• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Half Title
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Impulse and principle
 Sea-shell island
 In Swanage Bay
 Bonny Jean
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Good boys' annual : a Christmas and New Year's gift
Title: Good boys' annual
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028252/00001
 Material Information
Title: Good boys' annual a Christmas and New Year's gift
Physical Description: 279, 6 p., 4 leaves of plates : ill. ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Abbott, Annie W
Sartain, John, 1808-1897 ( Engraver )
Finden, Edward Francis, 1791-1857 ( Engraver )
Mote, W. H ( Engraver )
Rothermel, Peter Frederick, 1812-1895 ( Illustrator )
Stocks, Lumb, 1812-1892 ( Illustrator )
Drummond, William ( Illustrator )
Leavitt & Allen Brothers ( Publisher )
Publisher: Leavitt & Allen Bros.
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: [1875?]
 Subjects
Subject: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1875   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1875   ( lcsh )
Gift books -- 1875   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1875   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1875
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Gift books   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Annie W. Abbott ; illustrated.
General Note: Date of publication from inscription.
General Note: Contains fiction and verse.
General Note: Added title page printed in colors.
General Note: Some illustrations engraved by Sartain, E. Finden, and W.H. Mote and drawn by Rothermel, L. Stocks, and W. Drummond.
General Note: Binding is gold stamping on purple cloth with onlay picture of couple in a field.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements follow text.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00028252
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002230612
notis - ALH0974
oclc - 60884064

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page i
    Frontispiece
        Page ii
    Half Title
        Page iii
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
    Impulse and principle
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
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    Sea-shell island
        Page 147
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    In Swanage Bay
        Page 215
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    Bonny Jean
        Page 221
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    Advertising
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text










I -
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t1m ;tor k:
LEA VITT & ALLEN BBOS.


[OO0 [Iows


m mm 114
























NEW YORK:
LEAVITT & ALLEN BROS.,
8 HOWARD STREET.


18518~P


EN N U

























CONTENTS.




PAGE.
IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.................................. 8

SEA-SHELL ISLAND.......................................... 147

IN SWANAGE BAY........................................... 215

BONNY JEAN................................................. 221












IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.




CHAPTER I

GERALD has come, mother. I do not
know how long he has been sitting in the
parlor, reading the newspaper. So why
don't you carry in tea ? I am not hungry
myself; I am in no hurry for my own part.
But Sally could have got every thing ready
half an hour ago. Come; I will help you."
"No, no! Out of my way, you monkey
Go out of the kitchen, I say. Go! I can
do nothing with such a harum scarum at
my heels. Go off you will make me break
this teapot. Let my apron alone, will you?
What do people do, who have half-a-dozen
boys, I wonder? I am sure it is more than
I can do to manage one. Eugene, for
shame Take your hands out of that plate







THE OLNEYS; OR,


Ah, I shall trim your fingers off yes -
right off, with this knife."
Eugene was not a whit afraid. He loved
his mother, but he never obeyed her, unless
it suited his inclination to do so. He was
not blind to the admiring looks and the
half-hidden smiles that followed him in all
his'wild pranks. He knew that she would
find excuse for any thing in the world he
might take it into his giddy pate to do, or
to say.
Gerald, who was waiting for his friends
and his supper in the parlor, was Eugene's
cousin. He was just twenty-one, and had
recently opened a store in the town. Eu-
gene admired him; he was a little afraid
of him, however. He did not know why,
exactly. He observed every thing his cousin
said or did. He thought him gentle, and
even kind, in his manners; and he felt as
if he took a particular interest in him. Why,
then, should he stand in awe of him? He
could not tell. He supposed it was because
Gerald looked serious, often, when he had
hoped to make him laugh.
"0, what famous bread! Why, mother,
Sally's cakes used to rise above the top of







IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


the pan, so far--yes, let me show you.
Yours, now "
Run, open the doors for me, saucebox,"
Jaid his mother, whose face was red with
heat and vexation. She was not much at
home in the kitchen. Sally, a good cook,
had reigned there for some years. She had
gone away in a pet only the night before.
Gerald looked up from his paper, and
smiled upon the gay lad, as he came hop-
ping and dancing round the table. But a
cloud came over his features, when Eugene
snatched a lump of sugar, and popped it
into his mouth with a smirk, making a sign
with his finger to his cousin not to tell.
Not that he at all cared whether his mother
knew it or not. Only it was good fun to
rob her so cleverly, before her very eyes,
for she had entered close behind him. It
was something highly droll, he thought,
and the lump of sugar had a higher zest
than if any one had given it to him.
Mr. Olney came in and shook his nephew's
hand, with a cordiality not unmingled with
respect.
I am glad to see you, my dear fellow-
always glad to see you in my house. That
1*






THE OLNEYS ; OR,


you would not consent to make it y(r
home is a loss to myself and Eugene, but
lucky for you. I suppose my wife has told
you her help-less condition."
I had not heard that piece of domestic
intelligence," said Gerald, folding up the
gazette he had been reading.
"I have been busy in the kitchen," said
Mrs. Olney. "I thought you would re-
member that, Mr. Olney, and come in. Ger-
ald has been quite alone."
My trees will not prune themselves,
Mrs. Olney, or I should have been glad to
do so. I wish, with all my heart, for your
sake, my dear, poor Sally was here again."
"Poor Sally? Why, Mr. Olney! "
"You say you missed various things;
does that make it certain that Sally was to
blame ?"
Why, who else could have taken them ?
I asked her that. She heed not have flown
into a passion. That did not look like inno-
cence. I had no intention of turning her
off, I am sure."
"I do not blame her do you, Gerald ?-for
not staying, under suspicion of dishonesty."
Gerald started, as if stung by sudden pain.






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


Eugene, who sat opposite, looked earnestly
at him.
"Nothing can be more painful or degrad-
ing," continued Mr. Olney.
"There is one thing more painful, more
degrading," said Gerald, forcing himself to
reply.
"What is that ?"
"To have deserved it."
"0, yes," said Mr. Olney, of course so.
My dear, I will thank you for a spoon. No-
body has stolen them, I hope; there is not
one on the table."
The variety of things found lacking in
Mrs. Olney's tea arrangements occasioned
loud mirth in Eugene. He was sent to the
closet or the kitchen several times.
The bread proved heavy and ill baked.
" Have you no cake?" inquired the hus-
band in a low tone.
0, yes; I forgot to put it on the table."
"Send Eugene for it."
"No. I must go myself. I put it out of
his reach."
Eugene blushed and giggled. Mrs. 01-
ney's search upon a high shelf produced
nothing but a plate full of crumbs.






THE OLNEYS; OR,


"The naughty rats!" cried Eugene.
" What rogues they are Father looks very
mournful; and are you not sadly disap-
pointed, cousin Gerald ?" No one smiled,
not even his mother.
Eugene felt awkward and uncomfortable
under his cousin's eye. He was glad when
his mother broke the silence by scolding
him.
Now I understand why you wanted no
supper, Mr. Eugene," said she. "You had
been stuffing yourself with my nice cake.
I never can keep any thing in the house, for
you. You might at least have told me, so
that I could send to the confectioner. It
was very unkind to bring me into such a
scrape."
If you had not hidden it, I should not
have hooked the whole," said Eugene. I
was so diverted when I discovered it cud-
dled away in the corner, and thought how
blank you would look when you came, all
so sure of it, and found it all gone, as clean
as a whistle "
Eugene has such spirits," said his moth-
er aside to Gerald, "such a propensity to
play tricks!" She was anxious he should






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


view the matter in the same light that she
chose to do. But Gerald did not look as if
he regarded it as merely a piece of mischiev-
ous fun. He said nothing, however; so Mr.
Olney answered for him.
A very foolish joke, indeed; but let it
pass. Produce the cake now, boy; we are
really in perishing need of it."
It is not fit to produce, father; it would
not look very inviting, after being crammed
into my pockets,'' said'Eugene. He en-
deavored to look arch and funny, but a
glance at Gerald's serious countenance con-
fused him so much that his fond father
pitied him.
How can you keep your countenance,
Gerald ?" said he. I cannot help laugh-
ing, or I would punish the audacious imp.
He knows he is safe enough if he can only
make me laugh. He is full of capers."
Now I think of it, I do not doubt you
know all about my lost plum-pudding,"
cried Mrs. Olney. "Yes-yes; you de-
nied all knowledge of it, but I can hardly
believe "
0, I did not lie about it. If you please
to remember, I said I had never touched a
finger to it."






THE OLNEYS; OR,


Only a knife and fork eh ? "
"Did not I and the boys have a complete
lunch of it, out behind the barn Such fun
as I had! I carried it out on a couple of
shingles, and divided it with the hatchet;
and, putting our hands behind us, we put
into it with our mouths, like a parcel of
little dogs. One got a raisin stuck upon
his nose; another got a crumb in his eye.
One of the boys brought his head down on
mine like a mallet, and drove my teeth into
my lip, as I was mumbling at a piece of
crust. It was as big as two when I came
into the house."
I thought you had been fighting," said
Mrs. Olney, "and you declared you had
good reasons."
Good raisins, I said."
Mrs. Olney looked round admiringly; but
Gerald did not smile at a pun which had
answered the purpose of a lie.
We had famous laughing over that pud-
ding, I tell you. But I thought I should
have split to hear you and cross Sally at
variance about it. It was delightful to have
her take a miff and go off; she did nothing
out scold and croak about me."






