• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Note
 The wolf and the lamb
 The frog and the ox
 The ass in a lion's skin
 The lobster and his mother
 The wolves and the sick ass
 The ape and her two young ones
 The daw in borrowed plumes
 The lion and the gnat
 The fox and the crow
 The fox that was docked
 The dog and the shadow
 The fox and the grapes
 The mole and her son
 The cat's paw
 The treacherous cur
 The dog and the wolf
 The dog in the manger
 The hare and the tortoise
 The fox and the crocodile
 The ant and the grasshopper
 The wolf in sheep's clothing
 The wolf and the crane
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Fables of Aesop and others, translated into human nature
Title: The fables of Aesop and others, translated into human nature
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028255/00001
 Material Information
Title: The fables of Aesop and others, translated into human nature
Uniform Title: Aesop's fables
Physical Description: 1, 22 leaves, 23 leaves of plates : col. ill. ; 26 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Bennett, Charles H ( Charles Henry ), 1829-1867
Swain, Joseph, 1820-1909 ( Engraver )
Chatto & Windus (Firm) ( Publisher )
Publisher: Chatto and Windus
Place of Publication: London
Publication Date: 1875
 Subjects
Subject: Animals -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Fables   ( lcsh )
Smoking in art -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1875   ( lcsh )
Fables -- 1875   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1875
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Fables   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: designed and drawn on the wood by Charles H. Bennett ; engraved by Swain.
General Note: "The ass in a lion's skin" (plate following p. 3) smokes a cigar.
General Note: Illustrations engraved by Swain.
General Note: Text in a double ruled border.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028255
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002471063
notis - AMH6580
oclc - 14149645

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents
    Note
        Unnumbered ( 6 )
    The wolf and the lamb
        Page 1
        Page 1a
    The frog and the ox
        Page 2
        Page 2a
    The ass in a lion's skin
        Page 3
        Page 3a
    The lobster and his mother
        Page 4
        Page 4a
    The wolves and the sick ass
        Page 5
        Page 5a
    The ape and her two young ones
        Page 6
        Page 6a
    The daw in borrowed plumes
        Page 7
        Page 7a
    The lion and the gnat
        Page 8
        Page 8a
    The fox and the crow
        Page 9
        Page 9a
    The fox that was docked
        Page 10
        Page 10a
    The dog and the shadow
        Page 11
        Page 11a
    The fox and the grapes
        Page 12
        Page 12a
    The mole and her son
        Page 13
        Page 13a
    The cat's paw
        Page 14
        Page 14a
    The treacherous cur
        Page 15
        Page 15a
    The dog and the wolf
        Page 16
        Page 16a
    The dog in the manger
        Page 17
        Page 17a
    The hare and the tortoise
        Page 18
        Page 18a
    The fox and the crocodile
        Page 19
        Page 19a
    The ant and the grasshopper
        Page 20
        Page 20a
    The wolf in sheep's clothing
        Page 21
        Page 21a
    The wolf and the crane
        Page 22
        Page 22a
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text















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CHATTO AND \VINDUS, PICCADILLY.
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CONTENTS.


1. THE WOLF AND THE IAMB.
2. TIE FROG AND TIE OX.

3. THE ASS IN A LION'S SKIN.

4. THE LOBSTER AND HIS MOTHER.
5. THE WOLVES AND THE SICK ASS.

6. THE APE AND HER TWO YOUNG ONES.

7. THE DAW IN BORROWED PLUMES.
8. THE LION AND THE GNAT.

9. THE FOX AND THE CROW.
O0. THE FOX THAT WAS DOCKED.

I THE DOG AND THE SHADOW.
[2. T1IE FOX AND THE GRAPES.

13, THE MOLE AND HER SON.
[4. 'III CAT'S PAW.
I5. THE TREACHEROUS CUR.
i6. THE DOG AND THE WOLF.

17. THE DOG IN THE MANGER.
18. THE HARE AND THE TORTOISE.

19. TIHE FOX AND THE CROCODILE.

20. THE ANT AND THE GRASSHOPPER.
21, THE WOLF IN SHEEP'S CIOTILhNG.

22. THE l WOLF AND TlHE CRANE.



















NOTE.


