• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Main
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: fifth book of one hundred pictures
Title: The fifth book of one hundred pictures
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028271/00001
 Material Information
Title: The fifth book of one hundred pictures
Physical Description: 106 p. : ill., music ; 16 cm.
Language: English
Creator: American Sunday-School Union ( Publisher )
Publisher: American Sunday-School Union,
American Sunday-School Union
Place of Publication: Philadelphia ;
New York
Publication Date: 1875
Copyright Date: 1875
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1875   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1875
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
United States -- New York -- New York
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028271
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: notis - ALG2628
oclc - 08751997
alephbibnum - 002222384

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Frontispiece
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Main
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text


































The Baldwin Library
mB Univrsci
F l rid P


























-A-
















SABBATH MORNING.

Safely through another week
God has brought us on our way,
Let us now a blessing seek,
Waiting in his courts to-day,-
Day of all the week the best,
Emblem of eternal rest.





















/






THE




OF


ONE HUNDRED


PICTURES.





~ ft^-




PHILADELPHIA:
THE AMERICAN SUNDAY-SCHOOL UNION,
1o, 1122 Chestnut Street.
NEW YORK: Nos. 8 & 10 Bible House.






























Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1875, by

THE AMERICAN SUNDAY-SCHOOL UNION,

in the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.







THE PONY. 5





I I*" '-'4













WHAT a pretty pony! He belongs to
Charles Morly, who is standing beside
him. Charles lives in a village two or
three miles away, and has ridden over to
see his little cousins. They are delighted
to see him and the pony. Little Johnny
has picked a bunch of grass, and is feed-
ing the pony.
1*






6 LUCY AND SARAH.


























the cage beside Lucy, and Mrs. Dean is
tellin them a story.
Lucy and Sarah Dean are spending a
very pleasant morning with their mother,
learning to sew. Their little bird is in
the cage beside Lucy, and M1rs. Dean is
telling them a story.







EMILY MORRISON. 7


Id



I





._~- t ,) -,,)















MRs. MORRISON is hearing her little
daughter Emily repeat her evening hymn
before going to bed. This is a very plea-
sant hour for Emily and her mother.







S LITTLE ALICE.



li : !,.- :.



II [











LITTLE Alice has just returned from a
long ramble in the woods and fields with
her cousins. They have been picking
blackberries and gathering fern leaves.
She is telling her mother how much they
enjoyed themselves, and wishes to show
her the pail full of berries, and the book
filled with beautiful ferns and mosses.






THE KIND SISTER. 9


I I














CHARLEY and Gertrude are listening to
a story which their elder sister Bessie is
telling them. Their mother, Mrs. Nichols,
is very ill, and the noise made by Charley
and Gertrude in running about the house
disturbs her. Bessie has taken them into
a room by themselves, and is amusing
them to keep them quiet. The children
always like to be with Bessie, for though
she is only twelve years old, she is
thoughtful, kind and gentle.






10 LAME MILLY.


























the other. All her life long she must
walk with a crutch.






See how much shorter one limb is han








the other. All her life long she must
walk with a crutch.







RETURNING FROM SCHOOL. 11











i --- .. -











THE school-house is just over the
bridge, beyond the woods. Theodore
and Allen are walking home from school.
They are old friends. Allen is telling
Theodore that he means to study very
hard this summer, so that he may be
able to enter college next year.






12 THE NEW SCHOLAR.





SI I I


















Miss MORTON is introducing a new
pupil to her school. She seems a very
modest little girl, and I hope the old
scholars will receive her kindly.







THE FUCHSIA. 13



I 1 jJ






,f I'l n
















EFFIE ROBERTSON is bringing a present
to her teacher, Miss Markham: a beau-
tiful fuchsia, which she planted herself.
2








14 I MUST OBEY MY MOTHER.



S40, -




N














I MnUST obey my mother,
So gentle, kind and true:
Her loving hand has led me
Thus far life's pathway through.
She watches o'er me fondly,
And keeps the thorns away;
And it would deeply grieve her
If I should not obey.

I must obey my mother;
For I remember well
That Christ was thus submissive
"While He on earth did dwell.
Ie did his mother's bidding,
He still was meek and mild;
And He will grant a blessing
To each obedient child.