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


"Well, you deserve to eat no bread but
of your mother's baking for the rest of
your life," said Mr. Olney, angrily.
The bread would have been good, Mr.
Olney, had not something got out of order in
the oven," said Mrs. Olney, coloring. It
rose very well."
Ris, you should say, Mrs. Cook," said
Eugene, saucily. Ris sounds workman-
like and capable."
"Hold your tongue, scapegrace," cried
his mother, playfully rapping his head.
"Cannot you see that your sober cousin is
shocked at your froward conduct ? "
"He was a better boy at your age,-a
steady, well-behaved boy, who did not
take what was not his own," said Mr. Olney.
"Dear me! are you scalded? said Mrs.
Olney, as Gerald failed to take firm hold of
a cup she handed to him, and spilt his tea.
When the confusion was over, and the
fingers and table-cloth duly wiped, Gerald
turned his large, melancholy eyes full upon
Eugene.
I claim no such character as your father
gives me; still I can warn you, Eugene.
You weaken your moral sense--in other







THE OLNEYS ; OR,


words, your conscience, -by allowing your-
self to do things absolutely wrong under
the name of fun. Deceit and stealing are
no joke; I see them in their true light,
though I do not blame you for being blind
to their real nature."
"Deceit! Stealing !" repeated Eugene,
half angry, and wholly astonished.
"Do not be affronted. Think of some
other boy than Eugene Olney doing the
same things."
"Well! what then? I do not think the
worse of any boy for being a bit of a rogue,
I am sure. I should not think he did wrong,
when he did not mean to do any wrong.
Boys will be boys, as my mother says.
There's a great difference between doing
things for fun, and and -"'
On that principle, I see nothing to hin-
der you from putting your hand into your
father's purse, or even your employer's, by
way of joke, and chuckling to see an inno
cent person suffer blame or suspicion m
consequence."
Mr. and Mrs. Olney drew up, and the lady
put up her lip, and gave a little disdainful
.augh. It was a great liberty, to be sure,






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


that Gerald took, rebuking their boy before
their very faces, and tacitly throwing blame
upon their management of him. But Ger-
ald was no common young than; Eugene
had found that out before.
After staring at his monitor with open
eyes for some moments, he burst out, with
a face full of earnestness, "Let me be your
shop-boy, Gerald, will you ?"
"Yes," said Gerald, simply.
Yes? repeated Mrs. Olney, when
you think the boy a thief! And she sneered
as much as a lady can.
Yes ? asked Mr. Olney. Do you say
yes, when you think him capable of robbing
his employer? He shall not go."
"As you please, uncle," returned Gerald,
quietly. And he looked as if he was think-
ing of something else, as he slowly buttered
his roll, and laid it upon the side of his
plate without tasting it. His countenance
was provokingly contemplative and absent
in its expression.
"I don't see why you need to take fire,
as long as Gerald and I understand each
other," said Eugene, with his usual sauci-
ness, when he found the matter was settled







THE OLNEYS; OR,


contrary to his own wishes. I like Gerald
first rate. If he trusted me, I would lose
my right hand before I would do him any
mischief. Nobody ever thinks of trusting
me. I should not have taken the cake, if I
had not been expected to. Come, father;
it will be the making of me to go, and if
you don't let me, look out. I'll act ten
times worse than ever I did in my life."
"You are a spoiled child," said his father.
" Leave the table."
Luckily, I am not hungry," observed
Eugene, rising from his seat, and stretching
as he did so. To get away was just what
I wanted."
"Go up to your room."
Just where I was going. I've a book I
want to read."
You are not to set foot out of youi
chamber door to-night," said Mr. Olney,
much provoked.
"You have no objection, however, to my
getting out at the window? The cherry-
tree has served me for a staircase before
now."
"Cease your impudent replies, Eugene,
and obey. Go up stairs instantly. I forbid
Vouw coming down again to-night."







IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


Eugene bowed with much apparent good-
humor and content. "And won't you bring
me a light by and by, mother dear? 0
yes! You do not want me to fall over a
chair in the dark, and break my pretty little
Grecian nose "
"No indulgence, if you please, Mrs. 01-
ney. Gerald, if you or any one else could
tame this boy's insolent tongue, I would
bind him apprentice for seven years. He is
intolerable lately. His mother makes such
a pet of him, that "
It is not I, or, at least not I alone," be-
gan Mrs. Olney.
"Good night, cousin Gerald," said Eu-
gene, with a smile of conscious power. It
seemed to say, "You see how it is; neither
of them can manage me."
"Good night, my dear cousin," said Ger-
ald, gravely. Then, with a smile of pecu-
liar sweetness, he added, "And do nct forget
the fifth command, Eugene. I am an orphan,
and envy you the opportunity of making a
grateful return for the fond love of parents."
Eugene having gone at last, a weight
seemed to have fallen upon the spirits of
the father and mother, and the conversation







THE OLNEYS ; OR,


which Gerald tried to keep up upon indif-
ferent subjects was broken by long pauses.
When tea was over, Mrs. Olney retired
,o the kitchen to wash dishes, and sigh after
the injured Sally. Gerald prepared to depart.
Mr. Olney had begun to feel ashamed of
having taken offence in behalf of his indulged
boy. He knew Gerald was at least partly
right.
Do not go yet, my dear nephew," he said,
rousing himself to speak in a hearty manner.
"Indeed I must," said Gerald. Business
before friends, you know. To be sure, I
have few customers; but those few must
find me at my post."
"Right, right. Order and punctuality are
the wheels of business."
"A good maxim for me to remember;
thank you sir," said Gerald, putting on his
hat, and opening the door. He came back
into the room with a bright and happy smile,
when he saw his uncle's hand extended
towards him. He put his own into it with
a cordial grasp, which was emphatically
returned.
"My good fellow," said Mr. Olney, hold-
ing him fast, that he might hear him through;






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


"'we parents are somewhat sensitive, you
perceive, when we find ourselves censured
by young folks, who have no experience of
the difficulty of controlling children. Do
not mind it, however; I wish you to speak
your thoughts freely, at least to me."
"The looker-on sometimes sees most of
the game," said Gerald. "I meant well."
"I see you can be useful to Eugene.
Your opinions have great weight with him,
because you are near his age."
"I sincerely wish Gerald stopped,
and his lip trembled.
"You wish to save him from future error
and disgrace. The boy is wilful. I have
seen nothing positively bad; nothing as yet.
I am deeply anxious, however."
Your example of probity and truth
cannot be lost on Eugene. What the parent
is is not unfelt by the child, even when
what he says may seem to be disregarded."
"Thank you; you cheer me. I have, I
am sensible, guided him much less than I
ought, it has been so difficult to fix his at.
tention by words. But I am detaining you.
Good-by."






THE OLNEYS; OR


CHAPTER II.

T is nine o'clock! the bell is ringing !"
cried Mrs. Olney, starting up from the sofa,
on which she had dropped asleep, after the
fatigues of the day. "Have you heard any
thing of Eugene ? "
"Nothing. But I have not been listening,
particularly."
"Now, Mr. Olney !"
"Why? He is safe enough gone to
bed, and to sleep, probably."
"You know what an active spirit he has!
He is about something or other, I know by
his being so still. He may have done some-
thing dreadful-met with some accident,
some injury. Or who knows but something
in the dark may have terrified him ? It is
not more than a year or two is it? sinlc
he had a night lamp burning in his chamber,
he was so timid."
"A year? Six, or possibly seven.'
"Is it possible he has grown such a great
boy ? Dear me! But are you not willing I
should go and just peep in, with a lamp ? "






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


Do as you see fit. I shall not go near
him."
"He has been more saucy than he was
to-night many a time, and you have only
laughed. It is all Gerald, with his dry,
stern ways, that makes you so severe, all at
once."
"Gerald's presence only made me a little
more sensible than usual how unbecoming
and disrespectful his behavior is. I shall
not laugh hereafter, but teach him what is
proper, if it be not too late."
Poor boy Sad times are coming, I see,"
said Mrs. Olney, laughing. How long will
your dignified mood last ? Severity will
drive him from you, without making him
any more orderly."
"I fear that. I will do my duty, how-
ever, if I can, in future. He is getting too
old to be played with all the time-quite
too old, altogether too old, to be petted so
fondly by his mother."
Do not put such an idea into his head,
I beg. He is my only child, and when he
outgrows my care, life will be as tedious as
a twice-told tale."
Your husband is much obliged to you for






THE OLNEYS; OR,


the compliment. There was a time, Eugenia,
when you were not indifferent to his so-
ciety."
"How you misunderstand me! I was
only talking of care, the pleasant care of a
dependent object. As to that, I have al-
ways been more an object of care to you,
than you can be to me, being my superior,
you know."
"I don't know. But that is of no conse-
quence. What I want to impress on your
mind is this. If you care for Eugene in the
right way, now, while he is young, he will
never outgrow your care. He will respect his
mother as long as she lives."
How much that sounds like Gerald "
thought Mrs. Olney, as she took the way to
Eugene's sleeping chamber. Presently she
came flying down stairs on tiptoe, and beck-
oned her husband.
He silently obeyed the call, and was greatly
amused to find Eugene lying asleep on the
entry floor, with his feet just inside of the
chamber door. He was evidently sound asleep
- there was no feigning. The way he had
found to obey his father's injunction to the
better, and at the same time to set it aside, -






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE,


a thing he usually contrived to do, seemed
to tlim very witty and comical.
He looked so beautiful to his mother's eye,
with his long lashes motionless on his flushed
cheeks, that she could not but touch her lips
to his forehead. The kiss was as light as the
fall of a rose-leaf; but it waked the sleeper,
and at the same time informed him who was
near. A most obstreperous snoring ensued,
so evidently fictitious, that Mr. Olney began
to retreat on tiptoe, with all haste a circum-
stance which did not escape Eugene's quick
ears.
Hallo, father," he cried, "you see for
yourself I have not set foot out of the cham-
ber door. I have not been down the cherry-
tree, but up, to the roof, and astride the tall-
est chimney on the house. I had real fun up
there, looking down at you, pruning away in
the garden."
"It is a miracle you did not break your
neck," said his mother, shuddering.
"I shall have to buy a cowskin, yet," said
Mr. Olney.
0, fie, father! I shall die of laughing to
see you flourishing a cowskin about. A






THE OLNEYS; OR,


pretty figure you would cut, thrashing your
beloved son "
Well, go to bed, boy, and let me see, to-
morrow, you do not intend to deserve it."
You will let me leave school and be with
Gerald ? Hey, father ? "
"Not immediately." And Mr. Olney's slip
pers were heard, clattering down the stairs.
"But you will some time or other? "
screamed Eugene.
There was no answer but the clap with
which the parlor door was shut, cutting off
further parley.
Dear mother, are you very tired to-
night ? "
"Yes, and discouraged to death."
"0, I am sorry. What a fellow I was,
to let Sally go off mad about that pudding
and the other things I hooked!"
"0 Eugene!"
"I forgot about you, what a time you
would have. But you never forget me. I
wish I did not act so so bad, were it
only for your sake."
"Then you do love me? "
"To be sure I do; who doubts it ? "
"Only some persons say indulged chil-






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


dren never love their parents so well as
those which are more strictly brought up."
"And do you believe it ? "
"I am afraid it may be true."
"And does father think I do not love
him ?"
"Why, I -am not sure what he thinks
about it."
"Did Gerald say I did not love my pa-
rents? I want to know."
"No; but I think he is convinced of it,
from your behavior to us."
"I should like him to see the way I would
run between, if a robber should aim a pistol
at father or you! I would face a mad dog
for you, or fire, or any thing in the world.
Just try me, and see if I wouldn't!"
"Little things show affection just as
well."
Knock when you wake in the morn-
ing, and I will jump up, and make your
fire. One buss, and good night. I do love
you; no boy loves his mother more, or
has more reason to. And, if even Gerald
said any thing to the contrary, I don't know
but I should shake my fist in his face."
And getting up with due care not to take






THE OLNEYS; OR,


his feet out of the limits, Eugene went
thoughtfully to bed.
Mrs. Olney knocked, according to promise,
when she waked. While listening to hear
her son's step upon the stairs, the tired lady
dropped asleep again, and passed the time
till the usual breakfast hour, in sweet obliv-
ion of kitchen affairs. At the sound of the
bell, she dressed in haste, and, looking in at
the parlor, unexpectedly found herself called
upon to preside at a table well spread with
smoking viands.
The oven is in order again, then," said
Mr. Olney, smilingly regarding a pile of light
rolls.
They ris, as they ought, and so did I,"
remarked Eugene. We are both very good
this morning, -better than we were last
night."
"I am astonished -perfectly amazed,"
said Mrs. Olney. "You are really quite a
fine cook. I expected to find you and your
father in a state of starvation, watching at
the door, or perhaps at the corner of the
street, for the baker."
You would be still more struck up, if
you should take a peep into the kitchen."






