Lohmos and Ola
Luczak, who both finished with 3-3 records
after the fall season, will lead the Knights.
Both teams have young blood this year, as
the Gators carry three freshmen on their ros-
ter while the Knights boast four.
The first serve is slated for 5 p.m. at the
Ring Tennis Complex.


Thursday 6-10 pm Through April 21





Come visit The Florida Museum and The Ham Museum of Art!

UF Cultural Plaza 0 Across from the Southwest Recreation Center


Jan. 27th


7:30pm at the Ham Museum:

Charles Mason,

Chair of the Curatorial Department,

will present a gallery talk

highlighting the UF Art

Faculty exhibition.



Entertainment by local guitarists

Sarah Tobing and John Rogers



Free refreshments from The Swamp


Five or more sunburns
double your risk
of developing skin cancer.


Protect your skin.
www.aad.org 888.462.DERM


www.sg.ufl.edu


~_,._____ ._ _.~ _








38, ALLIGATOR E THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005


SITTING TALL


Paralysis can't stop former Gators great


By BRIAN SHAFFER
Alligator Staff Writer
bshaffer@alligator.org

He is the answer to one of pro--
fessional basketball's greatest trivia
questions, and his story is one of
the ,host stunning examples of irony
imaginable.
From towering over opponents
in the Southeastern Conference and
in the NBA to spend-


ing the last 17 years "You ha
paralyzed, the
life of Neal Walk Suck it up
has been both n ma
memorable and and make


motivational.
Many basketball As yoU
fans remember that Lew
Alcindor later Kareem Abdul-
Jabbar was the first pick in the
1969 NBA Draft by the Milwaukee
Bucks.
The widely forgotten second pick
was UF's Walk, selected by Phoenix
after the Suns lost a coin toss to the
Bucks.
"While I might be the only one,
I'm pretty freaking happy the coin
flip was what it was," Walk said.
There have been a lot of people who
have called me the booby prize ...
But I was pretty damn happy just to
be drafted in the NBA, let alone the
second pick in the first round."

The Great Debate
Widely regarded as one of the
greatest players to ever play at UF,
Walk averaged 20.8 points and 15.3
rebtfnds per game, in a three-year
career that spanned from 1967-69
(freshmen did not play varsity at
'.h time). Both rank first on the
all-time UF lists. Despite having
just three years' worth of statistics
to his resume, Walk's 1,181 career
rebounds also rank first in school
history. He was also the team's first
All-American.
And while others might be quick
to hail him as the greatest Gators
player ever, Walk calmly shrugs it
off.

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"It is a terrific compliment,
sure.," Walk said. "I guess that you
could make the argument for some
other guys, though. I don't know if
the term 'greatest' is the most appli-
cable, but 'most productive' brings
up a good point."
Walk might prefer most produc-
tive, one of Walk's college room-
mates, former Gators Hall-of-Fame
swimmer and diver Glenn Hoffman,


would be tested to the extreme by
what life had in store for Walk a
decade after retirement.
In 1987, Walk was diagnosed
with a small growth inside of his
spinal cord. Doctors recommended
immediate surgery. Without the sur-
gery, choosing to leave the growth
where it was separating the
spinal cord could have resulted
in death.
However,


16 Yi fl 4,* e + ;+ InI~c ~ Iff f'kif~f


doctors in-


IVw a !lUBlvIE, ai l LV II I IL VVCao I IU I IULC. formed him
and play the hand you're dealt there was a
the most out of it. possibility that
the surgery
Or, give up, dry up and blow away. could paralyze
can see, it ain't no choice. It was him. It was a risk
a no-braner thatneeded to be
a no-brainer. taken.


ma d e Nqea WalK
Walk's greatness
well-known.
"When I was inducted into the
Hall of Fame in 1999, [Walk] came
in from Phoenix," Hoffman recalled.
"And when I gave my acceptance
presentation, I said, 'Next, I'd like
to thank my roommate, the best
basketball player ever to play at the
University of Florida, Neal Walk.'
And I can assure you that nobody in
the audience objected."