THE COMING TIDE. 15


















"I -- .-_
1 /


























ocean. The tide is coming in, and a little
boat is sailing towards the shore.






16 STEALING FRUIT.






















JACK JONES and Joe Scott are doing a
very wicked thing-stealing fruit from
farmer Johnson's garden. They have
climbed the wall from the road, and one
is reaching for the fruit, while the other
holds the basket and keeps watch.







SUNDAY AFTERNOON. 17

I- 1 ,, .. i I ; 1,, ,, , i ; i;|i, I ..' I


tw.,
I


.... . ..... ... .
I* II IIy I L


















MARY THOMAS is spending the summer
in the country, four miles from any church.
On Sunday afternoons she gathers the
children of the neighborhood, and teaches
them as in Sunday-school.
2*








18 A HAPPY HOME.

































I IIAVE a home, a happy home,
And friends who love me, there
With daily bread I still am fed,
Still have warm clothes to wear;
I've health and strength in every limb;
How grateful should I be !
How shall I show my love to Him
Wh ho shows such love to me?







OLD DOG CARLO. 19



















OLD Carlo is a Newfoundland dog.
He belongs to Harry Bright, who is very
fond of him, and has taught him to do
many useful things. He goes every day
with Harry's father to market, and brings
home the market-basket, as we see him
in the picture. He will play with Harry,
and let him ride upon his back.






20 MOTHER'S LETTER.



I: '- I '




















FRED and Ella Carrington have just
received, and are reading, a letter from
their dear mother, who is spending the
winter in Florida. She writes that her
health is much improved, and they are
very happy to know it.







THE SHEPHERD. 21























SHEPHERD, I thy lamb would be,
Gentle, loving, like to Thee;
In Thy tender love would share,
Guarded by Thy constant care.

Shepherd, I would hear Thy voice,
In its gracious tones rejoice.
Gladly follow where it leads
To the cool and shady meads.

Shepherd, I would never stray,
Never wander from Thy way,
But this wicked heart within
Often leads me into sin.
..-:


























Shepherd, then when bleeding, torn,
Let me in Thy arms be borne
Safely to Thy fold, secure
From the lion's dreadful power.
From tho lion's dreadful power.







22 STEALING FLOWERS.



, '- -. 1 -_ -I
S ': ". ...
S^ -"T


.^ ( ; , . .








"







WHAT bad boys! Stealing flowers!
They do not dare to go inside of the
fence, for fear of the dog, but they are
picking all they can reach from the out-
side. Perhaps they will be caught, as
the farmer's boy is on the other side of
the fence with the dog.







NAUGHTY JANE. 23







IuVI








I *!








'' z-. .






JANE BROWN knows that she is doing
wrong in eating the nice jelly her mother
gave her to take to a sick neighbor







24 COMING TO JESUS.

S ,.J .
"I I .- :















IF I come to Jesus,
He will make me glad;
He will give me pleasure
When my heart is sad.
If I come to Jesus,
Happy I shall be;
He is gently calling
Little ones like me.

If I come to Jesus,
He will bid me live;
He will love me freely,
And my sins forgive.
If I come, &c.






THE SHOEMAKER. 25


---_ - . I''_ ,i [ '

















JAMES SMITH is a very industrious
shoemaker, and works steadily at his
trade. He has just finished a pair of
boots. He is a pious man, and always
keeps his Bible near him, that he may
read a verse occasionally. To-day his
good minister has called to see him, and
he is enjoying the visit very much.
3







26 THE FISHER BOY.


'






















"o you want to buy any lobsters to-
day ?" asked John Wilson, the fisher boy.
"No!" said Miss Sally Crips very crossly,
for she does not like to see Johnny's wet
"feet upon her newly-scrubbed floor.






THE SAIL BOAT. '27






















GEORGE and Ralph are sailing in a boat.
: $:~---=-.

















A sudden storm has come upon them,
and one of the boys is trying very hard
to take down the sail; the other one is
holding on to the rudder, to keep the
boat on its right course.






28 GRANDMAMMA'S BIRTHDAY.

S-- '" II









A 44..
,r '; .. i',' r I' I ; ^ J

S. -- : : /',' 1 ,. _-: &- ,
"- _-L












CHARLE arid Mary Grey, and David
and Julia Morris, are taking tea with
grandmamma on her birthday. They are
all very happy.