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


"Why so ?"
"Why ? Because there is Sally, as large
as life.".
"What, our Sally ? cried Mr. and Mrs.
Olney, in a breath.
"Yes; our Sally."
"I have actually been hearing her step
and voice, then," said Mr. Olney, while I
was pondering on the strange power of
imagination and habit which made me think
I did."
"I shall be quite ashamed to look her in
the face," said Mrs. Olney. "I believe I
should not have thought of accusing her, if
she had not persisted in laying the blame on
Eugene, after I thought he had denied hav-
ing any thing to do with it."
"I did not lie," said Eugene.
There was the essence of a lie in what
you said," said Mr. Olney. "The guilt is
not in the words, but the deceit. Truth
may be sacrificed even by a look, or a nod,
if it misleads purposely."
"Humph I know that -I have in my
day seen so many nods and winks when
Master Eugene was to be kept in ignorance
of any thing, or led to believe something. I







THE OLNEYS; OR,


was always shrewd enough to believe b)
contraries, however. You might as well
catch a weasel asleep as take me in. But
there's where I learnt to bamboozle people,
any how."
Bamboozle! What an elegant word "
said Mrs. Olney. "I wish you would avoid
such phrases as this, picked up among the
boys in the street. But, Sally -has she
really come back, after all, of her own ac-
cord? I guess she thought it too good a
place to lose."
"There you mistake, mother. I will tell
you all how and about it."
"There's good English! "
"I went over and asked her to come back.
I confessed all my pranks, and said, what is
very true, that I thought I had done wrong.
And then I coaxed her, and she likes me
pretty well when I am clever, as she calls it,
and so she began to waver. Well, her old
mother then took up the matter. She said
Sally had been insulted, and she tried hard
to keep her mad; for which, by the way,
I'll be even with her some day."
"Eugene! "
"But good Sally declared she had had no






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


peace for thinking of you, a delicate, weakly
person, not used to doing work, and taking
ten steps where she did one. Should you
get sick, she should never forgive herself for
going off without giving warning. And she
has come back to stay a spell, she says, until
you can get some one to fill her place."
"And if she does not stay another seven
years it shall not be my fault," said Mrs. 01-
ney, quite affected. "What a good girl, to
be thinking of me so kindly, when I thought
she exulted over me! I shall know how to
value her, in future."
"I told her my mother would make her
San apology, I knew; and I would never
play her tricks, or plague her any more.
Now I have said it."
"I am afraid you will have a short
memory."
"There! You never believe, or trust
me."
"Well, how should I?"
"I have not deserved that you should, I
suppose. You need not smile, father. I
hate such smiles as those."
"You must set up a new character
then."






THE OLNEYS; OR,


CHAPTER III.

GERALD'S store was very unpretending in
its exterior. His name was painted on the
sign in plain, black letters on a white ground.
The windows were rather small, and high
above the level of convenience for ordinary
gazers; the entrance narrow, and the steps
steep and awkward enough to discourage
any but most enterprising and determined
shoppers. The goods within were well
chosen, neatly arranged, and sufficiently va-
rious in kind and quality to suit the wants
of country customers. Every thing was
new, and the freshly-painted shelves and
counters looked extremely nice. The neat-
ness of the store, and the perfect order that
reigned throughout its multifarious contents,
made it evident that the tide of custom set
in some other direction. Ladies had not be-
gun to inquire for patterns, or pull over the
piles of goods for some impossible fabric or
color. Gentlemen had not become enough
acquainted with Gerald to make his shop
their morning lounge, or to perfume it by






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


the trial of nicely-packed Havanas, or long
nines. Little servant girls with buckets,
and errand boys with wheelbarrows, spelled
out. "W. I. Goods and Groceries" on the
side door, but passed by, being sent only to
the old established dealer, whose crammed
and dingy magazine occupied the next
corner.
Days lengthened into weeks, and the pros-
pect had not brightened much. Those cus-
tomers who had once strayed in, failed not
to tome again. But they were few and far
between. Gerald was particularly patronized
by that class of far-sighted economists, who
purchase the smallest quantity of every thing
that will answer a present necessity. He
was discouraged and half provoked at the
"fourpence-worths," and even cent's-
worths," he was required to deal out.
One morning, there appeared before the
open door a broad, ruddy visage, and a pair
of heavy shoulders, with a wide expanse of
waistcoat between, over which hung a gold
chain. The said waistcoat was of a showy
pattern, with red in it, contrasting agreeably
with the buff-colored gloves which were
spread out upon it, the thumbs being hooked
3*






THE OLNEYS ; OR,


in at the arm-holes. This apparition did not
catch the eye of the young shop-keeper,
who was beguiling his tedious leisure by
reading over a letter which he had taken
from his pocket-book. A most interesting
epistle it must have been, albeit evidently
much worn with frequent perusal; for Ger-
ald was so much absorbed by its contents
that he suffered the stranger, who was look-
ing in at him, to rise a step at a time, till
his shining boots appeared upon the thresh-
old, and then to examine with eye -and
fingers such articles as were within reach,
and to make a rapid survey and estimate of
the general contents of the shop, before he
became aware that he was not alone.
Starting up, and seizing his yard-stick
with as much haste as if the intruder had
been a robber, Gerald apologized for his
inattention, and inquired what his visitor
might lack.
"Well, sir, I do not wish to make any
purchases, in particular, this morning. I
merely dropped in to look at your new store.
How do you sell this ? How much is that
by the yard? What is the price of this ?
That ? The other ? "






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


Gerald patiently answered all questions,
and the stout gentleman, moving along the
counter, cast his inquisitive eyes upon the
open letter, which Gerald, in his haste, had
thrown down upon it.
"A lady's hand, I perceive. Have you
sisters, or a wife ? You will not bring them
into town at present, I presume ? "
Gerald made no answer. The indignant
flush upon his brow, however, showed that
he was not actually deaf. Having folded
the letter, and put it aside, he turned his
dark, serious eye upon the impudent face
of his customer. What shall I show you,
sir? "
"You have a pretty selection of goods;
very pretty. Too small a stock, though.
People must have a choice. You must risk
more to begin with. There is nothing like
getting a good start. You want some showy
articles; things to catch the eye; odd
things; novelty excites curiosity. And it
is in vain for you to take this stand, unless
you add a piazza, and large low windows
to the front; that you may be sure of, from
the trial you have made of it. At the
side entrance there should be large gilded






THE OLNEYS; OR,


letters, flaming advertisements of auction
prices, &c."
No reply.
"If you have much experience in busi-
ness, you must agree that my advice is
good."
I cannot profit by it, at any rate," said
Gerald, with a grave and distant air. Per-
haps I ought to thank you for your counsel.
In time I may make some improvements,
and remedy some inconveniences. My out-
lay for the present must be limited by the
amount I think prudent. My capital is very
circumscribed."
Plenty of credit to be had, my good fel-
low -plenty of credit; people don't know
what to do with their money. They and
you must run some risk. Nothing venture,
nothing have."
Gerald made no reply.
Come, I know a man who would be glad
to join in with you. He knows nothing of
the routine of business; you will have ths
chief management, till he gets some insight.
that is to say."
A mighty useful partner."
It matters not what he is, while he can






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


bring you capital enough to set out your
store in a way to draw all the best custom
in the town, the most fashionable, the
moneyed people, you see."
Gerald thought of the trivial items in his
day-book, and for a moment felt tempted to
entertain the proposal. He rubbed his fore-
head, doubtfully, and the eyes of the stout
gentleman twinkled with expectation. It
was pretty evident he had some personal
interest in the matter, Gerald thought. He
was the more convinced of it from the pains
he took to give a contrary impression; say-
ing at intervals, while he looked quickly and
keenly round the store, as if he would look
through the very boxes and drawers, I
nat'ly feel interested for a fine young man
like you, just setting out in life. I reckon
you'll repent, if you lose this chance of
bettering yourself. You will never suc
ceed at this rate. 'Taint every day a man
offers, with rich friends to back him, 'case
of any trouble "
Did he desire you to make overtures to
me ?" inquired Gerald.
"Candidly, I have full powers to treat
with you."






THE OLNEYS; OR,


I have certain important reasons why
I prefer doing business alone, even though
with less pecuniary profit," said Gerald,
with a glance at the folded letter lying upon
the desk beside him. Besides, I do not
think it a very good sign that this obliging
gentleman does not come himself, with his
offer, in the first place; and in the second,
that he takes such a step at all without
knowing any thing whatever of my charac-
ter. The mere fact that I am the ostensible
proprietor of a shop full of goods is not such
a guaranty as I should want, in his place."
"Your references are satisfactory, no
doubt; as good as his, probably, if I may
consider your uncle, Mr. Olney, as one of
them."
"I can have his recommendation, cer-
tainly, and twenty more such, and still you
will know nothing of my capacity for busi-
ness, or my habits of any sort. It is the
same as taking my own word for my steadi-
ness, and and integrity."
"He has no doubt of either,- that is,
that I know of; and the testimony of your
employers could be had, I presume. Whose
store were you in last ?"






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


For some reason or other the conversation
had become very annoying to Gerald. His
brows almost met, and his lips were closely
pressed together, as if to repress some violent
outbreak of impatience. His displeasure con-
founded the stranger, and made him feel
exceedingly awkward, although he was not,
in general, troubled with any very delicate
sense of propriety.
The entrance of a well-dressed lady of
his acquaintance was a welcome relief.
"Ah, Mrs. Jones, how do you do ? "
"Well, squire; how do you do? You,
have not pined, as I see. An idle life agrees
with you."
I have served an ungrateful public long
enough, Mrs. Jones, and laboriously enough,
to be glad to escape from office. I am only
chagrined that I waited to be turned out
by-by-the mobocracy, I call it."
The voice of the sovereign people," said
the lady, with an equivocal emphasis. Any
chocolate ribbon, with pink or blue edges ? "
Come to patronize the new store, I
hope ?"
The truth is," said the lady, aside,
"Brown has grown such a perfect Jew,






THE OLNEYS OR,


since Briggs failed, and left the coast clear,
that I would come and see what Mr. Olney
asks for his goods."
After having concluded the purchase of
a shawl, the lady declared that she should
let it be known that Brown's shawls, of the
same kind, were at least a quarter dearer.
Shop-worn and faded things they were too.
It was really quite abominable.
The value of these things is constantly
changing with the fashions," interposed Ger-
ald. Mr. Brown very probably sells at a
fair profit on what he was obliged to give
for his shawls last season."
You do not aim to undersell your neigh-
bors, I see," said the matron with an approv-
ing smile.
I wish to take no unfair advantage of
them, or of my customers," said Gerald,
earnestly.
Hum- muttered the squire, not adding
the other syllable, except in his own mind.
The lady took her departure, after a vain
attempt to cheapen another article.
"Why did you not let Mrs. Jones beat
you down a cent or two, to secure her cus-
tom ? I never measured off a yard of silk in






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


my life, yet I flatter myself I shall should,
I mean -be a better salesman than you
seem to be."
I could not oblige her, as I had already
set the price as low as I could afford to do."
"Poh! call it a few cents higher to the
next comer, to make the balance even."
"I do not see the Justice of that."
Why not ? You give customers a fair
chance to examine the goods, and judge for
themselves. Let them quarrel with the
price, if they will."
Few are qualified to judge; they de-
pend in some measure on my honesty, and
shall not be mistaken in so doing. I will
serve all alike, rich and poor, good shoppers
and bad. It is good policy, I am assured, in
the long run ; but if it were not "
"As to people being qualified to judge,
their ignorance is no concern of yours, as I
see. They have no eye to your interest,
have they ? They will beat you down to
the lowest penny, especially if they see you
are any wise anxious or distressed. In re-
turn, it is fair to ask as much as you can get.
For what's the worth of any thing,
But what in market it will bring?