A Little Too Ironic
After eight seasons in the NBA
with the Suns, Jazz and Knicks and
after battling against opponents such
as Jabbar and Wilt Chamberlain,
Walk retired following the 1976-77
season.
While he may be forever remem-
bered as being the guy taken behind
Kareem, Walk's NBA career was far
from ordinary. Suns owner Jerry
Colangelo remembers a player often
overlooked.
"Neal never really got his due as
a player, but I've never seen another
person with the work ethic that
Neal had coming into the league,"
Colangelo said.
The same work ethic that made
him the player he was on the court


The worst case sce-
nario became reality and Walk
was almost fully paralyzed from the
waist down.
"Suck it up and play the hand
you're dealt and make the most out
of it, or, give up, dry up and blow
away," Walk said. "As you can see, it
ain't no choice. It was a no-brainer."
Suddenly, this once world-class
athlete was confined to a wheel-
chair, unable to use the powerful
strength that helped make him a
star. Walking again would prove
too difficult, due in large part to his
6-foot-10 frame.
"Given my size, it reduced my
ability to regain function enough,"
Walk said. "If I was like a foot short-
er, I might be able to walk with as-
sistance. I walked with braces at this
height, but that feels like another
lifetime ago."

The Voice in the Chair
Today Walk works for the Suns
as a motivational speaker his fa-
vorite audience is prisoners.
His message was not one of over-
coming life's obstacles and picking
yourself up by your bootstraps. In
fact, he did not even like to incorpo-
rate his disability in his message, if
at all possible.


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Courtesy of Phoenix Suns
Neal Walk, arguably the greatest player in UF men's basketball his-
tory, boasts school records in single-season scoring (20.8 ppg.) and
rebounding, (15.3) and is the all-time leader in rebounds (1,181).


"He talks about what it's like
to be a great basketball player and
have interests in baseball and swim-
ming," Hoffman said. "He was even
a pretty dam good surfer."
Despite putting public speaking
behind him, Walk continues to work
for the Suns as a historian and archi-
vist. It is a job he thoroughly enjoys,
because it allows him to dabble in
his lifelong passion of photography.
Walk has ridden life's most ex-
treme emotional rollercoaster ride,


but through it all, he has maintained
a simple philosophy.
"There are low points for ev-
erybody all of the time," he said.
"Through adversity, you have to
find out about yourself. It is kind
of like sports. You can't hide. When
you meet adversity, you can deal
with it with a good face or you can
bitch, complain ard whine."
And after hearing the story of
Neal Walk, is there really anything
to complain about?


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THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005 N ALLIGATORI3c




Roles reverse as recruits hoping UF picks them


By BLAKE BONSA'CK
Alligator Contributing Writer

Recruiting is not just about
five-star blue-chippers, glamorous
campus visits and commitment an-
nouncements on ESPN.
For some prospects, the recruit-
ing process is about hope. Hope for
the opportunity to play football be-
yond their high school years. Hope
to go to a fine academic institution.
Hope to be a part of the team that
they've rooted for all their life.
Such is the case for Monsignor
Pace High's Quinton Andrews,
ranked the No. 41 safety in the coun-
try by Scout.com.
Andrews at 5-foot-11, 191
pounds with a 4.65-second 40-yard
dash is considered a marginal
athlete in comparison to top-ranked
defensive backs, but has earned a


reputation for his instincts and play-
making savvy.
"I wondered if he had the physi-
cal tools to make it on the next level,
but our guys in Florida just rave
about his ability on the field,"
Southeastern Conference recruiting
analyst Scott Kennedy said.
During his senior year for the
Spartans, Andrews compiled 60
tackles, six sacks and -two intercep-
tions while collecting 40 catches for
460 yards and five touchdowns.
He also led his team to a 3A state
championship during his junior
year.
"I'm not the fastest, but I have
enough speed to run to the football
and put me in the position to make
plays," Andrews said. "I think I
bring a lot of toughness and positive
attitude to the team. I'm fun to be
around, on and : tt t i h ld."
Andrews I-aiz b.- ,n ..ffered a


scholarship from West Virginia, but
is holding out on the possibility of
an offer from UF before he makes
his decision.
"Florida's close to home,"
Andrews said. "The coaching staff
is really cool and I like the respect
that they have for
the game. I have
an idea of where
I want to go, but
I'm going to wait
until signing
day."
S Andrews has
Andrews high aspirations,
but is just look-
ing for an opportunity to show what
he's capable of.
"I want to start at safety and be
able to play a little receiver every
now and then," he said. "It really
just depends on whatever will get
me on the field the quickest."