PRAISE AND PRAYER. 29




SNOSMIF

/ LORD



--d d





LIFT up your voices, children,
In gratitude and praise:
Unto the God who made us all
Your youthful voices raise;
Praise Him for all His mercies,
Vouchsafed to you each day;
And that His gifts may still be sent,
As humble suppliants pray.

Lift up your hearts, dear children,
To Him who died to save;
Jesus who suffered for our sakes,
And lay within the grave;
Blessed be God, He rose again,
And lives that we might live;
Oh, children, to the Lord of all
Your heart's best wishes give.

Lift up your hearts, dear children,
And lift your voices too;
Oh, kneel and pray that His free grace
May now descend on you;
Then join in hymns of sweet accord
To praise Him for his love,
And let your notes of rapture blend
With angels' songs above.
3*







30 THE ORPHANS.








S l 1 R ,
flowers over their grave. Poor little









,c do y n f s f
4 i







EDWARD and Jane are orphans, Their
father and mother are both dead, and they
have come to the church-yard to strew
flowers over their grave. Poor little
children! do you not feel sorry for them ?







MY THREE LITTLE TEXTS. 31





AM R,
















I AM very young and little,
I am only just turned two;
And I cannot learn long chapters,
As my elder sisters do.

But I know three little verses
That mamma has taught to me,
And I say them every morning
As I stand beside her knee.

The first is, "Thou God seest me,"
Is not that a pretty text?
And Suffer the little children
To come unto me," is next.

But the last one is the shortest;
It is only "God is Love."
How kind HIe is in sending us
Such sweet verses from above.






32 THE DEAD BIRD.







"-" I
l : ,,' " "-*













S. . -.. ... ....


ANNIE CLARK has come to feed her pet
canary, and finds it dead. Last night
Annie neglected to hang up the cage, and
the cat jumped upon it and killed the
poor bird. How sad she looks !








GENTLE WORDS. 33


i-1












A YOUNG rose in the summer-time
Is beautiful to me,
And glorious the many stars
That glimmer on the sea;
But gentle words and loving hearts,
And hands to clasp my own,
Are better than the brightest flowers
Or stars that ever shone.
The sun may warm the grass to life,
The dew the drooping flower,
And eyes grow bright and watch the light
Of autumn's opening hour;
But words that breathe of tenderness,
And smiles we know are true,
Are warmer than the summer-time,
And brighter than the dew.
It is not much the world can give,
With all its subtle art;
And gold or gems are not the things
To satisfy the heart;
But oh! if those who cluster round
The altar and the hearth,
Have gentle words and loving smiles,
How beautiful is earth!








34 BABY'S VALENTINE.

-.,- : ''; - -






i-I





















BLESS the little baby maid
Down from Heaven's nursery strayed!
Cradled on her mother's arm,
Bless her safe from every harm!
Bless her eyes from all sad sights,
To all innocent delights:
Bless her ears, that no ill word,
False or foul, may e'er be heard;
Bloss her hands to all good deeds,

Bless her lips to sing God's praise,
Bless her feet to walk His ways!
Can I any farther go?
Bless her all from top to toe-
From rosy toe to silken curl,
Bless the preions baby girl!
Bless the precious baby girl !







THE THRONE OF GRACE. 35


































Lord, teach us to pray.- Lnk xi. 1.

LORD, teach a little child to pray,
And then accept my prayer;
Thou hearest all the words I say,
For Thou art everywhere.

A little sparrow cannot fall
Unnoticed, Lord, by Thee;
And though I am so young and small,
Thou dost take care of me.






36 THE LESSONS.











I1












ROBERT GREG iS a studious boy. He
has learned his lessons for school to-mor-
row, and his sister is hearing him recite
them; to be sure, he knows them per-
fectly.







MAKING A BOAT. 37




--4
--. i _..-



















EDWIN is making a boat, and his sister
Elsie is watching him. He has cut it all
out with his penknife, and is now putting
the masts in. As soon as it is finished,
he will take it to the little lake behind
the house and launch it.
4







3S MAKING GARDEN.