THE OLNEYS; OR,


You are quite romantic in your ideas, Mr
Olney. You will never get along so."
"I can only claim the privilege, sir, of
conducting my own business according to my
own ideas of honest dealing. If I cannot
make a living in this place by means I myself
consider fair, and such as I can avow openly
to every one who deals with me, I will with-
draw."
"And I (myfriend, I would say) will step
into your place, and do as well without you
as with you, perhaps."
"You shall be welcome, sir," said Gerald,
smiling at the inadvertency which had be-
trayed what he had already suspected.
With a shrug and a half laugh, the stout
gentleman walked off. He did not look
at Gerald, as he tossed him a bow over his
shoulder, in going out at the door.
Good-by to you, for a meddlesome, im
pertinent fellow," thought Gerald. "I am
ashamed that I for a moment thought of a
partnership with a man so uncongenial. Yet
a small addition to my means, as he says, a
little more display. It is of no use wishing;
I do feel rather disheartened this morning -
a little blue.. I wish he had not come, to dis-






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


turb my mind. I could have knocked him
down, when But I have not finished read-
ing it." Gerald returned to the perusal of the
letter he had withdrawn from the curious gaze
of his visitor. As he read, some sudden emo-
tion made him press the paper to his lips;
after which little piece of folly he colored,
and looked hastily round, half expecting to
see another impertinent intruder at his el-
bow.
But all was still and lonely. The young
man stood long meditating, with his eyes
fixed upon the empty space of the door-way.
At first, his countenance was clouded by un-
easy reflections, but it soon grew calm and
elevated in its expression. Yes, she shall
see me win a character; I will not be bol-
stered up, even now, with references and un
meaning recommendations. I tread on firm
ground; I will be what I seem. No man
shall hereafter have wherewithal to put me
to shame; there shall be nothing on my
conscience to make me shrink and start at
a chance word, or to blush at the warm
praises of partial friends. I will walk in a
straight and upward path, so help me God!"






THE OLNEYS ; OR,


CHAPTER IV.

ONE warm afternoon, as Mr. Olney was
pointing out to Eugene the clusters of unripe
cherries growing upon some new grafts, and
charging him not to disturb them,-a charge
which the boy received with a kind of mon
keyish gravity,-the gate opened, and Squire
Todd stepped in. He was dressed wholly in
white, and looked like a great snowbank, or
rather like a snow figure, Eugene thought,
made by rolling snowballs into masses and
sticking them together.
What a fine prospect of fruit you -
have here, neighbor!" said he, panting.
"This weather 0 dear! will ripen your
cherries. If I had had your taste for culti-
vating trees, when I was a younger and more
active man, I might have had cherries and
peaches enough, by this time, on my place."
"Never too late," said Mr. Olney. "I
keep at work. If I do not eat the fruit,
those who come after me will. I will look
at your trees, some day. What scions shall
you want ? Any pears? "






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


My dear sir, how can you talk of gar-
den work to such a man as I, on such a day
as this! It is all I can do to maintain my
solidity."
Talking will not hasten your dissolu-
tion, I think. Of course, this is not the
season for working on trees; next spring,
now -"
"Next spring my hands will be full of
business of another guess sort, I hope. Pru-
ning indeed! I shall look for golden fruit,
if any."
"Ah," said Mr. Olney, with a change of
countenance. Another office in view? "
"0, no! I am quite content to be laid
upon the shelf. There is a deal of bustling
activity needful, in these party times, to get
hold of any thing worth having. No, sir;
I am a private man henceforth, quite unam-
bitious of public favor."
Do you see my grapes? That is a very
fine young vine, opposite you; or are you
looking at those cherries ? Have you busi-
ness in the city, or where is your golden
fruit to be gathered ?"
"Mr. Olney, I never, no, never saw any
cherries so early ripe and so beautiful," re-






THE OLNEYS; OR,


plied the squire, looking at Eugene's in.
quisitive face, with an evident recollection
of the maxim, Little pitchers," &c.
That is the the Prince de Joinville,
I believe;, yes, the Prince de Joinville.
The prince of early cherries it is, too,"
said Mr. Olney, forgetting his unanswered
query, and expatiating at great length upon
the genealogy of his graft.
"Master Er Er Edmund, or what's
your name ? "
Eugene is my name."
"A young Frenchman, eh? Hark in
your ear. I'll thank ye to take a little
run about the garden, my fine little fellow,
while I talk with your pa on some private
matters."
I'd rather go into the house," said the
lad, pouting, and approaching the gate
against which the man of snow was lean-
ing.
Go the other way, Eugene; do not
trouble Mr. Todd to move," said Mr. Olney,
rebukingly. Eugene "
Beg your pardon, Mr. -T -T-Toad,"
said Eugene, still persevering, till he obliged
the indolent gentleman to change his pos-






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


ture to let him pass through. He went into
the house, but stationed himself behind the
door-blind, to look and to listen.
To let you into my plans, then, Mr.
Olney -" Here Mr. Todd paused to put
one foot over the other, its support being
unnecessary, because he had comfortably
settled himself against the gate again. He
would not have done this, had he been
aware that Eugene had latched it so slight-
ly that it was but a precarious prop for so
ponderous a weight. "I am going into the
shop-keeping line here, and your nephew
has the very stand I want. It would par-
ticularly suit me, because it is but a step
from my own house. I hate a long walk
especially after dinner. I thought of it -
I had it in view before your nephew
pounced upon it; but I could not get u,
steam for a start."
"Well, sir ?" said Mr. Olney, rather coldly.
It is a pity; for your nephew has kept
me out, without, I fancy, much profit to
himself. Together, now, we might make
a pretty concern of it. I sounded him about
a partnership, a month since; perhaps he told






THE OLNEYS ; OR,


you. I found him shy, and, I must bay,
rather topping."
I heard nothing about it. Gerald is
rather reserved about his affairs."
I fancy he has now made long trial
enough of the business (or want of busi-
ness) to come down from his high horse.
What I want is, that you should give him
a little friendly advice. Tell him, if I set
up an opposition, it will be a regular flash
concern. Tell him, where there is not
room enough for three, the weakest must
go to the wall, or into the kennel. It will
break him up in no time, you are aware."
I will see him immediately," said Mr.
Olney, much concerned.
You see he has no alternative. Coali-
tion, or opposition! Ha, ha, ha! "
"That is rather hard upon him, Mr. Todd.
He would not have done such a thing, in
exchange of circumstances."
Sorry, very sorry, to interfere. But poh!
man, competition is to be expected in all
business. Nobody is ever blamed for it.
All the better for the public. It will be a
hard tug between me and Brown.' I shall
sacrifice pretty much all the profits, the






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


first year, to get the upper hand of him.
The second season will pay for it, I reckon.
As for Olney, I shall use him up in no
time," continued the squire, savagely, when
he perceived what profound dismay his
threats produced in the mind of the kind-
hearted uncle.
I should not have looked for this at the
hand of an old neighbor," said Mr. Olney,
shaking his head ruefully. Eugene felt a
malicious longing to knock up the latch,
which seemed wonderfully tenacious of its
hold.
"Why, I don't know; you could not
expect me to quit the homestead, the trees
ny ancestors planted, the play-place of
my early days," said Mr. Todd, a whimsi-
cal twist of his lips belying the sentimental
tone of his voice. "And as for leaving all
my old neighbors, my friends, on whose
patronage I can certainly count, surely
you will not say that young Olney, a stran-
ger, has a better right here than I have!
One place is as good as another to him. Let
him go where he is known, that is, if he
will not join in with me. I own I should
prefer that."






THE OLNEYS; OR,


Upon what terms? The advantage is
mostly upon your side, I think. I know
Gerald well."
"0, I know him too. I have not lived
next door to him for nothing. He is the
man I want. Knows all about the details
of business; is not afraid of trouble. His
taste not so good as my own, perhaps. He
does not know what is taking. There I
could advise, and also --"
Well, well; Gerald has not, to be sure,
seemed to take root and flourish as I hoped,"
said Mr. Olney.
"Graft my credit and my wit upon his
stock, then," cried Mr. Todd, laughing bois-
terously at his own joke. Eugene stuffed
his handkerchief into his mouth, and fell
down upon the mat, as he saw the gate
shaking in 'sympathy with its burden.
It flew open. After one or two frenzied
efforts to recover his balance, Mr. Todd fell
at full length upon the gravel, and lay groan-
ing, without an attempt to get up. Mr. 01-
ney rushed forward, with many expressions
of concern; he was very much frightened,
indeed.
A smothered "chee-hee-hee" came from






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


behind the blind, where Eugene was rolling,
and kicking upon the mat in a paroxysm of
mirth. Mr. Todd sprang up in a rage, in-
stantly suspecting the boy's agency in his
downfall, while Mr. Olney, happy to per-
ceive that no bones were broken, began to
laugh, in spite of his desire to be civil.
"Here, you young scamp," cried Mr.
Todd, pulling open the blind, "what do
you mean, hey? Playing off your jokes
upon me is no safe business, I can tell you."
And he attempted to lay hold of him; but
the urchin easily eluded his grasp, and gal-
lopped off on all-fours, occasionally throwing
up his heels like a young colt, and uttering
strange, shrill yells, such as no throat but
that of a boy could possibly send forth.




CHAPTER V.