Several other prospects are look-
ing to be offered scholarships.
Three Daytona Beach Mainland
High prospects Matt Lewis, a
6-foot-i, 235-pound linebacker,
Brent Davis, a 6-foot-2, 190-pound
linebacker, and Brian Ellis, a 6-foot-
3, 235-pound tight end hope to
join teammate Avery Atkins at UF.
Atkins, ranked a five-star defensive
back by Scout.com, has orally com-
mitted to the Gators.
In UF's sights is Pompan6
Beach native Walter McFadden, a
6-foot, 175-pound defensive back.
McFadden would join current
Gators commitment and Blanche
Ely High teammate Ronnie Wilson,
a 6-foot-3, 335-pound offensive line-
man.
Meanwhile, coaches appear
to have soured on prospect Tyller
Roberts, a 6-foot, 190-pound defen-
sive back from Orlando Edgewater


High.
Scholarship offers to someof
these players will be determined by
how many commitments the Gators
receive from higher-ranked recruits
and by how many scholarships UF
wishes to save for next year.

ANOTHER COMMITMENT ARRIVES:
Add running back Kestahn Moore
of Arlington, Texas to a grow-
ing list of UF oral commitments.
Moore, ranked No. 29 at his posi-
tion by Scout.com, chose UF over
Oklahoma State.
The 5-foot-l0, 199-pound Moore,
who runs a 4.45 40-yard dash, was
hosted by freshman running back
Markus Manson.
Oral commitments are non-bind-
ing until a national letter-of-intent is
signed on National Signing Day on
Feb. 2.


Pros befriend


shortstop Tordi
By TIM CASEY
Alligator Writer
tcasey@alligator.org

While many baseball fans collect player
autographs, UF shortstop Justin Toidi collects
phone numbers. If someone ever stole his cell
phone, they could be chatting with some of
the best in baseball. But the junior defensive
standout has more than an impressive share
of contacts.
Sure, he played in. the prestigious Cape
Cod league the past two summers, and rep-
resented the United States on junior national
teams that took bronze in 2002 and silver in
2001.
Tordi's style of play is reminiscent of one
of the UF baseball program's most famous
alumni, St. Louis Cardinals shortstop David
Eckstein.
Tordi posted a stellar .963 fielding percent-'
age last season, second in the Southeastern
Conference to Vanderbilt's Ryan Klosterman.
Tordi was second on the Gators with nine
sacrifice bunts and for reaching base on a hit-
by-pitch nine times.
He's not going to lead the team in home
runs or runs batted in. But he will reach base
38.5 percent of the time.
The similarities between Tordi and
Eckstein are obvious, and Tordi intends to
continue that imitation all the way to the
major leagues.
Eckstein returned to campus for the alum-
ni game on Nov. 12. Tordi is already a friend
of his, and can contact the 2002 World Series
Champion any time for advice.
"I have a good relationship with him,"
Tordi said. "David is actually dating a girl,
one of my friends from high school. If I
needed to get in touch with him, I have many
different options."
Another World Series Champion on his
speed dial is Red Sox center fielder Johnny
Damon, who Tordi was able to watch play
while in Massachusetts during the summer.
"I'm good friends with Johnny Damon,"
Tordi said. "When I was up there and had a
day off, he'd leave me tickets and I'd drive to
Boston and go to the games.
"He went to my high school. I know him
really well. Actually, he invited me to his wed-


WELL CONNECTED


maw.. .7


i'.:. -


Matt Marriott / Alligator Staff
Shortstop Justin Tordi has become a model.of consistency for the Gators. In 2004, he
ranked second in the Southeastern Conference in fielding percentage while batting
.302.


ding, but over the Christmas break I was out
of town so I couldn't make-it."
While missing his friend's wedding, Tordi
made another contact.
"I missed Johnny's wedding because my
family went to Hawaii," he said. "Roger
Clemens was on the same flight out there. I
met him, talked to him about pro baseball. He
said what to-expect in the minor leagues and
everything, [and I even] took a picture with
him."
The list of names might sound like he's
bragging. It gets better.
"When I was back in high school, I had
a personal trainer, and I was in a lifting"
group with Ken Griffey Jr., Barry Larkin, and.
Danny Graves from the Reds," Tordi said. "I
know my fair share of big leaguers, because
Orlando is kind of a hot spot for athletes. So.
you always run into them."
In reality, Tordi is very humble about
these relationships. He isn't very forthcoming
about them, and coach Pat McMahon wasn't
even aware his player was so well connected.
"That's Justin Tordi. He's a tremendous


personality and gets along with everyone so
well," McMahon said. "You know, Johnny
Damon was a Florida signee years ago. Of
course, he opted to play professionally in-
stead of coming to Florida, and I'm happy for
his successes too."