-- _
.j-. -7 _

















ELLEN, Freddy, and Edith Middleton
are spending the summer at their country
home, and are putting their gardens in
order. Alick, the gardener, has brought
them each a pot of beautiful flowers.
Their good mother has provided them
with a complete set of small garden tools.






STEALING APPLES. 39



P















THIS is the second time farmer Black
has caught Tom Morse stealing his ap-
ples. Tom looks very much frightened,
as well he may be, for Towser has hold
of his foot, and he will be badly hurt.
.-- '"
,,
/ ;. r, .. ,!ri,


..










of his foot, and he will be badly hurt.







40 THE FARMER.



















city. They have come into the country
to visit their uncle James, who is a farmer,
JOHIN and Arthur Evans live in the
city. They have come into the country
to visit their uncle James, who is a farmer,
and he is showing them all about his
farm. They are very much pleased, as
they have never been in the country
before; and ploughing and planting, and
all the things done on the farm, are new
to them.







THE FARM-YARD. 4.1


















THIS is a farm-yard. You can see the
barn, with the cart standing before the
door. It is evening; the cows have been
in the pasture field all day, and have now
come home to be milked. The pigs are
rolling in the mud, by the side of the
pond, and there is a rooster and two hens,
who are taking a drink before going to
bed. The farmer is just coming out of
the barn.
4*







42 COUNTRY PLEASURES.







I -










THE calf is going to have his breakfast,
and the children have come to see him
drink his milk. His name is Bossy.
These children live in the city; they are
very much interested in all that is going
on at the farm; they like to see the cows
milked, the chickens fed; and sometimes
farmer Owen lets them ride from the
hay-field on top of a load of hay.







THE RABBITS. 43




'. 1 A -_
















THESE little girls are feeding their rab-
bits. Mary is holding a piece of carrot
in her hand, and bunny is eating it.
Little Louisa has her apron full of clover
and lettuce, and many other things that
rabbits love. Rabbits are very nice,
gentle pets.







44 THE GOOD NURSE.























her dear mother when she was a little
baby. Nurse Myra has always taken
care of her. She is a very good Chris-
tian woman, and is very fond of telling
Bible stories to Lena.
LENA DALEY had the misfortune to lose
her dear mother when she was a little
baby. Nurse Myra has always taken
care of her. She is a very good Chris-
tian woman, and is Yery fond of telling
Bible stories to Lena.







THE BROKEN DOLL. 45



IIi ,








SIl l IIll













her head, and broken her doll. Her old
"nurse, Myra, is telling her not to 'ind,



her head, and broken her doll. ,er old
"nurse, Myra, is telling her not to mind
that; her head will soon be well, and that
she will mend the doll.







46 GEORGIE KINGSLAND.



--- -' - _















i 11 t







Miss MANSFIELD is taking a morning
ride on her pony, and has called to see
one of her Sunday-school scholars, little
Georgie Kingsland, who has been sick.
Georgrie K~ingslandl, who has been sick.








BIRDIE'S LESSON. 47
























BIReT up in yonder tree,
Sing a morning song for me.
"Twas you who waked me up, I know,
"With your singing long ago.
Why are you so silent now,
On that very topmost bough?
Oh! and there's your nest: I see
Baby birdies, one, two, three.

Little child, so bright and fair,
Have you said your morning prayer ?
Have you thought how Jesus, mild,
Cares for every little child ?
Oh! forget Him not, 'tis He
Says, "Let children come unto me."
My bird babies are so small,
Yet dear Jesus cares for all.






48 A DAY IN THE WOODS.








'lp,













THESE boys and their sister have come
with their father to spend a day in the
woods. The boys are fishing, and little
May is very happy gathering wild flowers.







WE WILL LIFT A LITTLE. 49




~ -' '"





2.




LIFT a little lift a little !
Neighbor, lend a helping hand
To that heavy-laden brother,
Who for weakness scarce can stand.
What to thee, with thy strong muscle,
Seems a light and easy load,
Is to him a ponderous burden,
Cumbering his pilgrim road

Lift a little lift a little !
Effort gives one added strength;
That which staggers him when rising
Thou canst hold at arm's full length.
Not his fault that he is feeble,
Not thy praise that thou art strong;
It is God made lives to differ,
Some for wailing, some for song.
5









50 REVERENCE FOR THE BIBLE.






:-








:- _'^^




LITTLE Josie was in mischief:
How his blue eyes snapped that day !
There was companyy" to see mother,
So thb baby had his way.
Quick, he runs up to the table,
Snatches all the handsome books,
Goes and hides them in the corner,
IIeeding not his mother's looks.