THE cherries ripened, and the birds and
Eugene plundered the grafted boughs in the
most unscrupulous manner, in defiance of
threats and scarecrows, until the sourest and






THE OLNEYS; OR,


the latest were no more to be had. The
fat, saucy robins whistled and sang in per-
fect security before the very windows. Who
ever knew Mr. Olney to fire a gun, or even
toss up a pebble, to disturb a feather of a
red, downy breast? The birds knew him
well, and so did Eugene, who bestrid a slen-
der bough, and popped his head into his
father's open window, to complain of the
feathered plunderers who alighted impudent-
ly about him; as if he had any better right
to a perch there than they !
"I grafted my trees for my son and the
birds," said the good man, smiling at the
flock of busy robbers. I only wish I could
scare them off until the fruit has time to
come to perfection."
Ha, father! I knew that was all you
wanted, all the time you were pretending
to be so choice of your Prince day Zwang-
vals. Now, I like them better not dead ripe,
I thank you, father; so you need not shake
your finger or your head at me at all, next
time."
"I shall shake something heavier than
my finger, next time you do not keep out of
my tree when I bid you." And Mr. Olney






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


endeavored to look very terrible, but could
not keep the corners of his mouth from turn-
ing the wrong way.
"There, now, father; do not make me
tumble off the bough, being so funny Haw,
haw! If you were like Gerald, now, I
should have to look out sharp. He always
does what he says he will, if he has to go
through fire and water to keep his word."
"My dear son!" began Mr. Olney, in
a very serious and grieved tone. Down
dropped the boy from the bough, as if he
had been shot. He had no desire to stimu-
late his father's resolution to the fulfilment
of many promised whippings, yet unpaid.
He presently heard his father at the window,
calling him. He only ran the faster down
the garden, till a thicket of currant-bushes
afforded a convenient screen. There he
threw himself down; and, happening to find
a small green apple, shaped like a pear, he
transferred the stem from the blunt to the
pointed end, and pinned it to the bough of a
young pear-tree. Then he chuckled and
rubbed his hands, for the leaves fell round it
so as to render the illusion perfect, and he
5 D






THE OLNEYS ; OR,


heard his father's step in the alley which led
to it. He slunk into his hiding-place, and
watched. Mr. Olney was not thinking of
trees or pears, yet it immediately caught his
eye. Eugene saw his face brighten with
pleasurable surprise, and heard him call upon
the gardener for congratulations upon the
precocity of his little nursling. Eugene's
heart smote him. He wondered that he felt
no disposition to laugh.at the success of his
imposition. He was ashamed and remorse-
ful, and would have considered a whipping
for his prank quite refreshing, were it not
hat it would afflict his dear, kind father to
administer the same.
"I wish the time would come for me to
De in Gerald's store. I should then have
enough to do to keep me out of mischief,"
said he to himself. "I should be almost a
man then, and put away childish things."
Eugene Eugene cried a shrill voice
at the garden gate. Eugene- Eugene! "
Sally Sally! Sally Sally! re-
sponded a mocking voice under the currant
bushes close by.
"Here, y'ur ma'am wants ye. She's a-






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


hunting every where after ye, to brush
y'ur hair, and see if y'ur face and hands is
clean. It's e'en almost school time."
Eugene, you plague, come, come said
a softer voice. I expect the clock to strike
every minute."
"If it strike every hour, it is as much as
I expect of it. And if it should take up
the practice of striking every minute, it
strikes me that you. and Sally will go alto-
gether distracted."
"Come right in, there's a good boy, and
I will give you a piece of molasses ginger-
bread for recess."
"No, I want a whole bar of rich cake,
and a pickle."
"You mean, if I have any. May be, I
have not any."
"You have. I smelt it baking, yesterday.
Catch a weasel asleep, you know."
"Well, well -only make haste. Your
father says I must write no more excuses for
you when you do not deserve them. So I
won't give you one to-day. You may de-
pend on that."
Don't want any. Master is so used to
your notes, he never even pretends to open






THE OLNEYS; OR,


one now. I can hand up a blank one, just as
well as any. However, I am coming along;
so tell Sally to get a large cucumber; or stay
-a whole mango -so I can treat," shouted
the pet, as he pulled off a soiled collar, and
rolled it into a ball to throw in Sally's face
as he entered the kitchen.
"A whole mango! screamed Mrs. Olney.
"I never heard such a demand "
"Then I'll duck, and wiggle about, and
snap at your fingers, all the while you are
washing me ; see if I don't, now! "
"Stand still, and I'll see about it. There,
do now stand still, like a man."
"I do believe you will wash my neck till
1 am a man," said Eugene, resigning himself
to .the process with a sigh and a shrug.
" I'll submit, till I go into Gerald's employ.
Then I'll be lord of my own sponge and
soap."
"I expect you'll set up a shaving-box
'fore ever that time comes," Sally remarked,
tauntingly. "Shop-boy you'd make! I'd
as lives have a monkey, and liveser."
"That is because you are an orang-ou-
tang," retorted Eugene. That is just what
you are."






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


"Hush -should not speak so to Sally,
Eugene. I shall stop your mouth with the
sponge."
Let her mind her own affairs, and I will
not speak to her at all. But hark, mother;
the master says I am the best boy he has, to
understand book-keeping, and the quickest
at figures. Now, do you not think it would
be better for Gerald to have me, than that
stupid little chap that carries parcels for him
at present? O, I'll help him first rate, I tell
you; and you and father will be proud
enough of me. Here's my mango; and I
declare it will not go into my pocket. Ha,
ha, ha! Squeeze it a little. Whew! the
vinegar! Then I will take it in my fist,
and hide it in the wall in the play-ground.
Dear, good, mother, there's a hug for the
mango, and another for the cake. Good-by,
mammy; good-by, Sally. You are not a
baboon; no, no!"
5*






THE OLNEYS; OR,


CHAPTER VI.

ALL summer long were Gerald's ears as-
sailed by the sound of the busy hammer and
plane, building a fine, new store opposite his
own. And there was Squire- Todd to be
seen, every morning, noon, and night, stand-
ing propped by a post, with hands in pockets,
or sitting on some pile of lumber. Now and
then, on pretence of wanting cigars, or some
other trifle, he came across the street to exult
over Gerald, and inquire, with a provoking
air of compassion, how he got along. The
only way to disappoint his petty malice was,
to seem not to see it; and Gerald kept his
temper under strict control. The squire
was under a certain degree of restraint, in
consequence; for it is no easy matter to say
rude things to one whose words and actions
always show him to be a gentleman.
As the time approached for the new store
to be opened, however, Gerald found it
sometimes difficult to be calm and dignified.
He grew nervous and apprehensive. His
customers had increased beyond all expecta-






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


tion; but many, he thought, dropped in
by chance, having been brought into the
street by curiosity to behold the "Gothic
Arcade; for that was the title blazoned in
gilt letters upon Mr. Todd's showy structure.
When its gay doors were set open, he feared
all would desert him, except some few whom
he could count -as friends. His cheek be-
came paler than ever, and his dark eye more
anxious and melancholy in its expression.
There was an assiduous politeness in his
attention to his customers, which, while it
irresistibly inspired them with a personal in-
terest in him, gave a painful impression that
he was not prosperous, and perhaps was even
embarrassed by debt. This false idea swelled
into a rumor. Gerald was not aware of it.
His pride would have been chafed, had he
known that any one bought merely to en-
courage and patronize him. But there were
many good hearts with whom it was certain-
ly a motive. Brown was rich and surly, and
the prospect of having a new competitor did
not improve his temper. If he missed some
of his oldest customers at this time, he prob-
ably thought they reserved themselves for
the day of great bargains at the cheap store,





THE OLNEYS; OR,


promised by the advertisements of Squire
Todd. In fact, they had quietly transferred
themselves to Gerald, much to their own
profit as well as his.
The large glass windows of the Arcade
were ready at last for the public gaze. Goods
of lively and beautiful colors trailed in long
folds, or hung in festoons on all sides, and
tempting placards with advertisements of
auction prices, and newest fashions, caught
the eye in every direction. A slim young
man, with a flattering smile, and a great
deal to say about the time when he was in
New York, or Washington, and sold at great
profit, now condescended to figure as the
partner of Mr. Todd, and give him the bene-
fit of his experience behind the counter.
Throngs of people of all classes, the greater
part of whom had never been seen in the
town before, filled the Arcade to overflowing,
as soon as its doors were opened. Mr. Todd
was so much wearied by the bustle and hur-
ry of the first day, that he was fain to look
for some aid, till he should himself become
an adept in the use of the yardstick. On
the second day, he had at his elbow a lump-
ish, yellow-haired boy, a sort of machine






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


to reach down or replace goods, to fetch and
carry, in short, to save his master all super-
fluous bodily exertion. Step and fetch it"
was so often addressed to him, during these
first weary days, that it grew into a byword,
and stuck to the lad for a year after, as a
nickname.
How fared Gerald during these palmy days
of the glory of Todd & Co.? To his sur-
prise, his hands were full of business, too,
and he had hardly leisure to think of his
neighbors. Many, on coming out of the
Arcade, finding themselves opposite another
store, crossed the street, and came in, and
found in his unpretending shop divers things
which they had forgotten they wanted, till
they saw them so neatly presented to view,
with the price, always a reasonable one,
ticketed upon them. Gerald now required
the services of Eugene, in addition to those
of the errand boy he already employed.
He was not a little surprised at his sudden
run of custom, as he had used none of
the expedients practised by his neighbor
to attract it. He had, indeed, posted up,
for convenience rather than policy, "ONE
PRICE," which all his old customers knew






THE OLNEYS; OR,


involved nothing new in his practice. And
as he had originally fixed his "one price "
on every article, in plain figures, so did they
remain. He disdained to sacrifice his goods
in rivalry with Todd & Co.
Eugene had the reputation of being an
arrant rogue, not in a bad sense of the term,
to be sure. Step-and-fetch-it, on the contra-
ry, was considered remarkably steady. Mr.
Todd pitied Gerald, as loudly and publicly
as he could, and predicted that no customer
could enter his premises without having a
dish-cloth pinned to his back; that, for his
own part, he should be afraid to go near the
store, having suffered greatly in his own
person from the prankful humor of the boy.
His own shop-boy was neither handsome
nor quick-witted, he confessed; but then
he could be trusted, equally with himself, at
all times.
Gerald had, however, made far the best
choice. It had long been the highest aim
of Eugene's ambition to take his stand at
Gerald's side, and win his approbation.
Proud of the responsibility resting upon his
young shoulders, and full of sincere anxiety
for Gerald's interest, he behaved himself






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


with sufficient discretion, and pleased all
comers, and especially enchanted the younger
ones, who uniformly went away grinning at
his merry jokes. The chief theme of his wit
was the Opposition," the firm of the Ball-
of-yarn and the Knitting-needle," meaning
Todd & Co. Occasionally, there was a sharp
encounter of wit between him and Step-and-
fetch-it, or Steppy, as he familiarly called him.
In these little skirmishes, Steppy was usual-
ly worsted, though his master condescended
occasionally to coin choice phrases of abuse
and derision for his use. This wordy war-
fare was mostly carried on when Gerald was
absent, as he was sure to spoil the sport by
calling his boy away, or bidding him be
silent. Soon the idle boys in the street
were attracted, and made Olney's Corner "
a point of rendezvous at the hour when
Gerald went home to dine. Some of them,
old acquaintances of Eugene, lounged into
the shop, without waiting for invitation.
Eugene did not know how to prevent them,
though he felt a little anxious lest it might
not please Gerald. He tried to watch them
so very closely that they could take no lib-
trties. But as he had but one pair of eyes






THE OLNEYS; OR,


and often had other business for them, ir
serving a customer, he did not feel entirely
secure that no mischief was done. He
found marks of vagrant feet or dirty hands,
here and there, where they had not a shadow
of right to be. He wondered loudly and
indignantly, and each and all of the roguish
chaps wondered loudly with him, and testi-
fied to each other's alibi. Surprising a boy's
fingers in a sugar barrel, one day, he did not
fail to cry stoutly, "Stop thief," and con-
vinced him and the rest that such practices
were not to be tolerated, by any means.
There were sour looks, and some mutter-
ing, at first. "What's a lump of sugar! "
" One would think the shop was carried
off &c. But, in fact,, the boys liked Eu-
gene the better for it. The candy depart-
ment was invaded without much resistance
on his part, for that was his own perquisite.
In time, however, he grew tired of being
generous to such a set of greedy cormorants
as they proved to be, and was rewarded for
his past favors by hints, how much more
stingy he was than Steppy, who gave away
raisins by the pocket-full.
." Whose raisins? demanded Eugene.