HE Design which forms the Frontispiece to this Book,
and which is therefore presumed to be somewhat typical
of the intention of Fable, represents Man tried at the Court
of the Lion for the ill-treatment of a Horse. It will be seen
that Man has the worst of it: while his Victim has secured
the Shark for his Solicitor, and the Fox, Ape, and Vulture
for Counsel; the woe-begone Defendant has had to make shift
with Wolf, Dog, Ass, and Daw. The Rat and the Rabbit, the
Elephant and the Sheep, even the Turkey and the little Birds,
seem to have given it against him, irrespective of the Silence"
of the Parrot Usher. The Clerk of the Arraigns looks through
his spectacles, and the Bull has gone to sleep in a corner.


CHARLES H. BENNETT.













THE WOLF AND THE LAMB.

AS a hungry thief of a Wolf was loitering at the end of a
lonely road, there passed by a mild-faced timid-looking
Lamb, who was returning to the maternal pen. As the Lamb
wore a fine fleecy coat, and carried about him many signs of
good living, the marauder's jaws watered at the prospect of a
supper.
What do you mean," said he, glaring upon the little tra-
veller with his fierce eyes, by taking up so much of the path
where I am walking ?"
The Lamb, frightened at the Wolf's angry tone and terrible
aspect, told him that, with all due submission, he could not
conceive how his walking on such a wide path could occasion
him any inconvenience.
What !" exclaimed the Wolf, seemingly in great anger and
indignation; "you are as impudent as your father, the magis-
trate's dog, with the letters on his collar, who seized me by the
throat last year, and caused me to be kept in a cage for three
months-having all my beautiful hair cut off!"
If you will believe me," said the innocent Lamb, my
parents are poor simple creatures who live entirely by green
stuffs, in Lambeth Walk, hard by; we are none of us hunters
of your species."
"Ah! I see it's no use talking to you," said the Wolf,
drawing up close to him; it runs in the blood of your family
to hate us Wolves; and therefore, as we have come so conve-
niently together, I'll just pay off a few of your forefathers' scores
before we part." ,
So saying, he leapt at the throat of the poor pet Lamb from
behind, and garotted him with his own pretty gold-studded
collar.


















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THE FROG AND THE OX.


AS a splendid Ox-who, by right of the great family he
belonged to, was permitted to disport himself as he pleased
in the fashionable parks of London-was taking his afternoon
stroll, an envious, tawdry-coated little Frog, that stood gaping
at him hard by, called out to certain of his fellows (who had
hopped thither in his company all the way from the Fleet
Ditch in the City), to take particular notice of the enormous
size of the first-mentioned animal.
'4 And see," he said, "if I don't make the biggest swell of
the two."
So he puffed himself up, once, twice, and again, and went
still swelling on in impotent emulation, till in the end,-spite of
the cautions of his brother Frogs-lie b-:rst himself.






















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THE ASS IN A LION'S SKIN.


T IHERE was a dreadful young Ass once, who prevailed
upon the old Asses, his indulgent parents, to obtain for
him a Lion's skin, in which to masquerade about the world.
At great cost and inconvenience to themselves, they provided
him with the disguise he had begged for; and, clothed in it,
he strutted forth believing himself a very Lion, and causing
men to flee before him in terror.
But it chanced in the end that, partly by the length of his
ears, and partly by the discordance of his bray when he tried
roaring, he was discovered, and the Lions with whom he had
sought to herd fell upon him so mercilessly, that he only saved
himself by flight, leaving his brave coat behind him, while men
on every side laughed at and pelted him as he flew to his
native common.










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THE LOBSTER AND HIS MOTHER.


A GREENISH young Lobster crawling along the Strand
with his mother (who, being old and learned, had attained
to a deep blue complexion), was struck by the appearance of a
specimen of his own tribe-evidently laid out for show-whose
shell-jacket was of a brilliant red. Young, ignorant, and vain,
he viewed the dazzling spectacle with admiration and envy.
Behold," he said, addressing his parent, the beauty and
splendour of one of our family, thus decked out in glorious
scarlet. I shall have no rest till I am possessed of an appear-
ance equally magnificent. How can I bear to see myself the
dingy object I am at present, mingling undistinguished with
our race?"
Proud and heedless idiot!" replied the hard old lady,
"this same tawdry finery, you so earnestly covet, is but too
easily obtained. In order to possess this appearance, it is only
necessary to be boiled."


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THE WOLVES AND THE SICK ASS.


SHERE were certain hungry carrion-hunting Wolves, who,
in a qualm of wonderful charity, paid a visit to a fat old
Ass, who lay ill of a bean-surfeit, and was like to die.
Pray, my good friend," said they, after many protestations
of regard, "whereabouts is your greatest pain ?"
Oh, gently! gently!" replied the Ass, as they proceeded to
feel his pulse, for it pricks me just there, where you lay your
fingers."