Now they're safe;-but one large volume
Rests upon the marble stand;
Josie creeps up softly to it,
And puts out his little hand;
Then he starts,-his hand withdrawing,
And he steps in awe away,
"No, no, Dodo, that's the Bible,"
This was what I heard him say.

Ah, dear baby, you have taught me,
What I should have learned before,
To use other books as playthings,
But God's word to hold in store;
And to leave it only lying
On the tablet of my heart,
As my only guide and treasure;
That with which I would not part.







THE KIND TEACHER. 51





Ii










I t










KIND Miss Davis has heard that Anna
Dale, one of her Sunday-school scholars,
is sick, and is inquiring of this little girl,
whom she has met in the street, the way
to Anna's house.







52 GOING TO SCHOOL.
.: : l : ',li l* ,i 0. "',
-'* ,' r' bilrlt,,,';,ip '^ 'f'!"






:[ -I














ROBERT and Margaret Bruce are get-
ting ready to go to school. Their kind
teacher Tracy, has called for them,
and they will have a pleasant walk to
the school-house.







LEARNING TO TELL THE TIME. 53










I19
_--









Mas. GIBSON has been hearing her
daughter Maggie recite her lessons, and
is now teaching her how to tell the time
by the clock. M '-.i.. is holding her
mother's watch, and observing how much
faster the long hand goes round the face
of the watch than the short one does.
When the long hand goes all the way
round, it marks one hour or sixty minutes.
5*







54 THE INDIANS.





















THESE men with feathers in their hair
are Indians. The white man who is
"talking to them is named John Eliot;
he is sometimes called the apostle to the
Indians, just as Paul was called the
apostle to the Gentiles, because he de-
voted his life to them.







THE CEDARS OF LEBANON. 55

















S- .JiJ _






THESE old cedar trees are growing in
the garden of Gethsemane, on Mount
Olivet, the garden in which our Saviour
spent the night before He was betrayed.







56 THE LIGHTHOUSE.










% a,,.- ,
.? t-.- _





DID you ever see a lighthouse ? Light-
houses are built at different points on the
coast, to give warning to ships at sea.
Every evening the keeper lights the
lamps in the top of the lighthouse, and
they burn brightly until morning. The
pilots of the ships approaching the land
see the lights, and know which way to
steer to reach the harbor safely.







SKATING. 57

_z _. ---7t __
- --
















I ,







THIS boy, with the cap in his hand, is
venturing upon very thin ice. The people
on the bridge are calling and shouting to
him not to go, but he will not heed them.
I fear that he will meet with an accident.







58 THE NEW ROCKING-HORSE.










101-






How delighted these children are with
their Christmas presents Frank has a
top, Alice a skipping-rope, and Master
Edmund a new rocking-horse and riding-
whip. Edmund has been wishing for the
horse, and now his kind father has grati-
fied him. He thinks he will call his
pony Prince. The baby is looking on,
very much pleased. Sometime nurse will
hold him on the horse, and let him take
a ride.






LAPLAND. 59

= ':_-"-- -i -=-






e Z2
-





LAPLAND is a very cold country. For
half the year the sun does not rise, and
it would be entirely dark were it not for
the appearance of the aurora borealis, or
northern lights, such as we see repre-
sented in the picture. Laplanders live
in huts built of blocks of ice, and travel
in sleds drawn by reindeer.







60 THE SHEEP.







I; ... .-







1
-= ., '1
. j _-' ." .
















IN Eastern countries sheep are pas-
tured upon the hillsides. The men who
take care of them are called shepherds.
This flock of sheep seem to have been
alarmed by some beast of prey.






ROVER. 61




















ROVER has just brought the stick out
of the water to his little master, Herbert
Raymond. Rover is a very young dog,
almost a puppy, and Herbert is teaching
him to bring a stick out of the water.
When he does what he is told to do,
Herbert pats him and says, "Good dog !"
6
' L'"': :- aa.- i :-- N :"-"-
, : -
o-. -. ,. t' .
', -* ' I .