"It feels not like a fantasy any-
more; it's in reach. It's right there,
so close that I can almost taste it.
It makes you feel good and have a
lot of confidence."
Justin Tordi
UF shortstop

McMahon stresses character as much as
on-field performance to all of his players.
"Humility is a great qualitL, and he has
that. He's very hard on himself," McMahon
said. "He's a very intense player, and he's got
to be able to battle to work through that. He's
very hard on himself offensively at times, so


he's got to continue to grow and work in that
area. And he will."
Tordi says that meeting professional play-
ers has helped his playing ability in college,
and that he doesn't dream of someday play-
ing in the major leagues the way every Little
Leaguer does.
"It feels not like a fantasy anymore; it's in
reach," Tordi said. "It's right there, so close
that I can almost taste it. It makes you fee.
good and have a lot of confidence."
To get there, Tordi will only have to contin-
ue to perform as he has the past two seasons.
Despite his defensive prowess and on-illece
efficiency, he was left off of every preseasor.
watch list published thus far.
He was drafted out of high school by the
Toronto Blue Jays, but had already made up
his mind to play college ball before the draft
began. McMahon got to him first the first
in-home visit of his tenure as skipper for the
Gators.
"He was our first commitment in the re-
cruiting process, and was a highly touted and
highly recruited young man. For him to come
aboard was nice," McMahon said. "He's done
exactly everything asked of him."
Sometimes, that means getting hit by a 90-
mile-per-hour fastball. Tordi says McMahon
emphasizes that big innings come from er-
rors, walks, hit by pitches.
"It's not always the home runs and base
hits that can win baseball games," Tordi said.
"Getting hit by a pitch is the easiest thing tc
do in baseball. You just stand there and let it
hit you."
"It doesn't hurt," he said. "A lot of people,
say it hurts if it hits the right spot, but for the
most part, if you get hit, you just shake it off. If
gets you on base, helps your on-base percent-
age and gives your team another baserunner
that can lead to a run."
Entering his third season, Tordi under-
stands it might be his last in Gainesville. One
peculiar thing about college baseball is tl 'ii
isn't necessarily a bad thing to not have many
seniors on roster, since players are not drafted
until after their third season.
"We just have to go out there and play
have fun, and it will take care of itself," Tordi
said. "But definitely, we have a chance at tak-
ing the SEC."
"I've grown a dislike for Miami over the
years. Just looking at our roster and atl
we've got, the talent we have, we're going tc
get.them this year and send them home pack-
ing. We're going to take it to Omaha."













Sports ALLIGATOR
THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2005 www.alligator.org/sports
_' -: ':', ,, :. -: ,7 ,,' : -~ :.- ? '. -: :-''- .- ., .-. -. .- -- .: :-: .'.*:-:-::,: .--. i ^-T -, --,= .- .. ...- ..,- .<., .. ." ,


Ugly win gets Gators on track

By BRYAN APP .:
Alligator Staff Writer
bapp@alligator.org

Perhaps ESPN scheduled the game back in
1996 when Tubby Smith led the Bulldogs to the
Sweet 16. Or maybe the network just forgot the
date of the real Cocktail Party.
Whatever the reason, plenty of hoops fans
throughout the Southeast found themselves
clicking over to the Kentucky-Tennessee tilt
before halftime of UF's drubbing of Georgia on
Tuesday.
Despite the not-so-Super Tuesday 23-point
win against one-time rival Georgia, Coach Billy
Donovan insisted the differential was mislead-
ing.
"I don't look at it like we beat them badly,"
Donovan said. "I think we earned it."
Dressing 10 freshmen and just six scholarship
players compared to UF's nine and start-
ing a freshman walk-on from Australia, Georgia
came into the game with an obvious talent defi-
cit.
Georgia coach Demnis Felton's solution: limit
the number of possessions, by taking each one
deep into the shot clock. Hack, foul and hack
some more to limit easy baskets. Avoid UF's run-
ning style by not pressing on defense and utiliz-
ing a half-court offense.
The strategy held the Gators to nine fewer
field-goal attempts than their season average and
left ESPN with little more than TV-timeout foot-
age of the dancing referee for the highlight reel.
The ultimate result, as freshman forward
Corey Brewer said: "It was kind of ugly. But we
won, sb that's all that matters."
And for Donovan, the win mattered, but per- -.
haps the way his team won meant more.
At the beginning of the season, Donovan said
UF wasn't able to "grind out" wins. Judging by
the numerous utterances of the cliche following Matt Marriott/ Alligator Staff
David Lee and the Gators dismantled Georgia, but Coach Billy
SEE MEN, PAGE 36 Donovan said the only difference was UF's upperclassmen.