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THE APE AND HER TWO YOUNG ONES.


SHERE was a foolish old widowed She-Ape, who had two
young Monkeys of twins. She doted upon one of them,
whom she countenanced in breaking and pilfering what he
pleased; while she only noticed the other to punish him bitterly
if he should aggrieve or thwart his brother, but on the whole
left him to his own devices.
In the end the spoiled favourite broke out of bounds, and
committed a theft away from his mother's cage, and was snapped
at by a big Watch-Dog, whose kennel was in a neighboring
Court; while his neglected brother grew up a harmless, active,
and amusing Monkey, much respected by all who knew him.


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THE DAW IN BORROWED PLUMES.


A RICH vulgar Daw, who had a mind to be genteel, tricked
herself out in all the gay feathers which fell from the
fashionable Peacocks, and upon the credit of these borrowed
ornaments valued herself above all the birds of the air. But
this absurd vanity got her the envy of all the high-born birds
with whom she wished to associate; who, indeed, upon the dis-
covery of the truth, by common consent fell to pluming her,
and when each bird had taken her own feather, this silly Daw
had nothing left wherewith to cover her naked vulgarity.

















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THE LION AND THE GNAT.


AS a great majestic Lion was gathering himself up within his
lair, to astonish mankind with the wondrous powers of his
roar, there came buzzing under his very nose a troublesome
Gnat, who challenged him to combat.
What avail your tremendous lungs and cavernous throat,
compared to the melodious pipes of my little organ ? and as for
your strength, endurance, and resolution, I defy you to put that
point to an issue at once."
The Lion finding the insect would not be brushed away, was
fain to accept the challenge; so to it they went. But the Lion
had no chance, for the Gnat charged direct into the drum of the
Lion's ear, and there twinged him until in very despair he tore
himself with his own paws. In the end, the Gnat gained the
victory over the noble beast, upon which he flew away, but had
the misfortune afterwards in his flight to strike into a cobweb,
where he, the conqueror, fell a prey to a large Blue-bottle
Spider.


































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THE FOX AND THE CROW.

A H-OMELY old female Crow, having flown out of a shop in
the town with a piece of rich cheese in her bill, betook
herself to a fine eminence in the country, in order to enjoy it;
which a cunning Fox observing, came and sat at her feet, and
began to compliment the Crow upon the subject of her beauty.
I protest," said he, I never observed it before, but your
feathers are of a more delicate white than any I ever saw in my
life! Ah, what a fine shape and graceful turn of the body is
there! And I make no question but you have a voice to
correspond. If it is but as fine as your complexion, I do not
know a bird that can pretend to stand in competition with you.
Come, let me hear you exercise it by pronouncing a single mono-
syllable, which will bind me to you, hand and heart for ever."
The Crow, tickled with this very civil language, nestled and
wriggled about, and hardly knew where she was; but thinking
the Fox had scarcely done justice to her voice, and wishing to
set him right in that matter, she called out Yes," as loud as
possible. But, through this one fatal mistake of opening her
mouth, she let fall her rich prize-(in the Fox's shrewd estima-
tion all she was worth in the world)-which the Fox snapped
up directly, and trotted away to amuse himself as he pleased,
laughing to himself at the credulity of the Crow, who saw but
little of him or her cheese afterwards.

















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THE FOX THAT WAS DOCKED.


T HERE was a cunning but over-reaching old Fox, who, hav-
ing fortified himself within certain Banks for the plucking
and eating of unsuspecting Geese, was, nevertheless, unearthed,
and pursued by the County Hounds. Being caught by a trap
in his flight, he was glad to compound for his neck by leaving
'his magnificent tail behind him. It was so uncouth a sight for
a Fox to appear without this distinguishing ornament of his
race, that the very thought of it made him weary of his life.
But, however, for the better countenance of the scandal, he
called the Foxes together, when he made a learned discourse
upon the trouble, the uselessness, and the indecency of Foxes
wearing long, draggling, bushy tails. He had no sooner finished
his harangue, than up rises a cunning old Fox, who desired to
be informed whether the worthy Fox that had moved against
the wearing of tails gave his advice for the advantage of those
that possessed such natural appendages, or to palliate the
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THE DOG AND THE SHADOW.


H.ERE was a vain and greedy young Dog, who, coming

near a certain shallow stream called Fashionable Society,

saw therein the mere shadow and reflection of a tempting prize

(the more so, that he conceived it the property of a luckier

Dog than himself), in snapping at which he opened his mouth

so eagerly and so foolishly as to cause to fall away from him a

rare possession of the same kind which was his own, and which

was all he could have desired for his heart's content, but which

his lips were never allowed to touch more.