62 THE PARROT.



























HELEN S uncle, who lives in South
America, has sent her a present of a
I -- I'









l11 r










HELEN'S uncle, ivho lives in South
America, has sent her a present of a
beautiful gray parrot. His name is Chico.
Helen is teaching him to talk.








BOY AND THE BIRDS. 63











.-r








A LITTLE black-eyed boy of five
Thus spoke to his mamma:-
"Do look now at my pretty birds,
How beautiful they are!
How smooth and glossy are their wings,
How beautiful their hue !
Besides, mamma, I really think,
That they are pious too."

"Why so, my dear ?" the mother said,
And scarce suppressed a smile;
The answer showed a thoughtful head,
A heart quite free from guile.
"Because, when each one bows his head
His tiny bill to wet,
To lift a thankful glance above
IHe never does forget;
And so, mamma, it seems to me,
That very pious they must be."

Dear child, I would a lesson learn
From this sweet thought of thine,
And heavenward with a glad heart turn
These earth-bound eyes of mine:
Perfected praise indeed is given
By babes below to God in heaven.







64 THROUGH THE ICE.





















PHILIP CARTER has been in great dan-
ger of drowning. He ventured upon a
part of the ice too thin to bear his weight,
and went into the icy cold water over his
head. Some gentlemen happened to be
near, and by means of a plank and a
- -' ----- -- '" i':
. ---

7----: ------











piece of rope, are drawing the unfortu-
nate boy safe to shore.







MILKING-TIME. 65



". _" .. . .
























IT is time for the cows to come home
to be milked. Johanna is going for them,
but has stopped for a moment to see the
little fish swimming in the brook.
6*







66 WARMING PAPA'S SLIPPERS.


.1
', ',

1'i ,1 "i 1
SII'I
71 11 II,



















EVENING has come, and little Willie
Dwight is expecting his papa, Willie is
holding his papa's slippers to the fire,
that they may be nicely warmed. A
good, helpful little boy.







ORDER AND DISORDER. 67


v ... ..


















EMILY and Rebecca Wells are sisters.
Emily is very orderly; her drawers and
boxes are always in the most perfect
order; but poor Rebecca is hardly ever
able to find anything, for all her clothes
and toys are in the utmost confusion and
disorder.







68 PLAYING WITH FIRE.







MI
-.^ .... "




















THIS is the Fourth of July, and Carrie
has been playing with fire-crackers, and
has set her clothes on fire. Poor girl!
how dreadfully frightened she is. Her
mother is coming to her assistance. We
hope she will be able to put out the fire.






VISIT TO GRANDMAMMA. 69



SI hII
'' l li~,, '' ,
"",,,, I",




















morning with her grandmamma, and now
she is reading a chapter in the Bible
before she goes home.
r:'I ,
:-: ~ ~' "' ','l,



















before she goes home.






70 THE SEASHORE.



















to spend a holiday. These boys have
enjoyed themselves very much. They
have picked up sea-shells, and taken a
bath in the rolling breakers, and now
they are listening to a story this old
sailor is telling them of a voyage he once
made to China, and all the wonderful
things that happened.







THE LIFE-BOAT. 71

-=--.- -- ~ ~.- .-- --




























trying to save some poor shipwrecked
people, whose ship has been thrown upon
the rocks in a violent storm.






72 THE MEDDLESOME BOY.

"A"'









I AM afraid Charlie Brown is in mis-
chief. He has climbed up on the legs of
the table to look at his sister's gold fish,
and is putting his hands in the vase.
He is trying to catch one. Gold fish are
very delicate, and will not bear to be
handled. It looks very much as though
the table and vase would be overturned,
and the poor fish thrown out upon the
carpet, where they will probably die.








INTO MISCHIEF. 73




























DANCING feet and busy fingers,
Never still the whole day through,
For the little brain from dream-land
Brings them work enough to do.
Racing through the hall and parlor,
Romping on the winding stair,
Tearing books and breaking vases-
Into mischief everywhere.