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


"Why, they are as good as his; for Mr
Todd, or else Mr. Co, -I don't know justly
which it was; but that is nothing to the
purpose; one of them, any how -- "
"Gave them to him, hey? I do not be-
lieve a word of it. Steppy is no better than
his master; nor no worse either, that I
know of. Some people can lie as fast as
a horse can trot, all in the way of business,
you see. Now, look o' here; you see this
piece of purple calico. A beauty, isn't it
So fine! only see! Why have we never
sold an inch of it but once? Because Mr.
Olney tells every body he has heard it will
not wash. Now, Todd and Co. have a plen-
ty of it, and sell it too, telling folks it will
wash like a piece of white cloth. And so it
will, indeed."
Then it is no lie."
Well, if that is no lie, then the raisins
are Steppy's. I understand such truth.
You are very honest. So is Steppy. But
I bet a pound of my best cream candy, not
one of you, nor Steppy neither, ever goes
nigh the cask when Todd and Co. are in."
Well, I don't care ; it is Steppy's own
6






THE OLNEYS; OR,


affair. He says they told him never to eat
any out of the boxes, but only out of the
cask, which is as good as saying he might
have as many as he wanted out of that.'
That is what I call stretching a point,"
said Eugene, laughing. "Steppy learns
that fast enough, if he is dull. He has ex-
amples and instructions, I'll warrant. I am
ready to split, sometimes, to hear how they
come over folks, that can't see through it as
I can."
Set a rogue to catch a rogue."
"Well, suppose I were a rogue, I have
confidence put in me now, and I shan't
abuse it. I have a good example before
me, and I admire it. I do; you may grin,
if you choose. Mr. Olney has not an India-
rubber conscience, like some of his neigh-
bors. Nor I, neither," said Eugene, speaking
quick and short, as he noticed the sneering
looks of his old schoolmates.
"Hear him brag!" cries Bob, putting his
elbow into the side of Jem. He forgets the
pudding he stole, and we ate, down behind
the barn, and how he told his mother he
never touched a finger to it."






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


And the great banging lies he used to
tell the master with such a grave face, and
set us all laughing," returned Jem.
"And robbing the old woman's tree in
the night. Apples are as good as raisins;
Steppy never was up to such a spree as that
was. Ah, ha!" cries Tom, smacking his
lips.
Eugene's face was as red as fire. Instead
of acknowledging his wrong doings, he set
himself hotly to defend them, as most peo-
ple are apt to do, when offensively accused.
As for Sally's mother, I did it to punish
her. As for the master, he did not deserve
to have the truth told to him, for he never
believed it. As for the pudding, that was
all in fun ; mother did not care."
Whose is the India-rubber conscience
now?" quoth Bob.
I'll bet a pound of cream candy, you
would not have liked being caught at the
tree," cries Tom.
Stealing is stealing, lying is lying, own
it or not," gravely observed Master Jem,
and shook his head.
"And every body is liar and thief but
himself, that's the beauty of it," roared Bob.







THE OLNEYS; OR,


"I think Steppy 's as good as another
Come, let's go over, and leave the sneaking
fellow to himself, with his inch bits of
candy."
"Go along, then. But, Tom, I am re-
solved I'll go to Sally's mother, and tell her
who robbed her tree."
If you mention my name, I will break
all your bones," cried Tom, flourishing his
fist in the neighborhood of Eugene's nose.
I shall have you taken up for a breach
of the peace, if you lay a finger on me,"
said the young man of business, with dig-
nity. Better mind what you are up to
in this store; it is no play-ground, for fisti-
cuffs."
"He'll never tell, Tom; you need not
worry," said the boys.
See if I don't, then. I shall tell, and tell
the whole truth, if I choose."
But you will say that it was your own
proposal?"
Certainly I shall, and pay her for the
apples, honestly, with my own money, sir.
Then you may fling it in my teeth again,
if you choose, and where and when you
choose."






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


Some folks are pretty smart."
"My compliments to Steppy, and say I
dare him to tell Mr. Todd about the rai-
sins. You need not take the trouble to call
on me again, gentlemen. Good morning
to you."





CHAPTER VII.

GERALD'S eye brightened, and his step
became elastic and joyous, when he became
convinced, as month after month passed by,
that he was doing a safe and increasing
business. Eugene affectionately exulted
with him, considering a part of the credit
of success due to himself. But for the
strong affection Gerald had awakened in his
warm young bosom, the daily routine of
business would have grown tedious to him,
though its sameness was relieved by many
a pleasant run with parcels, or on errands.
In fact, the sale of the least trifle, such as a
bit of cotton lace, or a nightcap, on which
the profit could be reckoned only in mills
6* E






THE OLNEYS; OR,


afforded him real delight; it was something
done for Gerald's advantage.
As things grew daily brighter, and he
perceived plainly that, in the long run,
the fair and liberal principles on which the
business was conducted would prove really
the most advantageous, his admiration of
his young master increased. He looked
up to him now as the wisest man that ever
lived; he had long thought him the most
upright.
With the improvement in Gerald's spir-
Its, his gloomy reserve melted away almost
entirely. He talked a great deal with Eu-
gene, and encouraged him to express his
half-formed ideas in return; gently setting
him right where he was ignorant or mis-
taken, and showing himself pleased by his
bright thoughts and fresh feelings. He was
delighted with the boy's evident attach-
ment to him, and now he often caressed him,
and called him by some endearing pet name.
Of words of praise he was still sparing, lest
the boy should learn to act from the desire
of applause as his chief motive. On the
other hand, he never scolded. One upbraid-
ing look, when Eugene had been careless






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


or mischievous, was generally enough to set
him crying, and a hasty word would almost
have broken his heart.
I should like to know what talisman
Gerald has," said Mrs. Olney, one day, "to
make our Eugene mind. It is a mystery to
me. I used to think it was his being so
grave and stern. Now that he is almost as
sportive and lively as Eugene himself, I can-
not tell what to make of it."
"Our boy is older. He behaves better
even at home. His mother has little chance
to spoil him by over-indulgence now."
"O! indeed!"
From the cradle, you have spoiled him
by over-fondness."
"You remind me, sage husband, of a
homely proverb about pots and kettles find-
irig fault with each other's sooty exterior.
Who used to walk with baby hour after
hour, and dared not sit down lest he should
scream ? Who used to hold him up to strew
the salt, with both chubby hands, all over
the dishes in the closet? Whose watch used
to go knicketty-knock, all about among
chairs and tables, suspended from young
master's neck ?"






THE OLNEYS; OR,


"Not a good watch; a poor, worthless
thing."
"Not till he spoiled it, remember."
Well, my dear, I do not deny having
been weak at times; but when I set my
foot down, then "
He laughed in your face, and commonly
made you laugh too, the rogue "
"Not in any serious case, I trust. I can
be firm, where the matter requires it."
Well, but just observe Gerald; he never
sets his foot down at all. He never wastes
breath when a nod or a sign will answer,
never uses two words if one will suffice;
and the boy springs to obey, as if he had no
will but his. He has had very severe and
stern masters at school, often, but he never
was obedient before."
It is not sternness that inspires reverence.
When a boy shows himself capable of genu-
ine respect for goodness and talent, it is a
good sign."
There is, there always was, a something
I could not fathom in Gerald. If I could
read his heart, I might feel the same glow
of enthusiasm that Eugene does, perhaps.
But "






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


"Talking of me ?" cried Eugene, bolt-
ing in.
Never nearer -you remember the prov-
erb," said his mother, her face lighting up
with joy at seeing him an hour earlier than
she usually did.
"I say, I'm pretty tired," said Eugene,
flinging himself on the sofa, with his head
in his mother's lap. "Why, don't you
think I have had the care of the shop, all
by myself, nearly all day. And now, I am
willing and ready to have the whole charge
while Gerald goes to buy goods. And me
not yet sixteen; think of that!"
Fifteen, and let me see; June, July,
August -three months and seven days,"
said Mrs. Olney.
"Why, I do not see but Gerald has a
partner, after all," cried Mr. Olney, laughing.
This was a veiy acceptable joke, and all
three laughed very joyously at it.
"You have had the heaviest end of the
yoke, to-day," said Mrs. Olney, fondly turn-
ing the hair back from the smooth brow of
her darling, and laying her cool, soft hand
upon the throbbing temples. "Does your
head ache ? "






THE OLNEYS; OR,


0, a trifle."
"How happened it that you were left
alone? said Mr. Olney.
"Gerald is one of the referees to settle
the dispute about that piece of land, up
yonder you know, father "
"Rutland's Ridge, which -but I will
tell you the merits of the case some other
time, my dear."
To-day they came for him to go up
there. Well, I was fresh and bright, then,
and I got along swimmingly."
Did none of the boys come in, to loaf
round and take up your attention ? "
They do not come in much, since they
called me stingy, and broke me of giving
them any thing. But I did not want for
company, I know that."
Tell us who came; any body from the
court end ?"
"Plenty of stylish people, Mrs. Olney.
Yes, ma'am. Mrs. Jones, for one. Bought
a lace cape, and some sewing silk, and made
me send it home for her. But a real lady -
it takes me to tell the genuine from the imi-
tation-came in, a stranger, and, I thought,
by the shape and air of her bonnet, and thq






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


altogether of her appearance, from the city.
She asked me some questions about some
handkerchiefs at the door; I think yes,
whether they were all linen, or in part
cotton."
"A shrewd lady."
"And said I, almost laughing, 'If you
want cheap handkerchiefs, warranted all
linen, every thread and fibre, you must go
across the street. But I can recommend
some nice French ones we have.' And I
mustered out the boxes, hurrying, for T
wanted to show them, though I know, from
her indifferent look, she did not come to buy
any. 'Mr. Olney is not in?' asked she.
'No, ma'am, but I can wait upon you; 1
know all about every article in the store.'
She smiled-not such a smile as makes
me mad, you know, but a real good smile,
that made me feel acquainted with her in
a minute."
"I have seen such smiles."
Yes. Where was I ? 0 'It is well
Mr. Olney has such a capable young sales-
man,' said she. How long have you been
with him ? So I told her, about a year."
Why, it is not! exclaimed Mrs. Otney






THE OLNEYS; OR,


"It is. I know I went in the fall, and
the leaves were beginning to turn. I saw
a yellow branch to-day."
"It is August only."
No matter. Let the boy tell his story,"
,said Mr. Olney.
About a year, I said. She sat down,
and did not once look at my handkerchiefs.
'When will Mr. Olney return?' she said.
Then I told her all what he was gone for,
and how every body was after him all the
time, and could not do without his help;
and how he got up a reading room, and a
mutual improvement club, and how he beat
all the speakers in town, and -and "
I think the lady must have been amused,"
interrupted Mrs. Olney.
0, I promise you, she smiled, and looked
pleased, else I should not have chattered so
much. I know how to behave, pretty well,
to different persons. To some, now, I am
as glum and silent-- "
"As a parrot in a sulky fit."
"Or Step-and-fetch-it, when he sees me
or my master. I see, lately, either Mr. Todd
or Mr. Co. stays in the store all the time;
they aren't leave Steppy a minute un-






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


watched. That's the steady boy, that could
be trusted like his master. Yes, like mas-
ter, like boy."
But what said the lady, to your trum-
peting of your master's praises ?"
"'I hope his becoming so popular will
not lead him to neglect his customers.' '0
no,' said I, very quick. Mr. Olney will do
nothing that is not right, as to that. He
will be in in an hour, at the farthest, if you
wish to buy any thing so very special. But
as he has but one price, and I can tell that,
I do not see how it can make much differ-
ence to any one who measures and cuts, I
am sure.'"
"You saucy chap !"
She would not buy any thing, though.
She went to the door, and looked up the
street and down, and presently, in stepped
a fine old gentleman, not so very old, nei-
ther "
You think any one almost decrepit at
forty," said Mrs. Olney, laughing.
One of these days he will think such a
man quite a young blade," said Mr. Olney.
Gerald is not in,' said the lady to him.
How I stared! 'What a pity!' said he. A






THE OLNEYS ; OR,


pretty young girl, not so very young though,
was hanging on his arm "
"You mean about your own age, I con-
clude," said Mrs. Olney. "You thmk you
are not so very young, now-a-days."
Shut up, mother," said Eugene, reacn-
ing up to hold her lips together. "No quiz-
zing, if you please.- I shan't allow it.'
Tut tut, boy," said Mr. Olney. Don't
be so rough."
"Did I scratch you, mother ? I did not
mean to hurt you. How old the damsel
was, I can only guess; nearer Gerald's age
than mine, I reckon. But, as I was going
to say, how astonished was I to hear her say,
as soon as ever she came in, This must be
Eugene.' I blushed and stared. 'I never
saw you, or the town before,' said she, but
you perceive I have heard of you.' I hope
you have heard nothing to my disadvantage,'
said I, bowing. '0, no,' said she, laughing,
'Mr. Olney is a good friend of yours.' I
knew, by that, it was from him she had
heard of Eugene."
I wonder who those people could be.
You did not learn their names, eh? Gerald
writes to them, perhaps. I shall ask him
when he comes here."






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


"Now don't, mother, unless he mentions
them. I hate to have him think me a
chatterbox and a telltale, as he will, if I set
any body querying and gossiping. What
matter is it to you, except so far as it con-
cerns me ? And that is not much."
"I won't say a word, then."
The old gentleman was not so particular
about having the master to trade with. He
took a fancy to one thing after another, till
I verily thought he was going to buy half
the things in the store. Then he ordered
them sent to the stage-office, and away they
all went. And when Gerald came home,
and heard about them, away he went, too,
like a lamplighter, and came not back till
just now, when he sent me right home, for
he knew I must be awful tired."
"He was too bad," cried Mrs. Olney;
"quite too bad."
Poh no, indeed. It would have been
lucky if it had been a rainy day, though, or
bad walking; I had to spring, I can tell you,
part of the time ; and I was so hurried 1 for-
got to set down one or two things, till I had
forgotten the exact amount. But I told
Gerald, honestly, how it was, and he said he






THE OLNEYS; OR,


could tell if I had guessed it right, when he
balanced the book to-night, and that is all
the scolding I got, every bit. He looked
real happy and bright, and I wanted to stay
:and talk with him; but he told me to go
home. So I had to."





CHAPTER VIII.

I HEAR Todd and Co. are in difficulty,"
said Mr. Olney to Gerald one day, when he
came to take tea with them, as was his cus-
tom once a week.
Have you not heard, too, that Co. has
dissolved the partnership sans cirgmonie, by
making off, last night, with as much as he
could carry?"
"You don't say it! Only yesterday the
workmen came to me to collect their claims
for work on the shop. They have never
been paid yet, except a small part in goods.
It was wholly built on credit."
That is no news," exclaimed Eugene.
"I guessed it, at the time it was going






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


up," said Gerald. Men work without
spirit who are paid with promises, not with
coin."
"Many a poor man will suffer, if Todd
fails."
He must fail, sooner or later. His cus-
tomers have fallen off, pitiably, since his
prices rose, and many before that, from hav-
ing been deceived in the value of goods."
Showy, sleezy articles being palmed off
as first rate," said Eugene, by way of pa-
renthesis.
I have reason to suppose his goods were
mostly bought on credit, from his advice to
me. And that he cannot meet his engage-
ments, is plain. Co.'s flight will be the ex-
cuse, not the cause, of his bankruptcy."
"Poor Todd! His homestead, to which
he was so much attached, and his trees, all
must go."
"I hear they were made over to some
one, long since; whether for value received,
I cannot say. I hope the best I can of him,
but Todd will not pay ten cents on a dollar
of his debts, in my opinion. And this is the
man you recommended to me, two years
since, as counsellor and partner, my dear
7*






THE OLNEYS; OR,


uncle. You thought me headstrong, because
I would not be persuaded to have any thing
to do with him."
"The truth is, your poor uncle was half
frightened out of his wits, on your account.
You were. right, and I was a fool. How
came such a wise head on such young shoul-
ders ? said Mr. Olney, pulling Gerald's hair,
and looking round to see Eugene laugh at
the action.
The secret of my marvellous prudence
was just this, and nothing more. I resolved
that no prospect of mere profit should tempt
me into a position where I might find it im-
practicable to do right."
"Christian prudence I call that," observed
Mrs. Olney.
And mine was but worldly wisdom, at the
best," said her husband, smiling. I- "
"I am sure it was not wisdom at all," in-
terrupted Eugene. "Any body might see
Mr. Todd was a rascal, from the beginning."
"Eugene, you never heard me say so,"
said Gerald, displeased.
"No; but I have at least heard you say
that he was a man of no principle," said
Eugene, coloring.






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


"A man of no principle, and therefore
liable to become what you called him,
through the mere force of circumstances.
Without previously intending to defraud, he
will come to spend other people's money at
last, without leave asked. Had I not been
made aware, by somewhat painful experi-
ence, of the importance of an unwavering
rule, I should have done little better than
poor Todd, I dare say."
"I would knock any body down who
said so of you," said Eugene, fired with in-
dignation at Gerald's injustice to himself.
Gerald sighed, and pressing the hand which
had earnestly seized his, he said, very se-
riously, "I may tell you, some day, what
makes me think so, Eugene."
There was a deep silence for a moment or
two. Mrs. Olney rattled the cups, and Mr.
Olney coughed and fidgeted, ere he spoke.
" I think a man without principle is like a
boat without rudder or compass; it would
be strange enough if it went safe to port."
Yes," said Gerald, rousing himself from
a fit of musing. There's selfishness, like
a tide, drifting him aside; the expediency






THE OLNEYS; OR,


of the moment, like a breeze, puffing now
on this side, now on that; waves of fear and
hope tilting and depressing him, and -"
Eugene gaped. He thought the conversa-
tion had suddenly become very dull. Gerald
smiled, and said, in a different tone, I pity
Todd, let him do what he will. He is
among the breakers."
"Perhaps you would not be so ready to
pity him, if he owed you," said Mr. Oley.
"Yes, I should, even if he dealt unfairly
by me. He must be wretched, in that case;
any man must, who despises himself." And
again Gerald fell into a deep reverie.
Every thing will be sacrificed, I sup-
pose, and not bring half its value," said Mrs.
Olney.
I shall offer him a fair price for the store,
or bid for it at the auction," said Gerald, if
he closes its doors; as he must, no doubt."
"Why, Gerald! cried Mr. Olney, in
great surprise. "Going to buy that great
store! A speculation, I suppose ; but where
is the money to come from ?"
Gerald bit his lip, and half smiled. The
question was not repeated, though it remained






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


unanswered. Eugene was all alive with ex-
citement; yet he, too, held his tongue. Mrs.
Olney looked at her husband, and her face
said, plainly, how very disagreeable she found
it in Gerald, his being so close and reserved
towards his relatives. There was a slight
tinge of suspicion, too, in the raised eyebrow.
" Queer enough it said. Gerald caught
the expression, but was evidently more di-
verted than offended by it.
The cake had been forgotten. Mrs. Olney
rang for Sally.
"Your mother does not find it necessary
to hide her cake, I trust," said Gerald to
Eugene.
No, indeed; we are all sober, old folks
now. I have done hooking cake."
"Nor plum puddings nyther," interposed
Sally, with the freedom of a privileged
person. "My mother charged me to tell
you, Master Eugene, her red apples are ripe,
and she wants you to come and eat some of
them. She will give you as many as you
want, if you will jest step in."
"I am ashamed to accept her kindness,'
said Eugene, but I am much obliged to her
tell her."






THE OLNEYS ; OR,


"She'll be dreatful disappointed if you
don't call," urged Sally. "She had as lives
you should have them as not, and lives-er."





CHAPTER IX.

CONTRARY to all expectation, Mr. Todd
seemed to flourish more greenly than ever,
decorating his Gothic windows with rich,
new goods, at prices which drew a rush of
customers. He had succeeded in persuading
his clamorous creditors that it would be
better for them to wait, than to push matters
to extremity.
Eugene was hugely disappointed, thus to
lose all prospect of removal to the handsome
and convenient store, and even Gerald looked
with a severe and displeased eye upon his
neighbor's apparent prosperity, though not
because he selfishly desired to profit by the
misfortune of another. He saw that he was
merely postponing his inevitable fall, and
wasting the resources which rightly belonged
to others. No one lived in more luxurious






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


style than Mr. Todd. Nobody had money
so plenty on every occasion. He was ready
to give, with full hands, and was perfectly
reckless of all small matters of economy, to
which other people, those who paid their
debts, were not ashamed to be attentive.
Todd came across in a great hurry, one
morning, to borrow a certain sum. He
would return it the next day, or in a week,
at farthest-if he did not forget it; if he
should, Gerald must remind him. Trifles
were apt to escape his memory, &c.
"You must excuse me, Mr. Todd," said
Gerald, if I refuse your request."
I might have known better than to ask
even a slight temporary accommodation of
an unfriendly neighbor," said Todd, bitterly.
As he turned his back to depart, Gerald
sprang over the counter, and stood directly
in his path. As he did so, he was struck
with the change that had taken place in the
man's appearance. He looked ten years
older; his face was sunken, and full of lines,
and his hair had become partially gray.
Gerald was affected; and, seizing his unwill-
ing hand, and squeezing it in his, he said,
with emotion, I am your friend; I feel for






THE OLNEYS OR,


you, believe me. I offer you my counsel.
and helping hand. Meet the crisis like a
man; pay your debts honestly, as far as you
can; it is a hard trial, but I will help you
afterwards; I shall then have no reason for
not doing it, and I will, to the last cent I
can spare from my own necessities -yes,
and stand by you as a friend in the storm
of ill-will you have to encounter. Only do
right, I earnestly beseech you ; do right by
those who have trusted in you poor and
hard-working men, who are waiting patient-
ly from day to day, and hoping on -do not
cruelly disappoint them at last "
By this time Mr. Todd recovered from his
consternation; and his voice, which had been
vainly struggling upon his white lips, came
low and hoarse upon the ear. Who gave
you a right to meddle in my affairs ? Con-
found your impertinence I'll not become a
bankrupt, for you to rise on my ruin. I'll
balk you yet! And, pushing Gerald from
him, he plunged down the steps, and crossed
the street, faster than he was ever seen to do
before.
Eugene for once forgot to laugh, and sat
down almost trembling. His eyes followed






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


Gerald, as he walked to and fro in the store
to compose himself. Before a word passed
between them, customers came in, and no
opportunity occurred during the forenoon.
When the busiest part of the day was over,
and Eugene was hurrying to and fro behind
the heaped counters to put things in order,
hoping for a few minutes' talk with Gerald
before he went away to dine, he was turned
to a statue by the sight of the bulky figure
of Mr. Todd, standing in the doorway
Gerald did not at first perceive him, and
Eugene was too much paralyzed to stir.
Coming forward, with his ancient free and
easy air, he called Gerald by name with a
shout, to arrest his attention.
The start with which Gerald turned about
was followed by a cordial warmth of man-
ner; for he thought, in the simplicity of his
good heart, that his neighbor had made up
his mind to accept his counsel and his friend-
ship. I am very happy to see you," said
he; step this way into the counting-room,
where we shall have no interruption."
Thank'ee, Olney; it is quite unneces-
sary, as I shall not take up much of your
time. I only wish to correct a wrong im.






THE OLNEYS; OR,


pression, which I find has gone abroad, and
which my coming in to borrow a trifle of
you this morning may have tended to con-
firm. I judge from something you said, I
hardly know what, that you suppose my
affairs to be deranged. I am happy to assure
you that you were never more mistaken. I
intend to form a new partnership in a short
time, and hope to be more fortunate than
before. Meantime, if you could spare me
the small loan I asked this morning, I should
oe much obliged, really. I will secure you,
if you are afraid to trust me."
No answer.
"One would think a man with a store
full of goods, like that yonder, might find
no difficulty in borrowing such a trifle as
fifty or a hundred dollars of the most miserly
and cautious person in the world." Having
ended this speech with a sneering laugh, and
a sidelong glance at the meaning faces' of
one or two by-standers, Mr. Todd sat down,
and seemed to be examining the quality of
the goods which chanced to be near him.
This is a beautiful thing, but the fabric
not equal to some I have, similar to it. By
the way, where do you buy your broad-






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


cloths? I see, by the mark, I retail much
lower than you can afford, getting mine
very low by the large quantity. I will let
you have a few pieces at what I gave for
them. I like to be obliging to my neigh-
bors," said Mr. T. with a grinl. Only, I
shall require the ready in payment."
I have as large an assortment of cloths
as I think desirable."
"You shall have them at a great bargain,
a mere song, seeing it is you," urged Mr.
Todd. Come; shall I step and fetch
them ?"
Gerald looked as solemn as night, and
continued to wait on his customers himself,
though Eugene stood ready to take his place.
When he had dismissed the last, and sent
Eugene away on an errand, he entered into
an earnest conversation with Mr. Todd,
across the counter. That gentleman was
fully prepared, and not to 'be moved from
the position he had taken. His fine-spun
representations imposed upon Gerald in some
measure, until a palpable untruth came out,
which put him on his guard.
"I beg you to believe, Mr. Todd, that







THE OLNEYS ; OR,


your competition with me has produced no
unfriendly feeling on my part."
Nor has it ever on mine."
"You have done me more good than
harm. You must therefore do me the jus-
tice to believe, that it is on principle that I
refuse you any assistance, however trifling,
without previous inspection of your books."
Having taken his ground, Gerald stood
firm, though Todd descended to entreaty
and supplication. It was the turning-point,
he declared-the very crisis of his fate. A
little help, and he was safe; quadruple in-
terest, nay, fifty per cent.--goods to any
amount in pledge, how could he refuse!-
Let Mr. Todd prove his integrity, and Gerald
was ready to lend, or even, he averred, to
give the sum required to him, in his day
of need. But it was against his principles
to help him to injure his other creditors.
No power on earth shqhld make him do it.
And there the matter ended.
A few weeks after, Eugene observed, one
day, long after he had opened the store, that
the shutters of the Arcade remained closed.
Todd had failed. Then came to light the






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


disgraceful system of artifices by which he
had kept his head above water since he had
been aware that his affairs were desperate.
He had squandered every thing he could lay
his hands on; and now, leaving some of his
best friends responsible for a large part of his
debts, he absconded, and was never heard
of again in his native town, where his very
name became a by-word.
Gerald bid off the store, when it was put
up at auction. No sooner was it knocked
down to him, than Eugene was off like a
rocket to carry the good news to his father
and mother. Mr. Olney was just going up
stairs, in a slow and gingerly manner, being
loaded with choice pears, poised upon his
hands, arms, and chest, up to his shoulders.
Eugene's joyous shake of his father's elbow
sent them hopping merrily through the ban-
isters, and down the stairs.
"It is ours -it.is ours. Olney's Gothic
Arcade Hurrah! "
Aha! Who was it, who said he despised
so much gingerbread work on a building?"
said Mrs. Olney, looking out at her chamber
door, with her unbound hair clasped in her
hand.






THE OLNEYS; OR,


For answer, her overgrown pet caugh
her up in his arms and carried her swiftly
down stairs, to her great terror and the sad
entanglement of her floating tresses.






CHAPTER X.

"THAT is a love of a silk, Mr. Olney,"
said the genteel Mrs. Jones, laying a fat
white hand upon it, which looked as if its
only business in life was to show forth an
assortment of rings. "Just the hue for my
Amelia. She is very fair, you recollect,
Mr. Olney. So very becoming a lilac, so ex-
actly the right shade You know Amelia?
She goes by here to drawing school."
Mr. Olney's memory of the troop of merry
damsels, who daily passed his door, was not
very discriminating. He was certain only
that the silk was of a rare color and good
texture, and the young lady in question
would have no fault to find with the pur-
chase






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


"Not know Amelia! You know Arabel-
la, at least? my lovely brunette "
Eugene, from the other counter, reminded
his puzzled master of the young lady with
black eyes, who so often stepped in to buy
crewels, or stationery. The silk was meas-
ured; alas it fell somewhat short of the
required quantity, and the lady departed,
having purchased a cake of soap for Eugene
to trudge a mile withal. He declared he
would convey it on a wheelbarrow, to make
every body laugh whom he met. On reflec-
tion, he changed his mind, lest the joke
might cost Gerald a customer. Going to
boast to Gerald of this heroic sacrifice of
fun to his interest, he chanced to cast his
eye on the rejected silk. He started, and
changed color very strangely, at the sight
of it.
It is a pity it fell short," remarked Ger-
ald. But we can find another purchaser,
perhaps, who will not require so many yards
for trimming."
Eugene's mirth was all gone. He had no
spirits all the forenoon. Now and then, he
sat down and leaned his head upon his
hands.





THE OLNEYS; OR,


"What's the matter? Headache?" in-
quired Gerald, coming to him, and laying a
kind hand on his shoulder. Then Eugene
told him that, having spattered the outer fold
of that piece of silk, in a frolic with a bottle
of opodeldoc he was selling to a boy, he had
hastily cut it off, to prevent the oil from
penetrating further; that he had feared he
had done wrong to cut it, and was so vexed
and sore about it he dreaded to say a word,
and so put it off till he forgot it. He would
take the silk, and carry it up to Mrs. Jones;
perhaps the damaged yard would answer to
make up the quantity. It would cut very
well for trimming, surely.
No; Gerald would not allow him to do it.
"Do let me! I shall be so unhappy, if
you should not sell that silk this season."
"No." Gerald walked away. Eugene
anxiously followed him.
"You were not angry with me, when I
overturned the lamp. I am sure the oil did
much worse mischief than this. Just look !
It is but a quarter of a yard that is spattered,
and hardly so much! I laid it away so
carefully, the rest looks perfectly well. See !
dear Gerald, I am very sorry, very sorry






IMPULSE AND PRINCIPLE.


indeed! How thoughtless it was of me!
I would not have taken the liberty to cut it,
had I thought a moment. But you were
away. I thought it would be the best plan."
"Best plan or not, I would not have
found fault with you for an error in judg-
mnent."
So careless as I was, with that plaguy
opodeldoc I can never forgive myself, and
no wonder you -- "
"Have I ever shown myself so severe
upon carelessness that you should be afraid
to acknowledge it, Eugene ? "
"No, indeed." And the memory of many
kindly-forgiven errors came across Eugene's
mind so strongly, that he burst into tears.
If I were a stern and severe master,, it
would be none the less your duty to hide
no wrong-doing."
I know it. I did not really intend
hiding it."
Is there any thing else on your con-
science ? Now is the time to make a clean
breast of it, if there is."
"Nothing whatever; only, now I think of
it, a moment ago, that little girl, who is for-
ever coming in for cents-worths of yellow






THE OLNEYS; OR,


snuff, wanted ground cinnamon, and I was
thinking so much about the silk, I forgot,
and fixed her off with snuff instead."
"Whereby her mother's pies will be
spoiled; and she is poor. Run directly over
and see about it." And Gerald smiled.
How much good that smile did Eugene's
heart! He caught his cap, and flew as if
his feet were winged.
On his return, he began to fold up the silk
for Mrs. Jones, consulting Gerald with his
eye whether he was to be permitted to
carry it.
Shall you not need the silk before your
eyes as a remembrancer? "
I know, if you will let me try to make
a bargain with Mrs. Jones, I shall remember
every thing always, or as long as ever I
can. And I want to make up the loss on
that yard, my own self; may not I? "
As you please. Eugene, you are lively
and playful, but you can reflect. What is
the lesson to remember, from to-day's pain-
ful experience? "
Why, never to put off doing any thing
disagreeable ; else, most likely, I shall never
do it. I am sure, in future, I had much




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