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THE FOX AND THE GRAPES.


A LONELY She-Fox was fascinated by some grapes which
hung high in a certain Vineyard, and, in order to obtain

which, she for some time fatigued herself in leaps, friskings,
and contortions, more or less graceful, until her joints grew

stiff, and her bones fairly ached again. But at last, finding her

agility decrease, and the grapes farther from her reach than

ever, Let who will take them," said she; "as for me, I would

none of them at a gift, for I am sure they are as sour as
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THE MOLE AND HER SON.


A YOUNG conceited Mole one day prevailed upon his
mother to take him out of their dwelling-hole to see some
of the fine sights so much admired by the people above them.
He proceeded to criticise the surrounding beauties.
What an execrable view this is !" said he, pausing in sight
of a beautiful landscape, and twirling his scanty whiskers with
an air. "You don't mean to tell me that sky is blue! and the
idea of purple grass is positively ridiculous. There's a horse,
too, with six legs, and a man taller than his own house. And
I'm sure we ought to be able to see the flowers growing on
those mountains at this distance! Out of all reason, colour, and
proportion. Preposterous !"
My son, my son," said the mother, as you are incapable
of appreciating what you affect to despise, it is unfortunate that
you are not dumb as well as blind, and so might have escaped
this exposure of your ignorance."






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THE CAT'S PAW.


A CUNNING old Ape who felt his mouth water at the
vicinity of certain tempting fruits which he longed to
possess, but which he knew to be guarded in a place too warm
for his fingers to venture in, asked a foolish'young Cat, whom
he saw passing, to come to his assistance.
I pray you," he said, "lend me your paw to reach those
pretty nice things that I require. I am a poor old creature
that cannot help himself, and will well reward you for your
pains."
The silly Cat complied; but in so doing, burnt his claws so
terribly that he was unable to catch mice for months to come,
while the old Ape got safely off with the plunder.












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THE TREACHEROUS CUR.


A CERTAIN Merchant had a Dog called Clerk," in whom
he placed a particular confidence. He fed the creature
from his own table, and, in short, took more care of him than
of any of his fellows. This kindness, however, was but ill
repaid; for, one day, no sooner was the Merchant's back turned,
than the rascally hound flew to the safe, tore it open, and helped
himself to all the choice bits that his benefactor, with much care,
had scraped together for the sustenance of his own children.
But, fortunately, his Master returned in time to detect him in
the act, and bade him prepare for punishment.
Master," said the Cur, in excuse, bethink you, I am one
of your family. I am a Dog who has hitherto borne a good
name. Punish me not for this first offence; rather turn your
displeasure upon those rascals the Wolves, who make a daily
practice of plunder."
No! no!" replies his Master. I would rather spare forty
Wolves, who rob through want or evil training, than a Dog like
you, who is faithless to trust and insensible to kindness."
So the Dog was bound and carried out of the house, and
consigned to the mercy of deep water, with a heavy chain
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THE TREACHEROUS CUR.















THE DOG AND THE WOLF.

HERE was a gaunt, ragged gipsy of a Wolf who fell into
company with a sleek, jolly Dog belonging to the Spaniel
tribe, on the King's highway. The Wolf was wonderfully
pleased with his companion, and was inquisitive to learn how
he had brought himself to that commendable state of body.
Why," said the Dog, I keep my Master's house, and I
have the best of meat, drink, and lodging for my pains; indeed,
if you'll go along with me, and do as I do, you may fare as I
fare."
The Wolf readily agreed, and so away they trotted together;
but as they approached the house the Wolf caught sight of the
Dog's curiously embroidered collar, from which a kind of gold
chain hung down over the shoulder. Brother," said he, what
is this I see ?"
"Oh, that's nothing!" says the Spaniel; "a mere social
badge to let the world know whose Dog I am."
"Indeed!" says the other. "If those be the conditions,
good-bye. Bare bones and independence, rather than cold
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THE DOG IN THE MANGER.


A CHURLISH, pampered Cur, who had a comfortable place
in a gentleman's well-filled Manger, would from thence
snap and snarl to frighten off all poor beasts of draught and
burden who passed that way-driven by the hardness of the
time of year to beg for provender they could not earn by
labour in the fields. This Dog wanted for nothing himself,
and yet took an ill-natured pleasure in keeping poor famishing
creatures from many a meal, which, but for his officious yelping,
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THE HARE AND THE TORTOISE.


\ HAT a dull, heavy creature," said a bright-eyed, nimble-
footed Hare, "is this same plodding Tortoise! He
trudges along in the mud, neither looking to the right nor to the
left, only caring to nibble such of the dryest grass and the
dirtiest roots as come in his way, and making no more progress
in a day's march than I can accomplish in two or three careless
bounds!"
And yet," said the Tortoise (in whose hearing the speech
had been made for his humiliation), "although I have neither
your lightness of foot, nor the compact and powerful symmetry
of your haunches, I will undertake to run you for a wager."
"Agreed !" said the Hare, contemptuously. So a goal was
named, and away they started together. The Tortoise kept
jogging along at his usual rate, and was soon left behind and
out of sight by the Hare, who, tired of running alone in a given
direction, fell to browsing on choice plants, and then went off to
a game of play with certain of his sportive companions, finally
making up his form for a snug nap among some tempting long
autumn grass! For," said he, with my great natural gift of
swiftness, I can fetch up Old Humdrum Master Tortoise when-
ever I please."
But he overslept himself, it seems. For when he came to
wake, it was already dark, the weather had changed, and the
fields were heavy with clay; and though he scudded away as
fast as the ground would let him, he was fain to drop at last, half
dead with cold and fatigue, in sight of the winning-post, which
the Tortoise had reached comfortably before him,-thereby win-
ning the wager.


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THE HARE AND THE TORTOISE.


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THE FOX AND THE CROCODILE.
T HERE happened to be an argument once between a quiet
cynic of a Fox and a conceited, vulgar Crocodile upon
the point of Blood and Extraction; the Crocodile boasted of
his descent and the renown of his ancestors.
Our family," said he, "is of the greatest antiquity. We
were princes in Egypt before the foundation of the Pyramids."
Friend," said the Fox, smiling, and pointing with his claw
to certain dabs of mud resting between the coarse excrescences
of the speaker's hide, "there will need no herald to prove your
gentility, for you carry the marks of your origin on your very
skin."


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THE ANT AND THE GRASSHOPPER.


AS a rich, purse-proud Ant was airing himself at the foot of
an old oak-tree, beneath the roots of which lay his vast

bonded warehouses of Corn, up came a poor starveling Grass-
hopper to solicit a grain of barley. The selfish Ant told him
he should have laboured in Summer if he would not have
wanted in Winter.
But," said the poor Chirper, I was not idle : I sung out
the whole season. I did my best to amuse you and your fellow-

husbandmen while you were getting in your harvest."

If that is the case," returned the Ant, with unpardonable

callousness, you may make a merry year of it, and dance in
Winter to the tune you sang in Summer."


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THE ANT AND THE GRASSHOPPER.















THE WOLF IN SHEEP'S CLOTHING.


'FHERE is a story of a greedy Wolf, who, having decep-
tively wrapped himself in woollen clothing marked X 25,
in sign of his belonging to the peaceful flock, was, for a long
while, permitted to prowl about certain homesteads, where, his
real nature not being suspected, he caused most unaccountable
decreases in the family store of mutton.
But being in the end discovered by the Shepherd (who was
named Inspector), he was, by that watchful guardian of the
public pastures, ignominiously stripped and flogged, howling, to
the wilderness.
Why whip you the animal ?" asked the neighbours. Was
he not faithful ?"
Faithful!" cried the Shepherd, laying on in wrath. "I
took him for an honest watch-dog, and, lo! I find him in Sheep's
clothing, making sheep's eyes at a foolish ewe, whom he would
have eaten out of house and home to satisfy his wolfish cravings,
had she not given him her Master's lamb for supper."






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THE WOLF IN SHEEP'S CLOTHING.
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THE WOLF AND THE CRANE.


A RAGGED-HAIRED, sharp-fanged Wolf, having, through
overgorging himself with honest men's property, brought
on an uneasy sensation about his throat, which threatened to be
fatal, applied to a clever Crane of the long-billed species to help
him through his trouble, upon condition of a very considerable
reward for the practitioner's pains. The Crane, by skilfully re-
moving certain perilous obstructive matters, brought the Wolf's
throat out of danger, and then claimed the fulfilment of his
client's promise.
"What!" said the knavish brute; "have I not let you go
without even the mark of my gripe round your own throttle ?
Be thankful that I have not mangled your lean carcase for you,
stripped your head of its knowing wig, and your back of its
glossy, rustling robe. Expect no greater recompense for saving
the life of a Wolf."






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THE WOLF AND THE CRANE.


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