Picks the cake and tastes the jelly,
Breaks the window, slams the door,
Throws the statues from their brackets,
Scatters playthings on the floor,
Tearing little coats and trousers,
Rumpling up his curly hair-
Busy, naughty little fingers,
Into mischief everywhere.
7






74 LAME ELLEN.
S. -.: :- -- -:, ' -'-















walk with the aid of a crutch. She is
very patient, and does many things to
help her mother. She has just brought
to her father his dinner, and is resting a
little while before she goes home.
l"~ ~ ,I. i: "/
% [ ..










little while before she goes home.






PET KITTEN. 75










I --.' -..' 1I

-- -














KITTY GREY was a very small kitten
when she was given to Allie Whitney
for a pet. Now she has grown to be a
large eat, quite an armful for Allie.









JII
76 THE NEW BOOK.




t i -J !: ~ "
U. o.>i -i













ELSIE and Allen Cameron have called,
on their way home from school, to see
their cousin Helen. This is Helen's
birthday, and she has been showing them
the new books she has received as pre-
sents, and is now reading them a story.
They all seem to be very much inte-
rested, even Jowler.






GOOD FOR EVIL. 77












I' "a Ii




SARAH MARLEY is not a good-tempered
girl, and is very often in disgrace at
school. To-day she struck M. .:-.- Wat-
son, and spoke some very angry words.
Her teacher obliged her to remain in the
school-room during recess, and not go out
to play with the other scholars. _M.._-..;
Watson feels sorry for her, and is return-
ing good for evil by offering her some of
her nice lunch.






78 TAKING CARE OF BABY.






















MARY ROGERS is a good, unselfish girl.
She was dressed to go to her friend
Esther's birthday party, but has re-
mained at home, spending the afternoon
in amusing the baby, to relieve her dear
mother, who is suffering with a severe
headache.
- , ,












headache.






BE KIND TO THE POOR. 79





;; i ;
', _:,I ,1,.





IF -







KATY MCKEE is a poor girl. Her
mother is sick, and Katy earns a little
money by sweeping the street-crossing
in muddy weather. To-day a kind little
lady has had pity upon her, and has
bought her a bun at the confectioner's,
and promised to go and see her mother.






80 THE ARMY HOSPITAL.























THESE poor soldiers have been wounded
in battle. riow glad they must feel to
be brought to this comfortable hospital,
where their wounds can be dressed, and
all their wants attended to. What a
horrible thin is war
inbattle o g they1 ms feel to












where their wounds can be dressed, and
all their wants attended to. What a
horrible thing is war!






THE OLD SOLDIER. 81





















THIS old soldier, with a wooden leg, is
returning from the war. Charlie Thorn
and his sister, on their way to school,
saw him seated by the sign-post. Charlie
feels sorry for him, and is asking him to
go to his father's house over the hill,
where he can obtain food and rest






82 THE POTTER.


















THE making of pottery is a very ancient
art. We read of potters -in the Bible,
and in some of the Egyptian tombs, many
thousand years old, very beautiful speci-
mens of pottery have been found. The
man in the picture is a potter. He is
making a pitcher. All kinds of pottery
are made of clay mixed with water, and
then moulded and baked in an oven.
mensof ottey hve ben ound Th







THE LESSON IN GEOGRAPHY. 83









/









UNCLE THOMAS is teaching his nephew
geography. He is showing him the situa-
tion of the different countries on a globe.
A globe is a great assistance in studying
geography. It is round, like the world,
and a child can obtain a much better idea
of the relative positions of continents,
oceans, rivers, and towns, than he can
from a map.







84 N TTING.











So wh






*."-* t^" 3 -0 0 .1.
~*i-B


IT is a bright October day. Jacob
and Alfred have been in the grand old
woods gathering nuts. Alfred beat the
trees with a long pole, and sent down
showers of glossy brown nuts, which
Jacob picked up and put in the baskets.
Now they are dividing the nuts.







A SAD FALL. 85






















TOMMY MORTON is having a sad fall.
I fear he has been climbing the tree to
rob bird-nests, as his hat seems to be full
of eggs. What a cruel boy! It is to be
hoped he will not break any of his limbs,
although he deserves some punishment.
.:. ... .' . 'r






86 LITTLE DOG TARTAR.








,, , ,








LOOK at this funny little dog. His
name is Tartar. He is a very intelligent
dog, and his mistress has taught him
many cunning tricks. He will sit up
and beg, jump over a stick, and carry a
basket to market; and if Julia gives him
a penny, lie will take it to the baker's,
put it down on the counter, and the baker
will give him a roll.