Competing for


SEC control

* THE UF WOMEN'S BASKETBALL TEAM
WILL PLAY GEORGIA TONIGHT.

By MICHAEL MAURINO
Allig1at.:, Writer
mmaurino@alligator.org

They can tell you it is just another game, that
all conference games are big. But when rivals
collide and early season control is up for grabs,
the game means much more. That's the situation
tonight when the UF women's basketball team
travels to Athens to meet No. 19 Georgia.
The Gators (12-6, 3-2 Southeastern Conference)
lost their last game, 80-72, to Mississippi on
Sunday. The Gators quickly fell behind in the
loss, only to rally and still lose. UF's weakness
was exposed late, as the Rebels recorded 30 of
their 58 rebounds in the second half.

"I think we know we have a long road
ahead of us, so we're just working on
getting better."
Tamia Williams
UF senior

Coach Carolyn Peck said the rebounding edge
had to do with UF's inside positioning.
"Our problem in the Mississippi game was
that we didn't focus on boxing out," Peck said.
'We need to make sure that. on every shot taken
everyone is finding someone to check out. Or to
make sure that [we are] keeping them from hav-
ing a second chance opportunity."
For UF, the statistics don't lie. The Gators are
7-1 when they win the rebounding battle, 4-6
when they do not. The Gators are also one of two
SEC teams with a negative rebounding margin.
The other, Arkansas, is 2-5 in league play.
Georgia (15-5, 4-2 SEC) has won its last two
games, and has lost only one of its 11 home
SEE WOMEN, PAGE 36


Meyer's recruiting success could lure more prospects to join Gators


Who needs the master re-
cruiter when you have
a reputation like the
late Johnny Carson?
In other words, who needs
Ron Zook when your name is
Urban Meyer? For that matter,
who needs a steady recruiting
coordinator like Mike Locksley?
We have seen in the last week
what happens when you answer
tha. questions. Whatever Meyer
is doing (and let's hope it doesn't


involve strippers and all-night
booze fests with lobster dinners
on the side), he is convincing
some highly touted players to
come his way.
While we .won't know with
certainty how good this recruiting
class is for a couple of years, one
thing is crystal-clear: the opinion
of Zook so pales in comparison to
Meyer that it shouldn't come as
a surprise that quality commit-
ments are flowing to the Gators


like gang-
busters.
T- his
weekend,
the rest
Gregg Girvan of the big
Throwing Girv Balls dogs come
ggirvan@alligator.org into town
to see what
Gainesville
and UF are all about. Meyer has
already proved that he doesn't
need recruiting advice, but


there's one statement he should
use this weekend to woo a few
more prospects and vault his
2005 class to the top of the rank-
ings: -
You see these guys I got com-
mitments from last week? Yeah,
those other schools thought they had
them in their pocket, but I snatched
them away. Because I am that good.
Now won't you come play for the
Gators?
I'm sure Meyer will use a more


subtle approach, but if the Gators
secure a few more recruits and
pull out a surprise or two, he's
got a lock on a top-10 class.
That's better than what Zook
did in his first year. The reason is
clear Zook was not an upgrade
to Steve Spurrier. Meyer, at least
by name if not reputation and
results, is an upgrade to Zook.
There is no other way to measure
SEE GIRV BALLS, PAGE 36


N 1968: UF's Neal Walk tied a
Gators men's basketball record
when he grabbed 31 rebounds
against Alabama. Walk finished
the season with 494 reboundS,
most in school history.


E One of UF men's basketball all-time great
players, Neal Walk, enjoyed success at both
the college and NBA levels. However, Walk's
life took a shocking turn and today he is
paralyzed. Check out his story on page 38.


UiNBA: Detroit vs. Indiana
TNT, 7 p.m.
ENBA: Sacramento vs. San Antonio
TNT, 9:30 p.m.


NBA
Miami
Toronto


Cleveland
Memphis