TRY TO DO GOOD. 87




He is a poor man, and has no money to















trying th o some good in the world.






gathers in all the children he can find,
and teaches them from the Bible.






88 SAIL ON THE RIVER.

























MR. and Mrs. Bonnel, with a party of
friends, are enjoying a sail on the Con-
necticut River. They are going to Hart-
ford.






THE PHOTOGRAPH. 89





(- '
hi -


S ,< -, 3











AMY LEE'S father and mother are spend-
ing a year in Europe. Amy has received
a letter from them, enclosing their photo-
graphs and one of her baby brother, with
which she is very much delighted. She
will answer the letter in a few days, and
has now come to the photographer's to
have her likeness taken, that she may
send it to her father and mother.
8*






90 THE FARM-YARD.






;- --- ,! "' ' i

A I






"On, mother! I've nad a splendid
time," said Willie Emerson, on his return
from spending a summer's day at his
uncle's farm.
"What did you do that was so delight-
ful ?" asked his mother. "I went all
over the farm and in the barn. I climbed
up into the wagon which stood in the
yard, and saw the horses and the cow,
and the lazy pigs, and the ducks, and the
hens with their dear little chickens. Oh!
I can't tell you all."






THE LITTLE FRENCH GIRL. 91





I '












ADELE ST. CLAIR'S home is in the West
Indies. She is from the island of Mar-
tinique, and is now at a boarding-school
in Philadelphia. She is a bright, plea-
sant little French girl, and her compan-
ions love her very much. An old friend
and neighbor of her father, from Martin-
ique, has just called to see her Adele
is very much delighted, as she expects
to hear news from her own dear home.








92 THE HONEY BEE.














. i








HONEY bee, honey bee,
Why do you hum?
"I am so happy,
Summer has come.
Summer and sunshine
Dearly I love;
Bright flowers around me,
Bright skies above.
Iereaway, thereaway,
Onward I haste,
Resting a moment
The blossoms to taste.
Toiling and working
While summer is sunny,
To lay up for winter
A store of sweet honey."
Fly away, honey bee,
Home to your hive,
You are so busy,
I know you will thrive.







THE NEW CARRIAGE. 93



i-- z


















Fon a long time David Curtis has been
wishing for a little carriage that he could
draw about himself. His father has made
him a birthday present of this pretty one.
David is delighted, and is taking old
Tabby, the sleepy gray cat, to ride.







94 SOAP-BUBBLES.


--- -- -- -- -'- : I









soapsuds between his knees, and his pipe
r. ----- N






DID you ever blow soap-bubbles ? It
is a very pleasant amusement for little
children. Harry Halsey has his pan of
soapsuds between his knees, and his pipe
in his mouth. He has just blown a large
bubble, which he will try to throw in the
air. If he succeeds, and the sun shines,
it will reflect all the colors of the rain-
1)ow.







TELLING STORIES. 95




1; 1 1 5 ;F'!*.1 ', '



1 I

















NORA was born in Ireland. Little
Marion is very fond of hearing Nora tell
stories about her native land, and how
she came across the ocean in a great ship,
to seek a home in this new country.







96 THE STAGE-COACH.



















A I





EDDIE and Lucy Lenox have been
spending the summer in the mountains
at the house of Morris' father. Now
they are going home in the stage-coach,
and Morris is bidding them good-by.







HOME, SWEET HOME. 97



.'.' ', ''' i'' ~













A VERY pleasant home-scene! Mr.
Horton is sitting in his easy-chair reading
aloud. Little Harry is standing beside
his knee. John is on the other side of
the table listening to the story, and baby
May sits on her mother's lap. A beau-
tiful vase of flowers is standing on the
table, and pussy is sitting very content-
edly upon the carpet
9







98 THE LION.























THE lion of the forest is a very dif-
ferent animal from the lion we sometimes
see in a menagerie. In his native wilds
the lion is very strong and cruel, and is
called the king of beasts.





University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs